OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

people programs and events

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

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Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

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Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

Celebrated memoirist Nick Flynn to read at OSU on Oct. 11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Writer Nick Flynn will read from his work on Friday, Oct. 11, at Oregon State University’s Valley Library rotunda. The free public event begins at 7:30 p.m. and will be followed by a question and answer session and book signing.

Flynn is the author of three memoirs including “The Reenactments” (2013), “The Ticking is the Bomb: A Memoir of Bewilderment” (2010) and “Another … Night in Suck City” (2004). Flynn is also the author of three books of poetry.

Of Flynn’s most recent memoir, “The Reenactments,”  Kirkus Reviews wrote: “Flynn’s determination to better understand his life through the act of writing and remembering has yielded a truly insightful, original work.” Clea Simon of The Boston Globe said Flynn’s writing is “always specific and honest” and “dryly funny.”

His award-winning memoir “Another … Night in Suck City” was turned into the movie “Being Flynn,” starring Robert De Niro and Paul Dano. That book recounted his unusual relationship with his alcoholic father and the suicide of his mother.

Flynn, 52, is a professor of poetry and married to actress Lili Taylor.

Flynn has been awarded fellowships from The Guggenheim Foundation, The Library of Congress, The Amy Lowell Trust, and The Fine Arts Work Center.

The Visiting Writers Series brings nationally-known writers to Oregon State University. The program is made possible by support from The Valley Library, OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817

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NickFlynn
Nick Flynn

Poet and essayist Ross Gay to read at Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Poet and essayist Ross Gay will read at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 10, in the Valley Library Rotunda on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow.

The event is free and open to the public. The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. 

Gay is the author of “Against Which” and “Bringing the Shovel Down.” His 2015 poetry collection, “Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude,” won the Kingsley Tufts Award and the National Books Critics Circle Award, was a finalist for the National Book Award, the Balcones Poetry Prize, and the Ohioana Book Award and was nominated for the NAACP Image Award and the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award.

He is also the co-author of the chapbooks, or small collections of poetry, “Lace and Pyrite: Letters from Two Gardens” with Aimee Nezhukumatathil and “River” with Richard Wehrenberg, Jr. Gay has also received fellowships from Cave Canem, the Bread Loaf Writer's Conference and the Guggenheim Foundation. 

Gay holds an MFA in poetry from Sarah Lawrence College and a doctorate in English from Temple University. He teaches at Indiana University. He is a founding editor of the online sports magazine “Some Call it Ballin’ ” and an editor of the chapbook presses Q Avenue and Ledge Mule Press. He is also a founding board member of the Bloomington Community Orchard, a non-profit, free-fruit-for-all food justice project.

This reading is part of the 2016-17 Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writers Series, which brings nationally acclaimed writers to Oregon State University. This series is sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film at OSU, with support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

Corliss, OSU to commemorate 40th anniversary of hydrothermal vents discovery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Forty years ago, a group of scientists led by Oregon State University oceanographer Jack Corliss discovered a unique colony of sea creatures living in the depths of the eastern Pacific Ocean in an area known as the Galapagos Rift.

There was no obvious source of light or food, yet clams, huge tube worms and other creatures were thriving. Their energy source turned out to be life-giving hydrothermal vents and the discovery revolutionized marine studies. 

This March 2-3, Oregon State University will celebrate the discovery with two presentations featuring Corliss, who is traveling from his home in Budapest, Hungary, to participate. The two-day commemorative event, which is free and open to the public, is called “OSU and Hydrothermal Vents: 40th Anniversary of the Discovery that Launched 1,000 Ships.”

“It was one of the biggest, most important discoveries by OSU scientists,” noted Martin Fisk, an OSU oceanographer who is helping coordinate the events. “Jack Corliss was designated by the National Science Foundation, which funded the research, as the leader of the submersible Alvin exploration, which descended into the depths of the Galapagos fracture zone, where the team discovered the vents and this unique biological community.” 

Robert Collier, a professor emeritus at OSU, was a participant on that 1977 expedition. “The discovery changed oceanography and spawned new fields of study, in everything from marine biology and chemistry to new approaches on the origin of life,” he said.

On Thursday, March 2, OSU will host three short lectures from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Learning Innovation Center, Room 210. They include:

  • Corliss and Collier will discuss the history of the discovery and the new fields of study it spawned;
  • Bill Chadwick, an OSU researcher at the Hatfield Marine Science Center, will describe new discoveries of hydrothermal vents in the western Pacific Ocean;
  • OSU oceanographer Andrew Thurber will explain how life at hydrothermal vents can influence global climate. 

On Friday, March 3, Corliss and others from the expedition will hold an open forum on the discovery that will be taped to help create an archive on its history. It will be held in Burt Hall Room 193 from 3:30 to 5 p.m.

Participating will be Lou Gordon, co-principal investigator on the expedition; Mitch Lyle, a graduate student with the late Jack Dymond; Collier, who was a grad student with John Edmond, also a co-principal investigator; and Corliss. 

During the 1977 discovery, the expedition scientists dubbed the hydrothermal vent community “The Garden of Eden” and used the mechanical arm of the Alvin to carefully collect samples of worms, mussels, clams and anemones. Some of those samples are still housed today at the Smithsonian Institution.

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Martin Fisk, 541-737-5208, mfisk@coas.oregonstate.edu

OSU Difference, Power, and Discrimination Program honored

WASHINGTON The American Council on Education announced today that the 2017 ACE State Network Leadership Award will be given to the Difference, Power and Discrimination program at Oregon State University.

This program was created in 1992 as a response to several bias incidents on campus. It works with all OSU faculty to develop inclusive curricula that address institutionalized systems of power, privilege, and inequity in the United States.

Since its launch, more than 200 faculty members, the majority of whom are women, have participated in the DPD Academy, and thousands of OSU undergraduates have taken related courses. The program helps raise consciousness about sexism as a system of oppression and its intersections with racism and other forms of oppression.

The award will be presented at ACE’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on March 11. Susan Capalbo, senior vice provost for academic affairs and Nana Osei-Kofi, director of the Difference, Power and Discrimination Program, will accept the award.

While there is wide variation in institutional diversity requirements across U.S. higher education, Osei-Kofi said, OSU’s program is unique in that courses must center on the United States; explicitly address issues of power; and be completed by students in addition to a diversity requirement.

“This is about understanding our time in history, the social, political and economic climate we live in, and our role in that,” Osei-Kofi said. “Work in DPD courses is really about providing students with tools for critical analysis of the world and the space they occupy in it.”

Lynn M. Gangone, vice president of ACE Leadership, said that the OSU program “is an excellent example of a program that is confronting these challenging issues in an intentional and thoughtful way.”

 

Media Contact: 

Kelli Meyer, 202-939-9328; kmeyer@acenet.edu

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Nana Osei-Kofi, 541-737-2824 or nana.osei-kofi@oregonstate.edu

OSU choral program presents annual Orange & Black Scholarship Benefit Concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University choral program will present the Orange & Black Choral and Vocal Scholarship Benefit Concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at the First United Methodist Church, 1165 N.W. Monroe Ave., Corvallis.

 The Orange & Black Concert is an annual tradition featuring the OSU Chamber Choir, Bella Voce and the OSU Meistersingers. All proceeds from the performance benefit the OSU Choral and Vocal Scholarship Fund.

The fund was established to provide financial support for students demonstrating outstanding professional potential in vocal and choral music. Contributions to the fund help support students’ educational costs and help bring top musical talent to study at Oregon State University.

 The OSU Meistersingers, under the baton of Russell Christensen, will open the program with five popular works: “Sound the Trumpet” by Henry Purcell; Johannes Brahms’ “Mainacht;” “Echoes (I am Hope)” by Daniel Elder; Gaetano Donizetti’s rousing “Song of the Regiment;” and Gary Ruschman’s arrangement of “Run On!”

Sandra Babb will lead OSU’s women’s choir, Bella Voce, in a set of original and arranged songs: “Spirit of Life” by Chris Aspaas; Kim Andre Arneson’s “Love’s Onward Journey;” “On a Rock” by Michele Kaschub; “Nigra Sun” by the internationally-renowned cellist Pablos Casals; and “Voice in the Wind” by Sarah Quartel.

The OSU Chamber Choir, directed by Steven Zielke, will close the performance. The Chamber Choir is the premier choral ensemble on campus, consisting of 40 to 45 selected students who perform the finest in choral music repertoire.

The Chamber Choir set includes: “Indonana,” a traditional South African work arranged for choir; Hugo Distler’s “Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied;” Eric Whitacre’s “Sainte-Chapelle,” a work composed in celebration of the famed Tallis Scholars; an arrangement of Dolly Parton’s “Light of a Clear Blue Morning;” and A.R. Rahman’s tongue-twisting “Balleilakka.”

General admission seating is $10. OSU students with identification and K-12 youth will be admitted free. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply. Advance tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/2lymoja. For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

Tickets available for Naomi Klein lecture at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Tickets are now available for an April 5 lecture by writer and cultural critic Naomi Klein, who will speak at Oregon State University’s LaSells Stewart Center.

The talk is free but tickets are required; tickets may be reserved online at http://bit.ly/2lts6a9. The lecture begins at 7 p.m., with exhibits on display in the lobby starting at 6 p.m. The event is sponsored by OSU’s Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word; the OSU Student Sustainability Initiative; Office of Sustainability; College of Science; Environmental Arts and Humanities Initiative; School of Public Policy; and the School of History, Philosophy, Religion. It is free and open to all. 

Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of several international best-selling books, including “This Changes Everything: Capitalism versus the Climate,” “The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism,” and “No Logo.”

“This Changes Everything” won the 2014 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction. The documentary inspired by the book, and directed by Avi Lewis, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in September 2015.

Since that book was published, Klein’s primary focus has been on putting its ideas into action. She is one of the organizers and authors of Canada's Leap Manifesto, a blueprint for a rapid and justice-based transition off fossil fuels. The manifesto has been endorsed by more than 200 organizations, tens of thousands of individuals, and has inspired similar climate justice initiatives around the world. In November 2016, she was awarded Australia’s prestigious Sydney Peace Prize.

