OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

OSU announces lineup for third season of SAC Presents

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Public radio personality Ira Glass, renowned Portland band Pink Martini and acclaimed percussionist Colin Currie and the Oregon Symphony String Ensemble are among the performers visiting Oregon State University as part of the 2017-18 “SAC Presents” series.

SAC Presents is a visual and performing arts events series presented by the School of Arts and Communication at OSU. The 2017-18 season marks the series’ third year. The goal of the series is to bring well-known headliners, rising stars and unique, lesser known artists and ensembles to the community.

This year’s performances include:

  • Nov. 2, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. – Voces 8, an a capella octet from the United Kingdom, now one of the world’s most popular vocal ensembles. The OSU Chamber choir will also perform.
  • Jan. 27, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. – “The Pianist of Willesden Lane,” a performance of the true story of a young Jewish musician whose dreams were interrupted by the Nazi regime.
  • Feb. 2, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. - “Body and Soul,” a film by Oscar Micheaux, restored and featuring a remixed score by Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky, performed live with Miller and an ensemble.
  • March 17, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. – “An Evening with Ira Glass: Seven Things I’ve Learned.” The host of “This American Life” will mix his program live on stage, explaining the creative process and sharing lessons from his life and career.
  • April 4, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. – Colin Currie and the Oregon Symphony String Ensemble. Currie, the internationally acclaimed percussionist, brings his energy and virtuosity to the region’s premier string instrumentalists.
  • Saturday, April 28, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. – Pink Martini, a Portland-based group known as the “little orchestra” that features a wildly diverse, multi-lingual repertoire.
  • Thursday, May 24, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. – Brooklyn Rider with Kayhan Kalhor. The adventurous string quartet and the master of the Persian kamancheh blur the lines between Western classical and Eastern traditional music.

All performances will be held in Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St.

New this year, SAC Presents is partnering with OSU KidSpirit to offer child care in Langton Hall during performances. Children must be 3 or older and fully potty-trained. Advance registration is required for child care. More information, including reservation and pricing details, are available online at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACpresents.

Also new this year, food, beer and wine and non-alcoholic beverages will be available from Valley Catering in the lobby before performances beginning at 6 p.m. Food and beverages also will be allowed in the Austin Auditorium. 

Discounted season tickets and “pick four” ticket packages are available online now at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACpresents. Individual performance tickets will go on sale Sept. 1.  Discounted tickets for OSU students will be available when individual performance tickets go on sale Sept. 1.

SAC Presents participates in Corvallis Arts for All. If tickets remain on the evening of the performance, individuals in the SNAP program with an Oregon Trail Card may purchase up to two tickets at $5 each starting one hour prior to each performance. Call for availability.

For more information and for accommodations for people with disabilities, call 541-737-5592.

SAC Presents is funded in part by donations made during the Cornerstone Campaign for the Arts and by OSU Friends of the Arts.

Source: 

Erin O’Shea Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

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Ira Glass

Ira Glass

Pink Martini

Pink Martini

Voces 8

VOCES 8

Self-identifying as disabled and developing pride in disability aid overall well-being

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Experiencing stigma, the severity of a disability and a person’s age and income level help determine whether someone with an impairment considers themselves to be a person with a disability, and experiencing stigma predicts whether those individuals will ultimately develop disability pride, new research from Oregon State University shows.

“Roughly 15 percent of the world’s population has some kind of disability but just a fraction of those people actually identify themselves as people with disabilities. Disability identity is a critical step in accepting a disability and helps to reduce the stigma surrounding the label,” said Kathleen Bogart, an assistant professor of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University

Those who self-identify are also more likely to develop pride in their disability, a shift in thinking that can help build resilience and change public attitudes about the “disabled” label, said Bogart, an expert on ableism, or prejudice about disabilities, whose research focuses on the psychosocial implications of disabilities.

“The challenge with disability as a label is that it’s so mired in stigma that people don’t want that label,” she said. “Can we reduce the stigma and reframe the label as a neutral label that is just useful as a category, like male or female? Or taking it even further, can we shift the label to the point where people have pride in that label?” 

