OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

leadership

OSU president calls on Oregon Legislature to prioritize state funding for higher education

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray today called on the Oregon Legislature to change course and make state funding for higher education a priority.

“We are at a crossroads, and the path we take will determine the state’s future and the future of all Oregonians,” Ray said during his annual State of the University Address that drew 750 people to the Oregon Convention Center today.

“Oregon’s disinvestment in higher education must not continue. After being adjusted for inflation, our state’s support for higher education has declined 21.7 percent since 2008 – 20 percent more than the national average rate of decline.”

Ray called on Gov. Kate Brown and Oregon legislators to “make college students and their future a priority for this state.”

In his speech, Ray also announced that the OSU Foundation had committed to raise $150 million to support Oregon State’s Student Success Initiative that aims to grow student access to Oregon State and increase substantially student retention and graduation rates by 2020.

Ray reported that the OSU Foundation has already raised more than one-third of its goal, money that will bolster the Student Success Initiative by supporting scholarships, student experiential learning “and other programs that will help all students reach their full potential.”

Without increased state funding, Ray said, student tuition may likely be increased by as much as 9 percent or more at some of Oregon’s universities; educational quality will suffer; and student programs will be cut.

“This impact is landing on the backs of students and their families as tuition now pays 66.9 percent of the cost of Oregon State’s Corvallis campus educational operations and the state only 21.4 percent. This represents more than a 50 percent decline in the state’s contribution from 15 years ago. And a 43 percent increase in the share that student tuition pays.”

Ray said Oregon’s seven public university presidents are seeking a $100 million increase in state operating funds for the 2017-19 biennium and that Oregon State is asking for $69.5 million in state bonding to continue expanding the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend – $49.5 million more than proposed by the governor.

Ray rolled out the Student Success Initiative one year ago, calling on the university within four years to make an OSU degree an affordable reality for every qualified Oregonian.

The initiative included by 2020 raising first-year retention rates for all undergraduate students to 90 percent; raising six-year graduation rates for all undergraduate students to 70 percent; achieving higher completion rates for all groups of graduate and doctoral students; and ensuring that every OSU student has at least one experiential learning opportunity such as an internship or study-abroad experience.

“I am all in for the Student Success Initiative,” Ray said. “As a first-generation college student myself, this is personal, and I am committed to double down and deliver. There is nothing worse for any student than to leave college without a degree – and for the only piece of paper they can show to be a bank statement from their student loan debt.

“While all of our graduates represent the future of Oregon, the nation and the world, it is simply not acceptable that some students have opportunities and others do not.”

Ray said that without requested state bonding, OSU-Cascades’ second classroom building will not open until 2023 at the earliest.

“That the Oregon Legislature would delay serving the demand for higher education in the fastest-growing region in the state is not credible,” he said.

“In 2025 OSU-Cascades will contribute $197.8 million in total annual economic output throughout Oregon,” Ray said. “Campus operations and construction activities will support $72.7 million in annual employee compensation and be responsible for 2,083 jobs across the state. This will result in an additional $3.43 million in annual state income taxes.”

Ray said in 2034, with 5,000 students, OSU-Cascades’ operations and construction activities will contribute $273.7 million in total annual economic output; $98.6 million in annual wages; 3,662 jobs across the state; and $4.83 million paid in annual state taxes.

“I know that Central Oregon residents would say they have waited long enough for a four-year university,” he said. “I hope that all Oregonians will agree that this university campus and its statewide benefits are long overdue.”

In his address, Ray said that 2016 had been another year of notable achievements for Oregon State. Among these:

  • The university in the fall opened the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend, Oregon’s first completely new college campus in a half-century, by dedicating Tykeson Hall;
  • Also in the fall, OSU opened Johnson Hall, the new, $40 million home of the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, and broke ground on the $65 million Oregon Forest Science Complex;
  • Grant-funded research at Oregon State totaled a record $336 million, a 9 percent increase from 2015, which had also been a record year;
  • The U.S. Department of Energy awarded OSU up to $40 million to create the nation’s premier test facility for wave energy;
  • Enrollment exceeded 30,000 students for the third year in a row, and more than 6,700 degrees were awarded to OSU’s largest-ever graduating class;
  • For the third year in a row, U.S. News and World Report ranked OSU’s online Ecampus undergraduate programs among the nation’s best – this year with a No. 8 ranking.

