Tag » Science

February 22, 2010

Radical Defense

Without antioxidants, you may be more prone to cancer and neurological or cardiovascular problems.


February 22, 2010

Stimulating Research

Oregon State University research projects are receiving a stimulus boost through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA)


February 22, 2010

Solar Gain

Photovoltaic advances lead to business development

With support from the University Venture Development Fund, Alex Chang and a student research team envision electricity-generating solar collectors built into windows, roofs and other building parts.


February 22, 2010

Singing of Science

Kevin Ahern's "metabolic melodies" have students singing in class and on YouTube

Like most teachers, Kevin Ahern savors the smile on his students’ faces when they suddenly get it. He remembers having those bright “ah hah” moments in school only too well. But Ahern, who teaches introductory and advanced biochemistry classes to many of Oregon State University’s pre-med students, has another reason for wanting to drive science into […]


February 22, 2010

Blue Hue

An accidental discovery has produced a new non-toxic blue pigment

An ancient quest for the perfect blue ended in a hot furnace in OSU’s Department of Chemistry — totally by accident. A blue pigment that is both safe and stable eluded the Egyptians, the Han Dynasty and the Mayans. The French developed cobalt blue in the 1800s, but it contains carcinogens. Prussian blue releases cyanide. […]


Product Lines
February 22, 2010

Product Lines

These 12 biotechnology, energy and computer software companies account for about 300 jobs and $100 million in investment. They have spun off directly from or leveraged relationships with Oregon State University research. (Source: OSU Office of Technology Transfer) Strands Personal recommendation software Corvallis, Oregon Fizzy Fruit Carbonated strawberries and grapes Portland, Oregon Clear Shape Technologies […]


February 22, 2010

The Stress Paradox

Coping with trauma can strengthen us over time

Carolyn Aldwin has been privy to countless untold secrets, heartbreaking stories from war zones, hospital wards and prisoner-of-war camps. People from all walks of life have confided their everyday problems and their worst nightmares to her. “I talked to someone who was a lawyer at the Nuremberg Trials,” she says. “I’ve talked to people who’ve […]


February 22, 2010

The Range Keepers

A perennial partnership of ecologists, hydrologists and ranchers is renewing Oregon’s grasslands

The Hatfield and McCormack ranch families of Brothers, Oregon, have partnered with OSU for generations to improve rangeland ecology. (Photo: Mark Reed)


January 22, 2010

Cells for Solar

Ocean plankton grow potential for solar technology

The diatom — an ancient form of single-celled algae — may hold the key to a new generation of cheap, clean solar technology.


November 22, 2009

Green Solutions

Farming that fosters ecological balance and biological diversity is the goal of OSU’sOrganic Agriculture Program in the Department of Horticulture. The program’s 29 researchers are investigating sustainable solutions for everything from weeds and soil-borne diseases to beetle infestations and livestock waste management. Here is a sampling of studies under way. Anita Azarenko The head of […]


October 24, 2009

Delving into Wellness

Children’s physical well-being is critical to their academic and emotional growth.  Yet for an alarming number of preschoolers, too much sitting and too much snacking have led to premature weight problems. OSU researchers are working on ways to intervene. Joanne Sorte, director of the OSU Child Development Center, and her colleague Inge Daeschel, a nutrition […]


June 23, 2009

Climate Impacts

Abrupt global warming could shift monsoon patterns and cut agricultural output

At times in the distant past, an abrupt change in climate has been associated with a shift of seasonal monsoons to the south, a new study concludes, causing more rain to fall over the oceans than in the Earth’s tropical regions, and leading to a dramatic drop in global vegetation growth. If similar changes were […]


Summer of Opportunity
June 23, 2009

Summer of Opportunity

Students plug into research experiences at home and abroad

Ah, summer vacation. Time to kick back, right? Not so much for OSU students who are discovering opportunities to expand their horizons. They’re modeling blood flow, studying wildlife conservation in Africa, surveying Oregon’s old-growth forests and teaching entrepreneurship.


June 23, 2009

Camps Build Confidence and Sharpen Minds

Kids engage their brains in cool ways — and get empowered at the same time

From Corvallis labs to Newport tidepools to Salem campgrounds, OSU experts are challenging K-12 kids to stretch their thinking and deepen their understanding of the natural and built environments. This summer, hundreds of Oregon children are limbering up their synapses in subjects as diverse as math and fine arts, engineering and journalism. They’re building brain […]


June 23, 2009

Explore Oregon Through OSU Research

When you're out in the wilds and wonders of Oregon this summer, let OSU's research and scientific discoveries enhance your adventure

From the state’s ancient forests to its briny oceans, from its prehistoric landscapes to its fertile fields, OSU scientists are studying the complexities of nature and the impacts of human activity. They invite you to stop and visit awhile: View Oregon State University Summer of Science in a larger map Feel the soft skin of […]


