OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

Pulitzer-winning play ‘How I Learned to Drive’ opens Feb. 13

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play “How I Learned to Drive” will show Feb. 13-15 and Feb. 21-22 beginning at 7:30 p.m. on the Withycombe Hall main stage.

A matinee performance will begin at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 23 – also at the Withycombe Hall main stage, which is located at 30th and Campus Way in Corvallis.

The powerful exploration of abuse and manipulation blends playwright Paula Vogel’s characteristic wit with raw emotion as she depicts the story of Li’l Bit, a young girl from rural Maryland. Set in the 1960s, Li’l Bit grows up under the shadow of sexual abuse at the hands of her Uncle Peck. The play explores themes of power and control.

“This is a drama about obsession which some compare to Nabokov’s ‘Lolita,’ ” said director Charlotte Headrick, a theater arts professor at OSU.  “But unlike ‘Lolita,’ Vogel has filled the play with sharp, biting humor, which makes the drama all the more powerful.”

OSU student Erin Wallerstein portrays Li’l Bit and Corvallis resident Charles Prince plays Uncle Peck in the production. OSU students Alex Reis, Elise Barberis and Annie Parham are featured as the “Greek Chorus,” and play multiple roles conjured from Li’l Bit’s memories.

The Friday evening performances will include post-show discussions that are open to the public.

The play contains subject matter that is not suitable for children, Headrick said.

Tickets are $12, $10 for seniors, $8 for youth/students and $5 for OSU students. They are available for purchase through the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784 or online at http://www.oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre

Media Contact: 

Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784; michelle.klampe@oregonstate.edu

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Noted soprano and scholar of African-American music to come to OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Carren Moham, a professor of music at Illinois Wesleyan University, will come to Oregon State University to lecture on African-American spirituals and perform a concert of songs by African-American composers.

The lecture, “The Importance of Negro Spirituals to the Underground Railroad,” will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18, in the Construction and Engineering Hall at the LaSells Stewart Center. Moham, a soprano, will perform at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, in the Memorial Union lounge.

Both events are free and open to the public. They are sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts.

Moham also will appear with the Willamette Valley Symphony Feb. 22 and 23.

Moham’s research into the virtually unknown and unpublished art songs of African-American composers led her to devise two concert series, “Songs by African-American Women” and “Songs by African-American Composers.” She’ll perform the second series at Oregon State. She has performed the series in many major cities in the United States, Europe and South America, and has performed for former President Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton.

While at OSU, Moham also will visit classes in the ethnic studies and music departments.

Media Contact: 

Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784; michelle.klampe@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Celene Carillo, 541-737-2137, celene.carillo@oregonstate.edu

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Carren Moham
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Poet Gary Young to read at OSU on Feb. 7

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Poet and artist Gary Young will read at Oregon State University on Friday, Feb. 7, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library rotunda. A question and answer session and book signing will follow. This event is part of the 2013-14 Visiting Writers Series at OSU.

Young has authored seven volumes of poetry including his most recent collection, “Even So: New and Selected Poems” (2012).

Publisher’s Weekly notes that Young “writes with a unique combination of wisdom and terror, engendering a kind of sad calm, a hard-earned acceptance of life’s difficulty and openness to its beauty.”

Young’s honors include grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council, the 1992 Pushcart Prize, the James D. Phelan Award for his collection “The Dream of a Moral Life,” the William Carlos Williams Award for “No Other Life,” and the 2013 Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America.

In 2010 Young was named the Poet Laureate of Santa Cruz County, where he teaches creative writing and directs the Cowell Press at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

His print work is represented in collections including the Museum of Modern Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and The Getty Center for the Arts.

The Visiting Writers Series brings nationally-known writers to Oregon State. The program is supported by The Valley Library, the OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

Media Contact: 

Source: 

 Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817; rachel.ratner@oregonstate.edu

OSU to hold symposium Feb. 14-15 featuring LeGuin, others

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A symposium designed to explore ways to live on Earth without exploiting the planet – featuring speakers ranging from author Ursula K. LeGuin to environmental activist Tim DeChristopher – will be held Friday and Saturday, Feb. 14-15, at Oregon State University.

