OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

people programs and events

Authors Tracy Daugherty and Wayne Harrison to read at OSU Jan. 30

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Authors Tracy Daugherty and Wayne Harrison will read from their works on Friday, Jan. 30, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

The reading will be held in the Valley Library rotunda, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow. The event is free and open to the public.

Daugherty is the author of four novels, four short story collections, a book of personal essays and two literary biographies. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, McSweeney's, The Georgia Review and other magazines. “Hiding Man,” his biography of Donald Barthelme, was a New York Times and New Yorker notable Book of the Year. His newest book, “Just One Catch,” a biography of Joseph Heller was excerpted in Vanity Fair. Daugherty helped found the Master’s of Fine Arts program in creative writing at OSU.

Harrison received a master in fine arts degree from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is an instructor in the School of Writing Literature and Film at OSU. His debut novel, “The Spark and The Drive,” was published in 2014. Harrison’s fiction has appeared in “Best American Short Stories 2010,” The Atlantic, Narrative Magazine, McSweeney’s and other magazines. His work also has been featured on NPR’s “All Things Considered.” His short story collection, “Wrench,” was a finalist for the Serena McDonald Kennedy Award, the Spokane Prize and the Iowa Short Fiction Award. 

The reading is part of the 2014-15 Literary Northwest Series, sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU and is made possible by support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele and Grass Roots Books and Music.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

OSU to host Willamette Valley Bird Symposium on Jan. 24

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University and the American Ornithologists’ Union will host the Willamette Valley Bird Symposium, a one-day event focusing on research and careers in avian biology, on Saturday, Jan. 24, at the Linus Pauling Science Center on the OSU campus.

The symposium is aimed at high school students, teachers and undergraduates. It is also supported by The Audubon Society of Corvallis and the U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center. More information is available at: http://www.audubon.corvallis.or.us/wbs.shtml

Eric Forsman, a bird expert from the U.S. Forest Service in Corvallis, will give the keynote talk: “A Thirty-Year Study of Spotted Owls in the Old-Growth Forests of Western Oregon.”

The symposium will feature more than 20 short talks on bird research. Among the topics:

  • Mercury in Willamette Valley riparian songbirds;
  • Snowy plover survival, population and management in Oregon;
  • Effectiveness of backyard wildlife habitats;
  • The Oregon 2020 project of citizen scientists contributing to Oregon bird surveys;
  • New research on Adelie penguins.

Other talks will cover a variety of bird species, including swallows, Aphelocoma jays, Pfrimer’s parakeet, songbirds, seabirds, Caspian terns, bald eagles and common murres. Monitoring technology will be covered in talks on solar-powered cameras, use of drones in ornithology, archival GPS tags on diving seabirds, and other topics.

The symposium runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. It also will feature a live bird exhibition from Chintimini Wildlife Center, demonstrations of ornithological research techniques, and a panel discussion on careers in ornithology.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Sue Haig, 541-750-0981; willamettebirds15@gmail.com

Education aids understanding, reduces stigma of facial paralysis, OSU study shows

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A little bit of sensitivity training can help people form better first impressions of those with facial paralysis, reducing prejudices against people with a visible but often unrecognizable disability, new research from Oregon State University indicates.

There is a natural tendency to base first impressions on a person’s face, but those impressions can be inaccurate and often negative when the person has facial paralysis, said Kathleen Bogart, an assistant professor of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University.

“We wanted to see what we could do to change that, and we found that education is a powerful tool,” said Bogart, who directs the Disability and Social Interaction Lab at OSU. “It takes away the uncertainty of how to accommodate the disability.”

The research showed that providing education about conditions that cause facial paralysis helps people correct their misperceptions. Education efforts could be particularly beneficial to health care workers, educators or other groups that are more likely to regularly encounter someone with facial paralysis, Bogart said.

For example, understanding the need to pay attention to other modes of communication could help a doctor develop a better relationship with a patient and more accurately detect when the patient is upset or in pain. It also could help educators avoid the assumption that an unresponsive face means the student is not attentive, and to understand when a child is actually engaged in a task, she said.

Bogart is an expert on ableism, or prejudice about disabilities, and her research focuses on the psychosocial implications of facial movement disorders such as facial paralysis and Parkinson’s disease, which affect more than 200,000 Americans. Her interest stems from personal experience; she has Moebius syndrome, a rare congenital neurological disorder characterized by facial paralysis and impaired lateral eye movement.

For the study, she conducted an experiment where some participants received sensitivity training in the form of educational information about facial paralysis, including the cause and nature of the disability. The information stressed the need to focus on body language and voice cues of people with facial paralysis. Other participants received no information on facial paralysis.

All 110 study participants were then asked to watch a series of video clips featuring people with facial paralysis, both mild and severe, and were asked to rate the sociability of the people in the videos. The people who read the educational information consistently rated people with facial paralysis as more sociable than those in the group that did not read the information.

“We found that awareness and education efforts are effective in reducing stigma related to rare disabilities such as facial paralysis,” Bogart said. “That could have a broad impact on the rare disease community, because many rare diseases are unrecognizable. People who encounter someone with a rare disease may not understand or know how to adapt to communicate with them.”

The findings are being published in the February issue of the journal “Patient Education and Counseling.” Co-author is Linda Tickle-Degnen of Tufts University. The research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Bogart is now developing educational materials about Moebius Syndrome targeted to educators and health care providers. She and the students in her lab also are conducting an awareness campaign in conjunction with Moebius Syndrome Awareness Day, which is held annually on Jan. 24.

The awareness campaign is a pilot project. Bogart and her students are encouraging people to take a self-portrait with a sign describing how they express themselves, then sharing the photos on social media sites using the hashtag #moebiusawareness. The Moebius Syndrome Foundation and several other college campuses are also participating in the campaign. For more information on the effort, visit: http://bit.ly/17BMR8o.

In the future, Bogart hopes to study the effectiveness of such educational efforts to determine if more information should be included, if other types of groups might be targeted or if there are other ways to enhance understanding of rare diseases such as facial paralysis.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Kathleen Bogart, 541-737-1357, Kathleen.bogart@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Kathleen Bogart

Kathleen Bogart

OSU to host screening, discussion of ‘Paths of Glory’ in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon State University will host a screening and discussion of the 1957 Stanley Kubrick film, “Paths of Glory,” beginning at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 24, at the NW Film Center at the Portland Art Museum.

The film will be introduced by Jon Lewis, professor of film studies at OSU and author of eight books on cinema and cultural studies. Lewis will give a brief talk and then he and OSU history professor Christopher McKnight Nichols will lead a discussion with the audience on the film, Kubrick’s work and World War I following the screening.

“Paths of Glory” tells the story of a unit commander in the French army who must deal with the mutiny of his men after a failed attack during World War I. The film stars Kirk Douglas as Colonel Dax, Adolphe Menjou as General Broulard and George Macready as General Mireau.

The screening is part of a larger initiative at OSU to commemorate the centennial of World War I and to explore that bloody conflict in light of its implications for citizenship in the United States and the world. The OSU series, “Citizenship and Crisis: On the Centenary of World War I," is led by the School of History, Philosophy and Religion in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts, with additional support from the School of Writing, Literature and Film.

The screening will be held in the Whitsell Auditorium at the museum, 1219 S.W. Park Ave., Portland. Tickets are $9 or $8 for seniors and students. Admission is free for OSU students with valid ID. Tickets can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1HP8e2T or at the door. A reception co-hosted by the OSU Alumni Association and the School of Writing, Literature, and Film will follow the film screening.

For more information on the screening or the event series, visit http://bit.ly/1yAFdps.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Christopher McKnight Nichols, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

‘Call to Life,’ a duet of music and words, to be performed Jan. 21 in Corvallis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Writer and philosopher Kathleen Dean Moore and concert pianist Rachelle McCabe will present a program in music and words, “In an Age of Extinction, A Call to Life,” on Wednesday, Jan. 21, in Corvallis.

The program begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, 645 N.W. Monroe St.  

The event is sponsored by Oregon State University’s Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word, and the Friends of the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library. Admission is free and the public is welcome.

In the program, McCabe will play Rachmaninoff’s “Variations on a Theme of Corelli.” Creating a “duet” of music and words, Moore will speak of the call to save Earth’s lives.

“The truths of our time are deeply challenging,” said Moore, an award-winning author who speaks across the country about the moral urgency of stopping a global carbon catastrophe. “In the face of on-rushing extinctions and chaotic climate change, we must feel called to safeguard Earth’s abundance of lives. Words alone cannot express the urgency for a moral response. And so we turn to music.”

