OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

OSU choral program presents annual Orange & Black Scholarship Benefit Concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University choral program will present the Orange & Black Choral and Vocal Scholarship Benefit Concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at the First United Methodist Church, 1165 N.W. Monroe Ave., Corvallis.

 The Orange & Black Concert is an annual tradition featuring the OSU Chamber Choir, Bella Voce and the OSU Meistersingers. All proceeds from the performance benefit the OSU Choral and Vocal Scholarship Fund.

The fund was established to provide financial support for students demonstrating outstanding professional potential in vocal and choral music. Contributions to the fund help support students’ educational costs and help bring top musical talent to study at Oregon State University.

 The OSU Meistersingers, under the baton of Russell Christensen, will open the program with five popular works: “Sound the Trumpet” by Henry Purcell; Johannes Brahms’ “Mainacht;” “Echoes (I am Hope)” by Daniel Elder; Gaetano Donizetti’s rousing “Song of the Regiment;” and Gary Ruschman’s arrangement of “Run On!”

Sandra Babb will lead OSU’s women’s choir, Bella Voce, in a set of original and arranged songs: “Spirit of Life” by Chris Aspaas; Kim Andre Arneson’s “Love’s Onward Journey;” “On a Rock” by Michele Kaschub; “Nigra Sun” by the internationally-renowned cellist Pablos Casals; and “Voice in the Wind” by Sarah Quartel.

The OSU Chamber Choir, directed by Steven Zielke, will close the performance. The Chamber Choir is the premier choral ensemble on campus, consisting of 40 to 45 selected students who perform the finest in choral music repertoire.

The Chamber Choir set includes: “Indonana,” a traditional South African work arranged for choir; Hugo Distler’s “Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied;” Eric Whitacre’s “Sainte-Chapelle,” a work composed in celebration of the famed Tallis Scholars; an arrangement of Dolly Parton’s “Light of a Clear Blue Morning;” and A.R. Rahman’s tongue-twisting “Balleilakka.”

General admission seating is $10. OSU students with identification and K-12 youth will be admitted free. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply. Advance tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/2lymoja. For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

Tickets available for Naomi Klein lecture at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Tickets are now available for an April 5 lecture by writer and cultural critic Naomi Klein, who will speak at Oregon State University’s LaSells Stewart Center.

The talk is free but tickets are required; tickets may be reserved online at http://bit.ly/2lts6a9. The lecture begins at 7 p.m., with exhibits on display in the lobby starting at 6 p.m. The event is sponsored by OSU’s Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word; the OSU Student Sustainability Initiative; Office of Sustainability; College of Science; Environmental Arts and Humanities Initiative; School of Public Policy; and the School of History, Philosophy, Religion. It is free and open to all. 

Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of several international best-selling books, including “This Changes Everything: Capitalism versus the Climate,” “The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism,” and “No Logo.”

“This Changes Everything” won the 2014 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction. The documentary inspired by the book, and directed by Avi Lewis, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in September 2015.

Since that book was published, Klein’s primary focus has been on putting its ideas into action. She is one of the organizers and authors of Canada's Leap Manifesto, a blueprint for a rapid and justice-based transition off fossil fuels. The manifesto has been endorsed by more than 200 organizations, tens of thousands of individuals, and has inspired similar climate justice initiatives around the world. In November 2016, she was awarded Australia’s prestigious Sydney Peace Prize.

Leading up to her visit to OSU, the Spring Creek Project will host a reading and discussion group on Klein’s latest book, “This Changes Everything: Capitalism versus the Climate.” The group will meet at 6 p.m. on Feb. 15, March, 1 and March 15 at the Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center, 128 S.W. 9th St. The reading and discussion group is free and open to the public.

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Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198, Charles.goodrich@oregonstate.edu

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Naomi Klein Credit: Kourosh Keshiri

Naomi Klein

Artist and activist Cannupa Hanska Luger to speak at OSU Feb. 16

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Artist and activist Cannupa Hanska Luger, a native of North Dakota who was born on the Standing Rock Reservation, will give a public talk on Feb. 16 at Oregon State University.

The lecture, “They Need Us More Than We Need Them,” will begin at 7 p.m. in the Construction & Engineering Hall at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. A reception with the artist will be held at 6 p.m. in the Myrtle Tree Alcove. The reception and talk are free and open to the public.

The event is part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series and SPARK, a year-long celebration of the arts and science.

Luger creates socially conscious work interweaving his identity as an American Indian with global issues. Luger, who is of Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, Austrian and Norwegian descent, creates unique, ceramic-centric, multidisciplinary artwork that tells provocative stories of complex indigenous identities coming up against 21st century imperatives, including mediation and destruction. Luger’s studio is currently based in New Mexico.

His recent work speaks to the environmental impact of energy extraction on the collective human psyche, and the political framework of unsanctioned land deals that primarily affect indigenous and rural communities and their land and water. He has spent time at Standing Rock during the protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The public talk concludes a three-day residency at OSU for Luger. On Feb. 14, he will attend a “Lunch & Learn” session with students and faculty in conjunction with an OSU course on the arts and social justice. He will also present his work at the Indigenous Poetry Night, from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Native American Longhouse.

On Feb. 15 and Feb. 16, Luger will be present in the art department, meeting with art faculty and students, hosting a maker’s event focused on art and activism and reviewing student portfolios.

The Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to the OSU campus to interact with students in the art department so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar.

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Source: 

Kerry Skarbakka, Kerry.skarbakka@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-1256; Charles Robinson, Charles.Robinson@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-6535

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Old Dominion

Old Dominion

Everything Anywhere

Everything Anywhere

Essayist Elena Passarello to read at Oregon State University Feb. 24

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Essayist Elena Passarello will read at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, in the Valley Library Rotunda on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow.

Passarello is an assistant professor of English in OSU’s School of Writing, Literature and Film. Her 2017 book, “Animals Strike Curious Poses,” is a collection of essays about celebrity animals. Her previous book, “Let Me Clear My Throat,” won the Independent Publishers’ gold medal for nonfiction and was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award. 

Her essays have also appeared in Oxford American, Creative Nonfiction, and the Virginia Quarterly Review, as well as in the anthologies “After Montaigne,” “I’ll Tell You Mine,” and “Cat is Art Spelled Wrong.”

Passarello is a recipient of fellowships from OSU’s Center for the Humanities, Literary Arts, the MacDowell Colony, the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts, and the University of Iowa Museum of Art. In 2015, she received the Whiting Award in nonfiction. She earned her MFA at the University of Iowa. 

Passarello has also worked for many years as an actor and voice-over performer, and now serves on the board of the NonfictionNow conference, is the nonfiction editor of Iron Horse Review and co-edits the “In-Place” nonfiction series at West Virginia University Press.

This reading is part of the 2016-2017 Literary Northwest Series, which brings accomplished writers from the Pacific Northwest to OSU. The series is sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film at OSU, with support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music. 

The event is free and open to the public. The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis.

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Source: 

Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

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Elena Passarello

Passarello.large_

Peopling of ancient America to be discussed at Corvallis Science Pub

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The first Americans are thought to have crossed the Bering Sea land bridge from Asia and travelled down an ice-free corridor into what is now the upper Midwest. However, new evidence in Canada and the Pacific Northwest casts doubt on that theory.

At the Feb. 13 Corvallis Science Pub, Oregon State University anthropologist Loren Davis will discuss his investigations of possible coastal routes that people could have used to reach North America. It begins at 6 p.m. at the Old World Deli, 341 S.W. Second St. in Corvallis.

As director of the Keystone Archaeological Research Fund at Oregon State, Davis leads investigations of what ancient Americans left behind on the southern Oregon coast and along Idaho’s lower Salmon River. He has also collaborated in work at Paisley Caves in Central Oregon and in projects in Baja California and elsewhere on the West Coast.

Sponsors of Science Pub include Terra magazine at OSU, the Downtown Corvallis Association and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

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Loren Davis, loren.davis@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-3849

    

Corvallis Queer Film Festival to run Feb. 22-25 at Darkside Cinema

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The 2017 Corvallis Queer Film Festival will be held Feb. 22-25 at Darkside Cinema, 215 S.W. Fourth St., Corvallis.

The international festival offers three feature-length documentaries and 60 short films by queer- and trans-identified directors selected from over 750 entries. It is a community project sponsored by the School of Language, Culture and Society in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University. 