The conference, “Transformation without Apocalypse: How to Live Well on an Altered Planet,” is at LaSells Stewart Center on campus. The event is free but participants should register on the Spring Creek Project website at http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/centers-and-initiatives/spring-creek-project. Workshop spaces are limited and registration is on first-come basis.

Keynote speakers on Friday include Rob Nixon, author of “Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor,” Susana Almanza, co-director of People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources (PODER), and geographer Carolyn Finney, author of the forthcoming “Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors.”

Also on Friday, artist Amy Franceschini will speak on her environmentally related art projects and the work of Futurefarmers, an international collective of artists, activists, researchers and others who work together to propose alternatives to the social, political and environmental organization of space.

Saturday’s speakers include DeChristopher, an environmental activist featured in the film “Bidder 70,” authors LeGuin and Kim Stanley Robinson, eco-philosopher Joanna Macy, author and environmental philosopher Kathleen Dean Moore, and Yes! magazine editor Sarah Van Gelder.

“It’s going to take a powerful surge of human creativity, energy, and commitment to create a socially just and ecologically well-adapted future,” said Charles Goodrich, director of the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word, the symposium organizers. “So we’ve designed this gathering to bring together a diverse community to imagine tangible visions of new/old ways to live without exhausting the planet.”

“Transformation without Apocalypse” is sponsored by the Spring Creek Project, along with OSU School of History, Philosophy, and Religion, Hundere Endowment for Religion and Culture, Anarres Project, College of Liberal Arts, and OSU Arts and Humanities Initiative.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198;  Charles.goodrich@oregonstate.edu

Corvallis screening of classic silent horror film set Jan. 13

The 1920 German horror film “Der Golem: How He Came into the World” will be shown at the Whiteside Theatre in Corvallis on Monday, Jan. 13, beginning at 6 p.m.

The silent film will be accompanied on the piano by Portland musician and composer Beth Karp, who has written her own score for the screening. The event is sponsored by the Oregon State University School of Language, Culture, and Society in the College of Liberal Arts.

The German Expressionist film, which was directed by Paul Wegener and Carl Boese, is about a 16th-century Prague rabbi who creates a giant creature from clay – a Golem – whom he brings to life in order to protect the city’s Jewish population from persecution.

Karp is a faculty member at Portland Community College, where she teaches composition, piano, music theory, and 20th-century music history. She is also a frequent performer, collaborator and solo artist.

Admission to the screening is free and open to the public. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. 

Media Contact: 

Celene Carillo, 541-737-2137

Source: 

Sebastian Heiduschke, 541-737-3957, Sebastian.heiduschke@oregonstate.edu

Authors Ponteri, Serber to read at OSU on Jan. 17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Authors Jay Ponteri and Natalie Serber will read from their most recent books at Oregon State University on Friday, Jan. 17, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library rotunda. A question and answer session and book signing will follow.

This event is part of the 2013-2014 Literary Northwest Series,

Ponteri is author of the memoir, “Wedlocked,” (2013) and “Darkmouth Strikes Again,” a chapbook of short prose, which will be released this summer. His essay, “Listen to This” was mentioned as a Notable Essay in “Best American Essays 2010.” Ponteri directs the undergraduate creative writing program at Marylhurst University and Show:Tell: The Workshop for Teen Writers & Artists.

Renee Nicholson of “The Los Angeles Review” writes, “Sometimes filled with raw sexual ambition, other times quietly sad and contemplative, Ponteri dares memoir to go in a bold direction, with precedence on the intimacy between writer and reader."

Serber’s debut story collection, “Shout Her Lovely Name,” (2012) was a New York Times Notable Book of 2012 and a summer reading pick by “O, the Oprah Magazine.” Serber teaches at Marylhurst University and is working on a novel set in Boring, Ore.  

