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OSU Theatre to host reading of ‘La Gringa’ in its 20th anniversary season

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The longest running off-Broadway Spanish language play, now in its 20th season, will be the focus of a public reading on Wednesday, May 4, at Oregon State University. 

“La Gringa” is the story of a young woman from New York who goes to Puerto Rico in search of her roots by finding her extended family. Her over-enthusiasm for what she calls her “homeland” leads to an array of complications and comic dialogue.

A cast of OSU students, faculty, staff and community members will present the reading, which begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Withycombe Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way. It is free and open to the public. Because of the set configuration, latecomers cannot be seated.

The cast includes Mayela Delatorre (Maria), Laura Galindo (Iris), Kerstin Colón (Norma), Oscar Montemayor (Victor), Eldon dela Cruz (Ramon), Steven Evans-Renteria (narrator), and Juan Guzman (Manolo). The reading is presented by OSU’s School of Arts & Communication’s University Theatre.

“La Gringa” premiered in New York City and is still being presented there by Repertorio Español Theater. The OSU reading is the fourth and final installment of OSU’s Latin@ Theatre Project, funded through the Memorial Union Foundation Pepsi Endowment. 

Susana Rivera-Mills, OSU’s vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies, said the series has been transformational.

“Theater provides a safe place in which to reflect on one’s experience, confront difficult human realities, and challenge our own sense of identity and knowledge of others as not being set in concrete, but always evolving and adapting,” Rivera-Mills said. “Latina plays give voice to a population that isn’t always seen or heard.

“I believe that these artistic expressions of diverse perspectives will help us better understand the experiences of our various campus communities.”

Other plays in the series have been readings of Elaine Romero’s “Wetback,” Milagro Theatre’s “Broken Promises” and Josefina Lopez’s “Real Women Have Curves.”

 

 

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Charlotte Headrick, 541-737-4918, cheadrick@oregonstate.edu

OSU student media earns national, regional honors

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Society of Professional Journalists has named The Daily Barometer the best all-around daily student newspaper in Region 10, which includes Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Alaska.

The Oregon State University student newspaper also took first place in sports column writing and other honors for breaking news and sports writing.

Additionally, members of Oregon State student media’s Orange Media Network have received a number of other recent awards:

  • KBVR-TV's "Beaver News" won best public affairs program - non-commercial, from the Oregon Association of Broadcasters 2015 OAB "Awards for Excellence” 
  • KBVR-TV (Producers Gabe Fremonti and Sean Watson) have been nominated for a NATAS Northwest (College Emmy) Award for short form non-fiction for State of the Arts: Episode 2 - Evelyn Kritler (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF_EU2apbK4)
  • KBVR-FM took first place in the College Media Association Apple Awards (a national contest) for best radio promo; DAMchic took second place in design in this contest, and The Daily Barometer took third place in social media.

"Media is a constant evolution, and our Orange Media Network teams are at the start of their own revolution,” said Steven Sandberg, Orange Media journalism coordinator and adviser for The Daily Barometer, KBVR-TV, KBVR-FM.

“This year, those big steps were about investing in their skills. They now hold daily reviews with reporters, have regular critiques with advisers and lead their own workshops with staff. Our students' willingness to learn and try new things has increased the quality of their work, and these awards show that.”

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Candace Baltz, 541-737-4615; candace.baltz@oregonstate.edu

OSU, Beaverton School District develop new hybrid teacher licensure program

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A partnership between Oregon State University and the Beaverton School District will allow future teachers a unique opportunity to instruct K-5 students in the classroom through a new type of hybrid teacher licensure program. 

The masters of arts in teaching, or M.A.T. degree, with an option in “clinically based elementary program,” is a two-year, full-time master’s degree program that begins this fall. It will immediately immerse students in the classroom, where they will co-teach and work side-by-side with experienced Beaverton School District educators.

Frequently referred to as “Teach for Beaverton,” the program provides students the opportunity to actively engage with a cohort of peers while learning from faculty in the OSU College of Education. The program blends in-person classes with online course work, delivered by Oregon State Ecampus, a national leader in distance education.

“The program provides a powerful opportunity for future teachers,” said Matt Nyman, program coordinator and instructor. “They will benefit from the expertise of OSU College of Education faculty through course work, and the wisdom of practice from expert Beaverton School District teachers during two years of work in classrooms.”