Ray also noted that Oregon State’s robotics program, ranked best in the western U.S. and fourth in the nation, has 11 of the country’s top robotics faculty who work with 100 graduate and undergraduate students in “demonstrating how robots and artificial intelligence can operate in the real world.”

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

Source: 
Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Ed Ray

OSU President Edward J. Ray

OSU Board of Trustees adopts 10-year business forecast, fossil fuel divestiture

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees on Friday adopted a 10-year business forecast to serve as a framework for the university’s long-term planning and operational management.

The forecast includes strategic cost management and revenue initiatives, a capital forecast and a projection of the university’s key financial ratios. Strategic opportunities for revenue growth include a variety of new, non-traditional programs. These include offering expanded professional degrees and certificates; non-credit courses; and courses or credential programs offered online.

Trustees learned Oregon State’s enrollment and revenue projections are closely tied to the build-out of the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend, as well as the continued growth of OSU’s online Ecampus program. The Bend campus is forecasted to serve approximately 4,000 students by 2027, while Ecampus is expected to double its full-time enrollment to 12,500 students over the same period.

“The long-term forecast is a dynamic tool that the university will use to identify areas of opportunity, priority and concern that may lie ahead,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “This framework will help effectively inform the Board of Trustees and university administrators to guide OSU moving ahead over the long term.”

Trustees also approved a framework to guide the board when considering policy changes in how university funds are invested. The evaluation framework requires that a request for an investment policy change aligns with the university’s mission and core values, and includes:

  • The rationale for the proposed request;
  • Consideration of financial impacts;
  • Consideration of any legal constraints;
  • Consideration of sustained and broad concern from a variety of university communities over a significant period of time; and
  • Demonstrate that stakeholders, who have generated the resources being invested, have been engaged in developing the request.

Trustees voted 11-0 – with two members recusing themselves – to approve an amendment to the Public University Fund Investment Policy that calls on the fund to divest its current intermediate and long-term assets in fossil fuel-related investment securities and restrict future investment of Public University Fund assets in fossil fuel-related securities. The Oregon Treasurer’s Office manages the Public University Fund on behalf of OSU and five other state public universities. About 1.7 percent of the fund presently is invested in fossil fuel-related securities. This amendment will be communicated to the other five universities that make up the Public University Fund.

Trustees voted to amend the university’s capital plan to approve a $12.75 million renovation of Hewlett-Packard Building 11 on the company’s Corvallis campus.  Building 11, which Oregon State leases, houses OSU’s Advanced Technology & Manufacturing Institute, a collaboration among OSU researchers and private industry plus startup companies driven by OSU research. The Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI), a multi-university and private sector collaboration funded by Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency, also has its main office in the building. Nearly 27,000 square feet of the building is unimproved and available for build-out and increased economic impact.

The investment in renovating the building will allow Oregon State’s College of Engineering to accept a five-year, $15-million grant from the National Network for Manufacturing Initiative.

The board heard a report from Becky Johnson, vice president for OSU-Cascades, on options to expand the Bend campus to meet the university’s goals to enroll 3,000 to 5,000 students.

One option is to develop a 56-acre campus, which includes OSU-Cascades’ existing 10-acre campus and an adjoining 46-acre site that the university owns. The second option incorporates these two parcels and an adjacent 72 acres owned by Deschutes County that has been used for decades as a demolition landfill.

Johnson told board members that acquiring this property and remediating the landfill would provide space for surface parking, athletic fields, and solar power arrays while also creating an opportunity for an innovation district.  The university would utilize recycled and remediated material from the landfill in developing the campus, and offer experiential learning opportunities for students.

The board also approved a 6 percent increase in compensation for the university president, effective Jan. 1. The increase reflected the results of an annual review and 360-degree evaluation of Ray by the board.

“In Ed Ray, we have a leader who has propelled this university forward,” said Pat Reser, chair of the Board of Trustees. “The sage wisdom that comes from this university president is sought out over and over again – even nationally. Leadership matters, and it needs to be recognized and rewarded.”

Ray said he would continue to contribute any raises that he receives to student scholarships, academic programs and student success initiatives.

The board’s Academic Strategies Committee approved a new undergraduate program in geography and geospatial science in the College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science. Sponsors of this academic proposal said employment in the geospatial workforce is the second-fastest growing job sector in the U.S. economy. The state’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission must approve this new academic program.

