OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

OSU Opera Workshop to present production of Aubert’s ‘The Blue Forest’ May 13-14

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Opera workshop will perform Louis Aubert’s opera “The Blue Forest” at 7:30 p.m. May 13 and 14 on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Composed at the turn of the 20th Century during a golden age of artistic symbolism, “The Blue Forest” is a whimsical fairytale opera set to a libretto by Jacques Cheneviere, who drew inspiration from the fairy tales of Charles Perrault. The three-act opera includes material from the popular tales “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Hop-o’-my-Thumb,” and “Sleeping Beauty.”

Marc Callahan, a visiting assistant professor at OSU and a world-traveling opera performer/director is directing the production. “The Blue Forest” also features video and sound production by OSU music instructor Mike Gamble and extensive artwork from OSU art instructor Andrew Myers.

Marrying art and science, the cross-disciplinary production also draws from the body of scientific and technological knowledge and abilities at OSU. From the use of the brilliant blue pigment created by OSU chemist Mas Subramian and his research team, to “forest creations” by Sara Robinson, assistant professor in the OSU College of Forestry, a scientific approach is present throughout this multimedia-rich production.

“The Blue Forest” is the first major performing arts production to use the OSU’s new Learning Innovation Center, a $65 million 130,000-square foot multi-disciplinary building designed for students from all academic areas at OSU.

The performance will be held in a classroom in the round, Room 100, in the LInC building, 165 S.W. Sackett Place, Corvallis.

General admission tickets are $10 advance or $12 at the door. Advance tickets are available online at http://www.tickettomato.com. OSU students free with valid ID. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply. For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

Foreign policy conference to feature Corvallis lecture, Portland panel discussion

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Harvard University historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Fredrik Logevall will speak at 7 p.m. Friday, May 13, at Oregon State University.

Logevall, the author of “Embers of War,” is the keynote speaker for “Rethinking Grand Strategy,” an international conference on American foreign policy strategy hosted by OSU. More than 20 renowned scholars of the U.S. role in the world will present papers, discuss and debate the historical development of the United States’ foreign policy and how this history might inform contemporary policies and also present challenges.

Logevall’s lecture, “American Grand Strategy: How Grand Has it Been? Does it Matter?” will be held in the Horizon Room of the Memorial Union on the OSU campus. It is free and open to the public and a book-signing will follow.

Additional panel discussions and presentations will be held from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. May 13 and May 14 in the Memorial Union Journey Room on the OSU campus in Corvallis. All panels are free and open to the public; on-site registration is required. A full schedule of events is available online: http://bit.ly/1TteLnC.

The conference concludes Monday, May 16, with a panel discussion, “Immigration and American Politics,” at the Oregon Historical Society, 1200 S.W. Park Ave., in Portland. The discussion, co-sponsored by the World Affairs Council, will begin at 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Panelists are: Elizabeth Borgwardt, an associate professor of history at Washington University, St. Louis; Christopher McKnight Nichols, an assistant professor of history and director of Citizenship and Crisis Initiative at OSU; and Daniel J. Tichenor, the Philip H. Knight Chair of Political Science and senior scholar at the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics at the University of Oregon.

C-SPAN’s American History TV also is expected to record several panels for later broadcast. Organizers also hope to compile a book from the work presented at the event.

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Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

Auditions for OSU’s summer Bard in the Quad production to be held May 15-16

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Open auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s popular summer event, Bard in the Quad, will take place at 6 p.m. May 15 and 16 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. Call-backs may be held May 17 if needed.

Bard in the Quad, an annual production featuring Shakespeare plays in a casual, outdoor summer atmosphere, will return for its 11th season with a production of the romantic comedy, “Love’s Labour’s Lost.”

In the play, the King of Navarre and his three friends attempt to swear off love and affection in exchange for lives of study and denial, but their resolve is quickly tested when a beautiful princess and her ladies-in-waiting come to court. The tale explores the conventions of courtship, oaths, and human desire.

A full-text version of the script is available online at http://shakespeare.mit.edu/lll/full.html. Those auditioning should read the script beforehand and be prepared to perform cold readings and movement exercises. Auditions are open to all students, staff, faculty and community members.