The festival schedule is:

  • Feb. 22: 6 p.m., documentary, “Words: An Exploration of Identity.” 7:30 p.m., short films, Queer Subjects 1.
  • Feb. 23: 6 p.m. short films, Queer Subjects 2; 7:45 p.m., experimental short films.
  • Feb. 24: 6 p.m., documentary, “Parole de King!” 7:45 p.m., short films, 18 and older only.
  • Feb. 25: 6 p.m. documentary, “Hot Men, Cold Dictatorships.” 7:45 p.m. short films, Queer Subjects 3. 

Admission to all showings is free. All programs contain adult themes and viewer discretion is advised. The short films showing at 7:45 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24 contain explicit sexual content; no one under age 18 will be admitted and identification will be required.

The full program, including descriptions of films, is available online at http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1199626383.

 

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Source: 

Juan Antonio Trujillo, 541-737-3956, jtrujillo@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University Theatre presents 'For the Love of Lies' in February

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present in February the bold, romantic comedy “For the Love of Lies,” a bawdy tale in the tradition of Italian Commedia dell’arte.

The performances will be at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 16-18 and Feb. 24-25, and at 2 p.m. Feb. 26 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

Commedia dell’arte is a wildly physical and improvisational form of theatre dating back to the Italian Renaissance that has inspired everything from Shakespeare to contemporary musical theatre. Guest director Dan Stone will bring to life a traditional Commedia scenario filled with slapstick humor, music, mistaken identity and love that conquers all.

The play follows the madcap shenanigans of vain and willful young lovers attempting to defy the odds and live happily ever after. The production will follow a basic plot line, but each performance will be improvised and the show will vary from night to night.

“Because we have no script we are not bound by the world of a playwright, and therefore our possibilities for creation are endless and anything can happen,” Stone said. “These performances are intended for mature audiences and may include crude behavior, adult situations, bad language and most of all, poor taste.”

The cast includes students from OSU and Linn-Benton Community College. Performers include: Ethan Baker-Hayes as Fabrizio; Hayden Bickford as Orazio; Hannah Costa as Franchesca; Joe Cullen as Pantalone; Cheyenne Dickey as Zanni; Lindsey Esch as Arlecchino; Kelsey Farquhara as Musician; Alessandra Ferriso as Pedrolino; Cole Haenggi as Graziano; Sydney King  as Flaminia; Ben Lawrence as Brighella; Thomas McKean as Capitano; Keiley Neill as Zanni; Amy Stein as Isabella; Alexandra Walchli as Musician; and Matthew Wright as Flavio.

Tickets are $12 for general admission, $10 for seniors, $8 for youth/students, and $5 for OSU students. They are available through the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784. Contact the box office for disability access accommodations and/or group ticket sales. Tickets are also available online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ.

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Cliburn medalist Joyce Yang to replace Nareh Arghamanyan at Feb. 12 Steinway Series concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Pianist Joyce Yang will perform as part of the Corvallis-OSU Piano International Steinway Series at 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12, in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

Yang replaces pianist Nareh Arghamanyan, who was originally scheduled to perform. Arghamanyan, who is an Armenian citizen, was advised by her attorney in Vienna that she should not travel to the United States at this time because of current visa and border entry uncertainties.

Yang, a silver medalist at the 2005 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, has been hailed for her “poetic and sensitive pianism” by the Washington Post. The Korean pianist has entranced audiences around the world with a meteoric rise to international prominence.

Her solo appearances have included dates with major symphonies in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Toronto and Sydney; the BBC Philharmonic, and the Deutsche Symphonie-Orchester Berlin. A frequent solo recitalist, Yang has notably performed at the Kennedy Center, New York City’s Metropolitan Museum and Lincoln Center, and the famed Tonhalle in Zurich, Switzerland.   

Tickets for the show are $25 in advance and $28 at the door. Advance tickets are available online at corvallispiano.org or at Grass Roots Books & Music and Rice’s Pharmacy in Corvallis. Students ages 8 to 18 and all college students with valid identification will be admitted free.

Corvallis Arts For All discounts apply and are valid for purchase of up to two $5 tickets at The LaSells Stewart Center starting one hour prior to the concert with a SNAP card. For accommodations relating to a disability please call 541-737-4671, preferably at least one week in advance.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

OSU’s Fairbanks Gallery presents work by Portland artists Damien Gilley and Jeff Sheridan

CORVALLIS, Ore. – New work by Portland area artists Damien Gilley and Jeff Sheridan will be on display Jan. 25 through March 8 in the Fairbanks Gallery on the Oregon State University Corvallis campus.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Admission is free. The gallery will stay open until 8 p.m. on Feb. 16 and refreshments will be served as part of the Corvallis Arts Walk.

Gilley is a multi-disciplinary artist and educator. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at venues including Tetem Kunstruimte, Enshchede, Netherlands; EastWestProject, Berlin; MARC, Kivik, Sweden; Suyama Space, Seattle; Las Belfry, New York; the Art Museum of South Texas and in various Portland locations.

Gilley’s studio process involves randomly laying down multiple, slightly varied laser lines across a darkened room. Each line uniquely adjusts to the physical variations of the room and the objects housed within it. This creates unique and colorful sprites that, when viewed in chorus, point to an architecture existing in an alternate dimension.

Sheridan is a multi-disciplinary artist who paints an archetypal narrative drawing inspiration from science, the occult and folklore. His work explores the dual nature of our contemporary existence, advocating for improvement while living in a state of constant decay.

Sheridan's cartoons are anecdotes on contemporary issues, social tics, psychological minutiae and the environment. They have been recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists and featured in Creative Loafing, The Tampa Bay Times, The South Florida Sun-Sentinel and the Portland Mercury.

Sheridan employs a reparative process of line-making, in which every mark is a slight variation of its predecessors. This semi-random process denies pre-conception outright. The outcome is a visual imprint of the artist’s experience over the course of a specific moment in time. 

The exhibition, titled “Darwin Machine,” is curated by Fairbanks Gallery Coordinator Andrew Nigon. The name is derived from a 1987 article by William H. Calvin, titled “The Brain as a Darwin Machine,” describing how the human brain arrives at complex conclusions through a natural selection process where many slightly varied random possibilities compete against one another to be the most effective.

Within a millisecond, a winning solution is elected, implemented and finally catalogued into a long chain of memories and experiences used to choose future winners. Every decision made affects our neurological hardware and so affects all future decisions. Nigon described the studio practices of Gilley and Sheridan as Darwin Machines.

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Andrew Nigon, nigona@oregonstate.edu

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"Scan C.L." by Damien Gilley

Chris L

"Populate" by Jeff Sheridan

Populate

Former GRAMMY Museum director to give talk on GRAMMY Awards

Former GRAMMY Museum executive director Bob Santelli will speak at Oregon State University on Thursday, Jan. 26, providing a backstage look at the GRAMMY Awards, the most watched music television program in the world.

The presentation will be at 7:30 p.m. at The LaSells Stewart Center, Construction and Engineering Auditorium on the OSU campus in Corvallis. A question-and-answer period will follow.

Santelli served as the executive director of the GRAMMY Museum from 2008 to 2016, and was instrumental in helping OSU become an official university affiliate of the Los Angeles-based museum. He is currently the director of popular music and performing arts in the College of Liberal Arts. 

Santelli will show rare performance clips, detail the process by which artists get nominated for GRAMMY Awards and share stories of great GRAMMY moments. The 59th annual GRAMMY Awards air Feb. 12, 2017, on CBS.

Santelli is the author of more than a dozen books on American music, including “Greetings from E Street” and The Bob Dylan Scrapbook.” He has contributed to Rolling Stone and the New York Times, among other news outlets.  In 1993, he was one of the original curators of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, eventually moving to Cleveland to become the museum’s first director of education and vice president of public programs.

In 2000, he became the chief executive officer of the Experience Music Project in Seattle, the first interactive music museum. Santelli also developed the UK’s first pop music museum, the British Music Experience. Named executive of The GRAMMY Museum in 2006, he created “An Evening With…” series that featured in-depth interviews with artists such as Dave Matthews, Brian Wilson, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Nicks and Clive Davis.

Since arriving at OSU in September, Santelli has brought a group of students to the White House for a special music education program, created programs for songwriters across campus and in the community, taught classes on popular culture, and maintained a partnership with the GRAMMY Museum. 

Media Contact: 

Celene Carillo, celene.carillo@oregonstate.edu; 541-737-2137

Source: 

Bob Santelli, robert.santelli@oregonstate.edu; 541-737-1797

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