Board members heard presentations on the university’s budget for fiscal years 2017-18; the Legislature’s budget-setting process; and the process that the university is undertaking to evaluate and recommend a 2018 budget and tuition levels for the next academic year. Budget Director Sherm Bloomer outlined the ongoing, multi-month process that includes the University Budget Committee, a Student Budget Advisory Council, the OSU Provost’s Council, Faculty Senate and other groups. The board will consider final budget and tuition proposals at its March meeting.

During two and a half days of meetings, trustees heard presentations on:

  • OSU’s research enterprise, including four research programs, centers and institutes;
  • The university’s collaboration with the city of Corvallis on initiatives related to livability; high-risk student behaviors; transportation; and parking;
  • Efforts to advance equity, inclusion and social justice initiatives at Oregon State;
  • Plans to update OSU’s strategic plan and vision statement;
  • A 2017 legislative session update;
  • The university’s freedom of expression principles and protest philosophy; and
  • A status report on academic programs and accreditations in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

During public comment on Wednesday and Friday, the board heard from a number of students on tuition; divestment of OSU assets in fossil fuel-related securities; and the location of the Marine Studies Building in Newport.

The board held an executive session pursuant to Oregon law to conduct deliberations with those designated by the governing body to negotiate real property transactions and to consider information exempt by law from public inspection.

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

Source: 

OSU Board of Trustees revises agenda for Jan. 20 meeting

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet on Friday, Jan. 20, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Horizon Room of the Memorial Union, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way on Oregon State’s Corvallis campus. The meeting is open to the public.

The board’s agenda has been revised to include a presentation on a potential acquisition of real property. The board will also hold an executive session pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(e) and 192.660(2)(f) (ORS 192.501(6), ORS 502(9), ORS 40.225) to conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to negotiate real property transactions and to consider information or records exempt by law from public inspection.

The agendas and meeting materials will be posted as they are available at http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees/meetings. If special accommodation is required, please contact Marcia Stuart at 541-737-3449 or marcia.stuart@oregonstate.edu.

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

Source: 

OSU Board of Trustees and committees to meet Jan. 18-20

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet Friday, Jan. 20, to discuss Oregon State’s efforts to advance equity, inclusion and social justice; to receive an update on efforts to prepare for the 2017 Oregon legislative session; and to develop a vision statement for 2030.

Trustees will also consider a 10-year business forecast for the university; a framework to guide evaluation of investment policy change requests; amendments to the Public University Fund investment policy; an amendment to the OSU capital plan; and an adjustment in presidential compensation.

During the meeting, the board will hold an executive session pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(e) and 192.660(2)(h) to conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to negotiate real property transactions and to consult with legal counsel in regard to current litigation or litigation likely to be filed.

A public comment period is provided at each board meeting. Commenters must sign up prior to the public comment period of the meeting. Commenters may register by e-mail before the meeting by contacting Marcia Stuart at marcia.stuart@oregonstate.edu or may register at the meeting itself. There is also a public comment opportunity before the board votes on each action item listed on the board agenda.

The meeting is open to the public and will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Horizon Room of the Memorial Union, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way on Oregon State’s Corvallis campus.

On Wednesday, Jan. 18, the Finance & Administration Committee of the board will meet from 3:30-6:30 p.m. in the Willamette Room of the CH2M Hill Alumni Center, 725 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. The committee will review 2017-18 fiscal year tuition and budget scenarios. There will be an opportunity for public comment during this agenda item. Commenters may register by e-mail before the meeting by contacting Stuart at marcia.stuart@oregonstate.edu or may register at the meeting itself. In addition, the committee will discuss the university’s fiscal year 2016 financial statement analysis and financial metrics; consider the annual internal bank report; and consider an amendment to the university’s capital plan. The committee meeting is open to the public.

The following board committees will meet Thursday, Jan. 19, in the Horizon Room of the Memorial Union. These meetings are also open to the public:

·       The Executive & Audit Committee will meet from 8-9:45 a.m. to review the Office of Audit Services charter and final progress report and audit plan. The committee will also consider an adjustment in presidential compensation and will discuss the university’s statement of mission, principles and core values.

·        The Executive & Audit and Finance & Administration committees will hold a joint meeting from 9:45-10:30 a.m. to consider and approve the university’s fiscal year 2016 annual financial statements.

·       The Finance & Administration and Academic Strategies committees will hold a joint meeting from 10:45-11:45 a.m. The committees will consider the university’s 10-year business forecast.

