OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

students

OSU hires new expert in violence prevention, holds open house for resource center

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has hired a new assistant director for violence prevention, Michelle Bangen, and on Oct. 8 will hold a grand opening for its Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center.

Bangen has already met many people on campus to better understand what resources OSU offers, and to assess the current culture around sexual violence and other issues. At The Ohio State University, she led a nationally-recognized bystander intervention program called Buckeyes Got Your Back. Bangen said the key to convincing students to intervene in potentially escalating situations is to appeal to their core values.

“That way, what we’re asking you to do as a bystander is not far off from what you already value,” Bangen said, “so it becomes an easy ask for people, and empowers them to feel they have a stake in keeping their community safe.”

Bangen starts at a pivotal moment for Student Health Services, according to Rob Reff, director of the Alcohol, Drug and Violence Prevention Center.

“I wanted to make sure that we had expertise and strategic vision in both prevention and advocacy,” Reff said. “I could not be more pleased with the leadership that Bangen will bring to stop violence before it happens, and with the experience in trauma informed advocacy that Judy Neigbours, assistant director for the Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center, adds to our team.”

The OSU Advocacy Center for Survivors of Violence provides confidential and accessible services including a full-time advocate whose sole job is to listen to and support survivors, to help them navigate available resources, and ensure the survivor’s wishes and needs are respected.

The center will be housed in the Student Health Services Building, allowing for privacy and confidentiality, and will also put survivors within close proximity of trained sexual assault nurses if requested.

The grand opening of the center will be Thursday, Oct. 8, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in Room 311 of Plageman Student Health Center. Speakers will include OSU President Ed Ray, sexual violence survivor and advocate Brenda Tracy, and ASOSU President Cassie Huber. Refreshments will be served. For more information about the Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center, visit studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/advocacy.

Bangen wants to have OSU students look at the bystander intervention programs from Ohio State, review the curricula and see which messages resonate, and infuse the values of Oregon State students. The fraternity population will be the first community approached to be trained and to implement a version of the bystander program.

“I value getting peers from within various communities to facilitate these conversations,” Bangen said. “It has a really positive impact when a fraternity brother can go in and speak to a group of men about how these issues are popping up in their community and how they can build their skill set to address them.”

One key to Bangen’s approach is to make sure that the focus is on helping and empowering all students, rather than trying to paint one group or gender as guilty or suspect.

“Rather than speaking to potential victims or potential perpetrators, we can talk to everyone as potential bystanders,” she said. “We need everyone to use the skills they have, and we as an institution need to help build that skill set.”

Story By: 
Source: 

Michelle Bangen, 541-737-7880

Former OSU cooperatives to be transformed into student services cluster

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Buildings that formerly housed Oregon State University’s cooperative house program will become new homes for student services and campus support programs, including those serving student parents and a new home for the OSU Emergency Food Pantry.

The facilities, located on the east side of campus, will undergo upgrades over the next three years. Plans in place so far for this student services cluster include:

  • The new location for the Human Services Resource Center will be in Avery Lodge. This program provides direct service, outreach, education, and referral services to OSU students that help alleviate effects of hunger, poverty, and other needs. This space will include a new home for the OSU Emergency Food Pantry.
  • Additional campus services to support student parents and their childcare needs, as well as the administrative offices for OSU’s Child and Family Resources team, will be in Azalea House.
  • Oxford House will become home to the administrative offices for University Housing & Dining Services. This move will consolidate the UHDS staff into a smaller space and create additional on-campus residential space at the existing UHDS office location on the first floors of Buxton and Hawley halls.
  • Dixon Lodge will continue to serve OSU’s visiting scholars and researchers as the University Scholars Community. The community offers 30 single units with shared bathroom and kitchen amenities, and is designed to support visiting guests or scholars of OSU academic departments with short and long-term accommodation needs. For more information visit: http://oregonstate.edu/uhds/scholar-housing  

The upgrades to the facilities and surrounding areas will provide convenient short-term parking for campus guests, attractive park-like landscaping, and upgraded paths of travel throughout the area to provide full access to the buildings and their associated programs. 

OSU closed its four cooperative houses in June 2014, after a comprehensive review the previous year.

Media Contact: 

Jennifer Viña, 541-737-8187, jennifer.vina@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Dan Larson, 541-737-4771, dan.larson@oregonstate.edu

OSU’s Daily Barometer given top award by ONPA

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s student newspaper, The Daily Barometer, has been awarded the top prize by the Oregon Newspaper Publisher's Association. The honor was announced May 8 at the 2015 ONPA Collegiate Day conference.

