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Great Gray Garden Slug, Tiger slug, spotted leopard slug

Limax maximus is found commonly in West Coast gardens. It has spots on the mantle and spots or tiger stripes on the upper surface of its foot. It has a smooth, furrowless body with the pneumostome placement located near the rear edge of the mantle. It's length is about 4 inches (10 cm). It is four times faster than banana slug which is useful as it is predatory on other slugs. It originated from Asia Minor and Europe. (Gordon, 1994).

This slug is also reknown for it's ardent courtship. Great gray garden slugs mate while suspended from a slime cord (copulate midair). The courtship was captured photographically recently on my siding.

References:
Gordon, David George. 1994. Field Guide to the Slug. Western Society of Malacologists, Sasquatch Books, Seattle, WA. 48 pp.

Terrestrial Gastropods of the Columbia Basin, British Columbia: Limax maximus.

Leopard slug: Limax maximus This site is a photographic delight.

 

leapard slug keel shot
Photo: Rosetta, OSU
Limax maximus spotting
Limax maximus
Photo: Rosetta
Evening shot highlighting spotting
Limax maximus spotting
Photo: Greg St. Onge
leopard slug keel shot
Photo: Rosetta, OSU
leaopard slug tiger stripes
Photo: Rosetta, OSU
Website editor:
Robin Rosetta
Page last modified 10/15/07
 

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