OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

Celebrated memoirist Nick Flynn to read at OSU on Oct. 11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Writer Nick Flynn will read from his work on Friday, Oct. 11, at Oregon State University’s Valley Library rotunda. The free public event begins at 7:30 p.m. and will be followed by a question and answer session and book signing.

Flynn is the author of three memoirs including “The Reenactments” (2013), “The Ticking is the Bomb: A Memoir of Bewilderment” (2010) and “Another … Night in Suck City” (2004). Flynn is also the author of three books of poetry.

Of Flynn’s most recent memoir, “The Reenactments,”  Kirkus Reviews wrote: “Flynn’s determination to better understand his life through the act of writing and remembering has yielded a truly insightful, original work.” Clea Simon of The Boston Globe said Flynn’s writing is “always specific and honest” and “dryly funny.”

His award-winning memoir “Another … Night in Suck City” was turned into the movie “Being Flynn,” starring Robert De Niro and Paul Dano. That book recounted his unusual relationship with his alcoholic father and the suicide of his mother.

Flynn, 52, is a professor of poetry and married to actress Lili Taylor.

Flynn has been awarded fellowships from The Guggenheim Foundation, The Library of Congress, The Amy Lowell Trust, and The Fine Arts Work Center.

The Visiting Writers Series brings nationally-known writers to Oregon State University. The program is made possible by support from The Valley Library, OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817

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NickFlynn
Nick Flynn

Author Paul Bogard to read from his book on Oct. 9

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Paul Bogard, author of “The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light,” will read from his book on Wednesday, Oct. 9, at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library. The reading begins at 7 p.m. at the library, located at 645 N.W. Monroe Ave., Corvallis.

The event is sponsored by Oregon State University’s Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word and Friends of the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library.

In his book, Bogard examines the night and how people experience it, traveling to the Grand Canyon, Las Vegas, Walden Pond, and the Canary Islands to explore degrees of darkness. After talking to astronomers, lighting professionals, nurses, and other night-time workers, Bogard writes about the cultural, social and health implications of a night that’s getting brighter every minute, thanks in part to parking lot lights and streetlights.

Publishers Weekly wrote: “Even readers unable to tell Orion from the Big Dipper will find a new appreciation for the night sky after spending some time with this terrific book.”

A native of Minnesota, Bogard teaches creative nonfiction at James Madison University. He is also editor of the anthology “Let There Be Night: Testimony on Behalf of the Dark.” 

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Carly Lettero, 541-737-6198

Screening, discussion of “World Peace” film on Aug. 5

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A screening of the filmWorld Peace and Other 4th-Grade Achievements,” will be held at Linus Pauling Middle School in Corvallis on Friday, Aug. 5. A panel discussion featuring the film’s subject, World Peace Game creator John Hunter, as well as Mary Yates, former U.S. ambassador to Burundi and Ghana, will follow.

The event, sponsored by Oregon State University’s School of History, Philosophy and Religion, begins at 7 p.m. at the school, 1111 N.W. Cleveland Ave. It is free and open to the public.

The film focuses on Hunter’s work with his fourth-grade class as the students participate in an exercise called the World Peace Game, and discover that they share a deep interest in taking care of the world and each other.

OSU is hosting a World Peace Game camp for area students – enrollment for the camp is full – as well as training for teachers Aug. 1-5. The screening and panel discussion conclude the week’s activities.

Yates, an OSU graduate who served as a U.S. ambassador to the countries of Burundi and Ghana, will join Hunter and students and teachers who have participated in the World Peace Game for a discussion about the diplomacy of the game and diplomacy in the real world.

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Natalia Bueno, 541-737-8560, Natalia.bueno@oregonstate.edu

Bard in the Quad at OSU to present ‘Love’s Labour’s Lost’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s popular Bard in the Quad program returns for its 11th season in August with a production of Shakespeare’s witty and romantic, “Love’s Labour’s Lost.”