Moore is a philosopher, environmental advocate, and writer at Oregon State whose most recent books are “Wild Comfort,” and “Moral Ground: Ethical Actions for a Planet in Peril,” which gathers testimony from the world’s moral leaders about our obligations to the future. She is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy Emerita at OSU and also is co-founder and senior fellow of the Spring Creek Project.

McCabe is a concert pianist and professor of music at OSU and has an international career as a concert artist and teacher. As a concerto soloist, she has performed with many orchestras including the Seattle, Pittsburgh, Victoria, and Oregon Symphonies. She has performed recitals in cities including Washington, D.C.; Atlanta; Detroit; Seattle; Singapore; and Cambridge, United Kingdom, and has appeared on NPR's Performance Today and the CBC.

Media Contact: 

Erin Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198, Charles.goodrich@oregonstate.edu

“Wild” author Cheryl Strayed to speak at OSU on Jan. 15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Cheryl Strayed, author of the New York Times bestselling memoir, “Wild,” will speak at Oregon State University as part of their Discovery Lecture Series on Jan. 15.

Her talk, which is free and open to the public, begins at 7:30 p.m., in the LaSells Stewart Center Austin Auditorium. It will be followed by book sales and signing by the author.

At the age of 22, Strayed found herself shattered by two major life events: her mother’s sudden death from cancer and the end of her young marriage. After hitting rock bottom, Strayed decided to confront her emotional pain by trekking more than 1,000 miles along the Pacific Crest Trail.

“Wild” tells the amateur hiker’s tale, peppered with the colorful characters she encounters along the way, as she struggles to find inner peace and stability. Her story inspired Oprah Winfrey to revive her popular book club, with “Wild” as its inaugural selection. The story also inspired producer and actress Reese Witherspoon to bring “Wild” to the big screen in 2014 (It will premiere in Corvallis on Dec. 25).

Strayed is also the author of The New York Times bestseller “Tiny Beautiful Things,” a collection of her “Dear Sugar” columns forTheRumpus.net, and the critically acclaimed novel “Torch,” a finalist for the Great Lakes Book Award. Her writing has appeared in The Best American Essays, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post Magazine, Vogue, Allure, The Missouri Review, Creative Nonfiction, The Sun and elsewhere. Her books have been translated into 26 languages around the world.

The Discovery Lecture Series brings prominent scientists, acclaimed writers and key policymakers to Oregon State to present on matters of national and international importance. This installment of the Discovery Lecture is supported by the Office of the Provost, the OSU Foundation and the Hundere Endowment in Religion and Culture.

Editor’s note: Interviews with Strayed must be arranged by Random House Inc. To contact her publicist, email theresa.hogue@oregonstate for contact information.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Penguin Random House

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

cherylstrayed

Author Kazim Ali to read at Oregon State on Nov. 21

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Author Kazim Ali will read poetry at Oregon State University on Friday, Nov 21, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library Rotunda. A question and answer session and book signing will follow this free, public event.

Ali is a poet, essayist, fiction writer, and translator. He has written several volumes of poetry, including “Sky Ward,” “The Fortieth Day,” and “The Far Mosque,” which won the Alice James Books New England/New York Award.

Of “The Far Mosque,” Lucille Clifton said: “The author has managed to render into the English language the universal inner voice. These poems talk to the reader from the realm in which we are all human.”

Ali’s work in translation includes “Water's Footfall” by Sohrab Sepehri and, with Libby Murphy, “L’amour,” by Marguerite Duras. His novel, “Quinn’s Passage,” was named one of the “Best Books of 2005,” by Chronogram magazine. His books of essays include “Orange Alert: Essays on Poetry, Art and the Architecture of Silence,” and “Fasting for Ramadan.”

Ali, an associate professor of creative writing and comparative literature at Oberlin College, is also a contributing editor for AWP Writers Chronicle and associate editor for the literary magazine FIELD, as well as founding editor of the small press Nightboat Books.

The reading is part of the 2014-15 Visiting Writers Series sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings nationally known writers to Oregon State University.

The program is supported by OSU Libraries and Press, the School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, OSU’s Center for the Humanities, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele and Grass Roots Books and Music.