·       The Academic Strategies Committee will meet from 12:15-3:15 p.m. to hear reports on OSU’s research enterprise; initiatives regarding student behavior, student housing and Corvallis community livability; OSU’s freedom of expression policies; and campus policies and practices regarding student protest. The committee will also consider a new academic program in geography and geospatial science, and will hear a status report on new and existing academic program reviews and accreditations in progress.

·        The Finance & Administration Committee will meet from 3:15-5 p.m. to consider a framework to guide evaluation of investment policy change requests. The committee will also hear presentations on an athletics financial sustainability plan and on the 2017 legislative session.

The agendas and meeting materials will be posted as they are available at http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees/meetings. The public can listen to the meetings by calling the toll-free number listed on the agendas.

If special accommodation is required, please contact Stuart at 541-737-3449 or marcia.stuart@oregonstate.edu at least 72 hours in advance.

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

Source: 

OSU’s online bachelor’s, engineering programs top-ranked nationally by U.S. News

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University upheld its status as a leader in online education today when it was ranked in the top 10 nationally by U.S. News & World Report for the third consecutive year.

Oregon State Ecampus, the university’s online education division, is ranked eighth out of more than 300 higher education institutions in the category of Best Online Bachelor’s Programs. OSU is tied for first among land grant universities on the list.

The full rankings are available online at http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education

Oregon State scored 89 points out of 100 in the rankings. Schools were assessed based on student engagement; faculty credentials and training; student services and technology; and peer reputation.

“Our mission is to provide adult learners with access to engaging programs that help them finish their degrees online and advance their careers,” said Ecampus Executive Director Lisa L. Templeton. “We view this recognition as a sign that the collaboration between Ecampus and our 600 Oregon State faculty partners is providing students everywhere with high-quality learning experiences.”

U.S. News also recognized Oregon State’s online master of engineering in industrial engineering program as being among the best of its kind in the nation. The fully online program, which has a focus on engineering management, is ranked number 28 nationally.

OSU Ecampus delivers 21 bachelor’s degrees online including business administration and a post-baccalaureate program in computer science. An additional 28 OSU graduate degree and certificate programs are offered online and in a hybrid (online/face-to-face) format.

In the 2015-16 academic year, more than 19,000 Oregon State students – over 60 percent of the university’s student body – took at least one Ecampus class. OSU’s distance learners are located in all 50 states and more than 40 countries.

Media Contact: 

Tyler Hansen, 520-312-1276

tyler.hansen@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Lisa L. Templeton, 541-737-1279

lisa.l.templeton@oregonstate.edu

Edward Feser named provost and executive vice president at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray has named Edward Feser the provost and executive vice president for the university.

Feser, who currently serves as interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and provost at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will begin at Oregon State on Feb. 28.

He succeeds Ron Adams, who has served as OSU’s interim provost and executive vice president since July 1.

“Ed Feser will be a great addition to Oregon State University,” said Ray. “His academic and leadership success at the University of Illinois, the University of North Carolina and the University of Manchester in England will serve him very well.

“Ed fully understands Oregon State’s land grant mission as Oregon’s statewide university and OSU’s role as an internationally recognized public research university,” Ray said. “As the provost of the University of Illinois, a nationally top-ranked land grant university, he has successfully helped provide transformative learning experiences for students in and out of the classroom, and steward a global research portfolio.”

As provost and executive vice president, Feser will provide leadership to continue implementation of the university’s strategic plan and student success initiative; support growth of OSU’s grant/contract-funded research and impact; foster faculty and graduate student success; and support OSU’s diversity, enrollment management, and outreach and engagement strategies.

Feser said he is excited to join Oregon State and inspired by the university’s successes and many future opportunities.

“Oregon State has gone through a remarkable transformation over the last decade or more,” Feser said. “This has been achieved as part of a deliberate and strategic process to guide Oregon State to become one of the leading land grant universities in the U.S.”

Feser said he was drawn to Oregon State for several reasons, including its West Coast location and natural orientation toward the Pacific Rim.

“I am very impressed by Oregon State’s quickly increasing research profile; the new OSU-Cascades campus in Bend; its focused instructional priorities; its outreach and engagement impact throughout Oregon; its current global reach and focus to expand internationally; and the institution’s next phase of visioning and strategic planning.

“As part of this strategic planning process and as Oregon State’s provost, I am committed to provide every student with the tools and community support needed to succeed.”

Feser was named Illinois’ interim provost in September of 2015. Beginning in 2012, he served as dean of the University of Illinois College of Fine and Applied Arts. As dean, he oversaw academic and engagement programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, design and the visual and performing arts.