Bogart explored issues around disability self-identification and disability pride in two new studies published recently in the journal Rehabilitation Psychology.

The first study examined who is most likely to self-identify as disabled. For the study, about 700 people over age 18 completed an online survey that asked them to identify health conditions they had by checking boxes, or if their condition was not listed, filling in a box. Among the most common impairments were allergies, anxiety, depression, migraines, back injury or pain, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, respiratory disease, hypertension and chronic pain. 

Participants also were asked to rate characteristics of their health condition, such as whether it affects daily life, how often it causes physical pain and how often it is noticeable to other people. In addition, they completed a questionnaire about whether they experienced stigma and discrimination because of their condition. They were also asked whether they identify as a person with a disability. Only 12 percent of people with a health condition agreed or strongly agreed that they were a person with a disability.

The researchers found that experiencing stigma, along with severity of the impairment, were the biggest factors influencing whether someone with a disability identified that way. 

“The finding regarding stigma was a really powerful one,” Bogart said. “It supports the idea that the concept of disability is primarily a social construct, developed by society’s reaction to that impairment. It’s not just the physical impairment. It’s the way people treat you and the way society builds an environment that does or does not include you.”

The study results suggested that severe impairments lead to greater stigma, which increased the likelihood that people self-identified as disabled. 

In the second study, the researchers looked further at the role disability pride plays in overall wellbeing for people with disabilities. Developing pride in the disability – and rejecting the stigma of society on whole - shows promise as a way to protect against stigma and build self-esteem, Bogart said.

“Little is known about the good things that might come with embracing a disability identity,” Bogart said. “We believe developing pride may offer some protective effects for people with disabilities who experience stigma.” 

Using the same set of more than 700 survey participants from the previous study, but looking at additional questions, the researchers analyzed factors that influence whether someone has pride in their disability. They found that disability pride tended to be more prevalent among those who experience stigma, those who have strong social support and people of color. They also found that people experiencing greater stigma seemed to lead to more pride, and greater pride was associated with greater self-esteem.

“Disability pride is still a rare thing,” Bogart said. “Most disabilities are invisible and people have to choose to identify with them. Many people hide their disabilities to avoid discrimination. But not identifying also perpetuates the stigma that disability is undesirable. Developing disability pride seems to protect self-esteem against the negative effects of stigma. It’s a really valuable protection for people with disabilities. 

“A logical next step for the research would be to develop interventions designed to boost disability pride among people with disabilities and at a policy level, with the goal of improving overall well-being and reducing stigma.”

Social support within the disability community could be bolstered through social groups and mentoring. At a policy level, political activism, media representation featuring disability pride and disability pride events may support pride development.

Co-authors of the self-identification study are Adena Rottenstein of Eastern Michigan University; Emily M. Lund of Boston University; and Lauren Bouchard of Purdue University. Rottenstein and Lund are also co-authors on the pride study. The research was supported by a research grant from the OSU College of Liberal Arts.

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Kathleen Bogart, 541-737-1357, Kathleen.bogart@oregonstate.edu

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Kathleen Bogart

Kathleen Bogart

OSU summer choir presents eclipse-themed ‘The Path of Totality’ concert Aug. 19

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University summer choir will present “The Path of Totality,” an eclipse-themed concert, at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19, in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis.

In celebration of the upcoming solar eclipse and as part of the “OSU150 Space Grant Festival: A Total Eclipse Experience,” the concert program will explore a range of music from baroque to present. Works include excerpts from Handel’s “Messiah,” “Samson” and “Israel in Egypt;” Haydn’s “Creation;” Mendelssohn’s “How Brightly Shines the Morning Star;” Abbie Benitis’ “Lumen;” “My Song in the Night” by Paul Christenson; “Bright Morning Stars” by Sean Kirchner; Morten Lauridsen’s “Sure on this Shining Night;” “Lux Aeterna” by Tom Porter; “True Light” by Caldwell and Ivory; and “Lux Beatissima” by OSU music alumnus Joshua Rist.

