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Taxonomy Table Examples

Examples taken from OSU Extended Campus distance courses and adapted from A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Lorin W. Andersin, David R. Krathwohl; et al. 2001 Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.
Factual Knowledge
The basic elements students must know to be acquainted with a discipline or solve problems in it.
Conceptual Knowledge
The interrelationships among the basic elements within a larger structure that enable them to function together.
Procedural Knowledge
How to do something, methods of inquiry, and criteria for using skills, algorithms, techniques, and methods.
Meta-cognitive Knowledge
Knowledge of cognition in general as well as awareness and knowledge of one's own cognition.
Remember
Retrieve relevant knowledge from long-term memory.
Understand
Construct meaning from instructional messages, including oral, written,and graphic communication.
Apply
Carry out or use a procedure in a given situation
Analyze
Break material into constituent parts and determine how parts relate to one another and to an overall structure or purpose.
Evaluate
Make judgements based on criteria and standards.
Create
Put elements together to form a coherent or functional whole; reorganize elements into a new pattern or structure.
Achieve
Students will achieve a level of understanding regarding their personal lifestyles and how the choices they make in their own lives change the environment.
Action
Apply concepts learned in class to implement a recycling program.
Actualize
Engage in activism on behalf of social justice for women.
Appropriate Use
Use the Science of Foods terminology in relation to discussing foods or food products.
Assess
Given a set of occurances, students will be able to conclude which outcome is most likely.
Calculate
Devise and put into use, a method of counting votes in an election.
Classify
Understand fund raising and grant-making as function of the donor/beneficiary relationship and to apply theoretical principles to the act of fund raising.
Combine
Students will be able to combine healthy ingredients into an entire meal.
Compose
Given a set of guidelines, students will be able to compose poetry which follows the contraints set out.
Conclude
Students will be able to draw conclusions based on their knowledge of how a system works.
Construct
Complete a theme-based or place-based historical reconstruction of a topic or site.
Describe
Describe the history (and pre-history) of wildland fire.
Differentiate
Differentiate between the terms gender and sex and understand the differences.
Execute
As a result of this class, students will be able to execute and demonstrate to others, complex conservation techniques in their own area.
Experiment
Use the chemistry and composition of foods to explain how it relates to the quality of a food product.
Explain
Explain why an understanding of wildland fire ecology is important.
Interpret
Consider the connection between structure of the landscape and function of ecosystems within that landscape.
List
To identify the names, professional identities, and ideas of two or three of the major western sexologists
Order
Students will be able to place important events in the order in which they happened.
Plan
Students will make personal and professional decisions regarding their own participation with non-profit organizations, third sector professions, citizen leadership, voluntary action, philanthropic studies and research, graduate education, volunteering and gifting and other philanthropic activities.
Predict
Predict the future of political activism among certain demographic groups in the United States
Rank
Students will be able to rank current political issues on how they feel emphasis should be placed.
Summarize
Summarize an article, speech or book in the students own words.
Tabulate
Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of each step a bill takes on its way through the legislative system.

 

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