Students who graduate from the program could enter the workforce with an advanced set of skills at a time when there is an increased demand for teaching professionals with master’s degrees in the Pacific Northwest, educators say.

The program’s collaborative learning environment enables students to hold a part-time job in the district during the first year and earn a salary while leading a classroom during the second and final year.

To meet the state and nationwide need for more teachers from underrepresented groups, the in-person portion of the program is based in Beaverton – near Portland, and one of the state’s most diverse cities with more than 90 languages spoken in area schools. It is designed for those who bring a rich diversity of cultures to their classrooms.

“We believe every student, regardless of background, deserves a great education every day of every year,” said Sue Robertson, chief human resource officer in the Beaverton School District. “And the key to a great education is a great teacher. We can make this a reality by fully supporting and preparing teachers to meet the needs of all students during their very first year of teaching.”

The curriculum of the 52-credit program include culturally literate education, teaching for social justice, and science and math topics. Specific course work includes teaching students with special needs, classroom management and K-5 STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) integration.

Visit the Ecampus website for more information.

Media Contact: 

Heather Turner, 541-737-3297

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Matt Nyman, 541-737-1811

matt.nyman@oregonstate.edu

Officials work to contain spread of gastroenteritis outbreak at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University and Benton County staff and health officials are working aggressively to contain an outbreak of what they believe is a norovirus infection on the Corvallis campus, which began March 30 and by today has infected 50-60 students, most of whom live in residence halls.

Although it is not yet confirmed by tests, the symptoms reported by most people who are ill are consistent with a norovirus outbreak, and include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and fever. This type of gastroenteritis, sometimes called “stomach flu,” is highly contagious and most common in winter or spring.

County health officials say they don’t believe there’s a specific food or location source for the infection, because otherwise the infection rate would be much higher. They say the most likely routes of infection are person-to-person or person-to-object transmission in shared living spaces, often through simple food utensils, cups, or even cell phones.

The outbreak, which is still comparatively small, has not required any changes in campus classes, programs, events or activities.

There are about 20 million cases of norovirus-caused acute gastroenteritis in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They are often found in schools, nursing homes, hospitals or other places where many people reside in close quarters, such as cruise ships. At universities such as OSU, they are especially common after school breaks when students return from traveling.

University staff and officials are working to stop this outbreak by using aggressive cleaning programs in affected areas, and helping to inform and educate the campus community about what aspects of personal hygiene can help prevent infection.

“The health and safety of our students, faculty and staff is our top priority,” said Jenny Haubenreiser, director of OSU Student Health Services. “We continue to closely monitor the situation and are meeting regularly with county health officials. With everyone’s cooperation we hope this situation will be contained in the near future, while it is still small.”

OSU Student Health Services has developed a “gastroenteritis health alert” online that includes more detail and recommendations about what individuals can do to protect their health and reduce the spread of this outbreak, at http://bit.ly/1SO1WX3

A range of preventive measures are under way through the efforts of OSU custodial services and other staff. Deep cleaning is being done repeatedly on “touchpoints” such as doorknobs, elevator buttons and tables, in work at all 15 campus residence halls and three dining halls. Dining staff are implementing their training in food safety, handwashing and glove use. All students in OSU residence halls have been sent specific information about the outbreak, including symptoms of illness and hygiene recommendations.

Students are being advised to wash their hands frequently with soap and water, since hand sanitizers don’t work on viruses such as norovirus. They also should not clean up infected fluids themselves, and are being requested to isolate themselves for 72 hours after the last resolution of symptoms.  

Additional and more detailed information about norovirus infections is available at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at http://www.cdc.gov/norovirus/worldwide.html

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Steve Clark, 541-737-4875

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU holds town hall on issues of equity and inclusion on campus

CORVALLIS, Ore. – President Ed Ray will host a town hall discussion on equity, inclusion and civil and social justice at Oregon State University on Monday, Feb. 29.

The discussion, aimed at students, staff and faculty, will be from 5-6 p.m. in Room 128 of the Learning Innovation Center. It will also be live streamed at http://live.oregonstate.edu.

President Ray and interim Chief Diversity Officer Angela Batista will provide an update on efforts to address diversity and inclusion at OSU. These include expanding the Leadership Council for Equity, Inclusion and Social Justice, to bring focus to university-wide planning and implementation of equity, inclusion, diversity and social justice initiatives.

The Leadership Council includes faculty, staff and students and is chaired by Brenda McComb, senior vice provost for academic affairs, and Allison Davis-White Eyes, director of Diversity and Cultural Engagement. Ray and Batista will also discuss the formation of a bias response team to provide coordinated response reports of campus-based incidents; and the effort to hire a permanent chief diversity officer.

Students, staff and faculty at the event will be able to provide input and ask questions. Scott Vignos, special assistant for strategic initiatives in the Office of Institutional Diversity, said the plan is to hold quarterly town halls to continue to inform the campus community and offer a safe space for discussion.

“The idea of the town hall emerged after conversations with students following the speak out in November,” Vignos said. “It’s an opportunity for campus leadership to take the temperature of the campus community and listen closely to community voices regarding issues of equity and inclusion.”

Live streaming of the event will also allow OSU students and staff in Bend, Newport and Extension and Research Stations to be able to listen to the conversation.

For those unable to attend, questions regarding OSU’s ongoing effort to improve equity and inclusion on campus can be addressed to the Office of Institutional Diversity at diversity@oregonstate.edu or to Angela Batista, interim chief diversity officer, at angela.batista@oregonstate.edu.

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Scott Vignos, 541-737-4113; scott.vignos@oregonstate.edu

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November's speak out

Recycling gets competitive during RecycleMania

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will be participating in a national recycling competition from Feb. 7 through April 2.

 Known as RecycleMania, the competition pits universities against each other to see which school can reduce the most waste. Colleges are ranked based on several categories, including best recycling rate, recycling rate per capita, and least amount of generated waste.

 Alongside the national competition, OSU will compete locally with the University of Oregon in an annual recycling Civil War, comparing total per capita pounds of recycling and compost. Oregon State won the previous year’s Civil War, reclaiming the trophy and title by only 0.07 pounds per person.

 Events will take place each week during the 8-week competition, starting with the construction of a sculpture created from recovered material, which will be exhibited in the Memorial Union Quad Feb. 8-12.

 During the first three weeks of the national competition, OSU residence halls will compete against each other in the RecycleMania Hall Challenge. Each week, halls will be evaluated for the total pounds of recycling per person generated. The top halls in the competition will receive points for the Inter-Hall Challenge while contributing to efforts in the national competition.

 Other events will include the 11th annual Career Wardrobe event on Feb. 18, the Winter Repair Fair on Feb. 24, and the Recycled Fashion Show on Feb. 25. More events will be added during the later weeks of the competition.

 A full listing of events, as well as further details about RecycleMania and past results, may be found at: http://tiny.cc/rm-osu  

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Andrea Norris, 541-737-5398, andrea.norris@oregonstate.edu

OSU awards $68,000 in agricultural scholarships

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s College of Agricultural Sciences has awarded 34 undergraduates $68,000 in scholarships for the 2015-2016 school year.

The scholarships are made possible by gifts to the college.

Recipients of the 2015 scholarships are:

ALBANY: Michael Perkins, agricultural business management major, received the $1,000 Savery Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

BLODGETT: Andrew Damitio, environmental economics and policy major, received the $1,000 Charles E. and Clara Marie Eckelman Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

CENTRAL POINT: Elizabeth Puttman, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Grange Co-op Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

CORVALLIS: Nicole Barrett, fisheries and wildlife major, received the $1,000 Lawrence E. and Marguerite Kaseberg Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

CORVALLIS: Holly Omoto, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Savery Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

DAMASCUS: Matthew Crouser, agricultural business management major, received the $1,000 Frank Burlingham Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

DAYTON: Joanna Kubes, agricultural business management major, received the $1,000 Frank Burlingham Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

EDMONDS, Washington: Hanna Lee, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Eugene H. Fisher Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

EL CAJON, California: Alessia Azevedo, fisheries and wildlife major, received the $1,000 Charles E. and Clara Marie Eckelman Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

GOLD BEACH: Hannah Hooker, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Karla S. Chambers Leadership Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

HILLSBORO: Rachel Wirachman, food science and technology major, received the $1,000 Paul and Frances Montecucco Beginning Venture Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