The OSU summer choir is an annual tradition that brings together students, staff and community members. It also serves as a learning laboratory for graduate music education students. Steven Zielke, director of choral studies at Oregon State, facilitates the ensemble and mentors the five graduate conductors, Danika Locey, Terence Madlangbayan, Emma Nissen, Francis Sefton and Joseph Mikkelson, who lead the ensemble in performance.

Tickets are $10 for general admission; OSU students, K-12 students and guests who purchased lodging packages for the OSU eclipse event will be admitted free on a space available basis. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply.  

Advance tickets are available at: http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/events/music/osu-summer-choir-path-totality. Accommodations requests relating to a disability may be made by contacting Erin Sneller at 541-737-5592 or erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu at least one week in advance.

“The OSU150 Space Grant Festival: A Total Eclipse Experience” is the start of a 15-month celebration of OSU’s 150th anniversary.

Media Contact: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671

OSU’s Fairbanks Gallery presents eclipse-related art exhibition, ‘Totality’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “Totality,” a cosmos-themed art exhibit saluting the rare total solar eclipse occurring in August, will run Aug. 14 through Sept. 28 in Oregon State University’s Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

 “Totality” brings together a group of artists who make work about people’s relationship with the Cosmos in some manner. The emphasis is on lyrical, conceptual, scientific, fantasy and historic responses to the universe or to humankind’s space exploration.

Selected artists and their artworks include photographer Eric William Carroll’s project “Standard Stars,” which documents the deterioration of emulsion peeling off astronomical glass plate negatives. Artist Penelope Umbrico samples images of the most-photographed subject matter - sunsets - in her single-channel video “Sun/Screen.” Corvallis-based astrophotographer Tom Carrico exhibits his photographs of nebulae, which are clouds of dust, hydrogen, helium and plasma in space and can be challenging to photograph.

The exhibition was curated by Julia Bradshaw, assistant professor of photography and new media at OSU. Bradshaw also has assembled a host of arts-related special events for visitors coming to Corvallis and the OSU campus during the weekend prior to the eclipse, which will occur Aug. 21.

“I relish the range of imaginative and fact-based artistic responses to the Cosmos,” Bradshaw said of the exhibit. “Making and viewing artwork that explores philosophies of space puts us in touch with our humanity in ways that are particularly thought-provoking.”

Additional arts programming the weekend prior to the eclipse will include photography workshops and performances in the gallery. Activities are free and take place at Fairbanks Hall. For a complete schedule of events, visit: http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/school-arts-and-communication/art/fairbanks-gallery-art/upcoming-exhibitions/totality.

Fairbanks Gallery is open weekdays from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m., and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 17 and Sept. 21 for the Corvallis Art Walk. The gallery will also be open Aug. 19 and 20 leading up to the eclipse. A closing reception for “Totality” will take place Sept. 21 in conjunction with the Corvallis Art Walk.

“Totality” is part of the OSU150 Space Grant Festival: A Total Eclipse Experience, and SPARK, a year-long celebration of the arts and science.

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Julia Bradshaw, 541-737-5014 or julia.bradshaw@oregonstate.edu

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“Sunburst,” by John Whitten
Sunburst

Photograph by Eric William Carroll
Eric William Carroll

“Laika’s Lullaby,” by Julia Oldham

Laika

Bard in the Quad at OSU to present ‘Two Gentlemen of Verona’ for 12th season

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s Bard in the Quad returns for its 12th season this August with a western-themed production of Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, “Two Gentlemen of Verona.”

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. nightly from Aug. 3-6 and Aug. 10-13 in the Memorial Union Quad, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis. 

Bard in the Quad performances are held outside and no seating is provided, creating a fun, laid-back atmosphere. Attendees are encouraged to bring low lawn chairs and/or blankets, warm clothing and food if desired. Seating begins at 6:30 p.m. and no one will be seated prior to that time.

“Two Gentlemen of Verona” is a romantic comedy about Proteus and Valentine, two inseparable friends living happily in Verona. When Valentine seeks his fortune in Milan and ends up leaving Proteus behind, promises are broken as Proteus finds himself suddenly infatuated with Valentine’s love-interest, Sylvia. 

With a new setting in the American Wild West and music presented by Miss Kitty and the Barn Bangerz, the story of action, disguise, mistaken identity, and a scene-stealing dog unfolds.

This summer’s production will feature adoptable dogs playing the role of a senior dog named Crab for each performance. The dogs will be provided by Heartland Humane Society and Heartland volunteers will join the cast and crew in promoting the organization’s work caring for homeless animals in Benton County. 

The cast features Oregon State University students, staff, alumni and community members including: Stuart Ashenbrenner as Valentine; Sedona Garcia as Sylvia; Forest Gilpin as Thurio; Matt Holland as Launce; Emily Peters as Miss Kitty; Andrew Schiek as Speed; Cheyenne Dickey as Antonia/Bandit; Matt Easdale as Bandit; Genesis Hansen as Julia; Kay Keegan as musician; Grace Klinges as Lucetta/Bandit; Mac Powers as musician; Mike Stephens as Duke of Milan; and Kyle Stockdall as Proteus.

Tickets are $15 for general admission, $10 for students and seniors, and $5 for OSU students. Tickets are available online at http://oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre/ or available by phone at the Theater Arts Box Office at 541-737-2784. A box office also will be available in the MU quad at 6:30 p.m. on performance evenings.

For disability access accommodations or information about group sales call Marissa Solini, the box office manager, at 541-737-2853.

Media Contact: 

Lanesha Reagan, 541-737-4611, oregonstateuniversitynews@oregonstate.edu

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Elizabeth Helman, 541-737-3067, Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu

OSU Press publishes new book on strategies for ‘wicked problems’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new book about past ”wicked problems” that have confounded society, the economy, the environment and politics may help guide the nation through its current era of political polarization and complex issues.

Scholars say so-called wicked problems usually involve social, economic, environmental and political issues. In a new book, just published by the Oregon State University Press, a group of scholars has written a series of essays to address these challenges and propose an assortment of problem-solving methodologies to tackle wicked problems.

The essays were solicited and edited by Edward Weber, Denise Lach and Brent Steel of the School of Public Policy at Oregon State, and compiled into “New Strategies for Wicked Problems: Science and Solutions in the 21st Century.” It is available in bookstores, by calling 1-800-621-2736, or by ordering online at osupress.oregonstate.edu

“The book will appeal to scholars, students and decision-makers wrestling with wicked problems and ‘post-normal’ science settings beyond simply environment and natural resource-based issues,” said Marty Brown, marketing manager for the OSU Press. “At the same time, it will provide much-needed guidance to policymakers, citizens, public managers and other stakeholders.”

One such issue addresses the pros and cons of hydraulic fracturing, commonly referred to as “fracking.” Written by Christopher Weible and Tanya Heikkila of the University of Colorado-Denver, the essay explores how professional expertise, personal values, and affiliation with different groups affects how people approach the issue – and how the process might be regulated.

Robert Lackey, a fisheries biologist who has worked for the Environmental Protection Agency and OSU, tackles the issue of wild salmon recovery in the Pacific Northwest. He argues that the science and technology to restore wild salmon runs is available, but the solutions ultimately would be too restrictive and divisive to succeed. The billions of dollars spent on salmon recovery to make minute inroads into the solution might be considered “guilt money,” he says.

“It is money spent on activities not likely to achieve recovery of wild salmon, but it helps people feel better as they continue the behaviors and choices that preclude the recovery of wild salmon,” Lackey wrote.

In their concluding essay, editors Weber, Lach and Steel explore whether there is need for a new social contract for scientists and policy implementation. They argue that plans to address issues are often rushed and lack sufficient time for implementation – and the timetable for addressing such issues rarely matches funding cycles. Additionally, leadership needs training – not only on issues, but on how to engage stakeholders and collaborate on processes.

They wrote: “… We also hope to energize the scholarly and practitioner-based conversations and real-world practices around these topics in ways that help leaders and stakeholders imagine new possibilities, conduct new experiments in implementation, and, ultimately, make even more progress in the ongoing, difficult battle against wicked problems and their less-than-desirable effects for society as a whole.” 

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Mark Floyd, 541-737-0778

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Marijuana use among college students on rise following Oregon legalization, study finds

CORVALLIS, Ore. – College students attending an Oregon university are using more marijuana now that the drug is legal for recreational use, but the increase is largely among students who also report recent heavy use of alcohol, a new study has found.

Oregon State University researchers compared marijuana usage among college students before and after legalization and found that usage increased at several colleges and universities across the nation but it increased more at the Oregon university. None of the universities were identified in the study. 

“It does appear that legalization is having an effect on usage, but there is some nuance to the findings that warrant further investigation,” said the study’s lead author, David Kerr, an associate professor in the School of Psychological Science in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts.

“We found that overall, at schools in different parts of the country, there’s been an increase in marijuana use among college students, so we can’t attribute that increase to legalization alone.” 

The results were published today in the journal Addiction. Co-authors are Harold Bae and Sandi Phibbs of OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Adam Kern of the University of Michigan.

The study is believed to be the first to examine marijuana usage patterns following legalization of recreational marijuana in Oregon and the first to examine the effects of any state’s legalization on college students. Voters in Oregon approved legalization in 2014 and the law took effect in 2015. 

Oregon’s legalization of marijuana is part of a larger trend among U.S. states, but little research has been done so far to understand the impact. In their study, Kerr and his colleagues set out to begin addressing some of those questions.

“It’s an important current issue and even the most basic effects have not been studied yet, especially in Oregon,” he said. “There are a lot of open questions about how legalization might affect new users, existing users and use of other substances.” 

Researchers used information collected in the Healthy Minds Study, a national survey of college students’ mental health and well-being – including substance use – conducted by the University of Michigan. The study is designed to give colleges and universities information to help them understand the needs of their student populations.

As part of the survey, participants are asked about marijuana and cigarette use in the previous 30 days, as well as frequency of heavy alcohol use within the previous two weeks. 

Using data from a large public university in Oregon and six other four-year universities around the country where recreational marijuana is not legal, researchers compared rates of marijuana use before and after the drug was legalized in Oregon. They also examined frequency of heavy alcohol use and cigarette use at those points.

The researchers found that the overall rates of marijuana use rose across the seven schools. Rates of binge drinking – where a person consumes four to five or more drinks in a period of about two hours – stayed the same and cigarette use declined in that period. 

“It’s likely that the rise in marijuana use across the country is tied in part to liberalization of attitudes about the drug as more states legalize it, for recreational or medical purposes or both,” Kerr said. “So legalization both reflects changing attitudes and may influence them even outside of states where the drug is legal.”

Researchers also found that marijuana use rates were generally higher, overall, among male students; those living in Greek or off-campus housing; those not identifying as heterosexual; and those attending smaller, private institutions. 

One area where legalization had a marked impact was among college students who indicated recent binge drinking; students at the Oregon university who reported binge drinking were 73 percent more likely to also report marijuana use compared to similar peers at schools in states where marijuana remains illegal.

“We think this tells us more about the people who binge drink than about the effects of alcohol itself,” Kerr said. “Those who binge drink may be more open to marijuana use if it is easy to access, whereas those who avoid alcohol for cultural or lifestyle reasons might avoid marijuana regardless of its legal status.” 

The researchers also found that Oregon students under age 21 – the minimum legal age for purchasing and using marijuana – showed higher rates of marijuana use than those over 21.

“This was a big surprise to us, because legalization of use is actually having an impact on illegal use,” said Bae, the study’s primary statistician. 

These initial findings about marijuana use among college students help form a picture of how legalization may be affecting people, Kerr said, but more study is needed before researchers can quantify the harms or net benefits of legalization for young people.

“Americans are conducting a big experiment with marijuana,” Kerr said. “We need science to tell us what the results of it are.”

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David Kerr, 541-737-1364, david.kerr@oregonstate.edu

OSU Chamber Choir honors Ed and the late Beth Ray at annual President’s Concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Steven M. Zielke, will present the 13th annual President’s Concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 10, at First United Methodist Church, 1165 N.W. Monroe Ave. in Corvallis. 

