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Elliott Finn: “Blanket solutions aren’t the answer.”
June 18, 2013

Elliott Finn: “Blanket solutions aren’t the answer.”

What runs through the life of author Norman McLean is a river. In the life of Elliott Finn, it’s a plant. Vegetation, wild and domestic, wends through every childhood memory: playing hide-and-seek among fruit trees in his parents’ sprawling Soap Creek garden near Corvallis. Dashing through botanical gardens and greenhouses with his little brother Ian. […]


Allison Stringer: “There’s still hope.”
June 18, 2013

Allison Stringer: “There’s still hope.”

Siberia seldom tempts Western travelers to explore its vast taiga forests and endless permafrost  — unless that traveler happens to be Allison Stringer. For the OSU biology student, nothing could be more enticing than spending a summer month “out in the middle of nowhere”— living on a barge at the Northeast Science Station near a […]


Justin Conner: “Amphibians are crashing.”
June 18, 2013

Justin Conner: “Amphibians are crashing.”

When manatees and alligators are members of your backyard ecosystem, it’s like living with a ready-made science project. Justin Conner took full advantage of the biodiversity bursting in and around the Florida canal that linked his childhood home to the ocean. There were peacock bass and cichlids to hook. There were frogs and toads to […]


What It’s Like to Necropsy a Moose
June 17, 2013

What It’s Like to Necropsy a Moose

It’s physical and sensual.  It’s not an exercise in hypothetical counter-factuals or wonderings about brains in vats or the playing of a clever devil’s advocate.  It’s hot and uncomfortable and smelly.  You flail in vain at ginormous mosquitos with your forearms and shoulders (because your hands are covered in rubber gloves which are covered in […]


June 4, 2013

After the Quake

Saving lives is everybody's business

As an epidemiologist, Jeff Bethel understands the vital role of public health in saving lives after a natural disaster. Most at risk, he says, are vulnerable populations — migrant laborers and people who live alone or have chronic illnesses. “If you’re in your little bubble, you’re at higher risk,” says the assistant professor in the […]


Oregon 9.0
May 25, 2013

Oregon 9.0

When the next Big One comes, will we be ready?

Professor Scott Ashford has seen the consequences of “megathrust” quakes in Chile, Japan and New Zealand: buildings and bridges tilted and broken like toys, beachfront tourist towns reduced to rubble, pipelines squeezed out of the ground like toothpaste out of a tube, businesses closed or forced to relocate.


Of Texts and Textiles
May 24, 2013

Of Texts and Textiles

Tapestries loom large in Renaissance literature and modern metaphor

For the rich and the royal, arras hangings were status symbols. They depicted ancient stories of valor and virtue. Often designed to inspire viewers to be braver and better, they also were instruments of political propaganda and puffery.


Aquatic Vigil
May 23, 2013

Aquatic Vigil

Labs go to extraordinary lengths for fish and other water dwellers

It boils down to a centuries-old debate among philosophers, scientists, veterinarians, farmers, ranchers, aquarists, and pet owners: What is our obligation to captive animals?


Online and Face-to-Face
May 22, 2013

Online and Face-to-Face

Active learning combines technology and teamwork

The hallowed “sage on the stage” tradition is giving way to a more interactive process leavened by Wi-Fi and the Web.


Seeing the Light
May 22, 2013

Seeing the Light

New window technology will save energy and money

Oregon scientists and startups have joined forces to create the next generation of “Low-E” window technology.


On the Beach
May 22, 2013

On the Beach

Stranded whales are not always related

The mothers of beached whale calves often were missing entirely from the beach, a study found.


Hmong Health Study Defies Expectations
May 22, 2013

Hmong Health Study Defies Expectations

More cancer screening, less male influence found

The risks are especially high among the Hmong, whose cervical cancer rates are some of the nation’s highest.


