Event Planning Guide

At Oregon State University faculty and staff may be asked to plan a variety of events from small dinners to large receptions, as well as meetings, lectures and other celebrations. The talent, energy, and vision of the individuals in your unit have the ability to create events that contribute to the development of OSU as an inclusive and collaborative community. The participation in planning events are growth enhancing opportunities for individuals to develop skills in time management, team building, leadership, resource management and community building.

While navigating the links and information you will find elements that may or may not pertain to your event. Survey them all and select the ones that apply to you and your situation. Keep in mind that it is only a resource; the success of the event is dependent upon you and your organization.

Congratulations on undertaking the process of planning an event and for providing an opportunity for engagement and growth on the OSU campus.

This manual includes information on:

If you are aware of additional information and resources that should be posted here, please send an e-mail to University Events with "Event Guide" in the subject line. Thank you!

Creating an Event Plan

When hosting an event, developing a plan will allow you to move forward in an organized fashion and create an environment for success.

 

There are six steps to developing Event Plan:

1. Organization and Community Assessment
2. Goal Setting
3. Planning
4. Implementation
5. Post Event Assessment
6. Administrative Decision Making

Step 1: Organization and Community Assessment

If you are planning an 'open to the public' event, consider the elements below. If you are planning a private 'invitation only' event, these elements may not apply.

Current Operations- Determine what activities and programs are already in place and serving the needs of the community

Will your efforts be duplicating or contradicting existing programs?

Have your previous activities/events met the goals of your organization, furthered your mission and the mission of the University?

Need- Is there a need for an event? If a need exists, what type of event would best suit the need?

Brainstorm with your organization

Discuss your goals and mission with faculty, administration, and community leaders as needed. What activities/events would they suggest/support? Use both obtrusive measures (asking stakeholders to supply program ideas) and unobtrusive measures (such as consulting with student groups, faculty, other units, or community leaders).

Institutional Environment- Consider the institutional mission, history, and political climate and views of significant campus decision makers.

Are you providing a perspective of an issue that may be viewed as controversial? If so how are you creating a welcoming environment for the university community as you move forward?

Resources- Determine the availability and skill levels of your organization leaders, members and volunteers; anticipated costs, potential funding sources, and availability of money; available resources such as space, furnishings, equipment, and services.

How many individuals will support the development of the project (who will help you plan and coordinate details)? Are they skilled in the areas that will allow successful completion of the project?

What are the anticipated costs and what are "free" resources? Investigate the large items (performers, space, food, etc.); estimate the small items (marketing, decorations, etc)?

What funds are currently available?

Who can we target for additional funding resources?

What environment do you want to create?

Are the expenses reasonable? Estimated Cost per person?

What facility will accommodate your event?

What resources are available (such as space, furnishings, equipment, and services)?

What support services do you need?

Once your organization answers these questions, check back periodically to see how your event plan plays out.

Setting goals for your event

When hosting an event, developing a plan will allow you to move forward in an organized fashion and create an environment for success.

 

There are six steps to developing Event Plan:

1. Organization and Community Assessment
2. Goal Setting
3. Planning
4. Implementation
5. Post Event Assessment
6. Administrative Decision Making

Step 2: Goal Setting

Target Population- Identify who the program is intended for and take steps accordingly to be appropriately inclusive or restrictive in planning.

What types of marketing will grab the attention of your target audience?

What marketing strategies will get them through the door?

Desired Outcomes/Objectives- Be clear about what you expect to accomplish and what you plan to achieve. Indicate for whom and under what conditions the outcomes should occur. Since broad-based goals are difficult to evaluate, set specific, measurable objectives.

Is there an educational component of your activity?

Is community building intended?

Is this a recruitment activity for your organization?

How will you measure if your goals were achieved?

Brainstorm ideas with your organization- at this stage all ideas are good ideas. Start by asking these questions:

What types of activities will allow you to meet your goals?

What scope of activity can your existing resources support?

What is your organization committed to moving forward?

Explore the idea of partnerships - Our campus is big, but many groups have the same goals. Partnering with others can share the work load or get more mileage out of the work that you do.

Is there a donor component to your event? Check with your development director or the OSU Foundation to see if there are current or prospective donors who may be interested in the activity that you are planning.

Would Alumni attend your event? Check in with the Alumni Association to see if your event is a candidate for their event calendar. They also have the ability to e-mail Alumni within the area to promote your activity. To explore these options, and others such as co-sponsoring or on site event support from the Alumni Association, please contact Julie Schwartz.

Think of others who might be interested in your activity and talk to them about it. They may have some great ideas, and you might end up with some new connections that will be helpful to you on other projects as a bonus!

Planning for the event

When hosting an event, developing a plan will allow you to move forward in an organized fashion and create an environment for success.

 

There are six steps to developing Event Plan:

1. Organization and Community Assessment
2. Goal Setting
3. Planning
4. Implementation
5. Post Event Assessment
6. Administrative Decision Making

Step 3: Planning

Planning team- Establish a small but effective working group with a broad range of skills that is able to function as a team. The team must include members of the target population or others affected by the program, particularly if the target group is not a mainstream group. Brainstorm for the event:

What are the major components of your event? Establish an event committee and then create a sub-committee for each component.

What role will your stakeholder(s) play? Remember organizations Presidents are responsible for the wellness of the organization. This does not mean the management of events.

Establish an Event Coordinator position for this project, this will allow the stakeholders to participate in the program instead of managing it.

Approach- Consider your target population and consider how the group learns, what media is available, what delivery system will be most effective, and whether to use convergent thinking to focus the planning group or a divergent approach to consider different learning styles.

How will the planning committee develop an environment to achieve the goals?

How will the planning committee be organized for success?

Initial Extent of the Program- Determine the initial scope of the program: one hour, multiple hours, multiple days, simple or complex (a speaker or a dinner, dance and speaker), etc.

What type of program will allow you to meet your goals?

What scope of activity can your existing resources support?

Does the identified venue (location) allow you to capitalize on seating capacity?

What is your planning committee committed to moving forward?

Training- Compare the skills and abilities of the committee members against the tasks to be performed to determine what training is required. Build in enough time to allow skill development, including training the trainers if appropriate.

What committee members are best suited for what tasks?

Do you need to allow extra time to get your/the committee prepared to move this activity forward?

Time line- Determine a target date and work backward to establish a realistic, week-by-week activity plan. Select a date and time most conducive to the target populations needs and circumstances. Avoid conflicting with major traditional activities, academic events like final exams, religious holy days or other special events observed by different members of the campus community.

How many weeks are there between now and your event? Is their realistically enough time to plan the event?

Have each sub-committee create a backwards time-line for their activities. Use this as a touchstone to track the planning progress.

Budget- Determine the actual fiscal resources necessary to complete the program, including all costs for personnel, materials, space, marketing, food, transportation, equipment, etc.

Does your current available budget cover these costs?

Do you need to identify a plan to generate more money?

Will you be selling tickets? If so what will the cost need to be? Or will the tickets be free of cost?

Implementing the plan

When hosting an event, developing a plan will allow you to move forward in an organized fashion and create an environment for success.

 

There are six steps to developing Event Plan:

1. Organization and Community Assessment
2. Goal Setting
3. Planning
4. Implementation
5. Post Event Assessment
6. Administrative Decision Making

Step 4: Implementation

Responsibilities- Delegate tasks and responsibilities, identifying clear lines of accountability, reporting relationships, and deadlines.

Be realistic about task load.

Keep in mind available amount of time.

Allow people to identify others to support the work.

Listen when someone says that he/she is swamped. Identify others to help.

Do not let things slip through the cracks and become a crisis.

Be proactive.

Publicity- Catch the attention of your target group and make them want to seek more information. Use a variety of media and techniques. It may not be so much advertising the event as highlighting your organization. Involve members of the targeted group in designing the campaign.

Has your event historically been a sell out? If so, plan to end your advertising of the event within a day or two of tickets becoming available. Always include the ticket sale location, cost and availability in your marketing. Advertise ticket sales a minimum of one week in advance of the tickets becoming available.

Remember to include an ADA statement in all of your marketing. 'For accommodations related to accessibility contact,___________ by ________.'

If you wish to use photography of people in any way make sure to complete a photo release form (Word Document) for each person featured.

Location- The location of the program and your knowledge of it is critical to the success of your program. Take into consideration the traffic flow, available square footage, possible set-up configurations, lighting, access, parking, technology and equipment.

Set a meeting with the facility staff early in the planning process. Tell your event story; allow them to tell you what is possible. With enough time, and bit of money, almost anything is possible.

Set specific times to meet with the facility staff throughout the planning process.

Communicate all needs and changes well in advance of the event.

Document all of your interactions; follow up all conversations with an email outlining your perceived agreements.

Equipment- Be certain adequate amounts of all needed materials are on hand and in good working order. If a trained technician is required to operate a device, be sure to schedule that person.

Check all equipment prior to the beginning of your event! Do not assume that anything works.

Be certain to get specific equipment needs for all performers prior to the event day. How many microphones, amp and voltage requirements, what type of lighting, etc.

Evaluation- Collect evaluative responses from participants. Solicit both process evaluations, on how well the planning and implementation went, and product evaluations, on the elements contained in the program itself. Use a variety of media for evaluation: face-to-face interviews, written forms, telephone calls, suggestion cards.

These are the first four steps in creating a comprehensive event plan. Organizations that take the time and make the effort to move forward in this way will have a comprehensive guide outlining the good work of the organization and an opportunity to raise the bar of success of their events.

Evaluating the success of your event

When hosting an event, developing a plan will allow you to move forward in an organized fashion and create an environment for success.

 

There are six steps to developing Event Plan:

1. Organization and Community Assessment
2. Goal Setting
3. Planning
4. Implementation
5. Post Event Assessment
6. Administrative Decision Making

Step 5: Post Event Assessment

Analysis- Create tools to determine if the program planning and program met intended goals.

Provide program participants the opportunity to submit an evaluation on the event. Ask for feedback on all of the components of the event.

Follow up with all service providers to evaluate the services provided, what worked---what did not work.

Review evaluation data and relate the information to program goals, objectives, and anticipated outcomes. Prepare a report applicable to future programs.

Recognition and Rewards- Identify individuals and groups who contributed significantly to the success of the program, including program planners, participants and sponsors to publicly acknowledge and celebrate their roles.

Within two weeks of the close of the event follow up with appreciation by e-mail, cards, Barometer, etc.

Unexpected Outcomes- Identify activities or events that were not part of the original plan and determine whether they impeded or enhanced the program.

Fiscal Evaluation- Determine how well actual expenses matched anticipated costs for each program component, Identify unusual factors that may account for any change. Document all cost.

Programmers reactions- Collect evaluative data from program planners, including suggestions for potential changes. Ask about both process and product.

Have the members of the planning committee identify the strengths and weaknesses of the process and product, and what, if any, skills and abilities they further developed.

Ecological Impact- Make sure the success of the program did not come at the expense of some element of the campus environment. Determine the impact of the program on the campus community as a whole, on other programs, on physical space and its use, on non-targeted segments of the population, and on the mission and goals of the institution.

Community Building- View the program in terms of its effect on efforts to develop positive relationships among all segments of the campus community and with the larger community surrounding the campus.

Program modifications- Use all of the evaluation data to identify suggestions for program modifications. Make appropriate recommendations; even small changes can often bring a program closer to its stated goals and objectives.

Showing appreciation for the groups and individuals who helped to make your event a success builds good relations for future projects that you do. DO NOT skip the step of showing gratitude for others, no matter how busy life gets or how tired you are after the event.

What to do now that the event is over

When hosting an event, developing a plan will allow you to move forward in an organized fashion and create an environment for success.

 

There are six steps to developing Event Plan:

1. Organization and Community Assessment
2. Goal Setting
3. Planning
4. Implementation
5. Post Event Assessment
6. Administrative Decision Making

 

Step 6: Administrative Decision Making

Future plans- After examining all the information compiled in the post assessment step decide on one of three actions for the future: modification, abandonment, or continuation.

If you are committed to contining the program, support the next team of event planners by securing a possible location for the next event. All OSU event venues can be reserved one year in advance of the event date.

Create a document to pass on to the next coordinator or to jog your memory for the next time you produce this event. Do this before too much time passes so you can note details and suggestions for improvement.

Event Committee

Strategically organizing the planning will enable sanity to exist throughout the process. Organizations that are committed to event planning create positions that are focused on and dedicated to event planning. Some things to remember:

The Event Chair is responsible for:

The Event Committee is made up of the Event Chair, Sub-Committee Chairs, and interested organization and community members. They are responsible for:

When assigning committee responsibilities take into account:

It is okay to have:

It is not okay to have:

Learn about each sub-committee and their responsibilities.

Program Sub Committee

The program is the heart of an event. The program content will allow the event goals to be met as well as communicate the theme. A program can focus on one performance, or it can incorporate many different performances and media presentations.

What components will be used in the program will be suggested by the program committee and determined by the event committee. It is the job of the program committee to identify and secure what is needed.

 

When determining the program, these items should be taken into consideration:

  • Audience- who will be participating. Keep presentation relevant and interesting to the audience
  • Venue- where the event is located often dictates possibilities for the program
  • Event theme/goals- the program content must be in alignment with the overall event theme and goals
  • Available money- what resources can be made available to fund/create the program
  • Available time- how long is the actual program component of the event
  • Committees available time- to secure/create the program
  • Technical support- for media development

 

The Chair of the Program sub committee is responsible for:

  • Convening a committee
  • Setting meeting times, rehearsal times, and agendas
  • Supporting the development of a program plan
  • Communicating the program plan to the Event committee
  • Identifying needed human and monetary resources
  • Creating a planning time line
  • Assigning task to committee members
  • Coordinating performer contracts and program budget
  • Communicating all technical needs to facility at facility meeting
  • Coordinating rehearsals and stage management
  • Welcoming all performers
  • Trouble shooting during program
  • Leading an evaluation after the event
  • Thanking all of the participants

 

The Program Committee is responsible for:

  • Creating a program plan
  • Contacting/Contracting with performers
  • Creating/Accessing all needed media
  • Creating a performance schedule/script
  • Work with Event committee to develop guest program
  • Identify and communicate all technical needs
  • Be stage hands, MCs, stage managers
  • Host Green Room

Program Planning Priorities Check List

Program Committee Priorities

  • ___ Develop goals for entertainment
  • ___ Choose a Director of Entertainment and Programming (see previous page for specific duties)
  • ___ Develop a budget for committee
  • ___ Establish and create a backwards timeline for program planning
  • ___ Brainstorm possibilities of entertainment
  • ___ Present ideas to Event Committee
  • ___ Contact all performers, assess needs
  • ___ Meet with facility staff
    • Determine room set-up
    • Determine light and sound needs
    • Determine equipment needs
    • Determine door control, security, and other personal needs
  • ___ Complete contracts for all performers
  • ___ Arrange for payment to performer (Purchase request)
  • ___ Script the entire performance
    • What will be the sequence of events?
    • Will you have MCs? How will they participate?
    • How will light and sound play a part?
    • Prepare a written script for the stage managers, light and sound operators
  • ___ Plan logistics, and assign tasks for event night
    • Who will be there, when?
    • Who will greet the performers?
    • Who will keep the show moving along?
    • Where will the performers dress?
    • Will you be providing food for the performers?
  • ___ Rehearsal

 

Day of the Event Priorities List

  • ___ Meet with the Event Coordinator
  • ___ Map out the Day
  • ___ Troubleshoot
  • ___ Confirm arrival of Entertainers
  • ___ Confirm light and sound are set

Funding Sub Committee

Identifying what you will need to support the goals and theme of your event is critical to the success of the event. Most organizations have an event budget. Your event may need only this amount or you may identify the need for more money.

Here are some things to consider:

  • Your current budget is only a starting place
  • Other sources of funding are available if you are willing to do the work to get it
  • You can charge an admission fee to cover additional expenses for your event

The Chair of the Funding sub-committee is responsible for:

  • Advising the Event Committee and sub-committees on available funds and process
  • Creating a Funding Plan/Budget
  • Signing off on all funding plans in advance of any expenditure with the Event Chair
  • Setting time-line for purchases and paperwork submission for all committees
  • Creating Purchase Requests
  • Tracking all expenditures
  • Evaluating the Funding Plan
  • Thanking all of the participants

The Funding sub-committee is made up of the Event Chair, Sub-Committee Chairs, and the Organization Treasurer. They are responsible for:

  • Creating and agreeing on comprehensive funding plan inclusive of all the estimated expenses of the sub-committees
  • Determining how to solicit/raise additional funds if needed
  • Setting ticket cost and process
  • Reporting ticket information to Marketing sub-committee
  • Monitoring expenses in each sub-committee and reporting any overages or shortages

Decorating Sub Committee

Other sub-committees and their responsibilities:

Decorations create the environment for the event. The environment can convey culture, mood, or an attitude, and is instrumental in meeting goals and communicating the theme. Table center- pieces, serving line set-up, back drops and stage decorations all add to the environment.

When determining the Decoration plan, these items should be taken into consideration:

  • Stage Set-up
  • Food Area Set-up
  • Colors
  • Costumes
  • Lighting
  • Room capabilities and limitations

The Chair of the Decorations sub-committee is responsible for:

  • Convening a committee
  • Setting meeting times and agendas
  • Supporting the development of a Decorating plan
  • Communicating the Decorating plan to the Event Committee
  • Identifying needed human and monetary resources
  • Creating a planning and decorations time line
  • Assigning tasks to committee members
  • Communicating with the Facility
  • Schedule preparation and decorating times
  • Communicating the need of volunteers to Volunteer Committee Chair
  • Overseeing the prep and decorating
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the Decorating plan
  • Thanking all of the participants

The Committee is responsible for:

  • Creating a Decorating Plan
  • Identifying needed supplies
  • Identifying where products can be purchased
  • Purchasing products
  • Making, building, creating decorations
  • Decorating
  • Clean-up after event
  • Securing reusable decorations

Volunteer Sub Committee

Other sub-committees and their responsibilities:

Volunteers are critical to the success of an event. By supporting the work of the food, program, decorating and marketing sub-committees volunteers help complete the committee’s workforce.
Some things to consider:

  • Volunteers are future members and leaders
  • Volunteers expect to do things, let them
  • Communication is key to success

The Chair of the Volunteer sub-committee is responsible for:

  • Convening a committee
  • Setting meeting times and agendas
  • Supporting the volunteer needs of other sub-committees
  • Communicating the Volunteer plan to the Event Committee
  • Identifying needed human resources
  • Creating a volunteer committee time line
  • Assigning tasks to volunteers
  • Scheduling volunteer times
  • Confirming volunteer times with volunteers and committee chairs
  • Send a reminder the day prior to the scheduled activity
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the Volunteer plan
  • Thanking all of the participants

The Committee may support:

  • Decorating
  • Set-up
  • Kitchen production and Serving (if not handled by the caterer)
  • Venue clean up
  • Kitchen clean up
  • Booth staffing

Food Sub Committee

Other sub-committees and their responsibilities:

Food has an international language of its own, an invaluable tool to meeting event goals, and is easily tied into any theme. Food can help convey culture and celebration, be a means for attracting participants or a way to provide sustenance. The food committee can choose to self-cater an event through the OSU Cultural Meal Support Program or hire an approved caterer. When determining how to move forward a food event consider these things:

  • The types of food desired, and a caterers ability to create authentic food
  • The groups ability to plan, produce and serve the meal
  • Theme and Goal of the organization and program
  • Skill level of committee members
  • Available funds
  • Available time before the event
  • Availability of raw food products

The Chair of the Food sub-committee is responsible for:

  • Convening a committee
  • Setting meeting times and agendas
  • Supporting the development of a Food plan; menu, recipes, production schedule, serving plan, clean up plan and coordinating with the efforts of the caterer
  • Communicating the Food plan to the Event Committee
  • Identifying needed human and monetary resources
  • Creating a planning, production and serving time line
  • Assigning tasks to committee members
  • Communicating with Student Involvement or OSU Catering
  • Schedule production and serving times
  • Communicating the need of volunteers to Volunteer Committee Chair
  • Overseeing the production and serving of the food
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the Food plan
  • Thanking all of the participants

The Committee is responsible for:

  • Creating a Food plan, that includes menu, recipes, production and serving plans
  • Developing grocery list or placing catering order
  • Grocery shopping
  • Production (prep, completion, packaging, transport)
  • Serving- set up, signage, training, portion control, serving
  • Serving area and kitchen clean-up

 

NOTE: Pepsi has "pouring rights" on OSU Campus. Any soft drinks served should be from the Pepsi family. Questions regarding Pouring Rights should be directed to Business Services 737-3102.

Marketing Sub Committee

Other sub-committees and their responsibilities:

A well-developed Marketing plan will create a buzz about the event and your organization. The culture/environment of OSU, the history of the event, a small display in the Barometer and word of mouth will fill the seats. A good buzz will increase member moral, build membership and allow the OSU community to celebrate the work that you do.

When determining the Marketing Plan, these items should be taken into consideration:

  • Theme and Goal of the organization and program
  • Skill level of committee members
  • Available money
  • Available time before the event
  • Various Marketing techniques; print ads, flyers, posters, press releases, activities
  • Headline performers
  • History of the event

The Chair of the Marketing sub-committee is responsible for:

  • Convening a committee
  • Setting meeting times and agendas
  • Supporting the development of a Marketing plan
  • Communicating the Marketing plan to the Event committee
  • Identifying needed human and monetary resources
  • Creating a planning timeline
  • Assigning tasks to committee members
  • Proof-reading all materials with the Event Coordinator
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the Marketing plan
  • Thanking all of the participants

The Committee is responsible for:

  • Creating a Marketing plan
  • Reserving bulletin boards, table tent locations
  • Creating flyers, posters, tickets
  • Writing press releases
  • Arranging for interviews by news reporters, prior to and day of event
  • Including ticket information on all advertising
  • Hanging posters on campus and the surrounding community
  • Documenting activities day of event

Publicity Tips for Marketing
It is impossible to have a successful program without an audience, and it is also impossible to have a successful organization without new members. Your advertising should get peoples attention, draw them in and keep their interest. There are a lot of ways to do that.

The best way to begin is to form a publicity committee or choose a publicity coordinator.

First, prepare a budget. How much money do you have to spend? Make sure you get estimates that are accurate as possible for all of your publicity needs. Don’t forget hidden costs like printing costs of flyers or mailing press releases. Once you have completed the budget and you have determined how you would like to spend your money, it is time to think about some more specifics.

Timing is everything. When you are working with radio, TV, newspapers or other publications, they will have deadlines that you need to follow. To display ads in newspapers, including the Barometer, usually you have a deadline of three or four days prior to the event. Make a calendar going backwards from your event date to determine when it would be best to start your media campaign.

Who is your audience? It is important to determine what populations will be most interested in your event and to target your advertising to those groups. If your target group is students your advertising will be very different than if you are targeting the community.

TYPES OF ADVERTISING

1. Word of Mouth- the cheapest and best form of advertising. Get the word out about your event. Talk to people. Do class raps (contact professors of large classes with subjects that might have an obvious audience and ask them if you can make an announcement in their class).
2. Display advertisements and posters/flyers- fun graphics and attractive presentation will attract people to read your posters and ads. Make sure you do not forget to include the basics. If you have a logo for your organization or for the event, be consistent and use it on all your display ads. Posters should be hung all around campus and in the windows of local businesses. It is important to ask permission of either the business owner, or someone in a campus building before you hang your poster or it may be removed.

Publicity

Develop goals for publicity with the other members of the event planning team. Consider working with University Marketing to design your look and delegate some of these responsibilities.

Who is your target audience?  Your top priority is to get the message about your event to this group.  Think about where they look for information and make sure your activity is represented there when possible.

Develop the advertising budget:

Decide which media(s) you will use for publicity:

Create an information page including:


Using the OSU Logo

Putting your plan into action

Publicity Priorities

Form Publicity Committee to decide on:

  • Theme
  • Graphic image
  • Target audience

Recommended 10 weeks before event:

  • Reserve:
    • Display cases
    • Bulletin boards
    • Easels
    • Counters
  • Place your event on the OSU Calendar

Recommended 5 weeks before event:

  • Develop drafts and details of:
    • Print designs
    • Posters
    • Display ads
    • Fliers
    • Send notices to news "calendars"

Recommended 4 weeks before event:

  • Order and pay for Newspaper ads
  • Begin running classified ads
  • Submit your event announcement to OSU Today
  • Order posters (OSU Printing and Mailing)
  • Send press releases to newspapers
  • Produce all materials

Recommended 3 weeks before event:

  • Pick up ordered fliers, posters etc. and begin distribution
  • Combine publicity with ticket sales

Recommended 2 weeks before event:

  • Put up displays
  • Run display ad
  • Run public service announcements
  • Run ad on Channel 26

Recommended 1 week before event:

  • Begin special promotions
  • Hand out fliers around campus
  • Call newspapers to see if they will cover event

Recommended the day before event

  • Do special promotion activity to run through event day

Day of Event!

  • Make sure that people know WHERE your event is held
  • Signs or balloons or arrows or anything that points to your event location will be helpful.

Good publicity can make the difference between a mediocre event and a SUCCESSFUL event!

 

Distribute Press Information Page to stakeholders and media groups as needed:

  • Bring a picture from last year's event or from something that your group has done-the more colorful, the better.
  • If appropriate, supply information to be posted on the info screens at the LaSells Stewart Center and MU
  • You can fax the press release to KBVR-TV Channel 26 (7-7957), Barometer (7-4999), and OSU News and Communication (7-2130).
  • Write a public service announcement for KBVR-FM and deliver - send to other radio stations in the community. For guidance in writing your public service announcement you can view the PSA form (Word Document) and PSA submission guidelines and samples (Word Document).

Making arrangements for printing of publicity: 

Publicity Tips

It is impossible to have a successful program without an audience. So ADVERTISE! Your advertising should get people's attention, draw them in and keep their interest. There are a lot of ways to do it, some free and some will cost money. There's no doubt that you will use a little of both. The best way to begin is to form a publicity committee or choose a publicity coordinator.

First, prepare a budget. How much money do you have to spend? Make sure you get estimates that are as accurate as possible for all your publicity needs. Don't forget hidden costs like printing costs of fliers or mailing press release.

Timing is everything. When you are working with radio, TV, newspapers or other publications, they will have deadlines that you need to follow. If you want a free public service announcement, you will usually need to contact the radio/TV stations early. Display ads in newspapers, including The Barometer, usually have a deadline of three or four days prior to the event. Make a calendar going backwards from your event date to determine when it would be best to start your media campaign.

Who is your audience? It's important to determine what populations will be most interested in your event and to target your advertising to those groups. If your target group is students, your advertising will be very different than if you are targeting the Corvallis community.

Types of Advertising

  • Word of Mouth - The cheapest and best form of advertising. Get the word out about your event. Talk to people. Do class raps - contact professors of large classes or classes with subjects that might have an obvious audience (i.e. the Women's Center might go to a Women Studies class) and ask them if you can make an announcement in their class. If they say OK, schedule a time with them and MAKE SURE someone from your group shows up! It's important that everyone in your group knows the details of the event so they can talk about it to anyone they might meet.
  • Display advertisements and posters/fliers - Fun graphics and attractive presentation will attract people to read your posters and ads. Make sure you don't forget to include the basics (who, what, when, where). If you have a logo for your organization or for the event, be consistent and use it on all your display ads. Posters should be hung all around campus and in the windows of local businesses. It's important to ask permission of either the business owner, or someone in a campus building, before you hang your poster or it may be removed.
  • Table Tents - Like a mini poster, these billboards are a great way to get the word out. There are 20 tables on the MU Concourse, 65 spots on the Commons (because MU suggests placing on every other table in this area) and Buenos Burritos location has 32 tables. Contact the MU at 737-2650 to reserve the tables for your promotion. It is your responsibility to place the items, and refresh occasionally as the MU staff must trow away any pomotion pieces that end up on the floor. Consider printing 150 to cover all the above mentioned areas including refreshing. Arrangements can also be made to display table tents at the dining halls. Each Hall's Dining Manager must be contacted individually to make arrangements. Arnold: 737-2262, McNary 737-1004, and Marketplace West: 737-2100.
  • Online calendars and outreach (excel document) - Posting your event on online calendars can help you reach your target audience where they look for information.  Many options are availabe at no cost!  If you know of an online outreach method that is not listed on this document, please let University Events know.  New ones are appearing every day.
  • Sidewalk stickers - these have become a more frequent sight on our campus, but still new enough that they are very eyecatching.  R3 Engraving & Signs has printed several of them, and other printers are also capable of providing this product.  Make sure to complete the Temporary Sign Request form, and receive approval before ordering your product.  Stickers may be installed up to three weeks before the start of the event and must be removed no more than three days after the event.

OSU News and Research Communication Services

News and Communication Services is OSU's connection to the local, regional and national news media. We work with journalist from newspapers, radio, television, and magazines to obtain the best coverage for Oregon State.

This includes:

  • Daily dissemination of news releases about OSU programs, research, events, and student activities
  • Helping journalists identify and contact OSU faculty who could serve as expert sources for their news coverage
  • The production of the OSU Faculty Resource Guide, other specialty publications, the weekly faculty and staff newsletter, OSU This Week, and the daily e-letter OSU Today
  • Distribution of press releases and contact information via the Web and other electronic means

Please contact us, we're here to help:

Visit the News and Research Communications web site.

Getting the word out

In Corvallis and across the state
Getting the word out about your events has come along way from print media being your only option.  Check out our list for online calendars and outreach (excel document).  Select the location and audience that you would like to target before starting your outreach.

Consider paid media to promote your event.  Check out the rate cheat sheet (word document) to get some ballpark ideas for how much it costs to run an advertisement in print.

 

Student Organization and Residence Hall Mailbox Distribution
Interested in distributing information about a recognized student organization's or university-sponsored event to other student organizations with mailboxes on campus? It is easy.. just follow this list by preparing enough copies of the information for each location, and then distribute accordingly.

NOTE: No fundraising solicitation can be sent through campus mail, no commercial mailings - this should be only for recognized student organization events or university sponsored events.

Greek System (MU 016)

  • 42 mailboxes- drop off 42 copies to the Greek Life Office.

Memorial Union Program Council (MUPC)

  • Hundreds, but only about 50 are active... Drop off 50 copies at the main desk.

Display options at Dining Centers
Reserve Dinning Center locations for the following media at UHDS in Poling with Debbie Kuehn (7-3477) at beginning of year or term:

  • Table tents
  • Display cases
  • Easels

UHDS Residence Halls and Cooperative Houses

Prepare each set of copies according to Hall name. You can drop off each Hall's packet at the University Housing and Dining Services Office, 102 Buxon Hall, to be distributed into each Hall Director's mailbox. (The hall director will distribute one copy per floor in the residence hall.)

  • Halsell Hall 5 floors + 1 director = 6 copies
  • McNary Hall 6 floors + 1 director = 7 copies
  • Poling Hall 5 floors + 1 director = 6 copies
  • Weatherford Hall 5 floors + 1 director = 6 copies
  • Sackett Hall 24 floors + 1 director = 25 copies
  • Bloss Hall 7 floors + 1 director = 8 copies
  • Buxton Hall 5 floors + 1 director = 6 copies
  • Callahan Hall 6 floors + 1 director = 7 copies
  • Cauthorn Hall 5 floors + 1 director = 6 copies
  • Finley Hall 7 floors + 1 director = 8 copies
  • Hawley Hall 5 floors + 1 director = 6 copies
  • West Hall 5 floors + 1 director = 6 copies
  • Wilson Hall 6 floors + 1 director = 7 copies
  • Avery Lodge 1 copy
  • Azalea House 1 copy
  • Dixon Lodge 1 copy
  • Oxford House 1 copy
  • Steve Swanson (News and Communications, Admin Services #416L)
  • 1 mailbox (send via campus mail or drop off)

Sports Clubs (in Dixon Rec. Center)

  • 33 mailboxes... Distribute to each box.

Associated Students Center (ASC)

  • 55 mailboxes (this includes the cultural centers, Women's center, and Pride center) you will need to distribute the copies to each box yourself.

A more detailed poster distribution list.

Publicity Opportunities at the Memorial Union

Tips for reserving ad spaces via the MU on-line reservations:

  • Book 1 week at a time
  • Use the same ad space (by number or location) when possible
  • Realize if you select different spaces, YOU are committing to coming and moving your ad spaces around on all dates that the location changes
  • For assistance, at any time, call MU Guest Services 7-2416

 

Information about Memorial Union advertising options:

 

Concourse Easels (for posters)

  • There are six locations that include the MU Rotunda stairs and the 1st floor concourse
  • Maximum reservation time is 2 weeks, reservations are accepted at the start of the term and are on a "first come" basis.
  • Maximum size is height 50", width 24", thickness 1/4", must be lightweight paperboard of foam board
  • Space reservation is forfeited if poster is not installed within 24 hours of the start date
  • Only promotion of a single event will be allowed, one easel per event
  • All unclaimed posters will be recycled or destroyed within 72 hours of the event date

Axis TV slides (plasma screens)

  • Slides run for one week and can start on any day.
  • The image is on the screen for 5 seconds and will rotate through every minute. (shown over 480 times a day!)
  • Slide should be designed to 8.5" x 11" in horizontal (landscape) orientation and should be submitted in jpeg format. Send document to Kent Sumner, MU Marketing Coordinator. He can also answer your specific questions 7-8511.
  • Cost is $30 a week for deparments, $30 a week for RSO, $21 a week for SFF. This fee is waived if you are advertising an event in the building.

Bulletin Boards (display cases)

  • There are six locations located in the MU Mezzanine Hallway.
  • Maximum reservation time is 2 weeks; reservations are accepted at the start of the term and are on a "first come" basis.
  • Maximum size is height 33.5", width 58"
  • Displays must include the name of the sponsoring organization, a designated contact person and a current email or phone
  • Keys and cards for this are provided at MU Guest Services upon the guest's check in for installation.  Case keys must be returned immediately after installation, and can be signed out again should changes be necessary.

Collection Boxes (philanthropy donation collection)

  • Located at the information desk at MU Guest Services, 112 MU
  • Maximum reservation time is 2 weeks; reservations are accepted at the start of the term and are on a "first come" basis.
  • Must provide a box no larger than 2' in height, width or length that has attached signage with a contact name and phone number, event title and dates.
  • You must advertise your project as the box WILL NOT be visible to MU guests.
  • You must promptly respond to requests to empty the box of contents once it becomes full.

Commons Windows (open events on campus only)

  • Located on the west side of Commons
  • Maximum reservation time is 1 week; reservations are accepted at the start of the term and are on a "first come" basis.
  • This ad space is only available for advertising open event on campus.
  • Two panes are provided, one for ad to face inside, and one for ad to face outside (which requires one pane be painted in reverse)
  • Only paint provided by the MU can be used; paint and supplies provided at MU Guest Services.
  • Reservations begin on Sunday and must be painted between 3pm-11pm; and will be removed by MU custodial staff at the end of the week.

Distribution Areas (tables and chairs)

  • Locations include booths 1 & 2 Trysting Tree Lounge & Counter A Commons/Mezzanine hallway entrance
  • Maximum reservation time is 1 week
  • Recognized student organizations must register their events on-line with Student Involvement, failure to register an event can result in cancellation of distribution area use.
  • Distribution areas must be staffed, include use of tables/chairs and/or countertops in the immediate area of the space.  Use of nearby hallway space is not allowed.
  • Materials may not be left unattended on-site and must be removed promptly at end time.  No food may be dispensed!

Table Tents

  • There are three locations that table tents can be used including the Mezzanine, Commons and the Concourse.  22 holders are available at Mezzanine, 95 holders are available at Commons, and 22 holders are available at Concourse.
  • Maximum reservation time is 2 weeks; reservations are accepted at the start of the term and are on a "first come" basis.
  • Table tent holders will accommodate a 4"x6" (width x height) ad.
  • Reservation is forfeited if not installed within 48 hours of reservation start date.
  • Sample table tents must be brought to Guest Services, 112 MU BEFORE installation on site.

The Wall (5 panel black fabric wall)

  • The wall is located at the Concourse near 112 MU
  • The wall consists of 5 panels, each 7'5" in height and 2' in width for a total width of 10'; lighting included.
  • Maximum reservation time is 2 weeks
  • This space is only available to advertise for an event, promotion, or a celebration and may include open space for gathering comments and/or signatures.
  • The wall is covered with black fabric and displays may only be attached with Velcro adhesive strips provided by MU.
  • No staffing or additional furniture is allowed.
  • MU staff will erect the wall on the start date
  • Cost is $30 per reservation

 

How to Hang a Banner on The MU:

 

Why: To advertise your event in a BIG way!

Where: Outside the south entry to the MU commons. This is the only place where you may hang a banner on the Memorial Union.

Reservations: Can be made at the MU Business office up to one year in advance. Banner may be hung on building for up to 5 days. The MU staff will hang the banner for you, but they are not responsible for theft or damage. Please pick up banner from MU Business after event within 24 hours.

Is it free to hang the banner? Yes, but you must supply the banner. These can be purchased at a sign company.

Banner specifications:

  • Banners must be made of exterior grade canvas or vinyl with metal grommets.
  • Banner size must not exceed 11 feet wide and 5 feet high.

Where to get banners made: You can have banners made by sign companies.

How much do banners cost: They vary in price, but a large banner (11' x 5') can cost $150.00 and up. This is reasonable if you plan to reuse the banner to promote an annual event or your organization. Dated lettering or numbering can be removed and new lettering applied.

Design factors: According to professional sign makers anything that can be done on computer can be done on a banner. They can work with your design or they can help you come up with one. Sign makers typically have at least 2,000 font styles to choose from.

Facilities for Hosting Events

Selecting a location is very important to the success of your program or event. Consider where your guests are coming from (walking on campus or driving from off campus) and what time of day and the day of the week your program is scheduled for (to avoid conflicts with other users of parking spaces). View the OSU Campus map.

If you would like to offer alcoholic beverages to your guests (beer and wine only), please visit Risk Management to get the appropriate form. The form must be submitted at least three weeks prior to the event. Note also that alcohol can not be served at all locations on campus and cannot be served during normal business hours (8:00-5:00 M-F).

Sound permits are required for any outdoor event using amplified sound. Amplified sound is defined as sound played for anything other than personal listening. The proper permit must be obtained at least two weeks prior to your event. Learn more about Campus Grounds Use or download the Grounds Use Request form (Word document). If your event is to be held in the MU Quad, then download the sound permit for the MU Quad.



Primary event venues on campus:

 

Other Locations for Events and contact for who to reserve the space with:

All housing and dining locations Housing and Dining: 737-8521
Athletic buildings Conference Services: 737-9300
Classrooms Scheduling Desk: 737-2181
Gilfilan Conference Services: 737-9300
Gill Coliseum Athletics Facilities and Operations:  737-9379
Langton Hall IM Sports and Facilities: 737-4083
McAlexander Fieldhouse Dixon Rec. Center: 737-6828
Memorial Union MU Business Office: 737-2416
Milam Schedule Desk: 737-2181
Peavy Lodge Language, Culture and Society; Catherine Draper
MU Quad MU Business Office: 737-2416
Women's Building IM Sports and Facilities: 737-4083
Asian Cultural Center 737-6361
Black Cultural Center 737-4372
Centro Cultural Cesar Chavez 737-3790
Dixon Rec Center Dixon Rec. Center: 737-6828
Native American Longhouse 737-2738
Women's Center

737-3175












Risk Management

Although there are risks associated with all events and activities, managing those risks does not have to be complex. Below you will find links to several resources available from the Office of Risk Management to help you proactively manage event risks and avoid, prevent, reduce, and transfer losses, liabilities and litigation. In addition to a comprehensive list of risk factors lower on this page, events considered of high risk include activities involving:

If you have additional questions regarding managing risks for a particular event, please contact the Office of Risk Management.

 

Risk Resources:

 

Risk Factors

Below is a list of the top 50 risks to mitigate in event planning. While this list is comprehensive, it is not all-inclusive. Please contact the Office of Risk Management for questions regarding risk mitigation tools. 

Event Planning Risk Guidelines

If you are planning an event or activity on campus, proper planning can determine if your event will be a safe and successful venture. The below guidelines will help with this process.

  • Identify the risks associated with the event by reviewing a list of risk factors
  • Evaluate the risks involved in your event. Consider probability of an incident occurring (frequency) and the impact of the incident (severity)
  • Chose risk mitigation techniques. These may include:
    • Implementing loss prevention and loss control measures such as having an EMT/Fire Department at the event.
    • Transferring the risk through contracts, waivers or procuring special event insurance coverage.
    • Avoiding the risk. Consider this technique if you do not have the expertise (training) to conduct the activity safely or if there are alternative ideas which are safer or a better use of resources.
    • Monitor the results of your chosen techniques.
    • Reevaluate your decisions for future events.

If you have questions regarding the University's insurance coverage or the evaluation of risks for a particular event, please contact the Office of Risk Management.

Non-OSU Vendors or Contractors

There are always risks when OSU departments, colleges, or units contract with a vendor or contractor for goods or services. However, there are more risk exposures when we do not have a contract in place when procuring goods and services.

Using non-OSU vendors or contractors for any type of activity at your event should include a contracting process. The contract terms determine who will be responsible for paying a loss. If we have favorable contract terms the risk to OSU is reduced. In the absence of a contract, OSU's risk exposures increase significantly. The University's position is to accept those risks that are ours while requiring others to accept those risks that are theirs. For this reason, OSU requires all non-OSU vendors or contractors to have in effect a General Liability Insurance policy with a minimum limit of $1,000,000.00 per occurrence. An insurance company licensed to do business in the State of Oregon must issue the certificate of insurance. In some cases, OSU, its officers, employees and agents shall be named as an additionally insured in this insurance policy. Occasionally, OSU may waive this requirement, but this is rare and must be approved by the Office of Risk Management and/or Procurement and Contracts Office (PaCS).

There are only 16 OSU individuals authorized to obligate the University to contractual guidelines; therefore, all contracts and procurements for goods and services must meet the Procurement and Contracts Office (PaCS) guidelines.

Facility Use to Non-OSU Organizations

If a non-OSU organization desires to use an OSU facility, a facility use agreement must be in place prior to permitting the organization to use the facility. This includes all facilities, including those with costs or those provided at no costs. These agreements are available through the Procurement and Contracts Office (PaCS) and can only be signed by the 16 OSU individuals authorized to obligate the University to agreements. Therefore, all facility use agreements must be submitted to the Procurement and Contracts Office (PaCS) for signature.

The agreement outlines OSU's responsibilities and determines who will be responsible for paying a loss. In the absence of an agreement, OSU's risk exposures increase significantly. The University's position is to accept those risks that are due to our negligence, while requiring others to accept those risks that are theirs. For this reason, OSU requires all non-OSU organizations who use our facilities to have in effect a General Liability Insurance policy with a minimum limit of $1,000,000.00 per occurrence. An insurance company licensed to do business in the State of Oregon must issue the certificate of insurance. In some cases, OSU, its officers, employees and agents shall be named as an additionally insured in this insurance policy. Occasionally, OSU may waive this requirement, but this is rare and must be approved by the Office of Risk Management and/or Procurement and Contracts Office (PaCS).

Resources

Three Week Event Planning Check List

Learn about creating your own personalized check list by reviewing how to create a backwards timeline.

Three weeks out from your event is a good time to check to see how your planning is coming along. The following is a checklist to make sure your organizers are on track to planning a successful event.

Day of the Event List

The day of the event is often chaotic. We have created a list of tasks to help you organize and keep track of your progress throughout the event day.

Early A.M.

Mid Day

 

One hour before Event

 

End of the Event

Guidelines for Providing Notice of Access

Providing Notice of Availability of Information in Accessible Formats

 

Any publication describing services, programs, or activities (e.g., brochures, handouts, position announcements) must include the following statement:

This publication will be made available in an accessible format upon request. Please call [list the phone number and contact person of the sponsoring department].

Accessible formats can include: large print, Braille, or audio taping. Departments are encouraged to state if specific formats already exist.

Note: Individuals requesting large print usually need font size 18 or greater. Braille transcription is limited on campus, but can be done with advance notice from an ASCII file. Specialized formats and tape recorders may need to be used for audio taping materials. Short passages can often be read directly to the person.

For more information visit the Technology Access Program.

 

Providing Notice of Opportunity to Request Accommodation Based on Disability

Physical access must be provided for all campus programs, conferences, and events. It is the responsibility of the coordinator of the event to make sure that the location is physically accessible and to be aware of particular limitations of the space (i.e. front and back access to a room, parking nearby). By inviting requests for accommodations by a specific deadline, needs should be met and surprise requests prevented.

  • Accommodations typically requested for programs, conferences, and events include:
  • Preferential seating
  • Portable amplification systems
  • Sign language interpreters
  • Modified formats of printed materials

Allow at least seven working days when scheduling a sign language interpreter. When a formal lecture is given, it is helpful to provide a copy of the speech to the interpreter several days ahead of time. Sessions that last more than three hours will usually require at least two interpreters who share responsibilities. For interpreter services, contact Disability Access Services at (541) 737-3670.

Please note that when academic credit is being received by an OSU student for attending a program, it is the responsibility of the student to request accommodations through the Services for Students with Disabilities Program.

 

Athletic, Theater, and Music Events

Individuals attending campus events must be given the opportunity to request accommodations within a specific time period. All announcements, ticket information, brochures, posters, etc., should include the following statement:

Accommodation requests related to a disability should be made to [sponsoring department contact person and phone number].

Note: If specific equipment is available or is a sign language interpreter has already been scheduled for a specific performance, note that on printed materials.

 

Lodging Accommodations

 

To the extent possible, no University sponsored event should be held in an inaccessible location on or off campus. If an event includes arrangements for lodging, the degree of accessibility must be determined and alternatives to inaccessible meeting rooms developed. Hotels should have completed an ADA barrier survey and should be aware of the extent to which their facilities are accessible.

The event coordinator should make certain the hotel understands its responsibility for access and has a procedure for asking if customers have special needs related to a disability. If a lodging facility does not handle registration, the event sponsor needs to coordinate receiving requests for accommodations or insure that a lodging representative is named as the contact person for accommodation requests.

This publication will be made available in accessible formats upon request to the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity. Please call (541) 737-3556.

 

This information was provided by the office of Affirmative Action and can be found at the Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity, disabililty resources web site in the "Guidelines for providing notice of access.

About US Copyright Law

Pre-recorded home videocassettes and DVDs ('Videos') that are available for rental or purchase include the right to exhibit the movie for home use only.
These motion pictures do not include a license for showing outside one's home. If you wish to show movies for any other use or in any other place, you must have a SEPARATE license which specifically authorizes such use.

These simple and straightforward rules are detailed in the federal Copyright Act, as amended, Title 17 of the United States Code. According to The Copyright Act, only the copyright owner holds the exclusive right, among others, "to perform the copyrighted work publicly." (Section 106) In summary, the Copyright Act mandates:

The rental or purchase of a Video does not bear the right "to perform the copyrighted work publicly." (Section 202)

Videos may be shown without a SEPARATE license in the home to "a normal circle of family and its social acquaintances" (Section 101) because such showings are not considered "public."

Videos may be shown without a license for non-profit educational purposes and in certain narrowly defined "face-to-face teaching activities" because the law provides limited exceptions for such showings. (Section 110(1)).

All other public performances of Videos are illegal unless they have been authorized by license. Even "performances in 'semipublic' places such as clubs, lodges, factories, summer camps and schools are 'public performances' subject to copyright control." (Senate Reprt No. 94-473, page 60; House Report No. 94-1476, page 64).

Both for-profit organizations and non-profit institutions must secure a license to show Videos, regardless of whether an admission fee is charged. (Senate Report No. 94-473, page 59; House Report No. 94-1476, page 62)

A party is liable for contributory infringement when it, with knowledge of the infringing activity, contributes to the infringing conduct of another.

Proprietors of a social establishment are vicariously liable for infringement committed by an independent contractor. Vicarious liability arises where a party has "the right and ability to supervise the infringing activity and also has a direct financial interest in such activities." Gershwin Publishing Corp. Vs. Columbia Artists Management, Inc., 443 F.2d1159, 1161 (2d Cir. 1971). Both the property owner and exhibitor must make sure a license is in place before a video is shown by either party.

Non-compliance with The Copyright Act is considered infringement and carries steep and significant penalties. Such exhibitions are federal crimes and subject to a $150,000 penalty per exhibition (Section 506). In addition, even inadvertent infringers are subject to substantial civil damages ($750 to $30,000 for each illegal showing) and other penalties. (Sections 502-505)

Please do not hesitate to call us at (800) 462-8855 or send us an email to info@mplc.com with any questions about the U.S. Copyright Law.



FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q. We own the video, do we still need a license to view or show it in public?
A. Yes. The location requires a license regardless of who owns the Video. While you may own the actual video, you are only granted the right to view it in your home, not to perform it in public.

 

Q. We do not charge admission. Do we still need a license?
A. Yes. Regardless of whether an admission fee is charged, a license is required. However, the Umbrella License® covers only those situations where admission is not charged.

 

Q. We are a non-profit organization. Do we still need a license?
A. Yes. Under the law, it does not matter if you are a non-profit or for-profit organization. You are required to have a public performance license to show Videos.

 

Q. How much does the Umbrella License cost?
A. In most cases, the MPLC has set license fees based on the type and size of facility. However, if the facility and/or use falls outside of these categories we will determine a reasonably priced license fee within your organization's means based on the nature and size of the audience and anticipated frequency of showings.

 

Q. We are a preschool; do we qualify for a "face-to-face" teaching exemption?
A. No. The educational exemption is narrowly defined and applies to non-profit academic institutions only.

 

Q. We show videos on our closed-circuit system. Do we need a license?
A. Yes. The Copyright Act provides that closed-circuit transmissions are automatically deemed public performances.

 

Q. We are not open to the general public. Do we still need a license?
A. Yes. Any location outside of the home is considered public for copyright purposes and requires a license.

 

When in doubt, check with the Motion Picture Licensing Corporation to make sure your activity is exempt.

Food Service Guidelines

Open events, on or off campus, that involve the service of food by a University recognized organization must be in compliance with the regulations of Benton County Environmental Health Division, OSU and the State of Oregon.

The following is an outline to assist student groups in planning and preparing a safe and successful food event.

  • Food products must be purchased at a licensed food purveyor.
  • All items that require production (mixing, slicing, chopping, cooking) must be prepared in an approved licensed kitchen facility.

Women's Center, Native American Long House, Cesar Chavez Cultural Center, Asian Cultural Center and the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center can be licensed as a Temporary Restaurant by Benton County for small gatherings with limited menus sponsored or co-sponsored by the Centers. Contact Benton County Environmental Health to submit application for license. Events that have an outdoor cooking component may be required to have a Temporary Restaurant License. Contact Benton County Environmental Health to submit application for license.

All groups preparing foods for public consumption are required to have at least one member with a Food Handlers Permit through Benton County Environmental Health. This person is responsible for training volunteers in safe food handling practices. At least one licensed food handler should be present at the event at all times.

Items that are purchased service ready,( i.e., deli trays, baked goods and fruit trays, must meet Benton County requirements during transport, holding and serving. Special attention should be given to maintaining temperature, sanitation and safety and to eliminating the possibility of cross contamination.

Many venues on campus have a specific list of approved food service providers. Make sure your plans fit within the guidelines of the venue.

  • The Organization can hire a licensed caterer for events held on or off campus:
  • A Caterer is a licensed food and service provider who contracts with an organization for a set amount of meals or items. Payment to the caterer is from the organization responsible for the event.
  • The caterer is responsible for:
    • Obtaining a Benton County Temporary Restaurant License for Open Events
    • Completing all food preparation before coming to campus.
    • Maintaining all of Benton County health and sanitation guidelines for handling, preparing, cooking, transporting, holding and serving food.
    • Having in effect a General Liability Insurance policy with a minimum limit of $1,000,000.00 per occurrence. An insurance company licensed to do business in the State of Oregon must issue the insurance. OSU, its officers, employees and agents shall be named as an additionally insured in this insurance policy.
    • Serving the food on site: no self- service is allowed. The sponsoring organization can assist in serving if supervised by the caterer.
    • Maintaining the set-up and service area in a clean and orderly fashion.
    • The caterer assumes all responsibility of liability that arises from the service of the food.
    • A member of the sponsoring organization must be on-site at all times.
    • A contractual agreement between the sponsoring organization and the caterer must be on file with the Event Chair/Coordinator.
    • Lasells Stewart Center and CH2M Hill Alum Center have approved a list of caterers, which are allowed to serve in these facilities. Check with Facilities Managers for the current listings.
    • Sodexho (Beavers Catering) Concessions has the catering contracts with the OSU Athletic Department and is responsible for catering at Reser Stadium, Gill Coliseum, Valley Football Complex and Coleman Baseball Stadium.
  • Notes and other things to consider
    • Food vendor is defined as a licensed food provider that is allowed to sell food products on campus directly to the public.
    • The sponsoring university organization is responsible for ensuring that all university policies and procedures are followed.
    • A member of the sponsoring organization must be available at all times while the food vendor is present.
    • The food vendor is responsible for maintaining all of Benton County Environmental Health policies and must have a temporary restaurant license from Benton County.
    • The food vendor accepts all responsibility for any liability that arises from the service/selling of food.
    • Food Vendor must have in effect a General Liability Insurance policy with a minimum limit of $1,000,000.00 per occurrence. An insurance company licensed to do business in the State of Oregon must issue the insurance. OSU, its officers, employees and agents shall be named as an additionally insured in this insurance policy.
    • An organization should receive compensation for the sponsorship of such vendor, i.e., a flat fee or a % of actual sales.
    • Permission for use of any indoor University location must be requested through the Building Manager of the location. Outdoor requests must be made through the office of Conferences and Special Events, LaSells Stewart Center (Memorial Union does not allow off site food vendors in its building for any purpose.)
  • Non-perishable items can be used for fund raising and publicity:
    • Individually wrapped baked goods and confections can be sold or given away in certain areas of the campus. Check with your desired location to confirm what is acceptable.
    • Canned or bottled beverages manufactured by Pepsi can be used. Any beverage that requires mixing must be obtained from a licensed food purveyor or produced/mixed in a licensable kitchen. Any condiment, i.e., cream and sugar, has to be served in individual servings and held at the correct temperature.

Please note: due to a University wide Pepsi contract, no other brand of canned or bottled beverage is allowed during any food event, as of 6/11/2006.

 

Tips for a Successful Self-Produced Food Event

 

Investigate possible menu structures Provide 2 or 3 options. Have the committee research best fit options. A variety of items including meat, vegetarian, entrees, side dishes, appetizers, desserts, and beverages should be researched.

When choosing recipes keep these things in mind:

  • Available funding
  • How will the plate look
  • Is the food compatible and varied
  • Vegetarian menu should be equal to meat menu
  • How much time will the item take to produce
  • What equipment is needed
  • How is the item served

Serving

  • Buffet (# of lines and set-up)
  • Plate service (at the table)
  • Family style (at the table)
  • Self service (hors D' oeuvres and beverages only)

Collaborate with the Committee Chairs to discuss set-up, decorations

  • Identify service ware:
    • Paper: be sure to purchase restaurant quality (heavy duty) paper products. Determine the size and shape of the plate based on the menu. If buffet serving, try to keep all items on one plate. Always purchase 100 extra items of everything.
    • China: identify local vendor. Identify the number of each items you will need. Arrange for delivery and pick up. Get cost estimate, communicate this to your Event Chair to ensure the funding is available. When receiving China ALWAYS count it in before signing an invoice. This will ensure you have what you need and also protect you from overcharges.

Create a serving plan

  • Number of needed volunteers
  • Training time
  • Set-up time and specifications
  • Dress code, if any
  • Serving time, start-end

Clean up

  • Assign a Kitchen Captain for during the production to maintain a clean and organized work space if not working with a caterer. Have someone available to wash dishes at all times.
  • Appoint an after event clean up chair
  • Create an after the event serving area and kitchen clean up plan:
    • Start time
    • Needed number of volunteers
    • Transportation
    • How to deal with any leftovers
    • List major kitchen equipment that will need to be cleaned
    • Projected end time

Guidelines for Fire Safety

It is your responsibility to make sure your event is safe and within code. No flames (such as candles) may be burned without written permission from the fire marshall. Also, make sure that all exit doors are marked and accessible. For questions regarding Fire Safety contact the Corvallis Fire Department at (541) 766-6961.

 

Uniform Fire Code Permit Requirements (Word Document)

Creating a Backwards Timeline

Once you have chosen your event components, tasks, event coordinator, and committees, you will want to map out a backwards timeline. The timeline is a guide to make sure you include all the details and tasks to make the event successful.

Begin with the actual day of the event. This is week zero. Write down everything that will take place on the day of the event, including tasks, program, decorations etc.

Then, working backwards from week one, write down what needs to be done in the prior weeks to make your event occur as you have mapped out.

Make sure you map out the most important components first, and then add the less necessary components.

  • Some timeline components to consider Include:
  • Reservation of Space
  • Food
  • Alcohol Service; The alcohol service permit process requires a minimum of three weeks.
  • Decorations (themes, materials)
  • Tickets (design, sales)
  • Budget
  • Entertainment (contracts, equipment, facilities)
  • Committee business (meetings, communication, administrative tasks)
  • Program (sequence, materials)

Also, having your committees map out their own backwards timeline for their specific component can be a very effective way to make sure they are aware of everything they are responsible for.

Backwards Timeline Example:

  • Backwards Timeline
  • Day of the Event: March 24, 2006
  • Program Food Ticketing Marketing
  • Week 0 (day of the Event)-March 24
  • Week 1-March 17
  • Week 2-March 10
  • Week 3-March 3
  • Week 4-February 24
  • Week 5-February 17
  • Week 6-February 10
  • Week 7-February 3
  • Week 8-(beginning of planning)-January 27