Leading up to her visit to OSU, the Spring Creek Project will host a reading and discussion group on Klein’s latest book, “This Changes Everything: Capitalism versus the Climate.” The group will meet at 6 p.m. on Feb. 15, March, 1 and March 15 at the Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center, 128 S.W. 9th St. The reading and discussion group is free and open to the public.

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Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198, Charles.goodrich@oregonstate.edu

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Naomi Klein Credit: Kourosh Keshiri

Naomi Klein

Artist and activist Cannupa Hanska Luger to speak at OSU Feb. 16

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Artist and activist Cannupa Hanska Luger, a native of North Dakota who was born on the Standing Rock Reservation, will give a public talk on Feb. 16 at Oregon State University.

The lecture, “They Need Us More Than We Need Them,” will begin at 7 p.m. in the Construction & Engineering Hall at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. A reception with the artist will be held at 6 p.m. in the Myrtle Tree Alcove. The reception and talk are free and open to the public.

The event is part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series and SPARK, a year-long celebration of the arts and science.

Luger creates socially conscious work interweaving his identity as an American Indian with global issues. Luger, who is of Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, Austrian and Norwegian descent, creates unique, ceramic-centric, multidisciplinary artwork that tells provocative stories of complex indigenous identities coming up against 21st century imperatives, including mediation and destruction. Luger’s studio is currently based in New Mexico.

His recent work speaks to the environmental impact of energy extraction on the collective human psyche, and the political framework of unsanctioned land deals that primarily affect indigenous and rural communities and their land and water. He has spent time at Standing Rock during the protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The public talk concludes a three-day residency at OSU for Luger. On Feb. 14, he will attend a “Lunch & Learn” session with students and faculty in conjunction with an OSU course on the arts and social justice. He will also present his work at the Indigenous Poetry Night, from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Native American Longhouse.

On Feb. 15 and Feb. 16, Luger will be present in the art department, meeting with art faculty and students, hosting a maker’s event focused on art and activism and reviewing student portfolios.

The Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to the OSU campus to interact with students in the art department so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar.

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Kerry Skarbakka, Kerry.skarbakka@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-1256; Charles Robinson, Charles.Robinson@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-6535

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Old Dominion

Old Dominion

Everything Anywhere

Everything Anywhere

Essayist Elena Passarello to read at Oregon State University Feb. 24

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Essayist Elena Passarello will read at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, in the Valley Library Rotunda on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow.

Passarello is an assistant professor of English in OSU’s School of Writing, Literature and Film. Her 2017 book, “Animals Strike Curious Poses,” is a collection of essays about celebrity animals. Her previous book, “Let Me Clear My Throat,” won the Independent Publishers’ gold medal for nonfiction and was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award. 

Her essays have also appeared in Oxford American, Creative Nonfiction, and the Virginia Quarterly Review, as well as in the anthologies “After Montaigne,” “I’ll Tell You Mine,” and “Cat is Art Spelled Wrong.”

Passarello is a recipient of fellowships from OSU’s Center for the Humanities, Literary Arts, the MacDowell Colony, the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts, and the University of Iowa Museum of Art. In 2015, she received the Whiting Award in nonfiction. She earned her MFA at the University of Iowa. 

Passarello has also worked for many years as an actor and voice-over performer, and now serves on the board of the NonfictionNow conference, is the nonfiction editor of Iron Horse Review and co-edits the “In-Place” nonfiction series at West Virginia University Press.

This reading is part of the 2016-2017 Literary Northwest Series, which brings accomplished writers from the Pacific Northwest to OSU. The series is sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film at OSU, with support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music. 

The event is free and open to the public. The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

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Elena Passarello

Passarello.large_

Corvallis Queer Film Festival to run Feb. 22-25 at Darkside Cinema

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The 2017 Corvallis Queer Film Festival will be held Feb. 22-25 at Darkside Cinema, 215 S.W. Fourth St., Corvallis.

The international festival offers three feature-length documentaries and 60 short films by queer- and trans-identified directors selected from over 750 entries. It is a community project sponsored by the School of Language, Culture and Society in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University. 

The festival schedule is:

  • Feb. 22: 6 p.m., documentary, “Words: An Exploration of Identity.” 7:30 p.m., short films, Queer Subjects 1.
  • Feb. 23: 6 p.m. short films, Queer Subjects 2; 7:45 p.m., experimental short films.
  • Feb. 24: 6 p.m., documentary, “Parole de King!” 7:45 p.m., short films, 18 and older only.
  • Feb. 25: 6 p.m. documentary, “Hot Men, Cold Dictatorships.” 7:45 p.m. short films, Queer Subjects 3. 

Admission to all showings is free. All programs contain adult themes and viewer discretion is advised. The short films showing at 7:45 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24 contain explicit sexual content; no one under age 18 will be admitted and identification will be required.

The full program, including descriptions of films, is available online at http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1199626383.

 

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Juan Antonio Trujillo, 541-737-3956, jtrujillo@oregonstate.edu