Student
C
enter

Schedule

Journal

Help!

Studies
 
Week 1
 Week 2
 Week 3
 Week 4
 Week 5
 Week 6
 Week 7
 Week 8
 Week 9
 Week10

Quizzes

 


The Science of Argument Part III

EVALUATING ARGUMENTS

To evaluate an argument philosophically (or logically) is to make a judgement about its strength. The strength of an argument depends on the capacity of the premises to support the conclusion.

Recall that an argument is made of parts (statements) that have specific functions (premises and conclusions) and relations. When the parts of an argument fit together well and are of good quality, the entire argument is strong. Compare this way of A Chairthinking about argument to a complex object like a chair. A chair is made of parts that have specific functions and relations. The parts of the chair are related to one another in different ways. A careful analysis of the chair will describe the parts and how they are related. When the parts of the chair are well assembled and fit together, the chair is capable of supporting a person who sits on it.

Similarly, an argument is made of parts that have specific functions and relations. The parts of the argument are related to one another in different ways. A careful analysis of an argument will describe the parts and how they are related. When the parts of the argument are well assembled and fit together, the premises are capable of supporting the belief-claim that rests on them. When the premises do support the conclusion, we may say that the argument is strong. Then it becomes relevant to consider the degree and type of strength that the argument has.

Subject: How well did you understand the concepts and points in this page? (Select the closest appropriate option from the three buttons below):

Very Well

Not Sure

Not at all

If you selected "not sure" or "not at all", please note below
some specific words or ideas that are unclear to you.

Your email
Your name

previous page next page