Rehearsals will begin with a read-through on May 28. Regular rehearsals will start June 19 and be held from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays. Technical/dress rehearsals are July 30-Aug. 3.

Performances run August 4-8 and August 11-14. All actors must be available for all of technical rehearsals and performances and to strike the set immediately following the closing performance.

For more information, contact Elizabeth Helman, Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Wind Ensemble to perform world premiere of ‘Heart of a Forest’ by artist Paul D. Miller

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Wind Ensemble will perform the world premiere of Paul D. Miller’s “Heart of a Forest” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 18, in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th Street, Corvallis.

Miller, a composer, multimedia artist and author who also goes by the stage name D.J. Spooky, composed the work after four artist residencies in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. He said that the piece is inspired by Thoreau and “the collision of data, sound and new ways to think about the absence of origins.”

“No one owns the forest and the sounds that it inspires,” Miller said. “It’s all a mirror of what is possible in our hyper interconnected world. Like the roots of trees underneath the forest. It is all connected, and we all contribute to the elements that make it evolve.”

Loosely based on the concept of Antonio Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons,” the work, composed for wind ensemble and turntables, explores a post-minimalist soundscape in which Miller draws from his immersive experience of visiting the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest during each of the four seasons of the year. Neo-classical in nature, the audience will be treated to a work that features the familiar and the modern.

Miller’s work has appeared at the Venice Biennial for Architecture, the Andy Warhol Museum, the Whitney Biennial and others. Miller spent 2012-2013 as the first artist-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and has collaborated with a diverse array of popular musicians, including Yoko Ono, Chuck D and Thurston Moore. Rising to fame through his hip-hop turntablist persona “DJ Spooky,” Miller is a global artist who has engaged in creative projects on all seven continents.

The project is collaboration between the Oregon State University School of Arts and Communication, the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word and the Oregon State University Wind Ensemble. Funding was provided by the Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights program and the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station.

The OSU Wind Symphony, under the direction of Dana Biggs, will open the concert with Alfred Reed’s “Hound of Spring,” “Elegy for a Young American” by Ronald Lo Presti, Chorale and Alleluia by Howard Hanson, an excerpt from Frank Ticheli’s Second Symphony and Vientos y Tangos by Michael Gandolfi.

The OSU Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Christopher Chapman, will also perform Percy Grainger’s popular “Lincolnshire Posy,” “Daybreak Crossing” by David Biedenbender and a transcription of John Adams’ fiercely rhythmic “Short Ride in a Fast Machine.”

Tickets are $7 in advance, $10 at the door. OSU students with ID and youth in grades K-12 will be admitted free. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply, allowing purchase of up to two tickets for $5 each at the door with a SNAP card. Advance tickets are also available online at www.tickettomato.com.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Wind Ensemble

OSU Wind Ensemble

 

Paul D. Miller

Paul Miller

OSU Theatre to present ‘Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead’ in May

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present Tom Stoppard’s existential comedy, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,” May 12-14 and May 20-22 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The production continues OSU Theatre’s yearlong celebration of William Shakespeare. Stoppard’s hilariously wise and surreal take on Hamlet re-imagines the classic tragedy from the perspective of two minor characters.

Unsure of why and how they have been brought to the castle of Elsinore, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern attempt to navigate their way through a dangerous high-stakes game of deception, madness, murder, and revenge. Originally premiering at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 1966, this absurdist comedy challenges audience perceptions of life, death, reality, and free-will.

 “This play is incredibly rich and complex. I love how it blends physical comedy with philosophical discourse and endearing characters,” said Director Elizabeth Helman, an OSU Theatre faculty member. “There’s something for everyone.”

The cast features OSU students Daniel Barber (The Player), Sedona Garcia (Gertrude), Forest Heintz (Tragedian), Jesse Johnson (Tragedian), Jackson Lango (Hamlet), Jay McNair (Ambassador), Reed Morris (Guildenstern), Nate Pereira (Horatio), Risa Perez (Tumbler), Lauren Smith (Ophelia), and Kyle Stockdall (Tragedian). Community members Matt Holland (Tragedian), Robert Iltis (Polonius), Brad Stone (Alfred), Rick Wallace (Claudius), and Joseph Workman (Rosencrantz) also join the cast.