April 24, 2009

Where Grass Seed Is King

Oregon’s Willamette Valley is the undisputed “grass-seed capital of the world.” In close partnership with growers and scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, OSU researchers and agronomists have been at the forefront of an industry worth $500 million. Here are some of the milestones. 1909 Seed lab starts up on campus for research and […]


April 24, 2009

Sensors for Safety

Microbiologists aim for rapid, accurate monitoring of food and water

The news grabbed national headlines in early 2009: eight dead, hundreds sickened by food poisoning in 34 states. After investigators traced the outbreak to Salmonella-tainted peanut butter from a Georgia plant, stores pulled thousands of products from their shelves. Worried consumers tossed suspect items into the trash. At least 100 companies will post losses from […]


April 24, 2009

Envisioning the Forest

Computer Models Combine Ecology and Economy

John Sessions likes to refer to forestry as “a bio-energy puzzle.” Like a lot of 21st-century puzzles, its solutions are digital 
and mathematical. “Forest landscape planning, as it is known today, was not possible before the advent of high-speed computers, geographic information systems, modern algorithms and graphic interfaces,” says the holder of the endowed Richard […]


April 24, 2009

Cut to the Bone

Wendy Baltzer's surgical technique does the trick for an old dog

The surgical suite in OSU’s small animal clinic bristles with crisp efficiency. A masked med tech wearing scrubs of sea-foam green unpacks sterile instruments from stainless-steel carts, treading lightly on puffy blue booties. Above the operating table, a state-of-the-art Stryker scope hangs like a giant jointed bug with shiny hooded eyes. The scene suggests an […]


April 23, 2009

Climate by the Numbers

Modelers explore future states of the planet

You can’t just walk into the data center in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS). The sign on the door says you need a pass card. There should be another sign too: Caution, planetary experiments in progress. Inside, computer clusters churn 24/7, spinning out information about ocean currents, winds, air temperatures, ice […]


February 24, 2009

Living Downwind

By collecting and testing the toxicity of particles in Northwest air samples, OSU Ph.D. student Julie Layshock is shedding light on the relative health threat posed by long-distance air pollution.


February 24, 2009

“Expedition” in Computational Sustainability

Scratch below the surface of a natural resources question and you’ll often find a tough nut to crack. The complex interactions among species and their habitats have bedeviled scientists from before Charles Darwin’s day to the present, preventing them in many cases from generating information that managers need to develop effective policies. Now a group […]


February 24, 2009

Chemistry Goes Green in New OSU-UO Center

Creating more efficient, environmentally friendly electronics manufacturing practices is the goal of a new Green Materials Chemistry Center at Oregon State University and the University of Oregon.


February 24, 2009

Targeting an Old Foe

Medicine for the new war on tuberculosis

M. tuberculosis is a tenacious germ. Armored in a thick, waxy wall impervious to water, the bacterium can lie dormant in the lungs for decades, waiting for a weakness in its human host.


Wired Watershed
January 23, 2009

Wired Watershed

Fiberoptics bring new precision to ecosystem sensing

It took a potato launcher, a canoe and a helium-filled balloon to propel a high-tech scientific enterprise during an international workshop at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest.


Lessons from the Magic Planet
January 23, 2009

Lessons from the Magic Planet

Researchers are engaging the curious in meaningful inquiry

Researchers are engaging the curious in meaningful inquiry


Lunging for Life
January 23, 2009

Lunging for Life

Next year, a class for 90-year-olds

The risk of falling rises as we get older, but researchers and fitness instructors have a prescription: Better Bones and Balance. Even if you’re 88 years old, there’s a class for you.


May 23, 2008

The Proboscis Hypothesis

Were dinosaurs bugged to death?

Was the mighty dinosaur done in by a midge? Very likely, argues OSU zoologist George Poinar in his new book, What Bugged the Dinosaurs? Insects, Disease and Death in the Cretaceous. Midges, together with millions of other Cretaceous insect species, may well have landed the “final knockout blow” to the giant reptiles by infecting them […]


April 23, 2008

Born To Love Bugs

Living a boyhood obsession

There are two kinds of entomologists: those who love insects intellectually and those who love them viscerally. Without a doubt, Chris Marshall fits into the second category. The love of bugs smote him early, and it smote him hard. He grew up combing the fields and woodlands of his New England neighborhood with a glass […]


April 23, 2008

“Bug Poop Grows Trees” (BPGT)

Insect collection aids ecological research

In Andrew Moldenke’s forest ecology course, students get the BPGT acronym drilled into their heads from Day One. Oregon’s fabled old-growth forests owe their existence to insect digestion, and the professor wants to make sure nobody forgets it. “Old, decayed, and decaying logs and other detritus,” Moldenke explains to author Jon Luoma in the 1999 […]