Kentucky bluegrass

Evaluation of Ergot Resistance and Disease Escape in Kentucky Bluegrass Cultivars

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2016
Abstract: 
Ergot is an important disease of Kentucky bluegrass seed production in Oregon. The disease is caused by the fungal pathogen Claviceps purpurea, which infects flowers prior to fertilization resulting in the production of sclerotia rather than seed. Sclerotia are the overwintering structures of the fungus and produce airborne ascospores that serve as primary inoculum the following growing season. In some years the timing of ascospore release by the fungus may not coincide with grass flowering (anthesis), which is the only period of host susceptibility, and cultivars with short, uniform flowering periods, or those that flower outside of periods of peak spore production, may potentially escape infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate Kentucky bluegrass cultivars for the potential to escape or resist ergot under central Oregon field conditions. It was hypothesized that cultivars which flower before or after peak ergot spore production, or those with shortened periods of anthesis, would have reduced ergot incidence and severity compared to cultivars with prolonged periods of anthesis or those which flower when ergot spores are present in large numbers.

Evaluation of Herbicides for Control of Rough Bluegrass, Cheatgrass, Rattail Fescue and Medusahead in Establishment Year and Second Year Kentucky Bluegrass Grown for Seed

Series/Report number: 
COARC2016
Abstract: 
Adequate weed control during the establishment year of Kentucky bluegrass seed production is a challenge, particularly for grassy weeds in a grass crop. This project is a second-year project to evaluate innovative ways to use currently registered products to accomplish this goal, focusing on rough bluegrass, cheatgrass, rattail fescue and medusahead. Treatments and application timings include Callisto pre-emergence between planting and first irrigation, Beacon applied at 0.19 oz/acre, with and without Bronate at 1 pt/acre, at the 2-3 leaf and 4-5 leaf stages, and Beacon at the split application rate of 0.38 oz/acre during a October/November timing. Potential new herbicides, Fierce, Alion and Sharpen were evaluated in a second year stand for control of the same four grassy weeds and for crop safety, compared to two current industry standards. Application timings were pre-emergence and during October/November. Results from establishment year plots indicates significantly less stunting of Kentucky bluegrass when Beacon is applied at 2-3 leaf rather than the 1-2 leaf stage as was done during 2015. Bronate appears to be an effective crop safener when added to Beacon at either 2-3 leaf or 4-5 leaf stages, with similar control of the grassy weeds.
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