The Barometer won first place in the “general excellence” category, which recognizes the overall achievements of student newspapers from universities and community colleges across Oregon.

Barometer sports writer Josh Worden also won top honors for best sports story, and Ryan Mason won best cartoon. A full list of awards are below.

First place:

‪General excellence, staff

‪Best sports story, Josh Worden

‪Best cartoon, Ryan Mason

Second place:

‪Best design, staff

‪Best writing, Sean Bassinger

Third place:

‪Best section (news), staff

‪Best columnist, Brooklyn Di Raffaele

‪Best sports story, Josh Worden

‪Best graphic, Eric Winkler

‪Best website, staff

 

Story By: 
Source: 

Steven Sandberg, 541-737-3383 or steven.sandberg@oregonstate.edu; Sean Bassinger, 541-737-3191 or editor@dailybarometer.com

OSU students to travel to Nepal to assist with earthquake recovery efforts, film documentary

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Two Oregon State University students are scheduled to travel to Nepal Friday, May 1, to film a documentary and to aid in humanitarian efforts following the devastating 7.8-magnitude earthquake that occurred there on April 25.

Cole Miller and Christian Nishioka had been planning the trip to Nepal since January. They were set to accompany CardioStart International, a Florida-based aid group that provides heart surgery and teaches local medical personnel advanced cardiac care, on a two-week humanitarian mission as part of a school project.

When the earthquake occurred, the students’ digital arts instructor, Alina Padilla-Miller, was sure the trip would be cancelled. But CardioStart is continuing with the mission, and the students don’t want to stay home when they could be of service in Nepal. 

“I still want to film a documentary, but I’m a lot more concerned about how I can help the people,” said Nishioka, 22, of Sherwood, Ore. “I actually felt like this was an even better time to go and help.” 

“Even if I am scared, I know the people over there are even more scared,” said Miller, 22, of Portland. “I think I would regret it if I had a chance to make a difference in the world and didn’t do it.”

The students’ commitment to the project has impressed their teacher.

“When the students said they still wanted to go, I was just stunned,” Padilla-Miller said. “Their biggest concern was how much aid they could provide.”

Miller, a senior majoring in digital communication arts, has been collecting monetary donations that will be used to purchase supplies needed in Nepal. Nishioka, a senior double-majoring in new media communications and business, has spent the last few days rounding up donations of food, blankets and other supplies and also set up donation boxes at each of Oregon State’s cultural centers. Some of the donations also may be shipped to Nepal, he said.

Officials with CardioStart have assured Padilla-Miller that the team and the students’ safety is a priority on the trip. The emphasis on safety and health is one of the benefits of traveling with a medical-based aid group, she said. Their destination is the city of Dhulikhel, about 38 miles from Kathmandu, where the medical team will work with a local hospital.

“We’re just going to be lending a hand wherever we can,” Miller said. “If we can at least put a smile on someone’s face, it’ll be worth it.” 

The students still plan to gather video footage of their work. They’ll use it to create a documentary as part of a new digital media course that is in development at OSU. A goal of the new course is to give students a chance to develop a project from design through filming and production, Padilla-Miller said.

Miller and Nishioka are the first two students to take the course, which is being offered as a pilot this spring. Footage from the trip also will be used in promotional materials for CardioStart as part of a partnership with the company, Padilla-Miller said.

The students hope their documentary will help demonstrate the need for aid in Nepal and encourage people to volunteer or donate to humanitarian aid efforts through programs such as CardioStart.

“Everyone has their own point of view and perspective,” Nishioka said. “If I show people what I’m seeing, it’s going to be different than what is on the news. And it might encourage people to get involved.”

Story By: 
Source: 

Alina Padilla-Miller, 541-514-0349, padillal@onid.oregonstate.edu

OSU to host housing expo, good neighbor workshops for students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s second annual off-campus housing expo will connect property managers, campus offices and community agencies with Oregon State students – an event that last year drew more than 1,000 students.

This year’s expo will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 25, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Memorial Union ballroom. An added feature in 2015 will be a series of “Live Smart” workshops designed to provide OSU students with tools to become informed tenants and responsible neighbors.

The event is open to all OSU students and is particularly aimed at students transitioning to off-campus housing and living, according to Jonathan Stoll, director of Corvallis Community Relations.

“It’s important that we provide students with the resources necessary to be good neighbors and to successfully transition to living off-campus,” Stoll said. “Living on one’s own for the first time is a big step – and for some of our students, this will be the first time without the conveniences and accommodations that University Housing and Dining Services provides its students, from residential advisers and tutors to meal plans, cable, internet and most utilities.” 