Prior to becoming dean at Illinois, Feser held the Davies Chair of Entrepreneurship and served as head of the Division of Innovation, Management and Policy at the Manchester Business School, University of Manchester in England. He also was an associate professor and associate department head at the University of North Carolina, and in 2003, served as assistant secretary for the North Carolina state Department of Commerce. Since 2009, Feser has served as a senior research fellow with the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness in Arlington, Virginia.

Feser earned both a master’s degree in regional planning and a doctorate in regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a bachelor’s degree in government from the University of San Francisco.

Feser’s wife of 26 years, Kathy, is a civil engineer-turned-primary school science teacher. Their son, Jack, 22, is pursuing a doctorate in computer science at MIT. Their daughter, Mary, 19, is a freshman at Colorado College, studying economics and languages.

Feser grew up in Montana, Washington and northern California as his father was a U.S. National Park ranger at Glacier, Olympic and Lassen parks.

“For me, joining Oregon State is something of a coming home,” Feser said.

“I’ve always considered the Pacific Northwest – broadly – to be home. As a National Park ‘brat,’ the environmental and land ethic is in my blood. So Oregon State’s strengths in forestry, the environment and marine sciences, and its land, sea, space and sun grant designations are very appealing. I look forward to working with President Ray, the deans and other senior administrators, and the faculty, staff and students to advance the goals of this great university.”

Source: 
Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Edward Feser
Edward Feser

Scott Barnes named OSU director of intercollegiate athletics

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Scott Barnes, athletic director at the University of Pittsburgh, today was named as vice president and director of intercollegiate athletics at Oregon State University. He will begin his new duties on Feb. 13, 2017.

Barnes has served as Pitt’s athletics director since the spring of 2015. He follows Todd Stansbury, who left Oregon State in late September, to serve as the athletics director of his alma mater, Georgia Tech.

Barnes is recognized as a national leader in intercollegiate athletics, including serving as the chair of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament Selection Committee for 2014-15.

He will be welcomed to OSU on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2016, at a news conference.

Barnes’ appointment was made by OSU President Ed Ray following a national search that Ray said drew “incredibly strong interest from a deep pool of leading university athletic directors and top private sector sports administrators.”

“I chose Scott Barnes because he is the perfect fit for Oregon State University,” Ray said. “He will guide OSU Athletics to compete and win championships the right way – the Oregon State way.

“Scott is a proven leader and a champion with a long track record of success. He will lead the immediate and long-term achievement for all OSU sports programs and contribute greatly to the passion of everyone within Beaver Nation. He understands that at Oregon State University, good is not good enough. OSU and its student-athletes will be champions in all aspects of athletics, as students and in the community.”

“I look forward to working with Scott as we build the next generation of remarkable success within Oregon State Athletics,” Ray said.

“I am very excited to join Beaver Nation and am ready to hit the ground running and build upon the success of OSU Athletics,” Barnes said.  “I guarantee that we will contribute to advancing the mission of this university. We will deliver the highest level of achievement on the playing field and for all student-athletes in the classroom, in the community and in their lives and careers.

“Everything that we will do will be defined by excellence. Success will be measured in wins, championships and by providing the best student-athlete experience possible.”

Prior to joining Pitt, Barnes spent seven years as athletic director at Utah State. Prior to his tenure at Utah State, Barnes spent nearly three years at UW as senior associate athletic director for advancement. In that capacity, he was responsible for all external operations for the Huskies' athletic department, including fund-raising, ticket sales, multimedia rights, marketing and communications. Barnes served as athletic director at Eastern Washington University from 1999 to 2005.

Barnes was recognized by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics in 2014 as an NACDA athletic director of the year recipient while at Utah State. At Eastern Washington, he was awarded a regional recognition by NACDA.

Since Stansbury’s departure, Marianne Vydra, senior associate athletic director/senior woman administrator, has served as interim vice president and director of OSU intercollegiate athletics.

Oregon State has 18 NCAA sports, more than 535 student-athletes and an athletics department budget of $84 million. Pitt has 19 NCAA sports, more than 475 student athletes, and a $75 million budget.

While at Pitt, Barnes initiated an organizational restructuring and strategic plan to re-energize Pittsburgh athletics.

Barnes led many Pitt athletics achievements, including these highlights:

  • The 2016 Pitt football team completed a second consecutive 8-4 regular-season record, are ranked in the nation’s top 25 and will play in the New Era Pinstripe Bowl this month.
  • The Pitt gymnastics team won its first-ever East Atlantic Gymnastics League championship in 2015.
  • The Pitt men's basketball team advanced to the NCAA Tournament in 2015 for the 13th time in the past 15 seasons, becoming one of only eight programs nationally to accomplish that feat.
  • In the classroom, 379 Pitt student-athletes were honored for achieving a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the 2015 spring or fall terms, while 24 earned a perfect 4.0. The Panthers had a record 245 students earn all-league ACC academic honors.

 

During Barnes’ tenure at Utah State, the Aggies won 20 conference team championships and the football program averaged 10 wins a year, compiled a 30-11 mark, and won a school-record three consecutive bowl games.

A native of Spokane, Wash., Barnes graduated from Fresno State University with a bachelor’s degree in 1986 and a master’s degree in athletics administration and physical education in 1993. He also played basketball at Fresno State. Barnes played professional basketball in Germany in 1985-86, and was the general manager of the Fresno Flames of the World Basketball League from 1988-89.

Barnes will be joined in Corvallis by his wife, Jody, who also graduated from Fresno State and competed in track as a student-athlete. The Barnes have a daughter, Milanna, 20, a college sophomore; and a son, Issac, 19, a high school senior.

Media Contact: 

Steve Fenk, 541-737-3720

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Scott Barnes
Scott Barnes

OSU overall enrollment up 2.9 percent, Corvallis campus increases less than 1 percent

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Fall term 2016 enrollment at Oregon State University grew 2.9 percent from last year, as stable enrollment continued at OSU’s Corvallis campus and double-digit growth continued at the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend and within OSU’s nationally ranked Ecampus online degree program.

Oregon State’s overall fall enrollment is 31,303 – up 852 students from 2015 – making OSU the largest university in the state of Oregon for the third consecutive year.

Oregon State’s fall enrollment includes:

  • 24,672 students at the university’s main campus in Corvallis, an increase from fall 2015 of 205 students or 0.8 percent;
  • 5,682 students in Ecampus, an increase of 573 students or 11.2 percent over last year; and
  • 1,122 students at OSU-Cascades, an increase of 106 students or 10.4 percent more than a year ago.

“As Oregon’s statewide university, we are committed to serve all qualified Oregonians,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “This year, 74.2 percent of our degree-seeking undergraduates on our Corvallis campus are Oregon residents.

“We serve as the ‘people’s university’ of the state of Oregon by offering diverse, high-quality academic programs at our campuses in Corvallis, Bend and Newport, and through top-ranked online degree programs. We are seeing students literally choose where, how and when it is best for them to learn. Each year, more students choose Oregon State as their destination of choice.”

Oregon State continues to attract high-achieving students. Among first-time college students from Oregon high schools, 47 percent of OSU’s freshmen class are considered high-achievers – having graduated from high school with a cumulative grade point of 3.75 or higher.

As well, of OSU’s new students:

  • 21 had perfect SAT mathematics scores and 11 had perfect SAT verbal scores, compared with 17 and 8 students, respectively, in 2015.
  • Five are National Merit award winners, compared with four a year ago.
  • 225 – or 3.8 percent of Oregon State’s new undergraduates – were ranked number 1 in their high school graduating class, compared with 156 students in 2015.
  • 78 are Presidential Scholars – 20 more than a year ago.
  • 358 entered the university’s Honors College, compared with 265 in 2015;

“Oregon State is achieving excellence through inclusivity,” Ray said. “Twenty-five percent of this year’s entering Honors College students come from diverse backgrounds. I also am pleased with the continued growth of U.S. minority and first-generation students in Oregon State’s overall enrollment. And that 3.2 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment – 956 students – are veterans of U.S. military service.

This fall, OSU has enrolled 7,204 students representing U.S. minorities – an increase of 450 students or 6.7 percent over a year ago. In total, 23.7 percent of the students attending Oregon State in Corvallis or within Ecampus identify themselves as a U.S. minority, compared with 2,806 students and 14.5 percent a decade ago in fall of 2006.

Twenty-three percent – or 5,858 OSU undergraduates in Corvallis or within Ecampus – are first-generation students, an increase of nearly 1 percent over a year ago. At OSU-Cascades, first-generation students make up 35.4 percent of the enrollment.