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. August 4-7 and August 11-14 on OSU’s Memorial Union Quad, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

Bard in the Quad brings innovative Shakespeare productions to Corvallis in a casual, fun summer atmosphere. Performances are held outdoors and no seating is provided. Attendees are encouraged to bring low lawn chairs and/or blankets, warm clothing and a picnic dinner if desired. Seating begins at 6:30 p.m. and no one will be seated prior to that time.

“Love’s Labour’s Lost” is the story of King Ferdinand and his three companions who vow to dedicate their lives to study and forbid the presence of women within the court. Their resolve is soon tested when the Princess of France and her three beautiful ladies in waiting arrive to Navarre. Love games quickly ensue as Ferdinand, Biron, Longaville and Dumain attempt to win the hearts of their guests through a series of ridiculous courtship rituals.

The play is set in an elegant garden inspired by the 18th-century French court of Versailles and will feature original music composed for the production.

The cast features Oregon State University students, staff, alumni and community members, including: Stuart Ashenbrenner as Longaville; Blair Bowmer as Maria; Grant Davis as Biron; Ariel Ginsburg as Boyet; PJ Harris as Dull; Joseph Hill as Costard; Matt Holland as Don Armado; Diana Jepsen as Princess; Reed Morris as Ferdinand; Alycia Olivar as Mote; Emily Peters as Jaquenetta; Mike Stephens as Holofernes; Kelsea Vierra-Ashenbrenner as Rosaline; Alex Weingarten as Dumain; and Reneé Zipp as Catherine.

Tickets are $15 for general admission, $10 for students and seniors, and $5 for OSU students. Tickets are available for purchase online at bardinthequad.org. An “early Bard special” discount is available now through July 22 on tickets purchased online.

For questions regarding tickets, seating, group ticket discounts and other accommodations, contact Marissa Solini, the box office manager, at 541-737-2784.

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When kids learn to conserve energy, their behavior also spreads to parents

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Girl Scouts and their parents reported increases in energy-saving behaviors, such as turning off power strips at night and washing clothes in cold water, after the children participated in an intervention program, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Energy.

The new energy conservation program was developed by researchers from Oregon State University and Stanford University, who designed and tested the program’s effectiveness with 30 Girl Scout troops in northern California.

The researchers found that the increased energy-saving behavior, as self-reported by the children, continued for more than seven months after the trial program ended. They also found that the intervention had an effect on parents’ energy-saving behavior for more than eight months. The findings suggests that these kinds of educational programs could have a significant and lasting impact on family energy consumption, said Hilary Boudet, an assistant professor of climate change and energy at Oregon State University and lead author of the paper.

“Children are a critical audience for environmental programs, because their current behavior likely predicts future behavior,” said Boudet, who teaches in the School of Public Policy at OSU’s College of Liberal Arts. “By adopting energy-saving behaviors now and engaging family and community members in such efforts, children can play an important role in bringing about a more sustainable future.”

The study was supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy Program, the California Energy Commission, the Child Health Research Institute and the Precourt Energy Efficiency Center. Co-authors of the study are Nicole Ardoin, June Flora, K. Carrie Armel, Manisha Desai and Thomas N. Robinson of Stanford University.

The researchers set out to develop a new energy conservation intervention program for children, using best practices from social cognitive theory and public health interventions to guide the program’s design.
 
“The goal of the program was to get the girls actively practicing and mastering the skills, and modeling the behaviors that would lead to reduced energy use,” Boudet said. “But we also recognized the importance of making the project fun and engaging.”
 
The program, called Girls Learning Environment and Energy, or GLEE, offered two interventions designed to promote energy-saving behaviors either at home or in food and transportation decisions. Using a randomized control trial, the 318 participating girls, all fourth- and fifth-graders, were randomly assigned to one of the programs.
 
In 50- to 60-minute lessons once a week for five weeks, the Girl Scouts learned about different ways to save energy in their assigned intervention group and participated in activities designed to support the lessons.
 
The girls and their parents completed surveys about their energy-saving behaviors in those areas at the beginning and end of the five-week program and again several months later.
 
The study’s authors estimate that the reported behavior changes associated with the home energy savings intervention represent an annual household energy savings of approximately 3-5 percent immediately following the intervention and 1-3 percent at follow-up. If magnified across the population, those savings become quite significant, Boudet said.
 