Workshops topics will include local laws and ordinances, tips on hosting responsible parties, safety and security, financial literacy, and tenant rights and responsibilities. The workshops aim to improve livability by fostering a commitment to community that upholds Corvallis’ ranking as one of the nation’s top college towns and best places to live, Stoll said.

“Most students have embraced being members of Beaver Nation and the Associated Students of Oregon State University is excited to spearhead a program that helps students embrace being members of our Corvallis community,” said Cassie Hubers, executive director of community resources for ASOSU.

Stoll said students who complete the Live Smart workshops and pass a corresponding preferred renters exam will receive a $50 rental deposit credit – a program endorsed by the Corvallis Rental Property Management Group. The proposed credit would be limited to properties electing to participate in the preferred renters program.

More information on the expo, including a list of workshops and participating vendors, is available at: http://studentlife.oregonstate.edu/ccr/community-and-u/2015-housing-expo

For additional information, contact Cassie Hubers at 541-737-7111 or asosu.community@oregonstate.edu; or Jonathan Stoll at 541-737-8606, jonathan.stoll@oregonstate.edu

Story By: 
Source: 

Jonathan Stoll, 541-737-8606, jonathan.stoll@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University to offer religious studies degree program

CORVALLIS, Ore. – More than 20 years after the religious studies degree program was eliminated, Oregon State University is bringing it back. OSU students will be able to declare religious studies as a major beginning with the upcoming winter term.

The religious studies degree will emphasize religious literacy, helping students understand how religion shapes the world and affects society, said Amy Koehlinger, an assistant professor in the School of History, Philosophy, and Religion in the College of Liberal Arts at OSU.

“Religion is one of the most powerful social, economic and political forces in the world,” she said. “Given how fast globalization is occurring, religious literacy is becoming more and more important.”

Religious studies is the study of religion in an academic setting, with an emphasis on skills such as critical thinking, discernment, deliberation, responsibility, courage and civility. The program will emphasize how religion is used to make sense of the world, in good ways and in bad, Koehlinger said.

“A religious studies major gives students the opportunity to have a deep understanding of religion as a powerful social force,” she said. “Students are trained to think critically and neutrally, and with a lot of subtlety about religion.”

The religious studies program is housed in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion, but faculty members from throughout the College of Liberal Arts will teach courses for the new degree, Koehlinger said. The interdisciplinary approach to the study of religion will include courses in history, philosophy, anthropology, art, literature and film.

One area of emphasis is on the religions of Southeast Asia, including Budhhism, Hinduism and Islam. Associate Professor Stuart Sarbacker is an expert on the religions of India and Associate Professor Hung-Yok Ip is an expert on China.

Another area of emphasis is on religion and ethics as they relate to sexuality, friendship, forgiveness, end-of-life issues, the environment and medicine, said Courtney Campbell, the Hundere Professor in Religion and Culture at OSU.

The new program is well-suited to students who are interested in working internationally, in business, international relations or other fields; it’s also a good choice for students interested in graduate school in law, medicine or politics, Koehlinger said.

Students can earn a bachelor of arts, a bachelor of science or an honors bachelor of arts or science degree in religious studies. A minor in religious studies is also available. The new degrees were approved by the OSU Board of Trustees over the summer, with final approval from the state Higher Education Coordinating Committee, Campbell said.

The 2014 Ideas Matter lecture series sponsored by the Hundere Endowment for Religion and Culture will help showcase and celebrate the new major. The lecture series, titled “Healings and Hurtings: Religion, Self and the Body,” will focus on the connection between religion and the body.

Lectures are scheduled for Oct. 27, Nov. 5, Nov. 10 and Nov. 18. All events are free and open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in the Journey Room in the Memorial Union on the OSU campus in Corvallis. For a full listing of speakers and topics, visit http://bit.ly/ZtmVYj.

Story By: 
Source: 

Amy Koehlinger, 541-737-3433 or amy.koehlinger@oregonstate.edu; Courtney Campbell, 541-737-6196 or ccampbell@oregonstate.edu

Visiting faculty members to read at Oregon State on Oct. 10

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Authors Nick Dybek and Inara Verzemnieks will read from their work on Friday, Oct. 10, at Oregon State University in Corvallis, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library. They are both visiting faculty members in OSU’s Master of Fine Arts program in creative writing this year.

Verzemnieks is a former reporter at The Oregonian and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in feature writing. Her creative and journalistic work has appeared in publications such as The New York Times Magazine, Tin House, The Atlantic and Creative Nonfiction.

Her first memoir, which engages her family’s history and her own journey to reconnect with their homeland in Latvia, is forthcoming from Norton. She is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writer’s Award and the Richard J. Margolis Award of the Blue Mountain Center.

Dybek’s novel, “When Captain Flint Was Still a Good Man,” earned the 2013 Society of Midland Author Award and is described by The Economist as having “the momentum of a thrilling yarn, delivered as if by a scarred man by the consoling light of a fire.” Dybek is also the recipient of a Michener-Copernicus Society of America Award and a Maytag Fellowship, and his work has been featured in Granta New Voices.

The reading is part of the 2014-2015 Literary Northwest Series, sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU and is made possible by support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele and Grass Roots Books and Music.

The event is free and open to the public. It will be held in the rotunda at the Valley Library, 201 S.W. Waldo Place. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow the reading.

Story By: 
Media Contact: 

 

Source: 
Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

 

OSU to move in most new students Sept. 23-24

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Oregon State University will host its two main days of new resident move-in on Tuesday, Sept. 23, and Wednesday, Sept. 24.

Increased traffic and congestion are expected on those days. Visitors to campus should expect limited parking and potential traffic delays as un-loading zones are set up around the residence halls.

More than 3,000 residents are expected to arrive Tuesday and Wednesday, many with family and friends in tow. Hundreds of campus and community volunteers will help with move-in.

In addition, many residents of the International Living-Learning Center will arrive Sunday, Sept. 21, in time for international orientation. That and a steady trickle of other early arrivals will mean that about 1,500 additional residents will already be in place before the main two move-in days.

New this year, will be the opening of Tebeau Hall on the east side of campus. The new residence hall is named for alumnus William “Bill” Tebeau (1925-2013), an Oregon engineer and teacher who was a pioneering student who persevered through numerous challenges to become the first African American man to graduate from Oregon State in 1948.

Tebeau’s family will be in attendance at a dedication ceremony for the hall at 2 p.m. Oct. 9. The community is welcome to attend the celebration at Tebeau Hall.

For more information on these events, contact University Housing & Dining Services at 541-737-4771 or housing@oregonstate.edu.

Source: 

Jennifer Viña 541-737-8187

OSU launches new online programs to decrease high-risk alcohol use, sexual assaults

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has introduced a new series of required online courses aimed at combating alcohol abuse and sexual assault.

The on-line programs will reach approximately 6,400 students, said Rob Reff, coordinator of substance abuse prevention programs within OSU’s Student Health Services Department.

Incoming first-year students to OSU’s Corvallis campus will be required to take AlcoholEdu, which is designed to help students make informed and healthy choices regarding alcohol and other drug use. It is not an anti-alcohol campaign, according to administrators, but rather an educational program giving students the tools they need in situations where drugs and alcohol are involved.

OSU is also requiring the sexual violence prevention course HAVEN for all incoming students – including those at OSU-Cascades and through Ecampus – in order to comply with the federal Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act that went into effect in March of 2014. This course helps educate students on sexual assault, consent, and how to be an active bystander.

 The OSU Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is requiring both programs for all its athletes.  

“OSU believes it is the responsibility of all students, faculty, and staff to create a community that encourages and promotes the well-being of our campus and the broader community,” Reff, said. “These two programs will provide all OSU students with an understanding of not only how to keep themselves safe but how to help fellow students.”

Students must complete these programs prior to arriving on campus for fall term 2014.  While at Oregon State, students will receive additional prevention and education on these topics from Student Health Services, University Housing and Dining Services, Counseling and Psychological Services, the Office of Equity and Inclusion, and other departments.

Program administrators say these combined efforts will help students achieve academic success, health, and wellness while fostering a community of care for one another.

For more information: http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/welcome

 

Story By: 
Source: 

Robert Reff, 541-737-7564

OSU to observe Veterans Day as official holiday beginning in 2015

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will begin observing Veterans Day as an official holiday beginning in 2015.

The decision was announced today by OSU President Edward J. Ray, after consultation with both the OSU Faculty Senate and the Associated Students of Oregon State University.

“I am proud that the university will begin honoring our veterans with the observance of this national holiday,” Ray said. “This is a meaningful decision. Last year, Oregon State had 1,025 students who received veteran educational benefits – the most of any university in Oregon – and it is important that we recognize and honor the many sacrifices that our nation’s veterans have made.”

Veterans now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU. A range of programs have been initiated or expanded to help support the university’s student veterans.

Ray also announced that the university will begin its academic year earlier in 2015, with the first day of classes scheduled on Wednesday, Sept. 23, that year.

Story By: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Veterans Day Parade
OSU students, supporters at

2013 Veterans Day parade