Shows are at 7:30 p.m. May 12-14 and May 20-21 and at 2 p.m. May 22. Tickets are $12 General Admission, $10 Senior, $8 Youth/Student, and $5 OSU Student. Tickets are available through the OSU Theatre Box Office by calling 541-737-2784. Online ticket sales begin at 9 a.m. May 2 and can be purchased at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ. Contact the box office for disability accommodations or group ticket sales.

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Artist Ben Buswell to speak at OSU, exhibit work at Fairbanks Gallery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Ben Buswell, an award-winning sculptor and multimedia artist, will speak and exhibit work at Oregon State University as part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series.

Buswell will exhibit embellished photographs, mixed media drawings, sculpture and acrylic on canvas in the Fairbanks Gallery on the OSU campus in Corvallis May 2 through May 25.

On Wednesday, May 4, he will give a talk in Fairbanks Gallery at 5 p.m. A reception will be held prior to the talk at 4:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Buswell also will speak in art classes and critique student work that day.

Buswell, a native of Dallas, Oregon, received a bachelor of fine arts from OSU in 2001. He went on to study at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he earned a master’s degree in 2004 and a master’s in fine art in 2005.

His work is temporal in nature, spanning a variety of media, from ceramics to incised photographs, using processes such as doubling and repetitive mark-making.

“I am always touching the world in an effort to build an intuitive sense of how materials communicate through their presence,” Buswell said in an artist’s statement about his work.

“I have a firm belief that we exist only through our bodies, that we are wholly physical things. So material and sculptural presence, as surrogates for this idea, are embedded in the way I think about content. My work is the interaction of the spaces between things: more specifically the space between us. I am looking for the space right before the story is told, the place where we agree to listen.”

Buswell has received a Hallie Ford Fellowship in the Visual Arts, supported by the Ford Family Foundation. His work appears in numerous public and private collections and has also been supported by grants from the Regional Arts and Culture Council and the Oregon Arts Commission. He lives and works in Portland and is represented by Upfor Gallery.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

The School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to campus to interact with students so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar.

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Michael Boonstra, 541.737.5017, michael.boonstra@oregonstate.edu 

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"Wasps," graphite on paper, 2008. Photo by Mario Gallucci, courtesy of the artist and Upfor Gallery.

Wasps

The Phi Beta Kappa Society to install new chapter at OSU April 28

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Phi Beta Kappa Society, the nation’s most prestigious academic honor society, will install a new chapter at Oregon State University at a special ceremony on Thursday, April 28.

The Epsilon of Oregon chapter will become the 286th Phi Beta Kappa chapter installed in the society’s 240-year history. The installation, led by Phi Beta Kappa President Catherine White Berheide, begins at 6 p.m. in Room 100 of the Learning Innovation Center on OSU’s Corvallis campus. It is free and open to the public.

Immediately following the installation, the new chapter will induct its first class of members. About 200 Oregon State University juniors and seniors will be recognized for their accomplishments in the liberal arts and sciences.

The new chapter also will induct four notable individuals as members, called Foundation members, selected in honor of their achievements, as well as their ongoing commitment to the arts and sciences. They are: writer, journalist, and educator Ta-Nehisi Coates, and OSU graduates Jon DeVaan, Patricia Reser and Patrick Stone. A chapter many induct chapter Foundation members only at installation.

Coates will offer a video message at the ceremony; he is planning a visit to OSU in the future to acknowledge his induction, meet with students and give a public lecture.

OSU President Edward J. Ray, who has been a member of Phi Beta Kappa since he was inducted during his studies at Queens College in the City University of New York, will also provide remarks at the event.

“I am genuinely pleased that we are now able to offer Phi Beta Kappa membership to some of Oregon State’s many high-achieving students,” Ray said. “Becoming a member of Phi Beta Kappa had a profound impact on my life and on my career as a higher education leader.”

When Ray was in college, he could not afford the membership fee, but a family friend generously paid it for him. That inspired Ray and his late wife, Beth, to set up a fund to make sure OSU students with similar financial limitations aren’t prevented from becoming members.

The Kay Bowers Fund for Phi Beta Kappa Students, established by the Rays, will provide assistance for eligible students who don’t have the resources to pay the society’s lifetime membership fee.

Because of the generosity of the Rays and with support from OSU administrators Larry Rodgers, Sastry Pantula, Toni Doolen and Susie Brubaker-Cole, OSU is covering membership fees for all students in the inaugural class of inductees, said Christopher McKnight Nichols, an assistant professor of history at OSU and vice president-elect of the new chapter.

“The level of commitment OSU has displayed in encouraging and advancing student achievement is truly remarkable,” said Phi Beta Kappa Secretary John Churchill. “The faculty and staff have worked together to create an environment that embodies academic excellence in the liberal arts and sciences. OSU Phi Beta Kappa graduates will be tomorrow’s critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers. We are very pleased to recognize OSU’s commitment and look forward to the chapter’s bright future.”

Only about 10 percent of the nation’s colleges and universities shelter Phi Beta Kappa chapters. Prospective inductees are usually seniors among the top 10 percent of their graduating class who have completed a broad range of liberal arts and science coursework, including foreign language study and mathematics. Exceptional students meeting the society’s requirements may also be considered as juniors.

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Tara Williams, 541-737-6412; tara.williams@oregonstate.edu; Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

Framing discourse around conservative values shifts climate change attitudes

BEND, Ore. – Conservatives’ attitudes toward climate change and other environmental concerns shift when the issues are reframed in terms more closely aligned with their values, a new study from Oregon State University indicates.

Researchers found that people who identified as conservative were more likely to support “pro-environmental” ideals when the issues were framed as matters of obeying authority, defending the purity of nature and demonstrating patriotism. 

The study underscores the ways in which discussions of important topics are informed by a person’s moral and ideological perspective, said the study’s lead author, Christopher Wolsko, an assistant professor of psychology at OSU-Cascades.

“We think we’re just discussing issues, but we’re discussing those issues through particular cultural values that we normally take for granted,” Wolsko said. “If you re-frame issues to be more inclusive of those diverse values, people’s attitudes change.” 

The findings were published in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Co-authors are Hector Ariceaga and Jesse Seiden, who are alumni of OSU-Cascades.

Wolsko studies ecopsychology, a field that examines the relationship between humans and the natural world from both a psychological and ecological perspective. The goal of his latest research is to better understand the widespread political polarization occurring around environmental issues such as climate change. 

“This political polarization has been a big issue, even in the current presidential campaign,” Wolsko said. “Why is that? What, exactly, is going on psychologically?”

Moral foundations theory suggests that liberals and conservatives respond differently to broad moral categories. Liberals respond more favorably to moral issues involving harm and care, or fairness and justice, and conservatives respond more favorably to issues framed by loyalty, authority and respect, and the purity and sanctity of human endeavors, Wolsko said.

In a series of experiments, the researchers tested how shifts in moral framing affected attitudes toward environmental issues such as climate change. They reframed questions about conservation and climate change around ideals of patriotism, loyalty, authority and purity and paired them with imagery such as flags and bald eagles. 

They found that reframing the issues around these moral foundations led to shifts in attitudes for conservatives, who were more likely to favor environmental concerns in that context. There was no noticeable shift in attitudes among liberals, which isn’t a big surprise, Wolsko said.

Environmental issues are typically framed in ideological and moral terms that hold greater appeal for people with liberal views. Conservatives may not so much be rejecting environmental concerns, but rather the tone and tenor of the prevailing moral discourse around environmental issues, he said. 

That does not mean people should reframe critical discourse to manipulate attitudes about environmental concerns, Wolsko said. Rather, the goal should be to find more balanced ways to talk about the issues in an effort to reduce the polarization that can occur.

“The classic move is to segment people along these ideological lines,” he said. “But if we’re more inclusive in our discourse, can we reduce the animosity and find more common ground?” 

Future research should look at messaging that is considered more neutral and appeals to people with both liberal and conservative ideologies, Wolsko said.

“I’m really interested in the extent to which we can bring everyone together, to be more inclusive and affirm common values,” he said. “Can we apply these lessons to the political and policy arenas, and ultimately reduce the vast political polarization we’re experiencing right now?”

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Christopher Wolsko, 541-322-3182, chris.wolsko@osucascades.edu

OSU Theatre to host reading of ‘La Gringa’ in its 20th anniversary season

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The longest running off-Broadway Spanish language play, now in its 20th season, will be the focus of a public reading on Wednesday, May 4, at Oregon State University. 

“La Gringa” is the story of a young woman from New York who goes to Puerto Rico in search of her roots by finding her extended family. Her over-enthusiasm for what she calls her “homeland” leads to an array of complications and comic dialogue.

A cast of OSU students, faculty, staff and community members will present the reading, which begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Withycombe Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way. It is free and open to the public. Because of the set configuration, latecomers cannot be seated.

The cast includes Mayela Delatorre (Maria), Laura Galindo (Iris), Kerstin Colón (Norma), Oscar Montemayor (Victor), Eldon dela Cruz (Ramon), Steven Evans-Renteria (narrator), and Juan Guzman (Manolo). The reading is presented by OSU’s School of Arts & Communication’s University Theatre.

“La Gringa” premiered in New York City and is still being presented there by Repertorio Español Theater. The OSU reading is the fourth and final installment of OSU’s Latin@ Theatre Project, funded through the Memorial Union Foundation Pepsi Endowment. 

Susana Rivera-Mills, OSU’s vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies, said the series has been transformational.

“Theater provides a safe place in which to reflect on one’s experience, confront difficult human realities, and challenge our own sense of identity and knowledge of others as not being set in concrete, but always evolving and adapting,” Rivera-Mills said. “Latina plays give voice to a population that isn’t always seen or heard.

“I believe that these artistic expressions of diverse perspectives will help us better understand the experiences of our various campus communities.”

Other plays in the series have been readings of Elaine Romero’s “Wetback,” Milagro Theatre’s “Broken Promises” and Josefina Lopez’s “Real Women Have Curves.”

 

 

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Charlotte Headrick, 541-737-4918, cheadrick@oregonstate.edu

OSU history professor awarded prestigious Carnegie fellowship

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Christopher McKnight Nichols, an assistant professor of history at Oregon State University, has been chosen as a 2016 Andrew Carnegie Fellow, a prestigious academic fellowship for social sciences and humanities scholars.

The Carnegie fellowship, supported by the Carnegie Corp. of New York, assists scholars, journalists and authors whose work in the social sciences and humanities distills knowledge, enriches culture, and equips leaders in fields of science, law, technology, business and public policy.

In all, 33 distinguished scholars from across the nation were selected from more than 200 nominees. Each will receive up to $200,000 to fund one to two years of scholarly research and writing aimed at addressing some of the world’s most urgent challenges to U.S. democracy and international order.

“I am thrilled and honored to have been named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow,” Nichols said. “The package of support this fellowship offers is unique for an historian or humanities scholar. Carnegie assistance is going to allow me to pursue an ambitious research and writing agenda as well as a plan for outreach and engagement on a set of historical issues with clear contemporary relevance, which I otherwise could not do.”

Nichols plans to research and write a book entitled “American Isolationism,” about isolation and internationalism in foreign affairs, from the founding of the United States to the present. It also will examine how American foreign relations affect domestic policies. In addition, he plans to host a summer institute on ideas and foreign policy and a conference on isolationism, democracy and international order.

“Though Professor Nichols is early in a very promising career, he has already become a national leader in the intellectual and political history of United States foreign relations,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “Beyond the originality and scope of his project, Professor Nichols’ work promises to richly inform our present debates about the proper role of United States intervention abroad.” 

Nichols teaches in the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts. He is an expert on the history of the United States and its relationship to the rest of the world, particularly in the areas of isolationism, internationalism and globalization, and is the author numerous works, including the book “Promise and Peril: America at the Dawn of a Global Age,” which traces the origins of modern American isolationism and internationalism.

He also launched the “Citizenship and Crisis” initiative at OSU in 2014. The initiative began as an effort to mark the 100th anniversary of World War I and has expanded to now include a wide array of programming focused on domestic and global aspects of citizenship as well as engaged democracy. The goal of the initiative, which includes a series of lectures, town halls and other events, is to examine how the concept of citizenship has changed over time and in moments of crisis.

Nichols, who joined OSU in 2012, earned his doctorate at the University of Virginia. He was recently elected as a permanent member of the Council on Foreign Relations, an independent, non-partisan organization that serves as a think tank and educational resource on foreign policy and international issues.

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Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu 

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Christopher McKnight Nichols

Christopher Nichols