Girls participating in the food and transportation intervention also reported a significant increase in energy-saving behavior at the end of the program, but there was no significant change noted at the seven-month follow-up or among parents.
 
Boudet said the food and transportation program may have proved more challenging for the children, in part, because they have less control over the types of transportation used by their families or the types of food their families buy and eat. Additional study could help researchers understand which pieces of the program worked best and which could be improved, she said.
 
Based on GLEE’s initial success, researchers are working to disseminate the curriculum to Girl Scout leaders around the country. They are also hoping to adapt the program for other groups, including schools and youth-focused organizations such as 4-H. More information is available online at  https://sites.stanford.edu/glee/.

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Hilary Boudet, 541-737-5375, hilary.boudet@oregonstate.edu

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Girl Scouts participate in the Girls Learning Environment and Energy program, or GLEE. Credit: Oregon State University

GLEE

GLEE

Fairbanks Gallery to host summer-long art faculty exhibit at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Fairbanks Gallery is hosting a summer-long art faculty exhibit at Fairbanks Gallery from June 14 through September 28.

The exhibit will be in Fairbanks Hall, 220 S.W. 26th St., on the OSU campus. It will include work by Evan Baden, Michael Boonstra, Julia Bradshaw, Kay Campbell, Anna Fidler, Julie Green, Stephen Hayes, Yuji Hiratsuka, Shelley Jordon, Andy Myers, Kerry Skarbakka and John Whitten.

A broad array of styles and approaches to creating art will be featured, in photography, painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking and video.

Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, with extra hours during the Corvallis Arts Walk. A closing reception, open to the public, will be held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. on Sept. 28.

For information on the CAW go to www.corvallisartswalk.com.

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Erin Sneller, 541-737-5592

erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

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Majestic Cascadia
Majestic Cascadia

Exhibit featuring graduating seniors’ artwork on display at OSU May 31-June 12

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students who are completing their bachelor of fine arts degrees will present their thesis work May 31 through June 12 in the Fairbanks Gallery.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open to the public Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will also be open from noon to 4 p.m. June 11 and June 12. The exhibits are free and open to the public.

Thirteen students graduating from various art disciplines will be exhibiting. They are: Abigail Losli, painting; Alisa Vernon, etching; Angela Perviance, etching; Ashley Howarth, silkscreen; Claire Elise Harden, ink; Daniel Henry Melancon, acrylic; Francisco Morales, mixed media; Heather Marie March, photo; Kaitlyn Carr, collage; Merri Madalynne Long, lenticular photo installation; Natasha Anismova, monotype; Paulina Teresa Ruize, charcoal, graphite and watercolor; and Teresa Yoshiura, mixed media.

A show featuring the work of students graduating with a bachelor of arts degree will run simultaneously in the west gallery of Fairbanks Hall. Students exhibiting in that show are: Erika Carlson, printmaking; Tanner Henderson, drawing/mixed media; and Nicolette Silva, photography.

A reception will be held in the gallery at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 1. Awards for the College of Liberal Arts Purchase Award, the President’s Award for Excellence in Art and the Provost’s Purchase Award will be announced. Seniors of Distinction awards and community sponsored awards also will be presented.

In addition, scholarships will be awarded to returning students, freshmen and transfer students selected through a competitive portfolio review. They include the Stone/Sponenburgh Scholarship, the Joyce Dickerson Printmaking Award, the Norma Seibert Print Scholarship, the Yaquina Art Association Scholarship, the Freshman Foundation Award, the Helen E. Plinkiewisch Scholarship and more.

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Doug Russell, 541-737-5009, drussell@oregonstate.edu

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Artwork by Teresa Yoshiura

Teresa Yoshiura

Artwork by Kaitlynn Carr

Kaitlyn Carr


Artwork by Francisco Morales

Francisco Morales

OSU one-act play festival runs June 2-5

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s annual Spring One-Act Festival returns June 2-5 with six student-directed one-act plays.

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. June 2-4, and 2 p.m. June 5, in the Withycombe Hall Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. 