The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Contact: Karen Holmberg, Karen.holmberg@oregonstate.edu

Expert on subsurface life to present Condon Lecture

CORVALLIS, Ore. – T.C. Onstott, a geologist, geochemist, biogeochemist and expert on unusual microbial life forms in the Arctic and deep beneath the surface of the Earth, will present the 2014 Thomas Condon Lecture on Thursday, Nov. 20, at Oregon State University.

The lecture is free, open to the public and designed for a non-specialist audience. It is titled "The Hidden Universe."

The presentation will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Construction and Engineering Hall of the LaSells Stewart Center on the OSU campus, preceded by a reception with refreshments. The Condon Lecture, named after a pioneer of Oregon geology, helps to interpret significant scientific research for non-scientists.

Onstott is a professor of geochemistry in the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University. He has won numerous awards, and was named as one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2008.

Onstott studies subsurface microbial life and microbial ecosystems of permafrost, and its implications for global warming, petroleum biodegradation, life on Mars and the origin of life. The work also raises questions about how deeply into a planet life can penetrate and whether life could originate inside a planet.

This research has explored the Canadian High Arctic, the mines of South Africa to depths of more than two miles, and Yellowstone National Park. Onstott’s research also involves collaborations with NASA scientists on the development of space-flight capable instrumentation for detecting life. 

Onstott will also give a more technical presentation on a related topic, in the George Moore Lecture titled “Carbon cycling in the deep subsurface: Never was so much owed by so many to so few.” That event will be Friday, Nov. 21, at noon in Gilbert Hall, Room 124.

The presentations are sponsored by the OSU Research Office and the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.

Source: 

Rick Colwell, 541-737-5220

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

T.C. Onstott
T.C. Onstott

Auditions for OSU production of ‘Anne Frank’ to be held Nov. 16 and 17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s winter production, “The Diary of Anne Frank,” will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Nov. 16 and 17 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

Auditions are open to all OSU students, staff, and faculty and Corvallis community members. Auditions will consist of cold-readings from the script. Scripts are available to check out from the Theatre Arts office in Withycombe 141.

The play is a new adaptation by Wendy Kesselman of the original by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. It tells the true story of a young Jewish girl and her family in hiding during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands from June, 1942, to August, 1944.

Roles include the title character, Anne Frank; her father, Otto; her mother, Edith; her sister, Margot; Miep Gies; Peter Van Daan; Mrs. Van Daan; Mr. Dussel; Mr. Kraler and three male Nazis.

A read-through of the play will be held in early December and regular rehearsals begin in January, 2015. Rehearsals will be held from 2-6 p.m. Sundays and 6-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday each week.  Performances will be held Feb. 12-14 and Feb. 20-22, 2015.  

For more information, contact Director Elizabeth Helman at Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu

Media Contact: 
Source: 

OSU Theatre to present ‘Mother Courage’ in November

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present Bertolt Brecht’s classic anti-war fable, “Mother Courage and Her Children.” Performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13-14 and Nov. 21-22, and at 2 p.m. on Nov. 16 and Nov. 23 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

“Mother Courage and Her Children” is the first production of the 2014-15 OSU Theatre season, which has the theme, “War and Remembrance.” The play, originally written in the late 1930s as an anti-war play, is a powerful and thought-provoking drama that grapples with themes of family, survival and the true cost of war.

The production captures the human drama and collateral damage of armed conflict through a tight ensemble of performers and embraces Brecht’s vivid, theatrical style.

“Indeed, Brecht tells us virtually nothing of the war, but rather uses it as a loose background to present the personal and emotional impact that battle has on its victims, perpetrators and especially profiteers,” said director George Caldwell, a member of the OSU Theatre faculty.

A small core of Oregon State Theatre ensemble players will portray a total of 36 characters. Never leaving the stage, ensemble members perform a variety of roles, change costumes, move scenery and create sound effects before the audience, creating a kind of dynamic production rarely seen on stage. The production also includes original music composed by OSU music faculty member Tina Bull and student J. Garrett Luna.

The cast features OSU students Kolby S. Baethke, Daniel Barber, Elise Barberis, Grant Burns, Burke DeBoer, Sidney King, Anna Elise Mahaffey, Luis Miranda, Alyssa Monning, Emily Peters, Alex Reis, Alexandria Shonk, Alex Small, Teri Straley, Sarah Sutton, Kelsea Vierra and Cory Warren. Community members Angie DeMorgan and Scott Trout also join the cast.

Tickets are $12; $10 for seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ  or by calling 541-737-2784.

Media Contact: 
Source: