OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

Auditions for OSU’s one-act festival to be held April 16-17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s Spring One-Act Festival 2017 will be held from 6-8 p.m. April 16 and April 17 in the Withycombe Hall Lab Theatre.

The 2017 One-Act Festival will feature three original plays written and directed by OSU Theatre students. The line-up includes “The Two Minds of Mr. Coffan,” by Hannah Fretz; “Skinner,” by Mike Stephens; and “Love Games,” by Heaven Carreon. Roles are available for twelve performers.

Auditions will consist of cold readings and short games. They are open to all OSU students, faculty and staff and to members of the Corvallis community. The theatre is located at 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

Rehearsals for each play will be scheduled by individual directors. All performers cast must be able to attend company run-throughs May 22-25, tech rehearsals May 27-28 and all dress rehearsals and performances May 30 through June 4.

Scripts will be available for check-out in Withycombe Hall, Room 145, during regular business hours. For more information, visit: http://bit.ly/1NbuaeH.

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Works by artist Betty LaDuke to be featured in OSU’s Little Gallery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “Bountiful Harvest & Border Crossings,” an exhibition of works depicting the stories of Latino farmworkers, by Ashland artist Betty LaDuke, is now on display in the Little Gallery at Oregon State University.

An opening reception will be held from 3:30-5 p.m. April 27 in the gallery, 210 Kidder Hall, 2000 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. The artist will be on hand and the public is welcome to attend. The exhibit runs through June 16. 

The Little Gallery is open 8 a.m. to noon and 1-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. It is free and open to the public.

LaDuke’s wood panel murals document and narrate the stories of Latino farmworkers who work in Oregon’s Rogue Valley. The aim of the work is to give recognition to those who live and work on the fringes of society. 

“My intention is to portray farmworkers and their families with dignity and appreciation for their work,” LaDuke said. “We all need a fair chance to feel visible, be paid a living wage and be respected for the work we do.”

LaDuke, who had a long career teaching art at Southern Oregon University, has traveled extensively around the world. Her work reflects the folk art traditions of the countries she has visited. Her body of work invites the viewer to celebrate the beauty of other cultures while recognizing mankind’s enduring hardships. 

Her work is on permanent display at the Medford Airport. She has also shown work at the Capitol Children’s Museum in Washington, D.C.; the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas; The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago; and elsewhere.

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Helen Wilhelm, 541-737-2146, helen.wilhelm@oregonstate.edu

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"Flower Harvest" by Betty LaDuke

Flower Harvest

OSU Music, Corvallis Repertory Singers present David Maslanka’s Mass

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The West Coast premiere of composer David Maslanka’s Mass will be presented at Oregon State University on Thursday, April 20, featuring the OSU Wind Ensemble, the OSU Chamber Choir and the Corvallis Repertory Singers.

The performance will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center on the OSU campus in Corvallis. Chris Chapman, director of bands at OSU, will conduct.

Tickets are $18 to $25. OSU students with identification and K-12 youth will be admitted free. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply. Advance tickets are available online at repsing.org or in Corvallis at Grass Roots Books and Music, Troubadour Music or Schmidt’s Garden Center, or in Albany at Sid Stevens Jewelers.

Maslanka is widely regarded as one of the greatest wind band composers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. From a catalog of more than 130 major works, more than 40 have been composed specifically for the wind ensemble.

The Mass, based on the transformational aspects of the Latin Mass, shows his distinctive compositional style. Scored for 36 instrumentalists, two vocal soloists, mixed choir and children’s choir, the 1994-95 work is one of only a handful of choral-wind ensemble works written by a major composer.

The Mass premiered in 1996 at the University of Arizona in Tucson and three more performances were given in 1998 by Illinois State University. Maslanka made substantial revisions to the work prior to a 2005 performance at Festival Miami in Miami, Florida.

The Corvallis performance will use the 2005 revision. Only two complete recordings of the work currently exist: one of the original version of the work and another of the 2005 revision. In addition to the performance on April 20 the performers will record the work under supervision of the composer for release as part of the “David Maslanka Composer Series” on Mark Records of Clarence, New York.

Chapman conducts the Wind Ensemble and Chamber Winds groups at OSU. In spring 2016, he and the Wind Ensemble recorded Maslanka’s “Saint Francis” for future release on Mark Records. The Corvallis Repertory Singers are led by Steven M. Zielke, director of choral studies at OSU.