Connective Tissue
May 22, 2013

Connective Tissue

Hope grows where facts and values intersect

When Michael P. Nelson talks about his work, he mentions carcasses and cadavers to a startling degree — startling because Nelson is not a physician or a veterinarian or even a biologist. He’s a philosopher. So at first glance, necropsy seems an odd topic of discourse.  But it starts to make sense when you notice […]


Ethical Evolution
May 22, 2013

Ethical Evolution

The history of medicine owes a debt to animals

Barely a century has passed since Louis Pasteur developed a vaccination for rabies. Since then, scientists have discovered treatments for some of the worst human scourges: smallpox, tuberculosis, polio and influenza. Much of their success can be traced to experiments on animals under circumstances that would shock us today. Pasteur learned about rabies by infecting […]


Balancing Work and Family
May 21, 2013

Balancing Work and Family

Drew Arnold juggles personal and professional

Babies don’t wait for you to get your master’s degree. They arrive on their own schedules and change your life. Drew Arnold learned that lesson when he became a father. He also found that sleep comes in a distant third to family and education. In 2010, he began a graduate program in mechanical engineering at […]


OSU Advantage: Sustainable Semis
May 21, 2013

OSU Advantage: Sustainable Semis

Partnership with Daimler Trucks North America produces carbon-fiber prototype

Trucking companies are looking for new ways to cut fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. A partnership between Oregon State and Daimler is making inroads


From Data to Doing
May 21, 2013

From Data to Doing

Climate science leads to community action

Adapting to climate change requires two key things: good data and boots on the ground. As oceans rise, icecaps melt, snowpack diminishes, wildfires rage and aquifers dry up, coupling science to action becomes ever more urgent. But the barriers to linking science to practical action are formidable, often springing from deep disparities in worldview among […]


Sea Trio
May 21, 2013

Sea Trio

Oregon State will lead design and construction of coastal research vessels

Oregon State has been designated by the NSF as the lead institution for the design, building and launching of as many as three state-of-the-art research vessels.


Grape Crush
May 21, 2013

Grape Crush

Food scientists find new uses for pulpy winery leftovers

As you sip your favorite Oregon wine, do you ever wonder what happened to the discarded remains of those luscious grapes?


Flight Plan
May 21, 2013

Flight Plan

UAV technology can create jobs, save money and lives

UAVs can help manage wildfires, support a search-and-rescue mission, plant trees to avoid wind or heat damage, monitor wildlife, improve irrigation, detect crop-disease outbreaks and gauge environmental health.


Freedom of Access
May 21, 2013

Freedom of Access

The public deserves and needs scientific information

“For scholars, access to the work of their peers is fundamental to the advancement of research.”


Nomads No More
May 21, 2013

Nomads No More

Anthropology student listens to the voices of Mongolian herders

Pressure from encroaching modernization threatens traditional patterns of migration and collaboration in Inner Mongolia. Tom Conte, master’s student in anthropology, traveled there to learn about impacts on the grasslands and Mongolian culture.


On the Drawingboard
May 21, 2013

On the Drawingboard

Space for the new paradigm of teaching and learning

A new learning laboratory will be a seedbed for the latest concepts in active teaching and learning to Oregon State.


A Place of Belonging
February 2, 2013

A Place of Belonging

Once a child immigrant, Susana Rivera-Mills’ past became her future

It was tragic enough that Susana Rivera-Mills’ girlhood was visited by war. It was frightening enough to flee her hometown of San Salvador on a dark night bundled in the backseat of the family Fiat with her little brother Fabio. And yet, as improbable as it seems, the hardest part was still ahead.


Words to Live By
February 2, 2013

Words to Live By

Language and culture meet identity

The early findings from Independence reveal a community that is holding onto Spanish for five and six generations.


February 1, 2013

10 Steps for Innovators

The journey from idea to innovation turns, twists and hits the occasional roadblock. Follow the progress of an Oregon State idea that is making the wood-products industry more sustainable. Research by wood-science professor Kaichang Li has enabled Columbia Forest Products, North America’s largest manufacturer of hardwood plywood, to switch from adhesives made with formaldehyde to […]


Corps of Discovery
February 1, 2013

Corps of Discovery

Mastering the natural history of Oregon's storied lands and waters - and passing it on

Just as some babies are born with special gifts for music or math, Harvard’s Howard Gardner argues, others come into the world with an exceptional sensitivity to nature. The Oregon Master Naturalist program was designed to tap into this devotion to the land and build a statewide corps of expert volunteers.


Concord Elementary School
January 31, 2013

Concord Elementary School

Where vegetables sprout (and kids, too)

Amid the chaos, the kids are learning about the art of gardening.


Lake of the Woods
January 31, 2013

Lake of the Woods

Where the wild things are

“The three key words in the mission of Oregon Master Naturalists are explore, connect, contribute.”


South Slough
January 31, 2013

South Slough

Where the waters mix

Anne and Philip Matthews have explored every twist and tangle of the South Slough, which became the nation’s first national estuarine research reserve in the 1970s.