OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Temporal and Spatial Variability in the Abundance of Marine Larvae on the Oregon Coast with a Proposal for Comparative Research in Morocco.

TitleTemporal and Spatial Variability in the Abundance of Marine Larvae on the Oregon Coast with a Proposal for Comparative Research in Morocco.
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication1999
AuthorsCameron, April S.
Academic DepartmentBiology
Thesis AdvisorLubchenco, Jane
DegreeBachelor of Arts in International Studies in Biology
Number of Pages45
Date Published06/1999
UniversityOregon State University
CityCorvallis
Thesis Typeundergraduate
Keywordsbenthic, biology, larvae, marine, Meroplanktonic larvae, ocean
Abstract

An important goal of marine ecologists is to discover what causes community structure to change over space or time (Menge et al. 1997). Until recently, most studies focused on factors influencing distribution and abundance of benthic (bottom-dwelling) populations (Lubchenco 1999). Factors affecting recruitment of juveniles onto the shore were ignored. Meroplanktonic larvae are responsible for replenishing benthic open marine populations like those of rocky shores (McConnaughey et al. 1992). My research quantified temporal and spatial patterns in the abundance of marine invertebrate larvae at Boiler Bay and Fogarty Creek, Oregon. Larval traps were deployed in the mid-intertidal zone and samples were collected from them in a daily basis between July 9 and 13, 1998. I found that the average abundance of all larvae in question varied significantly between traps and between days, with the exception of the barnacle nauplii. Similarly, the abundance of all larvae varied significantly between traps and days, with the exception of the crab zoea. Therefore the abundance of marine larvae supply at any site, and emphasizing the importance of on-going comparative research, using a multiscale approach within a predictive framework.