The performance also will feature soprano soloist Amy Hansen, who joined the OSU vocal faculty in fall, 2016; and baritone soloist Nicolai Strommer, who earned his undergraduate degree at OSU and earned a graduate degree from the Manhattan School of Music in New York City.

For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671, preferably at least one week in advance. The LaSells Stewart Center is located at 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

 

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Wind Ensemble

OSU Wind Ensemble

David Maslanka

David Maslanka

Artist Hank Willis Thomas to speak at OSU April 19

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Hank Willis Thomas, a photo conceptual artist who works primarily with themes related to identity, history and popular culture, will speak April 19 at Oregon State University.

The talk, “Divided We Fall,” will be at 6:30 p.m. in Construction & Engineering Hall at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. A reception with the artist will be held at 5:30 p.m. in the Myrtle Tree Alcove. The reception and talk are free and open to the public.

Thomas also will be in residence on campus April 18-19 and will spend time visiting art classes and reviewing and critiquing student art work. His visit and lecture are part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series.

Thomas has exhibited throughout the U.S. and abroad, including at The International Center of Photography, The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Studio Museum in Harlem, and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

His monograph, “Pitch Blackness,” was published by Aperture. His work is in numerous public collections, including The Museum of Modern Art New York, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and more.

In 2015, Thomas co-founded “For Freedoms,” the first artist-run super PAC. He is currently represented by Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City and Goodman Gallery in South Africa.

Thomas received the BFA in photography and Africana studies from New York University and the MFA/MA in photography and visual criticism from the California College of Arts.

The Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to the OSU campus to interact with students in the art department so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2dVv5kW and http://www.hankwillisthomas.com/

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Contact: Kerry Skarbakka, 541-737-1256, kerry.skarbakka@oregonstate.edu

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Hank Willis Thomas

Hank Willis Thomas

"I Am. Amen." by Hank Willis Thomas

I am. Amen.

"Amandla" by Hank Willis Thomas

Amandla

OSU to host events celebrating hands-on learning and maker culture April 14-15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host The Co., a  two-day event celebrating hands-on learning and maker culture, April 14-15 on the Corvallis campus.

“SEA Through the Eyes of an Artist” will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. April 14 at Furman Hall. The fourth-annual Corvallis Maker Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 15 in the Memorial Union Ballroom and the Student Experience Center Plaza. Both events are free and open to the public.

“Maker” culture is a popular movement honoring craftsmanship and technology and the sharing of knowledge, skills and resources. The Co. event offers the OSU community and the public an opportunity to collaborate, innovate and create. The event also provides a forum for teaching the value of hands-on learning in classrooms from kindergarten through college.

“SEA Through the Eyes of an Artist” is a new event this year, hosted by the College of Education in conjunction with The Co. and SPARK, OSU’s year-long celebration of the arts and science. All events are free and open to the public. The schedule is:

  • 9:30 a.m. to noon: Activities for K-12 students including a Muddy Creek project demonstration; SMILE (Science and Math Investigative Learning Experiences);  StreamWebs; Art at Sea; and Storytime with Judy Li. Furman Hall.
  • 1-2 p.m.: Keynote speaker, Brownwyn Bevan of the University of Washington College of Education, who will deliver an interactive keynote presentation on makerspace research in the Learning Innovation Center, Room 100.
  • 2-5 p.m.: Activities for the OSU community, including an earthquake/tsunami activity station; an “interpret your research” competition for graduate students to demonstrate their dissertation or capstone projects through music, dance, painting or other art forms; and happy hour with Bevan. Furman Hall.
  • 5-9 p.m.: Activities for families and the community, including a COSIA activity station. Furman Hall.

Other activities include an arts and science geocaching quest throughout the OSU campus; panels to inspire women and girls to enter STEM fields, presented by the campus groups Women in Science and Women in Engineering; and a show focused on arts and science presented by the Corvallis Public Library. A full schedule of events is available online: http://www.corvallismakerfair.org/the-co-2017/sea-through-the-eyes-of-an-artist/.

At Saturday’s Maker Fair, attendees can talk to experts in the arts, crafts, technology, and sciences and leave with unique souvenirs such as Michael Boonstra’s laser-etched cedar selfies.