The “Music of Spheres” concert revolves around Ola Gjeilo’s 2008 “Sunrise Mass,” for mixed choir and string orchestra. The film score-influenced work is a unique fusion of Latin Mass text and English titles in five sections: “The Spheres – Kyrie”; “Sunrise – Gloria”; “The City – Credo”; “Identity – Sanctus” and “The Ground – Pleni Sunt Coeli/Agnus Dei.”

The program also includes Michael Barrett and Ralf Schmitt’s arrangement of “Indonana,” a traditional South African folk song; “Sainte-Chappelle” by Eric Whitacre; a Craig Hella Johnson adaptation of Dolly Parton’s “Light of a Clear Blue Morning”; “Balleilakka,” by A.R. Rahman; and “Pseudo-Yoik” by Jaakko Mäntyjärvi. 

In 2004, OSU President Ed Ray and his late wife, Beth, established the Ed & Beth Ray Endowment for Choral Leadership Scholars. Each year since, four students – a soprano, alto, tenor and bass – who display excellent musicianship, leadership and vocal ability, have been honored with this award.

The following year after being selected, these students serve as section leaders in the OSU Chamber Choir. At the 2017 President’s Concert, four new students will be honored to continue this tradition. 

General admission seating is $10. OSU students with ID and K-12 youth are admitted free. Advance tickets are available online at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACevents. Corvallis Arts For All discounts apply. For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671, preferably one week in advance.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

Exhibit featuring graduating students’ thesis artwork at Fairbanks Gallery in June

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students completing their Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees will present their thesis work in an exhibit June 5-17 at the Fairbanks Gallery on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Twenty students graduating from various art disciplines will be exhibiting in the show. They are: Milla Oliveira, Mike Chasco, Angelica Ingeman, Diana Robbins, Kelsey Carruth, Ariyon Kawai, Brooklyn Cochran, Kiana McCurry, Mai Xee Yang, Johnny Beaver, Reid Dehle, Lily Hudnell-Almas, Koa Tom, Kaylee Weyrauch, Kody Kirkpatrick, Cat Fitzsimmons, Tiffany Cha, Madelaine Corbin, Alexandra May, Caroline Moses.

A reception will be held in the gallery at 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 6. OSU Provost Edward Feser will present the President’s Award for Excellence in Art and the Provost’s Purchase Award. Larry Rodgers, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, will present the College of Liberal Arts Purchase Award. Seniors of Distinction Awards also will be presented to outstanding graduating seniors in studio art, photography and art history.

Also at the reception, scholarships will be awarded to returning students, freshmen and transfer students selected through a competitive portfolio review. The scholarships include the Stone/Sponenburgh Scholarship, Joyce Dickerson Printmaking Award, Norma Seibert Print Scholarship, Yaquina Art Association Scholarship, Freshman Foundation Award, Helen E. Plinkiewisch Scholarship and others.

The Fairbanks Gallery is located at 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. Exhibits are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. It will also be open for special hours 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 15 and noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 17.

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Andrew Nigon, 541-737-4880, andrew.nigon@oregonstate.edu

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Tongue and Hip by Milla Oliveira

Tongue and Hip

Transcontinental by Milla Oliveira

 

Transcontinental

Student-directed one-act play festival runs June 1-4 at Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Three original, student-directed, one-act plays will be featured in Oregon State University Theatre’s annual Spring One-Act Festival June 1-3 on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. June 1-3 and at 2 p.m. June 4 in the Withycombe Hall Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way.

The three featured plays are comedies showcasing the creativity of student directors, actors and designers. The line-up includes: 

  • “The Two Minds of Mr. Coffan,” by Hannah Fretz and directed by Sedona Garcial, is a surreal look into the imagination of a struggling young writer whose characters come to life to help improve his terrible novel.
  • “Love Games,” by Heaven Carreon and directed by PJ Harris, is a wacky melodrama about the nature of sex, infidelity, and love.
  • “Skinner,” by Mike Stephens and directed by Brian Greer, is a pun-filled parody of 1980s teen-slasher movies depicting a group of naïve high school students on a weekend camping trip that goes terribly wrong.

Tickets for the 2017 One-Act Festival are $8 for general admission, $6 for seniors, $5 for youth/students, and $4 for OSU students. Tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ.

For accommodations related to a disability, contact the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784.

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