“As a first-generation college student myself, these students are near-and-dear to my heart,” Ray said. “Increasing the enrollment of people of diversity, students from low-income families, and first-generation students by providing access to an excellent higher education and a college degree is essential for all Oregonians.”

OSU also continues to expand its global reach as an internationally recognized public research university. This fall, international student enrollment increased by 201 students to a total of 3,529 students or 11.6 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment. International students from 110 countries attend Oregon State this fall. A decade ago, OSU enrolled 897 international students – or 4.6 percent of its overall enrollment.

“We live and work in a global society,” Ray said. “It is essential that universities such as Oregon State bring people worldwide together to learn, pursue research and engage as a community.”

Oregon State’s commitment to graduate studies and graduate student engagement in research is evident in this year’s enrollment. Overall, the number of graduate students, including professional students in OSU’s colleges of pharmacy and veterinary medicine, increased by 1.3 percent this fall to total 5,027 students, compared with 4,964 students in 2015. 

Steve Clark, OSU’s vice president for University Relations and Marketing, said Oregon State intentionally manages its enrollment to achieve the university’s land grant mission; support the state of Oregon’s educational attainment goals; operate in a financially sustainable manner; and be a good neighbor in Corvallis, Bend and Newport.

“We manage enrollment very mindfully,” Clark said. “For example, we have promised to slow the growth of our Corvallis campus and not grow above 28,000 students by 2025 by limiting enrollment growth to 1-2 percent each year. We are doing so intentionally and with good results. The past three years, our enrollment growth has been well below 1 percent and with such a trend, OSU’s Corvallis campus may not reach 28,000 students until sometime in the early 2030s.”

“In Bend, we have committed to limit our new OSU-Cascades campus to between 3,000 to 5,000 students by 2025, and in Newport, to between 400 to 500 students. At the same time, we will provide higher education where students live and work by enrolling more distance online students through Ecampus,” Clark said.

At OSU-Cascades, 92.2 percent of the enrollment is composed of Oregonians, including 205 students who are U.S. minorities – a 17 percent increase from 2015 – and 323 are first-generation students – a 7.7 percent increase from a year ago. Overall, OSU-Cascades’ enrollment includes 912 undergraduate and 210 graduate students. Freshmen enrollment at the new campus, which opened in September, increased 17.7 percent from 2015.

More students are studying engineering than any other discipline. The College of Engineering has a total of 8,724 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled this fall. The next largest programs are the College of Liberal Arts, 4,178 students; the College of Business, 3,726; the College of Science, 3,503; the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, 3,009; and the College of Agricultural Sciences, 2,580.

Enrollment in other colleges and programs includes: College of Forestry, 1,093, University Exploratory Studies, 1,081; Graduate School, 830; College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, 739; College of Pharmacy, 370; College of Education, 300; and College of Veterinary Medicine, 221.

Oregon State’s Honors College enrolls 4.2 percent of all undergraduates with a total of 1,057 students – a 3.6 percent increase over 2015.

The most popular undergraduate majors at OSU are computer science, followed by business administration, mechanical engineering, kinesiology and biology.

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-4875

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Robotics program expanding
Robotics program expanding

OSU trustees approve expanding veterinary teaching hospital, renovating Magruder Hall

BEND, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees Friday approved the renovation of Magruder Hall to allow OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine to increase its enrollment and expand the college’s small animal veterinary teaching hospital.

The trustees’ meetings were held on the new OSU-Cascades campus, which opened in September as the state’s first new public university in 50 years.

The $10 million project to expand Magruder Hall will be added to Oregon State’s overall $258 million 2015-17 capital plan.

Plans include a 6,000-square-foot expansion to double the size of the College of Veterinary Medicine’s small animal teaching hospital that presently serves nearly 40 cases per day and has from 45 to 70 people working in it. Over the past four years, the hospital’s case load has increased 15 percent annually. Renovation of Magruder Hall and the expansion of the hospital will enable the college to grow its enrollment by 16 veterinary medicine students.

“This project will directly improve the educational experience of veterinary students by providing improved instructional space, including laboratories for learning, such as anatomy and surgery skills,” said Sue Tornquist, dean of OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. “With this project, graduating veterinarians will have training in new and advanced treatment procedures, such as radiation oncology.”

Tornquist said the college will use philanthropic gifts, college funds and tuition revenues from the projected additional student enrollment to pay for the project.