Visitors can also tie flies with OSU Fly Fishing, experience virtual reality gaming with Solid Fuel Studios, help build a Mars lander based on the actual Viking design plans with the Viking Mars Mission Preservation and Education Team, learn basic programming concepts with the OSU Open Source Lab, find out about the process of creating pigments with the Mobile Color Lab and more.

The Co. is organized by a team of OSU faculty, staff, and students and professionals from the Corvallis area. Sponsors and partners for the 2017 event include HP, Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, OSU College of Education, OSU College of Forestry, OSU Division of Outreach and Engagement, OSU College of Liberal Arts, OSU Libraries and Press, and SPARK.

Registration information, a complete schedule, exhibitor list and additional details about the events are available on the event website, www.corvallismakerfair.org.

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Charles Robinson, 541-737-6535, charles.robinson@oregonstate.edu

OSU presents Northwest Dance Project April 14

CORVALLIS, Ore. –NW Dance Project will present an evening of contemporary dance at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 14, at Oregon State University.

Each season, the professional company based at NW Dance Project performs a new series that includes appearances in the Portland area as well as tours around the state and across the country. The OSU performance will be held in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th Street.

The event is part of “SAC Presents,” a visual and performing arts events series sponsored by the School of Arts and Communication in the OSU College of Liberal Arts.

Founded in Portland in 2004 by acclaimed dancer and choreographer Sarah Slipper, NW Dance Project is dedicated to the creation and performance of innovative, contemporary dance works from established and emerging dance makers in an open and artistically stimulating environment.

NW Dance Project has fostered the creation and premier of more than 190 original contemporary dance works and engages individuals and communities with dance through accessible performances by the company, studio sessions, dance samplers, outdoor performances, special events master classes and more.

Tickets are $25 and $30 for main floor seats and $10 for limited balcony seating; all seats are reserved. Free tickets are available to currently enrolled OSU students, one per person. Tickets are available online at http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACpresents, at The LaSells Stewart Center from noon to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and at the door starting at 6:30 p.m. the night of the performance. OSU students who are not on campus Tuesdays and Thursdays may call 541-737-5592 to obtain one free ticket.

The performance is part of Corvallis Arts for All (CAFA). The program allows for up to two tickets to be purchased at $5 each by those in the SNAP program with an Oregon Trail Card. CAFA tickets must be obtained in person at The LaSells Stewart Center during ticket-selling hours or at the door the night of the performance, and availability may be limited. For more information and for accommodations for people with disabilities, call 541-737-5592.

SAC Presents is funded in part by donations made during the Cornerstone Campaign for the Arts and by OSU Friends of the Arts. The goal of SAC Presents is to bring well-known headliners, rising stars and unique, lesser known artists and ensembles to the community. The lineup of artists ranges from country music to jazz musicians, chamber music to rock, as well as visual artists, guest lecturers and special events.

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Erin O’Shea Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

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NW Dance Project

NW Dance

Poet and nonfiction author Ellen Bass to read at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Poet and nonfiction writer Ellen Bass will read at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 7, in the Valley Library Rotunda on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow.

Bass is the author of the poetry collection “Like a Beggar,” published in 2014 by Copper Canyon Press. Her previous books of poetry include “The Human Line,” which was named a notable book by The San Francisco Chronicle, and “Mules of Love,” which won the Lambda Literary Award in poetry.

She also co-edited, with Florence Howe, “No More Masks!: An Anthology of Poems by Women.” Bass’ poems have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, The American Poetry Review, The New Republic, The Kenyon Review, Ploughshares and The Sun.

Her nonfiction books include “Free Your Mind: The Book for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Youth,” “I Never Told Anyone: Writings by Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse,” and “The Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse,” which has sold over one million copies and has been translated into 10 languages. 

Bass’ honors and awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and from the California Arts Council, two Pushcart Prizes, the Elliston Book Award for poetry (awarded by the University of Cincinnati), the Nimrod/Hardman’s Pablo Neruda Prize and The Missouri Review’s Larry Levis Award. She currently teaches in the low residency MFA program at Pacific University.

This reading is part of the 2016-17 Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writers Series, which brings nationally acclaimed writers to Oregon State University. This series is sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film at OSU, with support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

Prior to her visit to OSU, Ellen Bass will be writer-in-residence for the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest hosted by the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word. The Spring Creek Project is also a co-sponsor for the reading.

The event is free and open to the public. The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis.