Joan Frank of The San Francisco Chronicle writes that Serber’s story collection “plunges us into the humid heat and lightning of a perfect storm: that of American mothers and daughters struggling for power, love, meaning, and identity…Serber's writing sparkles: practical, strong, brazenly modern, marbled with superb descriptions.”

The Literary Northwest Series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU. This program is made possible by support from the Valley Library and OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

 Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817; rachel.ratner@oregonstate.edu

Postponed OSU play to be performed in January

CORVALLIS, Ore. – After a successful opening night performance on Dec. 5, the Oregon State University Theatre had to postpone its production of “The King of Spain’s Daughter” because of a major snowstorm that blanketed the area.

The play has been rescheduled for Friday and Saturday, Jan. 17-18, at the Lab Theatre in OSU’s Withycombe Hall beginning at 7:30 p.m. An additional matinee performance has been scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 18, beginning at 2:30 p.m. at the Majestic Theatre in downtown Corvallis.

Tickets for the Lab Theatre production are $5 for general admission and $3 for students. Tickets for the matinee at the Majestic are $8 for general admission and $6 for students. More information is available at: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre. Because of the configuration of the Lab Theatre, latecomers cannot be seated once the production has begun.

“The King of Spain’s Daughter” is a one-act comedy by Irish playwright Teresa Deevy, a prominent Abbey Theatre dramatist of the 1930s. Deevy was deaf and could lip-read in three languages. The OSU production of the play will be unique – for every speaking actor in the production, there will be an interpreting actor using American Sign Language.

Director Charlotte Headrick said this is the first time an OSU production will be “shadowed” by interpreters using American Sign Language.

Jo Alexander, a nationally certified sign language interpreter who manages accommodations at OSU for hearing-impaired students, faculty, staff, and visitors, will interpret the role of Mrs. Marks working alongside actress Vreneli Farber who is her speaking counterpart.

“The King of Spain’s Daughter” follows Annie Kinsella, a young woman with a rich imagination who has to deal with the limited opportunities for young women in 1930s Ireland. Live music before the performance will be provided by Jean Dick on violin playing traditional Irish tunes with Richelle Jean-Bart performing the title song.

Voiced actors are Rick Wallace as Annie Kinsella’s father Peter, Caitlin Reichmann as Annie Kinsella, Michael Beaton as her love interest Jim Sheridan, and Davey Kashuba as Roddy Mann, the loafer. Actors who are interpreting are Cheryl Witters as Annie, Peter Norland as Jim Sheridan, Steve Rianda as Peter Kinsella, and Lee Rianda as Roddy.

The production is underwritten by the office of the Vice-Provost of Student Affairs with the support of the OSU Theatre.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Charlotte Headrick, 541-737-4918; cheadrick@oregonstate.edu

Interactive eco-art projects sought for February symposium

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word at Oregon State University is seeking proposals for interactive art projects that demonstrate how we can live happily and healthily on an altered planet – without “exhausting the Earth.”

The artist whose work is selected will receive a $2,000 award and the work will be featured in a symposium, “Transformation without Apocalypse: How to Live Well on an Altered Planet.” The event will be held Feb. 14-15 at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center.

The deadline for proposals on the art projects is Monday, Jan. 13. Details are available on the Spring Creek Project website: http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/node/953

“Even though a majority of Americans now understand that climate change is upon us and radical changes are necessary, it’s still very difficult to imagine how to live without exhausting the Earth,” said Charles Goodrich, director of the Spring Creek Project. “So we are asking area artists to send us proposals for artworks that offer tangible visions of new/old ways to live.”

The February symposium will feature presentations by environmental activist Tim DeChristopher, eco-philosopher Joanna Macy, writer and philosopher Kathleen Dean Moore, novelists Ursula K. LeGuin, Kim Stanley Robinson and other speakers.  It’s being organized by OSU’s Spring Creek Project and supported by several departments and programs in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198; Charles.goodrich@oregonstate.edu

One-act Irish comedy interpreted in sign language opens at OSU on Thursday, Dec. 5

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “The King of Spain’s Daughter,” a one-act comedy by Irish playwright Teresa Deevy, will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 5-7 in the Lab Theatre in Withycombe Hall at Oregon State University.

A matinee performance will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8, at the Majestic Theatre in downtown Corvallis.

Second only to Lady Gregory, Deevy was a prominent Abbey Theatre dramatist of the 1930s. Deevy was deaf and could lip read in three languages. At Oregon State, the production is directed by OSU faculty member Charlotte Headrick, who has a special research interest in Irish drama by women and has published extensively in the field of Irish drama.

For every speaking actor in the production, there will be an interpreting actor using American Sign Language. Headrick said this is the first time a production at Oregon State will be “shadowed” by interpreters using American Sign Language.

Jo Alexander, a nationally certified sign language interpreter who manages accommodations at OSU for hearing-impaired students, faculty, staff, and visitors, will interpret the role of Mrs. Marks working alongside actress Vreneli Farber who is her speaking counterpart.

“The King of Spain’s Daughter” follows Annie Kinsella, a young woman with a rich imagination who has to deal with the limited opportunities for young women in 1930s Ireland. Live music before the performance will be provided by Jean Dick on violin playing traditional Irish tunes with Richelle Jean-Bart performing the title song.

Voiced actors are Rick Wallace as Annie Kinsella’s father Peter, Caitlin Reichmann as Annie Kinsella, Michael Beaton as her love interest Jim Sheridan, and Davey Kashuba as Roddy Mann, the loafer. Actors who are interpreting are Cheryl Witters as Annie, Peter Norland as Peter Kinsella, Tyler Reisnaur as Jim Sheridan, and Steve Rianda as Roddy.

The production is underwritten by the office of the Vice-Provost of Student Affairs with the support of the OSU Theatre.

Tickets for the Lab Theatre production are $5 and $3 for students, and $6/$8 for the Majestic. Information: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Charlotte Headrick, 541-737-4918

Inaugural Corvallis Queer Film Festival to begin Nov. 11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The inaugural Corvallis Queer Film Festival will run from Nov. 11-15 at Darkside Cinema in Corvallis, with all shows beginning at 6 p.m.

The event is sponsored by the School of Language, Culture, and Society and the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University.

In addition to free screenings each night, one of the films’ directors will visit Corvallis and participate in a panel discussion. Highlighting the week is the appearance on Friday, Nov. 15, of Del Shores, director of “Southern Baptist Sissies,” which depicts the story of four boys who are gay growing up in the Southern Baptist Church – and how they dealt with the conflict between their religion and their sexuality.

Shores will participate in a panel about LGBTQ experiences growing up Southern Baptist from 3-5 p.m. in the Memorial Union’s Pan-Afrikan Sankofa Room (Room 213). Other panelists include Dale Dickey and Emerson Collins – two actors from the film – and Susan Shaw, director of OSU’s School of Language, Culture, and Society.

On Wednesday, Nov. 13, a reading of Shores’ play, “Sordid Lives,” will take place from 3-5 p.m. at the OSU Women’s Center. The play is about a colorful family in a small Texas town dealing with the death of the family matriarch – and the secrets about her that emerge before the funeral.

The free films to be screened include:

  • Monday, Nov. 11 – “Trans,” a documentary about men, women and all the variations in between;
  • Tuesday, Nov. 12 – “The New Black,” a tale of the fight for marriage equality in Maryland and how the issue divided the African American community;
  • Wednesday, Nov. 13 – “Mosquita Y Mari,” the story of two 15-year-old Chicanas in Los Angeles who forge a friendship that grows increasingly complex;
  • Thursday, Nov. 14 – “Mario R.,” the story of a gay man in former East Germany who tries to escape to the West for love, only to undergo a series of traumatic experiences;
  • Friday, Nov. 15 – “Southern Baptist Sissies,” the story of four boys who are gay growing up with a conflict of religion and sexuality in the Southern Baptist Church.

Darkside Cinema is located at 215 S.W. Fourth St. in Corvallis.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Bradley Boovy, 541-737-0023; Bradley.boovy@oregonstate.edu