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OSU Wind Ensemble to perform world premiere of ‘Heart of a Forest’ by artist Paul D. Miller

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Wind Ensemble will perform the world premiere of Paul D. Miller’s “Heart of a Forest” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 18, in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th Street, Corvallis.

Miller, a composer, multimedia artist and author who also goes by the stage name D.J. Spooky, composed the work after four artist residencies in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. He said that the piece is inspired by Thoreau and “the collision of data, sound and new ways to think about the absence of origins.”

“No one owns the forest and the sounds that it inspires,” Miller said. “It’s all a mirror of what is possible in our hyper interconnected world. Like the roots of trees underneath the forest. It is all connected, and we all contribute to the elements that make it evolve.”

Loosely based on the concept of Antonio Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons,” the work, composed for wind ensemble and turntables, explores a post-minimalist soundscape in which Miller draws from his immersive experience of visiting the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest during each of the four seasons of the year. Neo-classical in nature, the audience will be treated to a work that features the familiar and the modern.

Miller’s work has appeared at the Venice Biennial for Architecture, the Andy Warhol Museum, the Whitney Biennial and others. Miller spent 2012-2013 as the first artist-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and has collaborated with a diverse array of popular musicians, including Yoko Ono, Chuck D and Thurston Moore. Rising to fame through his hip-hop turntablist persona “DJ Spooky,” Miller is a global artist who has engaged in creative projects on all seven continents.

The project is collaboration between the Oregon State University School of Arts and Communication, the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word and the Oregon State University Wind Ensemble. Funding was provided by the Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights program and the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station.

The OSU Wind Symphony, under the direction of Dana Biggs, will open the concert with Alfred Reed’s “Hound of Spring,” “Elegy for a Young American” by Ronald Lo Presti, Chorale and Alleluia by Howard Hanson, an excerpt from Frank Ticheli’s Second Symphony and Vientos y Tangos by Michael Gandolfi.

The OSU Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Christopher Chapman, will also perform Percy Grainger’s popular “Lincolnshire Posy,” “Daybreak Crossing” by David Biedenbender and a transcription of John Adams’ fiercely rhythmic “Short Ride in a Fast Machine.”

Tickets are $7 in advance, $10 at the door. OSU students with ID and youth in grades K-12 will be admitted free. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply, allowing purchase of up to two tickets for $5 each at the door with a SNAP card. Advance tickets are also available online at www.tickettomato.com.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Wind Ensemble

OSU Wind Ensemble

 

Paul D. Miller

Paul Miller

Spring town hall to be held May 4 at Oregon State University

A Spring Term town hall meeting will be held from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4, at Oregon State University in the Memorial Union Horizon Room.

Oregon State University is committed to hosting town halls each quarter as part of an ongoing discussion on equity, inclusion, and civil and social justice at OSU. Last term’s event was hosted by President Ray and Interim Chief Diversity Officer Angela Batista. More than 150 OSU community members attended the inaugural town hall and many more community members participated through the online live-stream.

During the spring town hall, a team of students, faculty and staff led by Jennifer Dennis, Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School, will provide an update on the development of an online social justice training module for all entering OSU students and gather feedback on training content.

Town hall attendees will have the opportunity to communicate concerns, feedback and suggestions about the online training plan within small discussion groups. This feedback will directly inform further development of the training, which is scheduled for implementation in the Fall 2016. For those unable to attend the town hall, an opportunity to provide feedback online will be provided following the event.

During the second half of the town hall, there will be time for open questions and comments by community members about other topics and issues.

The town hall will be streamed live at http://live.oregonstate.edu. No online chat services will be provided. For accommodations related to disability please contact diversity@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-1063.

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Angela Batista, 541-737-5936; angela.batista@oregonstate.edu

OSU Theatre to present ‘Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead’ in May

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present Tom Stoppard’s existential comedy, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,” May 12-14 and May 20-22 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The production continues OSU Theatre’s yearlong celebration of William Shakespeare. Stoppard’s hilariously wise and surreal take on Hamlet re-imagines the classic tragedy from the perspective of two minor characters.

Unsure of why and how they have been brought to the castle of Elsinore, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern attempt to navigate their way through a dangerous high-stakes game of deception, madness, murder, and revenge. Originally premiering at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 1966, this absurdist comedy challenges audience perceptions of life, death, reality, and free-will.

 “This play is incredibly rich and complex. I love how it blends physical comedy with philosophical discourse and endearing characters,” said Director Elizabeth Helman, an OSU Theatre faculty member. “There’s something for everyone.”

The cast features OSU students Daniel Barber (The Player), Sedona Garcia (Gertrude), Forest Heintz (Tragedian), Jesse Johnson (Tragedian), Jackson Lango (Hamlet), Jay McNair (Ambassador), Reed Morris (Guildenstern), Nate Pereira (Horatio), Risa Perez (Tumbler), Lauren Smith (Ophelia), and Kyle Stockdall (Tragedian). Community members Matt Holland (Tragedian), Robert Iltis (Polonius), Brad Stone (Alfred), Rick Wallace (Claudius), and Joseph Workman (Rosencrantz) also join the cast.

Shows are at 7:30 p.m. May 12-14 and May 20-21 and at 2 p.m. May 22. Tickets are $12 General Admission, $10 Senior, $8 Youth/Student, and $5 OSU Student. Tickets are available through the OSU Theatre Box Office by calling 541-737-2784. Online ticket sales begin at 9 a.m. May 2 and can be purchased at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ. Contact the box office for disability accommodations or group ticket sales.

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New exhibit at OSU’s Valley Library explores connections to forests

CORVALLIS, Ore. — People of the Pacific Northwest have deep and complicated connections with forests. Those connections are being explored in an exhibit called “Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests,” at Oregon State University’s Valley Library. 

The exhibit is on display until October on the fifth floor of the Valley Library in the Special Collections and Archives Gallery. 

The exhibit is a joint effort of the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at the Valley Library, the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, and the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word.

Two threads run through the exhibit. One features various ways that people engage with forest: as habitat, provider, sanctuary, studio, laboratory and classroom. The other shows how these engagements have evolved over time. Early in U.S. history, the vast scale of the forests in what was called “the Oregon Country” contributed to a belief in the boundlessness of nature and its infinite exploitability. Since European settlers arrived here in the mid-19th century, the concept of forest management has changed due to legislation, litigation, forest planning, and other social processes and forces. 

“This has been a truly collaborative effort that allowed us to meld history, science and art into a meaningful display,” said Ruth Vondracek, natural resources archivist at OSU’s Valley Library. 

The exhibit features historic forest policy and management documents and maps, photographs by Bob Keefer and Tom Iraci, artwork by Debbie Kaspari, poetry by Jane Hirschfield and Alison Deming, materials from the Gerald W. Williams and James R. Sedell collections and much more.

The exhibit area is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday–Friday during the academic term and noon to 5 p.m. Monday–Friday during academic breaks. The library is located 201 S.W. Waldo Place on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

More information about the exhibit is available by emailing scarc@oregonstate.edu. The OSU Libraries enhance and support the university’s instructional and research programs with traditional and innovative services and collections. To learn more, visit http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu.

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Ruth Vondracek, 541-737-9273, ruth.vondracek@oregonstate.edu; scarc@oregonstate.edu

Artist Ben Buswell to speak at OSU, exhibit work at Fairbanks Gallery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Ben Buswell, an award-winning sculptor and multimedia artist, will speak and exhibit work at Oregon State University as part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series.

Buswell will exhibit embellished photographs, mixed media drawings, sculpture and acrylic on canvas in the Fairbanks Gallery on the OSU campus in Corvallis May 2 through May 25.

On Wednesday, May 4, he will give a talk in Fairbanks Gallery at 5 p.m. A reception will be held prior to the talk at 4:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Buswell also will speak in art classes and critique student work that day.

Buswell, a native of Dallas, Oregon, received a bachelor of fine arts from OSU in 2001. He went on to study at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he earned a master’s degree in 2004 and a master’s in fine art in 2005.

His work is temporal in nature, spanning a variety of media, from ceramics to incised photographs, using processes such as doubling and repetitive mark-making.

“I am always touching the world in an effort to build an intuitive sense of how materials communicate through their presence,” Buswell said in an artist’s statement about his work.

“I have a firm belief that we exist only through our bodies, that we are wholly physical things. So material and sculptural presence, as surrogates for this idea, are embedded in the way I think about content. My work is the interaction of the spaces between things: more specifically the space between us. I am looking for the space right before the story is told, the place where we agree to listen.”

Buswell has received a Hallie Ford Fellowship in the Visual Arts, supported by the Ford Family Foundation. His work appears in numerous public and private collections and has also been supported by grants from the Regional Arts and Culture Council and the Oregon Arts Commission. He lives and works in Portland and is represented by Upfor Gallery.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

The School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to campus to interact with students so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar.

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Michael Boonstra, 541.737.5017, michael.boonstra@oregonstate.edu 

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"Wasps," graphite on paper, 2008. Photo by Mario Gallucci, courtesy of the artist and Upfor Gallery.

Wasps

The Phi Beta Kappa Society to install new chapter at OSU April 28

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Phi Beta Kappa Society, the nation’s most prestigious academic honor society, will install a new chapter at Oregon State University at a special ceremony on Thursday, April 28.

The Epsilon of Oregon chapter will become the 286th Phi Beta Kappa chapter installed in the society’s 240-year history. The installation, led by Phi Beta Kappa President Catherine White Berheide, begins at 6 p.m. in Room 100 of the Learning Innovation Center on OSU’s Corvallis campus. It is free and open to the public.

Immediately following the installation, the new chapter will induct its first class of members. About 200 Oregon State University juniors and seniors will be recognized for their accomplishments in the liberal arts and sciences.

The new chapter also will induct four notable individuals as members, called Foundation members, selected in honor of their achievements, as well as their ongoing commitment to the arts and sciences. They are: writer, journalist, and educator Ta-Nehisi Coates, and OSU graduates Jon DeVaan, Patricia Reser and Patrick Stone. A chapter many induct chapter Foundation members only at installation.

Coates will offer a video message at the ceremony; he is planning a visit to OSU in the future to acknowledge his induction, meet with students and give a public lecture.

OSU President Edward J. Ray, who has been a member of Phi Beta Kappa since he was inducted during his studies at Queens College in the City University of New York, will also provide remarks at the event.

“I am genuinely pleased that we are now able to offer Phi Beta Kappa membership to some of Oregon State’s many high-achieving students,” Ray said. “Becoming a member of Phi Beta Kappa had a profound impact on my life and on my career as a higher education leader.”

When Ray was in college, he could not afford the membership fee, but a family friend generously paid it for him. That inspired Ray and his late wife, Beth, to set up a fund to make sure OSU students with similar financial limitations aren’t prevented from becoming members.

The Kay Bowers Fund for Phi Beta Kappa Students, established by the Rays, will provide assistance for eligible students who don’t have the resources to pay the society’s lifetime membership fee.

Because of the generosity of the Rays and with support from OSU administrators Larry Rodgers, Sastry Pantula, Toni Doolen and Susie Brubaker-Cole, OSU is covering membership fees for all students in the inaugural class of inductees, said Christopher McKnight Nichols, an assistant professor of history at OSU and vice president-elect of the new chapter.

“The level of commitment OSU has displayed in encouraging and advancing student achievement is truly remarkable,” said Phi Beta Kappa Secretary John Churchill. “The faculty and staff have worked together to create an environment that embodies academic excellence in the liberal arts and sciences. OSU Phi Beta Kappa graduates will be tomorrow’s critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers. We are very pleased to recognize OSU’s commitment and look forward to the chapter’s bright future.”

Only about 10 percent of the nation’s colleges and universities shelter Phi Beta Kappa chapters. Prospective inductees are usually seniors among the top 10 percent of their graduating class who have completed a broad range of liberal arts and science coursework, including foreign language study and mathematics. Exceptional students meeting the society’s requirements may also be considered as juniors.

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Tara Williams, 541-737-6412; tara.williams@oregonstate.edu; Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

OSU Theatre to host reading of ‘La Gringa’ in its 20th anniversary season

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The longest running off-Broadway Spanish language play, now in its 20th season, will be the focus of a public reading on Wednesday, May 4, at Oregon State University. 

“La Gringa” is the story of a young woman from New York who goes to Puerto Rico in search of her roots by finding her extended family. Her over-enthusiasm for what she calls her “homeland” leads to an array of complications and comic dialogue.

A cast of OSU students, faculty, staff and community members will present the reading, which begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Withycombe Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way. It is free and open to the public. Because of the set configuration, latecomers cannot be seated.

The cast includes Mayela Delatorre (Maria), Laura Galindo (Iris), Kerstin Colón (Norma), Oscar Montemayor (Victor), Eldon dela Cruz (Ramon), Steven Evans-Renteria (narrator), and Juan Guzman (Manolo). The reading is presented by OSU’s School of Arts & Communication’s University Theatre.

“La Gringa” premiered in New York City and is still being presented there by Repertorio Español Theater. The OSU reading is the fourth and final installment of OSU’s Latin@ Theatre Project, funded through the Memorial Union Foundation Pepsi Endowment. 

Susana Rivera-Mills, OSU’s vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies, said the series has been transformational.

“Theater provides a safe place in which to reflect on one’s experience, confront difficult human realities, and challenge our own sense of identity and knowledge of others as not being set in concrete, but always evolving and adapting,” Rivera-Mills said. “Latina plays give voice to a population that isn’t always seen or heard.

“I believe that these artistic expressions of diverse perspectives will help us better understand the experiences of our various campus communities.”

Other plays in the series have been readings of Elaine Romero’s “Wetback,” Milagro Theatre’s “Broken Promises” and Josefina Lopez’s “Real Women Have Curves.”

 

 

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Charlotte Headrick, 541-737-4918, cheadrick@oregonstate.edu

OSU student media earns national, regional honors

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Society of Professional Journalists has named The Daily Barometer the best all-around daily student newspaper in Region 10, which includes Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Alaska.

The Oregon State University student newspaper also took first place in sports column writing and other honors for breaking news and sports writing.

Additionally, members of Oregon State student media’s Orange Media Network have received a number of other recent awards:

  • KBVR-TV's "Beaver News" won best public affairs program - non-commercial, from the Oregon Association of Broadcasters 2015 OAB "Awards for Excellence” 
  • KBVR-TV (Producers Gabe Fremonti and Sean Watson) have been nominated for a NATAS Northwest (College Emmy) Award for short form non-fiction for State of the Arts: Episode 2 - Evelyn Kritler (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF_EU2apbK4)
  • KBVR-FM took first place in the College Media Association Apple Awards (a national contest) for best radio promo; DAMchic took second place in design in this contest, and The Daily Barometer took third place in social media.

"Media is a constant evolution, and our Orange Media Network teams are at the start of their own revolution,” said Steven Sandberg, Orange Media journalism coordinator and adviser for The Daily Barometer, KBVR-TV, KBVR-FM.

“This year, those big steps were about investing in their skills. They now hold daily reviews with reporters, have regular critiques with advisers and lead their own workshops with staff. Our students' willingness to learn and try new things has increased the quality of their work, and these awards show that.”

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Candace Baltz, 541-737-4615; candace.baltz@oregonstate.edu

“Loosely Bound: A Ten-Year Creative Journey” opens for first public viewing

CORVALLIS, Ore. – This year’s fiber show, “Loosely Bound: A Ten Year Creative Journey,” will be displayed at Oregon State University from April 26 through May 26.

 

The exhibit will be in the Giustina Gallery at The LaSells Stewart Center. A free reception will be held from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 26, to celebrate the show’s opening and introduce the artists.

 

Nancy Bryant was inspired to start a fiber group in 2005, and members chose the name “Loosely Bound.” It reflects the ties they have to each other and the traditions they come from, but also the respect they have for their differences in design, interests, technique, and palette.

 

“Our original members all knew someone who was interested in joining the group and soon we had to limit the number of members to about 10-13 artists to keep the momentum and energy,” Bryant said. “It started out as mostly ‘art quilts’ but we do more than just quilts.”

 

Some of the artists use a variety of painting and felting techniques. Bryant is experimenting using alcohol inks.

 

“You can scrunch plastic wrap around the fabric and get all these unique forms and patterns,” she said.

 

She is often inspired by leaves, trees and flowers and tries to capture the color and texture of nature’s bounty.

 

Member Cheryl Jordan uses a combination of techniques.

 

“I don’t have to use traditional methods,” Jordan said. “I can glue, sew, slash, etc. There are so many options.” She enjoys experimenting with a variety of construction and surface design techniques to create pattern and texture.

 

This show is a culmination of projects from the last 10 years.  The group works together collaboratively on challenges or large group pieces for exhibitions. A member will often present an idea and then see who is up for a challenge. All members are not required to participate.

 

Challenges can take up to a year to complete. The Whisper Challenge has been one of the most creative pieces the members created. The first person works from a picture and starts a piece, then the second artist is given the first piece without seeing the original image. After about a month a third artist is given only the second artist’s creation without seeing the original. Each artist creates a piece based off the previous artist’s interpretation of the theme.

 

The 2008 group project entitled “Benton County Vistas Mary’s Peak” is an example of how each artist was giving part of a photograph and was able to create their own interpretation of the piece or panel they were given. Their recent group challenge “Abundance” was exhibited at the Canby Public Library and was also part of the Quilt County Exhibit.

 

More information about the group and examples of their work can be found at http://looselybound.net

The Giustina Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. and is located on the OSU campus at 875 S.W. 26th Street. Parking is available in the Reser parking lot across the street for $1 per hour from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

For more information about this show and upcoming exhibits is available at http://oregonstate.edu/lasells/gallery

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Tina Green-Price, 541-737-3116, tina.green-price@oregonstate.edu

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Lauri Morris, 541-737-8947, lauri.morris@oregonstate.edu

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Benton County Vistas Mary's Peak

Mary's Peak

Oregon State names Jennifer Dennis dean of the OSU Graduate School

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Jennifer Dennis, who came to Oregon State University last summer as associate dean of the OSU Graduate School, has been named vice provost and dean of the graduate school. Her appointment is effective Monday, April 25.

Before coming to OSU, she was on the Purdue University faculty for 11 years with a joint appointment in the departments of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture and Agricultural Economics, with an emphasis in specialty crops and consumer behavior.

Dennis succeeds Brenda McComb, dean of the graduate school since 2011, who in January was named senior vice provost for Academic Affairs at OSU. “Dr. Dennis is an innovative leader, with a natural ability to build alliances and advance the goals of the Graduate School,” said McComb, who recruited Dennis to Oregon State. “She is exactly the correct person to lead our efforts to ensure that every graduate student has the opportunity to succeed.”

As vice provost and dean of the Oregon State Graduate School, Dennis will provide leadership for graduate education and serve as an advocate for graduate students. She was active at Purdue in mentoring graduate students, as well as post-doctoral researchers, junior faculty and students of color. She was an adviser to the Black Student Union and the Black Graduate Student Union at Purdue and is the adviser for the Black Graduate Student Association at Oregon State.

“In the few months she has been here, Dr. Dennis has shown a wonderful balance of leadership, advocacy and passion for graduate student education,” said Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president. “She brings a strong commitment to our institutional values of collaboration, shared governance, diversity and inclusivity.

“She will help Oregon State University continue to advance interdisciplinary graduate education and develop and foster our graduate student community.”

Dennis has a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in horticulture from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in horticulture from Michigan State University with a minor in marketing and consumer behavior.

Oregon State University has more than 4,500 graduate students, comprising nearly 15 percent of the overall student body. About 30 percent of the graduate students at OSU are international students. The university conferred nearly 1,100 graduate degrees and 82 graduate certificates at its 2015 commencement ceremony.

Graduate education and research are among the university’s foremost missions, Randhawa said. The university offers 77 majors at the master’s level, 57 majors at the doctoral level, 84 graduate minors, and 12 graduate certificates across its 11 colleges.

Randhawa said graduate students “are critical to the success of OSU’s research enterprise,” which last year brought in $308 million.

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Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111

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jenniferdennis
Jennifer Dennis