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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

OSU to host exhibition from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host “Cultural Conversations,” an exhibition of prints from the collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Schnitzer Family Foundation, April 3 through May 3 on the Corvallis campus.

An opening reception will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. April 5 in Bexell Hall, 2251 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. Schnitzer, a Portland businessman, collector and philanthropist who owns one of the country’s largest private collections of contemporary prints and multiples, will provide remarks about the exhibition’s artists and artwork. 

OSU President Ed Ray also will give remarks. An informal, self-guided tour of the exhibition will follow.

Pieces from the exhibit will be displayed in the Fairbanks Gallery as well as in four cultural centers on campus. The exhibition was curated by Kirsi Peltomäki, associate professor of art history at OSU. 

“The prints for this exhibition address the educational context through assumptions about instruction and learning, effort and ease, task and performance,” Peltomäki said.

The Fairbanks Gallery will feature work by John Baldessari, an American conceptual artist who works with text and photographic images. Often drawing from popular culture and mass media, Baldessari challenges viewers to interpret their own meaning for unique or unlikely combinations. Prints from three of Baldessari’s renowned series are included in the exhibition. 

“I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art” resulted from a project that Baldessari assigned to art students at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in 1971. The pledge, repeated to inscribe it into muscle memory, transforms a form of grade school punishment into a challenge for art students.

The series “Throwing Three Balls in the Air to Get a Straight Line (Best of Thirty-Six Attempts)” (1973) is a visual documentation of a seemingly impossible task, documented visually against the bright California sky. Whimsy becomes intertwined with the thrill of the miraculous. 

The prints in the series “Hegel’s Cellar” (1986), use found imagery to evoke ideas about mass obedience against the place of the individual within collective formations.

Four campus cultural centers also will feature works from the Schnitzer collection: 

  • Prints by Enrique Chagoya, a Mexican-born, American painter and print-maker whose works focus on the changing nature of culture, will be on display at the Centro Cultural César Chávez, 691 S.W. 26th St.
  • Work by Joe Feddersen of Colville heritage, a Washington-based sculptor, painter, photographer and mixed-media artist. Feddersen is known for creating artwork strong in geometric patterns reflective of what is seen in the environment, landscape and his Native American heritage. His work will be on display at the Native American Longhouse Eena Haws, 311 S.W. 26th St. 
  • Art by Mildred Howard, an African-American artist known primarily for her sculptural installation and mixed-media assemblages, will be on display at the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center, 100 S.W. Memorial Place.
  • Pieces by Hung Liu, an acclaimed Chinese-born American contemporary artist and one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the West, will be featured at the Asian and Pacific Cultural Center, 2695 S.W. Jefferson Way. 

“I chose the artists and the particular prints for the cultural centers because they are powerful works of art. They are relevant to conversations about identity, heritage, and culture today,” Peltomäki said. “All of these works speak of shared histories, but they also invite viewers to think about how those histories connect to other stories and aspects of contemporary life in the United States today. They identify culture and identity as complex, multifaceted entities that are sources of strength and agency.”

The Fairbanks Gallery is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. the third Thursday of each month for the Corvallis Arts Walk. The gallery will be open until 7 p.m. on April 5. Campus Cultural Centers are open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. The exhibits are free and open to the public.


About the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation: At age 14, Jordan D. Schnitzer bought his first work of art from his mother’s Portland, Oregon, contemporary art gallery, evolving into his lifelong avocation as a collector. He began collecting contemporary prints and multiples in earnest in 1988. Today, the collection exceeds 10,000 works and includes many of today’s most important contemporary artists. It has grown to be one of the country’s largest private print collections overall. He generously lends work from his collection to qualified institutions and has organized over 100 exhibitions at more than 100 museums. Schnitzer is also president of Harsch Investment Properties, a privately owned real estate investment company based in Portland, Oregon, with over 24 million square feet of office, multi-tenant industrial, multi-family and retail properties in six western states. For more information about the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, please visit www.jordanschnitzer.org.
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Kirsi Peltomäki, 541-737-5008, kirsi.peltomaki@oregonstate.edu

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Jordan D. Schnitzer (Photo courtesy the Jordan D. Schnitzer Family Foundation)

Jordan D. Schnitzer

Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center

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OSU presents ‘A Call to Life’ performance, discussion

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “A Call to Life,” a three-part event featuring music, creative writing, science and discussion about the wonder and worth of the Earth’s wild species and the responsibility to save them from extinction, will be held at 7 p.m., Friday, April 7, at Oregon State University.

The event is part of “SAC Presents,” a visual and performing arts events series sponsored by the School of Arts and Communication in the College of Liberal Arts. It will be held in The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., and is part of SPARK, OSU’s yearlong celebration of the arts and science.

It is free and open to the public but interested attendees are encouraged to register for a free ticket online at http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/ACalltoLife. For more information and for accommodations for people with disabilities, call 541-737-5592.

In the first part of the program, Rachelle McCabe, music professor and OSU director of piano studies, and OSU philosophy Professor Emeritus Kathleen Dean Moore will present their music and spoken word program, “A Call to Life: Variations on a Theme of Extinction.”

The work, a musical narrative set to the Variations on a Theme of Corelli, op. 42 by Sergei Rachmaninoff, originally premiered at The LaSells Stewart Center in 2015 and has since been performed in Portland and Eugene; Seattle, Washington; Auburn, California; Tucson, Arizona; Rockford, Illinois; and Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

In September the pair took this work to the World Conservation Congress of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in Honolulu, Hawaii, where it was included on an agenda of presentations by world conservation leaders, scientists, conservation organizations, faith-based organizations and governments.

The second part of the program, “So Much Worth Saving,” will feature OSU philosopher Michael Paul Nelson facilitating a brief talk with OSU scientists Kim Bernard, Matthew Betts, Selena Heppell, Mark Hixon and Bill Ripple.

The evening will finish with “Continuing Conversations” in the Giustina Gallery. The interactive lobby fair will include conservation groups, artists, scientists, community groups, the presenters and performers. It is an opportunity for members of the audience to network, gather information, continue the discussion and create plans for action. Tables for discussion groups will be provided, and refreshments will be available for purchase.

SAC Presents is funded in part by donations made during the Cornerstone Campaign for the Arts and by OSU Friends of the Arts. The goal of SAC Presents is to bring well-known headliners, rising stars and unique, lesser known artists and ensembles to the community. The lineup of artists ranges from country music to jazz musicians, chamber music to rock, as well as visual artists, guest lecturers and special events.

Source: 

By Erin O’Shea Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

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Rachelle McCabe and Kathleen Dean Moore

Call to Life

Pianist Arthur Greene presents OSU lecture and concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. -- Pianist Arthur Greene will present a multimedia lecture and concert on Charles Ives’ Concord Sonata on Sunday, March 19, at Oregon State University.

The event is part of the Corvallis-OSU Piano International “Insights at the Piano” series, and the lecture-recital will explore the heights, depths and hidden beauties of the Concord Sonata. It will be at 4 p.m. in Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St.

Tickets are $10 in advance, or $15 at the door. Tickets are available online at corvallispiano.org or at Grass Roots Books and Music or Rice’s Pharmacy in Corvallis. Students ages 8-18 and all college students with valid identification are admitted free. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply and are valid for purchase of up to two $5 tickets at The LaSells Stewart Center starting one hour prior to the performance, with SNAP card.

Charles Ives’ Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass., 1840-1860, often referred to as the Concord Sonata, is a four-movement experimental work that Ives wrote as a personal response to the transcendentalism movement that was popularized during the early and mid-19th century.

The four sections of the work are named after and inspired by figures associated with transcendentalism: “I. Emerson” after Ralph Waldo Emerson; “II. Hawthorne” after Nathaniel Hawthorne; “III. The Alcotts” after Bronson and Louisa May Alcott; and “IV. Thoreau” after Henry David Thoreau.

The Concord Sonata explores a wide-ranging sound world filled with pithy musical quotations, including many references to Beethoven, a highly advanced rhythmic complexity and wild harmonies. The work calls for the use of a Concord Board, a wooden tool precisely 14.75 inches long, that the performer uses to depress the keyboard during the second movement, creating a tone cluster that is not physically possible to play using only the pianists’ hands.

Greene is a professor of piano at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre and Dance. He has performed with major orchestras around the world: The Philadelphia Orchestra; San Francisco Symphony; Utah Symphony; Washington D.C.’s National Symphony; the Tokyo Symphony; and the Czech National Symphony Orchestra. Greene is also a gold medal winner of the William Kapell and Gina Bachauer International Piano Competitions.

For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-758-0036, preferably at least one week in advance.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu