OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

OSU Theatre opens 2015-16 season with ‘Romeo and Juliet’ in November

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s 2015-16 season will begin this month with a production of William Shakespeare’s enduring tale of young love, “Romeo and Juliet.” 

Performances will be held beginning at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 12-14 and Nov. 19-20 and at 2 p.m. Nov. 22 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

OSU theater arts professor George Caldwell is directing the familiar tale of star-crossed lovers, which is set at the height of the 19th-century Romantic era and will feature elegant costumes and exciting swordplay.

The cast features OSU students Kolby Baethke as Paris; Daniel Barber as Mercutio; Cheyenne Dickey as a vendor;  Robert Best as Lord Montague; Dakota Carter as a Montague; Ruth Drake as a vendor; Erick Harris as Samson; Nick Diaz-Hui as Tybalt; Lindsey Esch as Lady Montague; Sedona Garcia as Benvolia; Anahelena Goodman-Flood as a friend; Brian Greer as Romeo; Alex Herrington as Rosaline; Emerson Hovekamp as a Capulet;  Jade Kasbohm as a local; Sidney King as the apothecary; Hunter Leishman as Abraham; Annie Parham as Juliet; Nate Pereira as a Capulet servant; Chase Pixley as a Capulet; Emily Upton as the nurse; Steve Walter as a Montague; and Cory Warren as the Prince.

Also featured are community actors Rick Wallace as Lord Capulet; Diana Jepsen as Lady Capulet; and Craig Currier as Friar Lawrence.

‘Romeo and Juliet’ is the first production of the 2015-16 OSU Theatre season, “All the World’s a Stage: Celebrating Shakespeare,” and will feature a collection of plays inspired by Shakespeare. The season is being dedicated to the memory of C.V. “Ben” Bennett, a long-time OSU faculty member who died this summer. During his career, Bennett worked in technical theater, as a director, as coordinator of the University Theatre and as chair of the Department of Speech Communication at OSU.

Other productions planned for the season include Cole Porter’s jazzy musical, “Kiss Me Kate,” Paula Vogel’s “Desdemona: A Play About A Handkerchief,” and Tom Stoppard’s “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.” 

Tickets for ‘Romeo and Juliet’ are $12; $10 for seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ or by calling the box office at 541-737-2784. Accommodations for disabilities and group ticket sales may also be arranged through the box office.

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Elizabeth Helman, Elizabeth.Helman@oregonstate.edu

 

Panelists to discuss Iran nuclear deal Nov. 5 at Oregon State

Oregon State University faculty and other experts will discuss the latest news and information about the nuclear deal with Iran beginning at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 5, in the Valley Library on campus.

The event is an opportunity to explore the historical roots of the accord, consider its impact on war and peace, and discuss central issues related to non-proliferation and related international relations issues.

It is sponsored by OSU’s Citizenship and Crisis initiative, directed by history professor Christopher McKnight Nichols. The discussion will be moderated by event co-organizer Jacob Hamblin, professor of the history of science and director of environmental arts and humanities at OSU. Panelists include:

  • Nichols, who also is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations;
  • Jonathan Katz, a history professor whose research has focused on Iranian history and Islamic political theory;
  • Linda Richards, instructor in the history of science, whose research has focused on issues related to human rights and the history of nuclear technologies;
  • Mark Schanfein, senior proliferation adviser at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former employee of the International Atomic Energy Agency;
  • Susan Voss, nuclear engineer, president of Global Nuclear Network Analysis, a consulting firm, and former employee of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

The discussion will be held in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center in the library, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. It is free and open to the public.

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Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

‘Contemporary Japanese Prints’ exhibit opens Nov. 9 at Fairbanks Gallery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “Contemporary Japanese Prints,” an exhibit exploring the Japanese aesthetic, will be on display Nov. 9 through Dec. 1 in the Fairbanks Gallery at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

A reception will be held from 4:30 to 6 p.m. on Nov. 19, with a gallery talk by OSU art professor Yuji Hiratsuka at 5 p.m.

“Contemporary Japanese Prints” explores the distinctive and influential Japanese aesthetic. A driving force behind this aesthetic is Japan’s appreciation of technical skill and craftsmanship. From fashion to fine art, the physical artifacts of Japanese culture reflect this dedication to creating precious and precise art and design, exhibit organizers say.

This dedication is well-suited to printmaking, a medium where the tools, workshop, esoteric details and variety of techniques make it an art form which is process-driven. The work in this exhibition embodies both superb technical ability and the alluring Japanese aesthetic.

The artists represented in the exhibit are from all stages in their careers. Yukio Fukazawa is a 91-year-old graphic master, while Fumiko Suzuki is a 27-year-old recent graduate of art school. She is producing hand-drawn stone lithographs; her images are that of her contemporary female artists in Tokyo portrayed in intimate self-reflection.

Keisuke Yamamoto, Tomuyuki Sakuta, Sohee Kim, Azumi Takeda and Ryohei Tanaka are among the other artists featured in the exhibit.

This exhibit was curated by Miranda K. Metcalf, director of contemporary works of paper at Davidson Galleries in Seattle. Metcalf traveled to Tokyo in September 2014 to research and prepare the exhibition.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

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Douglas Russell, 541-737-5009, or drussell@oregonstate.edu

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“Perhaps” by Fumiko Suzuki

Perhaps

“Golden Seven” by Hikari Hirose

Golden Seven

“A Frozen Passage” by Yukio Fukazama

 

A Frozen Passage

Novelist T. Geronimo Johnson to read at Oregon State Nov. 5

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Author T. Geronimo Johnson will give a free public reading beginning at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 5, in the Valley Library rotunda on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow.

Johnson is the author of “Hold it ‘Til it Hurts,” a PEN/Faulkner finalist. His most recent book, “Welcome to Braggsville,” was longlisted for the National Book Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction.

“Welcome to Braggsville” is a provocative comedy about four liberal University of California, Berkeley students who stage a mock lynching during a Civil War reenactment. It was named one of the 10 books all Georgians should read by the Georgia Center for the Book, and was recommended by UC Berkeley as summer reading for incoming undergraduates.

The Washington Post hailed the book, describing it as: “The most dazzling, most unsettling, most oh-my-God-listen-up novel you’ll read this year.”

Johnson is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. He is a founding and core faculty member in the OSU-Cascades low-residency creative writing program, teaching fiction. He also has taught writing at UC Berkeley, Stanford, Iowa Writers’ Workshop, The Prague Summer Program, San Quentin and elsewhere. 

The reading is part of the 2015-16 Visiting Writers Series at Oregon State, which is sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing with support from the OSU Libraries and Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

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T. Geronimo Johnson

T. Geronimo Johnson

Young Latinos experience discrimination when obtaining health care, research shows

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Young Latinos living in rural areas say they face discrimination when they obtain health care services – a factor that could contribute to disparities in their rates for obtaining medical care and in their health outcomes, a new study from Oregon State University has found.

Perceived discrimination is considered a barrier to obtaining health care services for underrepresented populations, including Latinos, according to lead researcher Daniel López-Cevallos, associate director of research for the Center for Latino/a Studies and Engagement at OSU.

The findings were published recently in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. The research was co-authored by S. Marie Harvey, associate dean and professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. Harvey received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to support the study.

Researchers conducted interviews with 349 young adult Latinos, ages 18 to 25, living in rural Oregon. Nearly 40 percent of those interviewed said they had experienced health care discrimination, such as being prevented from accessing services; being hassled; or being made to feel inferior in some way.

“What matters is the perception,” Harvey said. “If a person is less likely to seek out services because of that perception, it needs to be addressed.”

Latinos are considered an underserved group because they are less likely to obtain regular health care services and have higher rates of chronic disease such as diabetes than the general population, leading to disparities in their overall health and well-being. 

The researchers’ goal was to better understand the role perceived discrimination plays in Latinos’ access to and use of health care services. Much of the past research on discrimination in health care has focused on African-Americans and people living in urban settings. This study emphasizes the experience of Latinos living in rural areas, a trend emerging as Latino populations move to rural areas across the nation, Lopez-Cevallos said.

“We have a different population here, so we want to be able to address concerns in Oregon and other states with growing rural Latino communities,” he said.

Addressing health care barriers facing Latinos and other underrepresented groups is important because when health care issues go undiagnosed or untreated, health care costs tend to rise. Prevention, early diagnosis and disease management are critical components of health care reform under the federal Affordable Care Act.

Nearly 45 percent of foreign-born Latinos, reported discrimination, compared to about 32 percent of Latinos born in the U.S. Researchers did not ask participants in the study about their immigration status.

Some Latinos may feel discriminated against simply because they are not eligible for health care programs and cannot get the access to services that they need, Lopez-Cevallos said.

Immigration reform policies, such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy enacted by President Obama in 2012, could also open access for Latinos who are not eligible for care under the Affordable Care Act. People who qualify for the program have access to employment, and employment often leads to access to health care, Lopez-Cevallos said.

The findings also suggest a need to improve “cultural competency” among health care providers, from the doctors to the receptionists to the lab technicians, so Latinos are treated with respect and dignity, the researchers said.

“It’s not all on the doctor, it’s up to the whole health care team,” Lopez-Cevallos said.

“For young adult Latinos, ‘confianza,’ a term that encompasses trust, respect, level of communication and confidentiality, is really important,” Harvey added. “If they don’t feel like they are treated with confianza, they may view that as discrimination.”

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Daniel López-Cevallos, 541-737-3850, Daniel.lopez-cevallos@oregonstate.edu; S. Marie Harvey, 541-737-3824, Marie.harvey@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University’s School of Arts and Communication launches new arts event series

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The School of Arts and Communication in Oregon State University’s College of Liberal Arts is starting a new performing and visual arts series to bring well-known headliners, rising stars and unique, lesser-known artists and ensembles to Corvallis throughout the year. 

The series, “SAC Presents,” will feature a wide range of musical genres, from country music to jazz, chamber music and rock. The series also will include exhibits and lectures by visual artists and guest speakers addressing topics associated with the arts.

“This new series allows us to bring a wide range of artists to the campus and the community, while also providing our students with opportunities to go to a variety of performances they might not otherwise have an opportunity to experience,” said Lee Ann Garrison, director of the School of Arts and Communication.

SAC Presents will kick off with several events during OSU’s homecoming weekend. They are: 

  • “How Country Music Became America’s Pop”: A talk by Bob Santelli, executive director of the Los Angeles-based GRAMMY Museum, Thursday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. Free and open to the public.
  • The Music Revolution Project: A select group of OSU students and alumni will spend the day in a songwriting workshop with Santelli, a music producer and music faculty, followed by a concert showcasing their work. The performance will be held at 4 p.m., Friday, Oct. 23, in the Fairbanks Gallery at OSU, 220 S.W. 26th St. Free and open to the public.
  • Jackson Michelson Concert: Rising country music star Michelson, a Corvallis native, will present a free concert on Friday, Oct. 23. The Grange Hall Drifters will open the show, which is co-sponsored by the OSU Alumni Association. 8 p.m., Student Experience Center Plaza, 2251 S.W. Jefferson Way.

The series will continue in November with a performance by concert violinist, recording artist and Milwaukee Symphony concertmaster Frank Almond on Nov. 17. Almond will perform a recital to commemorate the 300th birthday of his celebrated, historical instrument, a 1715 Lipinski Stradivari. The concert will be held in Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center. Tickets are $25; they are available at Gracewinds Music in Corvallis and online at TicketTomato.com.

Performances by the chamber music group Ivy Street Ensemble; Douglas Detrick’s AnyWhen Ensemble, a chamber music- jazz hybrid band; and other events also are being planned for the winter and spring terms, with dates to be announced later.

The new series, along with growth in OSU’s music, art, and theatre programs, is supported in part by generous gifts from donors, including donations made during the Cornerstone for the Arts challenge, in which donors gave over $6 million to support the arts at Oregon State.

More information about SAC Presents is available online at http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/sac-presents-series.

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Erin O’Shea Sneller, 541-619-2420, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

Hiroshima bombing survivor to speak at Oregon State University Oct. 22

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Hideko Tamura Snider, who survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima at the end of World War II, will speak at Oregon State University on Thursday, Oct. 22.

The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in the Construction and Engineering Auditorium of LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. in Corvallis.              

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the bombing. Snider, the 2015 Hiroshima Ambassador for Peace, was injured but survived the August 1945 bombing of Hiroshima. Her mother and thousands of others were killed.

Since 1979, Snider has been speaking around the United States and in her native Japan, sharing her story and encouraging people of all cultures and nations to examine the consequences of the use of nuclear weapons and to work toward peace and nuclear nonproliferation. Her memoir, “One Sunny Day,” was published in 1996. She is also the author of the children’s book “When a Peace Tree Blooms.”

In her presentation at OSU, she will speak on the physical, psychological, and spiritual effects of the bomb, from the immediate aftermath to more permanent consequences. She also will discuss the challenge of peace and of lessons learned from Hiroshima since the war. 

In addition to Snider’s lecture, the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU’s Valley Library is marking the anniversary with an exhibit showcasing the Atomic Age. The exhibit includes a wide range of materials documenting nuclear history.

The exhibit, “The Nuclear Age: Seventy Years of Peril and Hope,” includes hundreds of original primary sources, including comics, newspapers, photographs, manuscripts and letters from anti-nuclear activists Linus Pauling and Albert Einstein. 

The exhibit gallery is located on the fifth floor of the library, 201 S.W. Waldo Pl. The exhibit, which will run through March 1, 2016, is free and open to the public. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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Anne Bahde, 541-737-2083, anne.bahde@oregonstate.edu; Linda Richards, 541-740-3341, atomiclinda@gmail.com

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Hideko Tamura Snider

Hideko Tamura Snider

Author Justin St. Germain to read at Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Author Justin St. Germain, a new faculty member at Oregon State University, will read from his work at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 16.

The reading will be in the Valley Library Rotunda, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow. The event is free and open to the public.

St. Germain joined OSU’s creative writing program this year as an assistant professor. His first book, the memoir “Son of a Gun,” was published by Random House. The book chronicles his mother’s murder, the reverberations of grief, and the culture of guns and violence in the Arizona desert.

“Son of a Gun” won the 2013 Barnes & Noble Discover Award in nonfiction and was named a best book of 2013 by Amazon, Amazon Canada, Library Journal, BookPage, Salon, Publisher’s Weekly and the Pima County Public Library.

St. Germain’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, the Guardian, Hobart, Barrelhouse, and various other journals, magazines, and anthologies, including the Best of the West series. He is the recipient of scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and was a Wallace Stegner Fellow and Marsh McCall Lecturer at Stanford University.

The reading is part of the 2015-2016 Literary Northwest Series, sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU and is made possible with support from the OSU Libraries and Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu 

 

Sex is more likely on days college students use marijuana or binge drink

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Undergraduate college students were more likely to have sex on days they used marijuana or binged on alcohol than on days they didn’t, new research from Oregon State University has found.

Binge drinking and being in a serious dating relationship also were linked with less condom use, putting young adults at risk for sexually-transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancies. The findings draw attention to some common but risky sexual behaviors in college students, said the study’s lead author, David Kerr

“People may judge risks, such as whether they will regret having sex or whether they should use a condom, differently when they are drunk,” said Kerr, an associate professor in the School of Psychological Science at OSU.

Having sex without a condom is considered a risky behavior because condoms are the only way to protect against STIs, including HIV. For the purposes of the study, binge drinking was defined as four or more drinks for women and five or more drinks for men. 

The effect of binge drinking on sex and condom use may not sound like a new finding - Kerr notes that dozens of studies have compared the risk behaviors of college students who drink a lot versus those who do not. But only a handful of studies have tested whether a given person behaves differently on days they drink heavily compared to days they do not.

For the study, the researchers recruited 284 college students who reported their marijuana use, alcohol use, sexual activity and condom use every day for 24 consecutive days. The findings were published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

One goal of the study was to examine marijuana use, which rarely has been studied in relation to risky behavior. Understanding marijuana effects is even more important now that several U.S. states, including Oregon, have legalized recreational use. Marijuana and alcohol affect the brain in different ways, and more research is needed to understand how these differences affect risk-taking, Kerr said.

“College students were more likely to have sex on days they used marijuana, but we didn’t find a connection between marijuana use and poor condom use,” he said. 

The study also compared the sexual behavior of college students who were single versus those who were seriously dating someone.

“Two findings stood out,” Kerr said. “Students in serious relationships had almost 90 percent of the sex reported in our study. But serious partners used a condom only a third of the time, compared to about half the time among single students. More frequent sex plus less protection equals higher risk. 

“The stereotypical image is of college students drinking and having casual sex,” Kerr said. “That is real, but in our study it was striking how often those in serious relationships were putting their guard down.”

Condom use was even less likely when college students used another form of birth control, an indication that they may be more focused on preventing pregnancy than on protecting themselves from an STI, he said. That’s a concern because while young people may believe they are in a committed relationship, many don’t end up with their college partners long-term. 

“When people are in a serious relationship they may think, ‘We can stop using condoms,’ ” Kerr said. “But if someone has unprotected sex with multiple monogamous partners over their college years, the risks can add up.”

Kerr worked on the study with Isaac Washburn, an assistant professor at Oklahoma State University; Stacey Tiberio, a research scientist at Oregon Social Learning Center; and former OSU student researchers Katherine Lewis and Mackenzie Morris. 

The researchers’ findings could be used by prevention professionals to improve sexual health messaging, identify the best times and places to distribute condoms, and encourage a focus specifically on STI prevention, Kerr said.

For example, ads and free condom campaigns might target people at bars or parties or those in committed relationships. Health providers also could counsel young adults about STI prevention when they discuss a patient’s alcohol use or when a patient seeks non-condom birth control.

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David Kerr, 541-737-1364, david.kerr@oregonstate.edu

OSU to present seventh International Film Festival Oct. 12-18

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s seventh International Film Festival, showcasing a diverse array of movies from international cultures, will be held Oct. 12-18 in Corvallis.

The festival is organized and hosted by the School of Language, Culture and Society in the College of Liberal Arts at OSU. The festival was launched in 2009 by faculty teaching film courses in foreign language and literature to showcase the variety of international cultures.

All screenings will be held at Darkside Cinema, 215 S.W. 4th St., Corvallis. The screenings are free and open to the public but attendees need to obtain a ticket at the Darkside before entering the auditorium. Seats are limited so early arrival is encouraged.

The schedule of screenings is:

  • Oct. 12 - 6 p.m.: “Akte Grüninger,” (Grüninger's Fall), 2013, in Swiss German and German with English subtitles.

8 p.m.:  “Huo zai anjian li de ren,” (Black Coal, Thin Ice), 2014, Mandarin with English subtitles.

  • Oct. 13 - 6 p.m.: “Männer zeigen Filme & Frauen ihre Brüste,” (Men Show Movies & Women Their Breasts), 2013, German and French with English subtitles.

8 p.m.: “Gekitotsu! Satsujin ken,” (The Streetfighter), 1974, Japanese with English subtitles.

  • Oct. 14 - 6 p.m.: “Hilda,” 2014, Spanish with English subtitles.

8 p.m.: “Wacken,” 2014, in English.

  • Oct. 15 - 6 p.m.: “Was heißt hier Ende?” (Then Is It the End?), 2015, German with English subtitles.

8 p.m.: “Soshite chichi ni naru,” (Like Father, Like Son), 2014, Japanese with English subtitles.

  • Oct. 16 - 6 p.m.: “Hijo de Trauco,” (Son of Trauco), 2013, Spanish with English subtitles.

8 p.m.: “Im Keller,” (In the Basement), 2014, German with English subtitles. Note this film is for adult audiences only; some images may be disturbing to some viewers.

  • Oct. 17 - 2 p.m.: “Shana: The Wolf’s Music,” 2014, in English.

4 p.m.: “El día trajo la oscuridad,” (Darkness by Day), 2013, Spanish with English subtitles.

6 p.m.: “Die abhandene Welt,” (The Misplaced World), 2014, German, English and Italian.

8 p.m.: “Cerro Torre,” 2013, English, Spanish, German and Italian.

  • Oct. 18 - Noon: “Lola auf der Erbse,” (Lola on the Pea), German with English subtitles.

2 p.m.: “Auf das Leben!” (To Life!), 2014, German with English subtitles.

4 p.m.: “Theeb,” 2014, Arabic with English subtitles.

 For additional information about the festival or the films being screened, visit the festival web site at http://bit.ly/1t36jOz.

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Sebastian Heiduschke, 541-737-3957, Sebastian.heiduschke@oregonstate.edu