In other business:

 

  • The board approved its annual performance review of OSU President Ed Ray for the past fiscal year;
  • Established guidelines for future presidential searches and selection processes;
  • Adopted a board calendar to guide the work of the board over the next year;
  • Adopted amendments to the university’s investment policy. The amendments enable the university’s vice president for finance and administration to provide quarterly reports regarding the investment of university assets to the board’s Finance and Administration Committee instead of the full board;
  • Approved the termination of a Master of Agriculture program. This master’s program is experiencing low student participation with currently only five students enrolled. The College of Agricultural Sciences plans to develop a new degree program that addresses current and future agricultural issues.

 

Board Chair Pat Reser said that Ray’s performance assessment included input from university, community, Oregon and national higher education constituents. She said Ray is considered a trusted, energetic and strategic leader. “We compliment President Ray on the progress the university has made over the past year and support his focused and continued outstanding leadership of Oregon State University,” Reser said.

The board deferred until its January 2017 meeting consideration of a change in the university’s in the Public University Fund that would have divested university funds from current fossil fuel-related securities and would restrict future investments in fossil fuel-related securities. Oregon State and five other Oregon public universities make up the Public University Fund, which is managed by the Oregon Treasurer’s office. Presently, approximately 1.7 percent of that fund is invested in fossil fuel-related securities.

In deferring action until January, trustees directed university administrators to develop a draft framework that the board could utilize in evaluating decisions about divestiture or other future financial matters.

During the meeting, trustees heard reports from President Ray; officers of the OSU Faculty Senate, the Associated Students of Oregon State University and the Associated Students of Cascades Campus; the chair of the state’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission; and the OSU Foundation regarding the foundation’s strategic plan.

During public comment provided the board, a graduate student in Oregon State’s College of Education, asked trustees to reverse the university’s decision to build OSU’s marine studies building on the Hatfield Marine Sciences Center campus.

On Wednesday, trustees held a public session retreat to learn more about the university’s student success initiative; the cost structure of the university; and future revenue and cost management opportunities.

Source: 

Tsunami-safety panel to oversee construction of Marine Studies building

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Ed Ray announced today the creation of an oversight committee to monitor construction of a Marine Studies Building and student housing in Newport, Ore.

“This committee will ensure that the design, engineering and construction of these buildings meet or exceed the earthquake and tsunami performance commitments the university has made to the public,” Ray said.

Ray also charged the committee with ensuring that the buildings are operated with the highest level of safety and evacuation procedures, preparation and training. The committee’s charge is available online.

The $50 million center for global marine studies research and education will be built at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. The 100,000-square-foot facility is an integral part of OSU’s ambitious Marine Studies Initiative, designed to educate students and conduct research on marine-related issues – from rising sea levels and ocean acidification to sustainable fisheries and economic stability.

Housing to accommodate Oregon State students at the campus will be located near Oregon Coast Community College and located out of the tsunami zone.

“Life safety for the occupants of these buildings, as well as the safety for all Hatfield Marine Science Center faculty, staff, students and visitors, is of the highest priority for OSU,” Ray said.

Scott Ashford, dean of Oregon State’s College of Engineering, will chair the committee, which will report to interim Provost and Executive Vice President Ron Adams. The committee will be made up of eight university leaders and will be advised by two seismic and structural engineers, one of whom will be externally employed and independent of the university.

Committee members include Michael Green, OSU interim vice president for finance and administration; Toni Doolen, dean of the university’s Honors College; Susie Brubaker-Cole, vice provost for Student Affairs; Jock Mills, government relations director; Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing; and Roy Haggerty, associate vice president for research. OSU’s Office of General Counsel will serve in an advisory capacity.

The committee will be advised by Chris D. Poland, an independent, third party seismic resilience structural engineer, who is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; and Dan Cox, an OSU professor in civil and construction engineering with expertise in coastal resilience and tsunami impacts.

Ashford said the Marine Studies Building will meet or surpass the new “inundation zone” construction guidelines announced recently by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Faculty researchers within OSU’s College of Engineering and Oregon State’s O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory aided in the standards’ formation.

In addition to design, engineering and construction matters, the committee will also oversee safety and evacuation planning, procedures and training for the Marine Studies Building, the HMSC campus and the student housing to be built in Newport.

The committee’s charge also includes keeping stakeholders informed; maintaining transparency of all the university’s work regarding design, engineering, construction and safety operations; and ensuring the buildings are completed within budget and on time.

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

Source: 
Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

AerialFullSize18

Hatfield Marine Science Center