This year’s festival includes an eclectic selection of one-act plays:

  • “Cake Top Follies,” by John Twomey, features two bridesmaids hashing out their differences after the wedding reception. The director is Kelsea Vierra.
  • “Dark King Kills Unicorn,” by Reina Hardy, is a swashbuckling fable about the nature of love and sacrifice. The director is Reed Morris.
  • “Funeral Tea,” by Pat Wilson, is a wry comedy about a group of funeral crashers. It is directed by Sedona Garcia.
  • “The Goon,” by Pete Malicki, is a comic exposé about the lives of a super-villain’s loyal henchmen. It is directed by Brian Greer.
  • “The Hardy Boys and the Mystery of Where Babies Come From,” by Christopher Durang, is a funny exploration of misunderstandings about sex. It is directed by Emily Peters.
  • “Knockers,” by Chris Sheppard and Jeff Grove, comically explores themes of religion, privacy, and sexuality. The director is P.J. Harris.

Tickets for the 2016 One-Act Festival are $8; $6 for seniors; $5 for students/youth; or $4 for OSU students. Tickets will be sold online starting at 9 a.m. on May 30 at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ.

For additional information or disability access requests, contact the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784 or visit http://bit.ly/1jdKUgy.

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Environmental writer, photographer Elizabeth Rush to read at OSU May 27

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Environmental writer and photographer Elizabeth Rush will give a free public reading at Oregon State University on Friday, May 27.

The event will at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library rotunda on the OSU campus, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session will follow.

Rush is the author of many books including the recently released “Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon, Myanmar.” Her work chronicles communities being irrevocably changed by late capitalist industrialization and has appeared in Granta, Orion, The New Republic, Le Monde Diplomatique, Frieze and other publications.

She is the recipient of the Andrew Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities at Bates College (2015-2017) and the Metcalf Institute Climate Change Adaptation Fellowship. Rush received her bachelor’s degree in English from Reed College and her master of fine arts in nonfiction from Southern New Hampshire University.

Her current book project, “When the Seas Rise,” is an on-the-ground investigation of five North American coastal communities adapting to climate change. Instead of predicting the negative effects of climate change, the book focuses on the lived experiences, both past and present, of those already dealing with the results of a warming planet.

Rush is the spring writer-in-residence at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. These residencies are part of the long-term ecological reflections program sponsored by the Spring Creek Project for Nature, Ideas and the Written Word, in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service, with aims to encourage writing and thinking that is finely attuned to place and to the deep continuity of natural and human processes.

The reading is sponsored by the Spring Creek Project and the 2015-2016 Visiting Writers Series, supported by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film.

The mission of the Spring Creek Project is to bring together the practical wisdom of the environmental sciences, the clarity of philosophical analysis, and the creative, expressive power of the written word, to find new ways to understand and re-imagine our relationship to the natural world.

The Visiting Writers Series brings writers to Oregon State University. This program is made possible by support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

Rep. Peter DeFazio to present annual OSU McCall Lecture June 1

CORVALLIS, Ore. – U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio will deliver the annual Gov. Tom McCall Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, June 1, at Oregon State University.

His lecture, “The Future of Our Representative Democracy,” will discuss the challenges facing U.S. democracy from a variety of negative factors, including gerrymandering; special interest money; partisan polarization; voter apathy; and voter disenfranchisement. He will also discuss ways in which citizens can take action to safeguard the democracy and strengthen political institutions. 

The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Construction and Engineering Hall in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. It is free and open to the public, and presented by the OSU College of Liberal Arts and the School of Public Policy.

DeFazio, of Springfield, represents Oregon’s 4th District in Congress. He was first elected in 1986 and is now the longest serving member of the U.S. House of Representatives in Oregon’s history. 

The OSU lectureship in public affairs is named after Tom McCall, who was Oregon’s governor from 1967-75. Past lecturers have included several Oregon governors; Washington Post columnists David Broder and William Raspberry; political analyst Floyd McKay; Dennis Dimick of National Geographic magazine; and Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

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David Bernell, 541-737-6281, david.bernell@oregonstate.edu

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Rep. Peter DeFazio

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