(Phishing) Examples

Phishing Examples

Sometimes phishing emails are obviously malicious, but other times they are pretty convincing. It is important to keep in mind the context of the email. If you did not request to be "added to a project" or if your mail quota is suddently "exceeding capacity", you will want to tread carefully in the email.

Below you will find a collection of phishing emails that have been reported to us and we have shown basic ways to tell if these emails are legitimate or not without even clicking on the link.

(Phishing) 07/06/2017 Account Block

07/06/2017 Example

This email was sent out on 07/06/2017 trying to steal email login information. There are a couple of intial red flags just after reading the email, even without further investigating:

  • You Requested for password change
  • Grammer and capitalization is terrible for an automated message.
  • Upgrade mailbox quota here
  • Blindly clicking hyperlinks in emails should always be avoided since they could lead anywhere.
  • Mail administrator 2017
  • We're just the "Service Desk".

Here are some additional ways we can tell this email is fake:

Sender Address

The sender has "admin" at least in the username, but that isn't where we send automated messages from and the email address doesn't even say @oregonstate.edu. Keep in mind that even if an email address is an @oregonstate.edu email address, that doesn't make it safe. Email addresses can be spoofed and manipulated to seem like legitimate emails or it could be coming from an already stolen account. That is why it is important to look at the context of the email and any hyperlinks in it.

Hyperlinks

This link could be tricky since it technically does have "oregonstate.edu" in the hyperlink, however the website is chamnoltravel.com. It is important to keep in mind that you don't have to "request" changing your password here and you can always call us in to discuss mail quota information.

If this information was useful, needs work, or you would like to see more of it, feel free to request that using the feedback button below!

(Phishing) 07/11/2017 Blackboard

07/11/2017 Blackboard

This email was sent out on 07/11/2017 trying to steal users login information. There are a couple of intial red flags just after reading the email, even without further investigating:

  • 2 New Important messages from your Admin Center
  • Capitilization is terrible for an automated message and it is extremely generic.
  • Click Here To Review:
  • "Click here" links in emails should always be avoided.
  • Blackboard.
  • We don't even support Blackboard, we use Canvas.

Here are some additional ways we can tell this email is fake:

Sender Address

The sender is not even close to any email from Oregon State, it doesn't even say @oregonstate.edu. Keep in mind that even if an email address is an @oregonstate.edu email address, that doesn't make it safe. Email addresses can be spoofed and manipulated to seem like legitimate emails, or it could be coming from an already stolen account. That is why it is important to look at the context of the email and any hyperlinks in it.

Hyperlinks

This is an easy way to tell the email is fake. ONID credentials wont work on sites that are not oregonstate.edu, especially not "ow.ly/ntuj30xrhf"

If this information was useful, needs work, or you would like to see more of it, feel free to request that using the feedback button below!

(Phishing) 07/12/2017 Quota Limit

07/12/17 Example

This email was sent out on 07/12/2017 trying to steal email address login information. There are a couple of intial red flags just after reading the email, even without further investigating:

  • To avoid being block click on the link
  • This grammer is terrible for an automated message.
  • Click Here To Validate
  • "Click here" links in emails should always be avoided.
  • Oregon State University Webmaster Email Technical Support
  • We're just the "Service Desk"

Here are some additional ways we can tell this email is fake:

Sender Address

The sender is not even close to an admin email from Oregon State, it doesn't even say @oregonstate.edu. Keep in mind that even if an email address is an @oregonstate.edu email address, that doesn't make it safe. Email addresses can be spoofed and manipulated to seem like legitimate emails, even when they are not. That is why it is important to look at the context of the email and any hyperlinks in it.

Hyperlinks

The validation email link does not go to an Oregon State, but instead goes to a seemingly random "webhostapp" page. Logging in here will do nothing but give someone your account information.

Even their "www.oregonstate.edu" link doesnt even go to Oregon State University, but instead goes to the malicious web page.

If this information was useful, needs work, or you would like to see more of it, feel free to request that using the feedback button below!