OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Celebrated memoirist Nick Flynn to read at OSU on Oct. 11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Writer Nick Flynn will read from his work on Friday, Oct. 11, at Oregon State University’s Valley Library rotunda. The free public event begins at 7:30 p.m. and will be followed by a question and answer session and book signing.

Flynn is the author of three memoirs including “The Reenactments” (2013), “The Ticking is the Bomb: A Memoir of Bewilderment” (2010) and “Another … Night in Suck City” (2004). Flynn is also the author of three books of poetry.

Of Flynn’s most recent memoir, “The Reenactments,”  Kirkus Reviews wrote: “Flynn’s determination to better understand his life through the act of writing and remembering has yielded a truly insightful, original work.” Clea Simon of The Boston Globe said Flynn’s writing is “always specific and honest” and “dryly funny.”

His award-winning memoir “Another … Night in Suck City” was turned into the movie “Being Flynn,” starring Robert De Niro and Paul Dano. That book recounted his unusual relationship with his alcoholic father and the suicide of his mother.

Flynn, 52, is a professor of poetry and married to actress Lili Taylor.

Flynn has been awarded fellowships from The Guggenheim Foundation, The Library of Congress, The Amy Lowell Trust, and The Fine Arts Work Center.

The Visiting Writers Series brings nationally-known writers to Oregon State University. The program is made possible by support from The Valley Library, OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817

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NickFlynn
Nick Flynn

Author Paul Bogard to read from his book on Oct. 9

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Paul Bogard, author of “The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light,” will read from his book on Wednesday, Oct. 9, at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library. The reading begins at 7 p.m. at the library, located at 645 N.W. Monroe Ave., Corvallis.

The event is sponsored by Oregon State University’s Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word and Friends of the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library.

In his book, Bogard examines the night and how people experience it, traveling to the Grand Canyon, Las Vegas, Walden Pond, and the Canary Islands to explore degrees of darkness. After talking to astronomers, lighting professionals, nurses, and other night-time workers, Bogard writes about the cultural, social and health implications of a night that’s getting brighter every minute, thanks in part to parking lot lights and streetlights.

Publishers Weekly wrote: “Even readers unable to tell Orion from the Big Dipper will find a new appreciation for the night sky after spending some time with this terrific book.”

A native of Minnesota, Bogard teaches creative nonfiction at James Madison University. He is also editor of the anthology “Let There Be Night: Testimony on Behalf of the Dark.” 

Source: 

Carly Lettero, 541-737-6198

Mammoth makes final touchdown in Reser Stadium end zone, construction reveals

CORVALLIS, Ore. – On Saturdays in the fall, cleats pound the turf at Reser Stadium at Oregon State University. But new evidence dug up during an expansion of the Valley Football Center has revealed that some much larger creatures once roamed this location more than 10,000 years ago.

Construction crews digging in the north end zone in Reser Stadium on Monday uncovered a large femur bone, likely from a mammoth. Further discovery revealed more bones from several extinct mammals.

“There are quite a few bones, and dozens of pieces,” said Loren Davis, an associate professor of anthropology at OSU who was called to the site after the initial discovery was made. "Some of the bones are not in very good shape, but some are actually quite well preserved."

There don’t appear to be any signs of human bones or artifacts at the site, Davis said. Further testing will be needed to determine the bones’ exact age.

The discovery of the ancient mammal bones is not unusual in the Willamette Valley, Davis said. The bones, including mammoth, bison and some kind of camel or horse, were discovered in a 10-foot deep plot in an area that could once have been a bog or marsh, Davis said.

 “Animals who were sick would often go to a body of water and die there, so it’s not unusual to find a group of bones like this,” Davis said. “We had all of these types of animals in the Willamette Valley back then.”

Crews are digging up a portion of the north end zone as part of the Valley Football Center expansion and renovation project. Work began after the fall football season ended and is slated for completion by the start of the 2016 home season.

A worker digging in the area made the initial discovery of the large femur bone and immediately stopped work in the area, said Tim Sissel, senior project manager for Hunt/Fortis, a joint venture, the general contractor on the project.

Company officials notified OSU officials, who brought in Davis and other experts to examine the bones and the site. Crews have moved to other areas of the construction project while Davis and others take a closer look at the find. The delay has been minimal so far, Sissel said.

The animals do not appear to have been killed, Davis said, and there is no other evidence of humans at the site. Since the find does not appear to involve humans or human artifacts, the bones are not considered part of an archaeological site, Davis said. Nonetheless, we can learn a great deal about what the ancient environment of the Willamette Valley was like from this discovery, he said.

The find does not appear to involve humans or human artifacts and there are no special rules or regulations in Oregon governing the preservation or protection of paleontology finds, Davis said.

In the short term, Davis plans to soak the discovered bones in water to prevent further deterioration, and hopes to send some out for carbon dating to determine more about their age. He and his students will also continue excavating a large pile of dirt pulled from the site, where more bones are believed to be buried.

“It’ll be a great learning experience for them, to learn how to identify extinct animal bones,” Davis said. “It’s really an amazing find.”

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

 

 

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Femur bone

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Loren Davis

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Nigel Poor to speak, exhibit work at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Renowned artist and photographer Nigel Poor will speak and exhibit work at Oregon State University as part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series.

Poor will speak about her experience teaching history of photography classes for the Prison University Project at California’s San Quentin State Prison at 7 p.m. on Feb. 10 in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. A reception will be held prior to the lecture at 6 p.m. The events are free and open to the public.

Poor’s work from the San Quentin Prison Report Archive Project will be on display in OSU’s Fairbanks Gallery from Feb. 8 through March 1. The exhibit consists of inkjet prints with handwritten text reflecting prisoners’ reactions to a variety of historical prison photographs.

Poor is an associate professor of photography at California State University, Sacramento. Since 2011, she has taught photo history at San Quentin. Her work with the inmates focuses on the various ways people leave behind evidence of their existence and how the U.S. manages crime, punishment and rehabilitation. She also produces a radio storytelling project called the San Quentin Prison Report Radio Project.

Poor’s work has been exhibited at the San Jose Museum of Art; the Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art; the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and the Haines Gallery in San Francisco. Her work is also featured in the collections of several museums and galleries.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

The School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to campus to interact with students so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar.

Media Contact: 
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Julia Bradshaw, julia.bradshaw@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-5014

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An example of work Nigel Poor does with inmates at San Quentin State Prison. Credit: Nigel Poor

Nigel Poor

No evidence that water birth poses harm to newborns, new OSU study finds

CORVALLIS, Ore. – There is no evidence that water births, where a baby is intentionally born under water in a tub or pool, poses any increased harm to the child, Oregon State University researchers have found.

Researchers examined outcome data for more than 6,500 midwife-attended water births in the United States and found that newborns born in water were no more likely to experience low Apgar scores, require transfer to the hospital after birth or be hospitalized in their first six weeks of life, than newborns who were not born in water.

The results were published this week in the Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health. The study is believed to be the largest study of water births to date and the first to examine the practice in the United States, said lead author, Marit Bovbjerg, an epidemiology instructor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at OSU. 

“The findings suggest that water birth is a reasonably safe, low-intervention option for women who face a low risk of complications during the birthing process,” Bovbjerg said. “These are decisions that should be made in concert with a medical professional.”

Co-authors of the study are Melissa Cheyney, a medical anthropologist and associate professor in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts, and Courtney Everson, a former OSU graduate student who recently completed her doctorate.

For the study, researchers analyzed birthing outcome data collected from 2004 through 2009 by the Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, commonly referred to as MANA Stats. Most of the nearly 17,000 women in the study were attended by Certified Professional Midwives, who provided detailed reports on their cases from their medical records.

More than 6,500 women in the database gave birth in water, either at home or in a free-standing birthing center. The outcomes in those births were compared to the outcomes for non-water births. The study compared only births at home or in a birthing center and not those in hospitals. 

The researchers found that babies born in water were no more likely to require transfer or admission to a hospital, nor were the mothers who gave birth in water. However, the researchers found an 11 percent increase in perineal tearing among mothers who gave birth in water.

“For some women, that potential risk of tearing might be worth taking if they feel they will benefit from other aspects of a water birth, such as improved pain management,” Bovbjerg said. “There is no one correct choice. The risks and benefits of different birthing options should be weighed carefully by each individual.” 

The researchers’ findings are congruent with outcomes reported in other water birth studies, Cheyney said, but are contrary to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ and the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee Opinion.

“Those groups support laboring in water, but caution against giving birth while immersed,” Cheyney said. “Our findings suggest that water birth is a reasonably safe option for low-risk women, especially when the risks associated with pharmacologic pain management, like epidural anesthesia, are considered.”

The researchers have shared their findings with a group that is developing a clinical bulletin designed to inform health care providers about the practice of water birth in both hospital and out-of-hospital settings.

Media Contact: 
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Melissa Cheyney, 541-737-4515, melissa.cheyney@oregonstate.edu; Marit Bovbjerg, 541-737-5313, Marit.Bovbjerg@oregonstate.edu

OSU Theatre to present the haunting tale 'Desdemona' Feb. 4-7

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present Paula Vogel’s haunting tale, “Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief,” on Feb. 4-7.

The play, a witty drama based on Shakespeare’s “Othello,” is directed by OSU Theatre Arts student Sam Zinsli. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. from Feb. 4-6, and at 2 p.m. on Feb. 7, in the OSU Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. 

The production continues the 2015-16 theater season, “All the World’s a Stage – Celebrating Shakespeare.”

“Desdemona” tells the story of three of Shakespeare’s most memorable female characters while exploring themes of sex, violence, love and trust. In the play, set on the island of Cyprus, Desdemona, Bianca, and Emilia share their hopes, frustrations, and fantasies as rivalries emerge and tender friendships are forged.

“Paula Vogel uses the familiar story of ‘Othello’ to address important topics like sexuality and gender roles for women in society,” said Zinsli.

The production features the work of OSU students Annie Parham as Desdemona, Bria Love Robertson as Bianca and Diana Jepsen as Emilia. 

Tickets are $8; $6 for seniors; $5 for students/youths; and $4 for OSU students. There is no reserved seating. Tickets can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ beginning Jan. 25, or by calling the Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784. For more information or for disability accommodations please contact the Theatre Box Office or visit http://bit.ly/1jdKUgy.

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OSU to host internationally-recognized printmaker Jan. 26-29

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Artemio Rodriguez, an award-winning artist, author and printmaker, is visiting Oregon State University as an artist in residence Jan. 26-29, as part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series. 

Rodriquez’ visit will include an artist’s talk on Thursday, Jan. 28, at 6 p.m., to be held in the Memorial Union, Room 13, on the Corvallis campus. A reception will follow the talk, and the event is free and open to the public.

During his time at OSU, Rodriguez will work with printmaking students to create an edition of an original relief print. The print will be one of three offered for purchase at an event in mid-May to honor and raise money for the art department’s Norma Seibert Printmaking Scholarship.

Rodriguez has worked in a variety of mediums, but is best known for his linocut prints, some of which are now part of distinguished collections at the Hammer Museum, the San Diego Art Museum, the Seattle Art Museum, Phoenix Art Museum and others.

A native of Michoacán, Mexico, Rodriguez migrated to the U.S. in 1994. He received recognition from the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs as an emerging artist and subsequently as an established artist.

After several years of working in the Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay areas of California, he opened a print shop near downtown Los Angeles, which he still owns. He recently returned to Mexico to live in Pátzcuaro, in his native state of Michoacán, where he founded a printing press, teaches his printmaking methods to Mexican artists, and co-owns a gallery.

Rodriguez is the author of several books, including “Posada,” “One Hundred-Fifty Years,” “American Dream,” and “Loteria Kind of Things.” He was awarded a grant from Creative Capital, a U.S.-based organization that provides financial support to artists pursuing adventurous projects in various disciplines.

Media Contact: 
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Yuji Hiratsuka, 541-737-5006, yhiratsuka@oregonstate.edu

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Evil Forest

Evil Forest

Triumph

Triumph

Journalist and novelist Héctor Tobar to read Jan. 15 at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Novelist and journalist Héctor Tobar will read at Oregon State University on Friday, Jan. 15.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library Rotunda, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow. 

Tobar is the author of “Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine and the Miracle that Set Them Free.” The book chronicles an official account of the 2010 Copiapó mining accident. The 33 miners chose Tobar to write a single history of the event and the book was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in General Nonfiction.

The Boston Globe said of the book: “Héctor Tobar’s masterful re-creation of the 2010 San José Mine collapse shows 33 ordinary men challenged to pull together as dire circumstances and diverse personalities pull them apart.”

Tobar is a longtime journalist who has worked for The New Yorker, LA Weekly, and in multiple positions at the Los Angeles Times, where he wrote hundreds of articles and contributed to the newspaper's Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the 1992 Los Angeles riots.

His other novels include “The Tattooed Soldier” (1998) and “The Barbarian Nurseries” (2011), which was named a New York Times Notable Book for 2011 and won the 2012 California Book Award gold medal for fiction. His nonfiction work in 2005 includes “Translation Nation: Defining a New American Identity in the Spanish-Speaking United States.”

In 2006, Tobar was named one of the 100 Most Influential Hispanics in the United States by Hispanic Business magazine. He earned a master of fine arts in fiction at University of California, Irvine, and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Oregon.

The reading is part of the 2015-2016 Literary Northwest Series, sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU and is made possible with support from the OSU Libraries and Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

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Héctor Tobar

Hector Tobar

OSU's Fairbanks Gallery to exhibit 'VČELA: Blood & Honey'

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “VČELA: Blood & Honey,” an exhibit of sculpture, installation and language by artist Craig Goodworth, opens on Monday, Jan. 11, in the Fairbanks Gallery on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis.

A reception and artist’s talk will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 14. The event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit draws from the forests of the Willamette Valley and central Europe as well as village folklore and ecological concern. With elements of sculpture, installation and poetry/performance, Goodworth connects to place, memory, object and land. The exhibit is the result of his research and art practice, and explores such questions as art’s role in helping one feel physically connected to land, and how aesthetics can witness to crises that arise in the natural world.

The exhibit includes nine bronze casts from a decayed bee box that Goodworth collected in the Slovak Republic near the Hungarian border. Apiology, or the study of bees, is both an historic tradition of work and fare, and a contemporary icon for crisis in the natural world. The nine bee frames were cast directly, burning out the original forms, at the Bratislava Academy of Fine Art and Design in the summer of 2015. They are part of a larger project, titled “Blood and Honey,” that addresses ancestry and land.  

Goodworth began drawing individual honeybees in the spring of 2013 in his home in the Chehalem Valley of Oregon. In a previous installation, Goodworth used 90 individual bee drawings. This more recent exhibit expands on the subject. In “VČELA: Blood & Honey,” he has compiled an even larger drawing, expanding it to wrap around the gallery and crossing the boundary from the paper on the wall to the walls themselves.

Accompanying the works are poems Goodworth wrote in 2014 and 2015 while he was living in Oregon’s Willamette Valley and in the foothills of Europe’s Carpathian Mountains.  

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public. The exhibit concludes on Feb. 2.

Source: 

Doug Russell, 541-737-5009, drussell@oregonstate.edu

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Včela Study #33, graphite and resin on paper

Včela Study #33,

Joan Didion biographer Tracy Daugherty to discuss his work Dec. 2 at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host a conversation with Joan Didion biographer and OSU Professor emeritus Tracy Daugherty at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 2, at the CH2M HILL Alumni Center.

Daugherty’s latest book, “The Last Love Song,” is a biography of American author and journalist Didion. The book, which was published in August by St. Martin’s Press, debuted at No. 11 on the New York Times best-seller list for hardcover nonfiction.

“The Last Love Song,” is the first printed biography about the reclusive Didion, a narrative that traces her life from her youth in Sacramento to her marriage and partnership with her late husband, writer John Gregory Dunne, and beyond.

Keith Scribner, an author and professor in the School of Writing, Literature and Film in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts, will interview Daugherty about his work at the event, which is free and open to the public. Refreshments and a book signing will follow.

Daugherty is a professor emeritus of English and creative writing at OSU, where he helped found the Masters of Fine Arts program in creative writing. He is the author of four novels, five short story collections, a book of personal essays and three literary biographies. “Hiding Man,” his biography of Donald Barthelme, was a New York Times and New Yorker notable Book of the Year. 

His first collection of literary essays, “Let Us Build Us a City,” will be published by the University of Georgia Press in 2016. He recently completed several new short stories and novellas and has begun research on a new biography.

The event is being presented by the OSU Foundation. The Alumni Center is located at 725 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

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University Events, 541-737-4717, events@oregonstate.edu

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Tracy Daugherty

Tracy Daugherty