OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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OSU Student Success Center will be renamed to honor First Lady Beth Ray

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s First Lady, Beth Ray, will be celebrated Monday, Jan. 13, in a ceremony renaming the OSU Student Success Center in her honor. It will now be called The Beth Ray Center for Academic Support.

The rededication ceremony begins with a reception at 4:30 p.m., followed by a program at 5 p.m. The center is located just south of the parking structure on 26th Street, in the center of campus.

Ray, who is currently battling advanced small cell carcinoma, an incurable cancer, is a greatly loved member of the OSU community, and the push to rename the center in her honor was largely driven by student enthusiasm. After the idea was proposed by OSU Athletic Director Bob DeCarolis, the Oregon State Student Athlete Advisory Committee unanimously supported the idea of changing the name of the center to honor Ray, and the student government organization ASOSU also supported the plan. Support for the re-naming was also provided by the university’s building naming committee and the OSU Faculty Senate and was authorized by Oregon University System Interim Chancellor Melody Rose.

Ray is seen by many students as a mentor and supporter, making the building, which is oriented toward student support, a natural extension of her interest in student success.

“The Beth Ray Center for Academic Support will serve as an essential place where all students can gather throughout the day and evenings to receive personal assistance along their path to graduation,” said Provost and Vice President Sabah Randhawa.

Ray said she was both surprised and excited about the news of the building renaming, and pleased that the honor focused on student support. A former business law professor, academic counselor and assistant dean for academic advising, Ray, 67, has been been teaching and mentoring students for many years.

“Most of my career involves working with students,” Ray said.

In her 10 years at OSU, Ray has seen many of the students she’s mentored go on to graduate and thrive. She keeps in contact with a number of them, taking the opportunity to have lunch and visit when they’re in the area. And each year a whole new crop of students arrives on campus in need of support and advice.

“I would tell freshmen to talk to their professors and advisors, and if they have a problem to share it,” she said. “Most people try to hide their problems, but you shouldn’t feel bad about asking people questions.”

Jaimee Kirkpatrick, executive assistant to Head Men’s Basketball Coach Craig Robinson, was one of the students Ray took under her wing as an OSU student. She said through many challenges and successes, the Rays were always there to support and guide her.

“Beth Ray holds an even more special place in my heart as she was one of the only female adults that took care of me as I went through some major surgeries during my time as a student at Oregon State,” Kirkpatrick said. “While my parents were living in Alaska, Beth took over and comforted, encouraged, and supported me through some very significant challenges in my life to date.”

 The $14 million Student Success Center opened in 2012, and houses programs that provide both the general student population and student-athletes with a range of academic support services. Hundreds of students are served every day in the building. The facility includes classrooms, a computer lab, study lounge and commons area as well as academic counseling and advising offices, meeting rooms and tutorial spaces.

Media Contact: 
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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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OSU celebrates legacy of Martin Luther King with month of events

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration begins Monday, Jan. 13, with the theme “Uniting Our Powerful Voices.” Events continue through Jan. 24.

The month-long celebration kicks off Monday with a celebration in the Memorial Union Quad from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be music and refreshments, information on events, promotional items, and more.

OSU’s celebration is one of the oldest continuous MLK events in the state. It is organized each year by a group of OSU community members convened by the Office of Equity and Inclusion. The events are open to the public and most are free.

The highlights of the two-week celebration include a musical event, Music of Hope and Resistance, Jan. 16, 5 p.m., at the Native American Longhouse; Our Powerful Voices in Action Conference for social change from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 17, in the Longhouse and Memorial Union; and the annual MLK Day of Service, Jan. 18, 8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m., an opportunity to participate in one of 11 community projects during the day.

The annual Peace Breakfast at 9 a.m., Jan. 20, will feature presentation of the Phyllis S. Lee & Frances Dancy Hooks Coalition Builder Awards. Walidah Imarisha, an educator, writer, poet and organizer, is keynote speaker.

Tickets will be available at the door, but organizers advise patrons to buy tickets in advance from the MU Information Desk, as the event regularly sells out. Tickets are on sale for $10 for general admission and $6 for students; children ages 5-and-under will be admitted free. Call 541-737-4379 for more information. 

This is the 32nd year of the celebration at OSU.

For more information and a full schedule of events see http://oregonstate.edu/oei/mlk-events and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/OSUMLKcelebration

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Chris Lenn, 541-737-4379; chris.lenn@oregonstate.edu

OSU, city’s MLK commission bring peace activist John Hunter to Corvallis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University and the city of Corvallis will celebrate peace and the teachings of Martin Luther King, Jr., in late January with a series of events coordinated by OSU and the city’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Commission.

John Hunter, author, filmmaker, educator and TED Talk participant, will deliver the annual Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Annual Peace Lecture, which will be held in Milam Auditorium at OSU on Thursday, Jan. 23, beginning at 7 p.m. His talk, “The Seeds of Peace Tomorrow are in the Children of Today,” will focus on Hunter’s work with elementary students and his creation of a World Peace Game, which he uses as an interdisciplinary classroom tool.

The World Peace Game has been hailed as a tool for peace by institutions ranging from the United States Pentagon to the United Nations.

A film screening of the documentary “World Peace and Other Fourth Grade Achievements” will take place on Jan. 22, beginning at 7 p.m., at the Majestic Theatre in downtown Corvallis. The film focuses on Hunter’s work with his fourth grade class as the students discover that they share a deep interest in taking care of the world and each other. 

The screening also will include a welcome by Corvallis Mayor Julie Manning and the announcement of this year’s City of Corvallis Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Commission scholarship winners.

For more information on the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Annual Peace Lecture,  http://oregonstate.edu/cla/pauling-memorial-lectures/

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Joseph Orosco, 541-737-4335; joseph.orosco@oregonstate.edu

Corvallis screening of classic silent horror film set Jan. 13

The 1920 German horror film “Der Golem: How He Came into the World” will be shown at the Whiteside Theatre in Corvallis on Monday, Jan. 13, beginning at 6 p.m.

The silent film will be accompanied on the piano by Portland musician and composer Beth Karp, who has written her own score for the screening. The event is sponsored by the Oregon State University School of Language, Culture, and Society in the College of Liberal Arts.

The German Expressionist film, which was directed by Paul Wegener and Carl Boese, is about a 16th-century Prague rabbi who creates a giant creature from clay – a Golem – whom he brings to life in order to protect the city’s Jewish population from persecution.

Karp is a faculty member at Portland Community College, where she teaches composition, piano, music theory, and 20th-century music history. She is also a frequent performer, collaborator and solo artist.

Admission to the screening is free and open to the public. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. 

Media Contact: 

Celene Carillo, 541-737-2137

Source: 

Sebastian Heiduschke, 541-737-3957, Sebastian.heiduschke@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University Board of Trustees notice of regular meeting

The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet on Thursday and Friday, January 9-10, 2014, on the OSU campus.

The meeting will be held in the CH2M Hill Alumni Center, located at 725 S.W. 26th St. in Corvallis. The purpose of the meeting is to orient trustees to their new role and responsibilities and to introduce trustees to the leadership and operations of the University.

Board members may choose to elect an interim chair and vice-chair of the board, adopt bylaws and establish one or more committees. The board’s meeting times are Thursday, January 9, 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., and Friday, January 10, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

An initial meeting of the Board of Trustees was scheduled for December 10-11, 2013, but was postponed because of a snowstorm.

Members of the public who may require special accommodations should contact Mark Huey at 541-737-8260 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting. 

More information about the OSU Board of Trustees is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Noted biologist, OSU science historian to discuss salmon recovery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Jim Lichatowich, a noted biologist and author, will discuss the fate of Pacific salmon during a presentation on Wednesday, Jan. 15, at Oregon State University. The free, public event begins at 7 p.m. in the rotunda of the Valley Library on campus.

Lichatowich will speak about his new book, “Salmon, People, and Place: A Biologist’s Search for Salmon Recovery,” which was just published by the OSU Press.

Joining Lichatowich will be Carmel Finley, an OSU science historian, and author of “All the Fish in the Sea,” which was published in 2012 by the University of Chicago Press.

In his OSU Press book, Lichatowich points out many misconceptions about salmon that have hampered management and limited recovery programs. These programs will continue to fail, he argues, as long as resource managers look at salmon as “products” and ignore their essential relationship with the environment.

Finley and Lichatowich will discuss the status of salmon recovery, address its problems and outline the potential for revitalization. Audience members will have the opportunity to pose questions to the scientists, purchase books and have them signed.

Earlier on Jan. 15, Lichatowich will present a seminar, “Salmon Management and Salmon Science at a Crossroads” as part of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife seminar series. It takes place from 4-5 p.m. in Nash 206.

“Salmon, People, and Place” is available in bookstores, online at http://osupress.oregonstate.edu, or can be ordered by calling 1-800-621-2736.

Media Contact: 
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Micki Reaman, 541-737-4620; Micki.reaman@oregonstate.edu

Authors Ponteri, Serber to read at OSU on Jan. 17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Authors Jay Ponteri and Natalie Serber will read from their most recent books at Oregon State University on Friday, Jan. 17, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library rotunda. A question and answer session and book signing will follow.

This event is part of the 2013-2014 Literary Northwest Series,

Ponteri is author of the memoir, “Wedlocked,” (2013) and “Darkmouth Strikes Again,” a chapbook of short prose, which will be released this summer. His essay, “Listen to This” was mentioned as a Notable Essay in “Best American Essays 2010.” Ponteri directs the undergraduate creative writing program at Marylhurst University and Show:Tell: The Workshop for Teen Writers & Artists.

Renee Nicholson of “The Los Angeles Review” writes, “Sometimes filled with raw sexual ambition, other times quietly sad and contemplative, Ponteri dares memoir to go in a bold direction, with precedence on the intimacy between writer and reader."

Serber’s debut story collection, “Shout Her Lovely Name,” (2012) was a New York Times Notable Book of 2012 and a summer reading pick by “O, the Oprah Magazine.” Serber teaches at Marylhurst University and is working on a novel set in Boring, Ore.  

Joan Frank of The San Francisco Chronicle writes that Serber’s story collection “plunges us into the humid heat and lightning of a perfect storm: that of American mothers and daughters struggling for power, love, meaning, and identity…Serber's writing sparkles: practical, strong, brazenly modern, marbled with superb descriptions.”

The Literary Northwest Series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU. This program is made possible by support from the Valley Library and OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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 Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817; rachel.ratner@oregonstate.edu

Postponed OSU play to be performed in January

CORVALLIS, Ore. – After a successful opening night performance on Dec. 5, the Oregon State University Theatre had to postpone its production of “The King of Spain’s Daughter” because of a major snowstorm that blanketed the area.

The play has been rescheduled for Friday and Saturday, Jan. 17-18, at the Lab Theatre in OSU’s Withycombe Hall beginning at 7:30 p.m. An additional matinee performance has been scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 18, beginning at 2:30 p.m. at the Majestic Theatre in downtown Corvallis.

Tickets for the Lab Theatre production are $5 for general admission and $3 for students. Tickets for the matinee at the Majestic are $8 for general admission and $6 for students. More information is available at: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre. Because of the configuration of the Lab Theatre, latecomers cannot be seated once the production has begun.

“The King of Spain’s Daughter” is a one-act comedy by Irish playwright Teresa Deevy, a prominent Abbey Theatre dramatist of the 1930s. Deevy was deaf and could lip-read in three languages. The OSU production of the play will be unique – for every speaking actor in the production, there will be an interpreting actor using American Sign Language.

Director Charlotte Headrick said this is the first time an OSU production will be “shadowed” by interpreters using American Sign Language.

Jo Alexander, a nationally certified sign language interpreter who manages accommodations at OSU for hearing-impaired students, faculty, staff, and visitors, will interpret the role of Mrs. Marks working alongside actress Vreneli Farber who is her speaking counterpart.

“The King of Spain’s Daughter” follows Annie Kinsella, a young woman with a rich imagination who has to deal with the limited opportunities for young women in 1930s Ireland. Live music before the performance will be provided by Jean Dick on violin playing traditional Irish tunes with Richelle Jean-Bart performing the title song.

Voiced actors are Rick Wallace as Annie Kinsella’s father Peter, Caitlin Reichmann as Annie Kinsella, Michael Beaton as her love interest Jim Sheridan, and Davey Kashuba as Roddy Mann, the loafer. Actors who are interpreting are Cheryl Witters as Annie, Peter Norland as Jim Sheridan, Steve Rianda as Peter Kinsella, and Lee Rianda as Roddy.

The production is underwritten by the office of the Vice-Provost of Student Affairs with the support of the OSU Theatre.

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Charlotte Headrick, 541-737-4918; cheadrick@oregonstate.edu

OSU students will be part of global initiative created by President Clinton

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has become a member institution of the Clinton Global Initiative University, an organization launched by President Bill Clinton to bring together student leaders from around the world.

The program has five focus areas:  education; environment and climate change; peace and human rights; poverty alleviation; and public health.

By becoming part of this network, OSU can send student leaders to the organization’s annual meeting, which includes student leaders and organizers, national and international experts, and some celebrities. The next meeting will be at Arizona State University in March, 2014.

Invited students develop “Commitments to Action,” which are new, specific and measurable initiatives that address challenges on their campus, in their community or on a larger national or global scale.

Laurie Bridges, assistant professor and librarian at OSU, worked closely with Vice Provost for Student Affairs Larry Roper to involve OSU in the CGI University Network. OSU’s emphasis on sustainability, entrepreneurship and social justice ties perfectly with the focus of the program, she said.

“I feel the CGI U is in perfect alignment with the mission and goals of our university,” Bridges said. “Promoting economic, social, cultural and environmental progress is part of OSU’s mission, which CGI University does on a global scale. Through the education they receive at OSU, our students are being prepared to be strong change agents in the world.”

OSU has committed $10,000 for students who participate in CGI University, part of which is offered as seed money for some of the initiatives they propose. The university will also provide support and mentoring to participating student leaders and entrepreneurs.

For more information see http://www.clintonglobalinitiative.org

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Laurie Bridges,

541-737-8821

Traber honored for research on vitamin E

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Maret Traber, a professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University, and principal investigator in the Linus Pauling Institute, has received an international honor for her work on vitamin E.

Traber received the DSM Nutritional Science Award 2013 on fundamental or applied research in human nutrition, which included an honorarium of 50,000 Euros. It recognizes her lifetime commitment to research on vitamin E and many new insights into its role in human nutrition and optimum health.

Traber is director of the Oxidative and Nitrative Stress Laboratory at OSU and is the Helen P. Rumbel Professor for Micronutrient Research. She has published nearly 250 professional publications on vitamin E, on such topics as its bioavailability, kinetics, metabolism, and effects of vitamin E deficiency – especially in people with particular health concerns, such as burn victims or diabetics.

She received the award in Granada, Spain at the IUNS 20th International Congress of Nutrition.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Maret Traber, 541-737-7977