HILLSBORO: Lindy Yoder, horticulture major, received the $1,000 Paul and Frances Montecucco Beginning Venture Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

INDEPENDENCE: Courtney Chase, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Naumes Family Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

KENT, Ohio: Costanza Fantoni, environmental sciences and sustainability majors, received the $1,000 Frank Burlingham Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

LAKE OSWEGO: Anya Britvan, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 John & Florence Scharff Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

LAKE OSWEGO: Annelise Jahraus, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Eugene H. Fisher Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

LAKE OSWEGO: Hannah Karimi, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Loren J. Smith Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

LONGVIEW: Cara Caldwell, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 John & Florence Scharff Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

MEDFORD: Alyssa Ettinger, animal sciences major, received $1,000 Tillamook County Creamery Association Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

NEWBERG: Kearsten Friedrich, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Summers Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

NEWBERG: Margaret Halstead, crop and soil science major, received the $1,000 Loren J. Smith Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

OAKLAND: Kayla Rushing, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Jernstedt Family Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

ONTARIO: Nathan Andersen, crop and soil science major, received the $1,000 Charles E. and Clara Marie Eckelman Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

ONTARIO: Brecklin Milton, agricultural business management major, received the $1,000 Charles E. and Clara Marie Eckelman Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

ONTARIO: Breanna Panages, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Summers Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

PENDLETON: Nels Swenson, agricultural sciences major, received the $1,000 Savery Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

PLACENTIA, California: Lauren Lerch, botany major, received the $1,000 Loren J. Smith Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

PORTLAND: Amita Kashyap, bioresource research major, received the $1,000 Clifford Smith Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

RENO, Nevada: Elizabeth Nicholas, food science and technology major, received the $1,000 Clifford Smith Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

SALEM: Kelsi Limbach, horticulture major, received the $1,000 Jernstedt Family Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

SCIO: Marcel Ortiz, agricultural sciences major, received the $1,000 Frank Burlingham Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

SPRINGFIELD: Connor Mackenzie, agricultural sciences major, received the $1,000 Frank Burlingham Memorial Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 Ursula Bolt Knaus Scholarship.

TWIN FALLS, Idaho: Kelsey Rogers, animal sciences major, received the $1,000 Savery Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

WEST LINN: Jessica Chadwick, biological and ecological engineering major, received the $1,000 Jernstedt Family Agricultural Honors Scholarship, and the $1,000 John W. DeMuth, Jr. Agricultural Sciences Scholarship.

OSU offers more grant and scholarship dollars than any other college or university in Oregon. A significant portion of this is provided by donors to the OSU Foundation, who have contributed more than $185 million over the last decade to support scholarships, fellowships and other awards for students.

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Paul Dorres, 541-737-5655, paul.dorres@oregonstate.edu

OSU students to hold vigil for victims of violence around world

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Ettihad Cultural Center at Oregon State University is holding a candle light vigil to stand in solidarity with victims of mindless terror in Paris, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria, Yemen and Kenya. Students are inviting the community to stand beside them as they pay respects to the victims. The gathering will take place from 6-8 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19, in  the Student Experience Center plaza, east of the Memorial Union. 

The ECC is a cross-cultural resource for OSU students who have a cultural or ethnic background in central and southwestern Asia and northern Africa, and for those who are interested in learning more about those cultures and regions. 

Organizers say the atrocities committed against humanity this week have shaken everyone. But the Ettihad student community is feeling particularly vulnerable right now because of the negative spotlight that can fall on people of Muslim faith and those with cultural or ethnic ties to the Middle East and North Africa. This event is a means to join hands and raise a voice against division and hatred. 

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Amarah Khan, 541-737-6342; amarah.khan@oregonstate.edu

OSU students in France reported safe; campus services offered to French students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University officials have determined that all 24 students participating in education programs offered in France are safe following terrorist attacks Friday night in Paris in which 129 people were killed.

Of the two dozen students in France, five are Oregon State students and 19 are students who attend other colleges, but engage in study abroad and internship activities within IE3 Global programs managed by OSU. Three IE3 students and one Oregon State student were believed to be in Paris at the time of Friday’s violence.

University staff members have been in contact with each of these students to ascertain their safety and any immediate needs they might have. Staff members have also provided information regarding the students’ status to family members and officials from the other colleges, who have students engaged in IE3.

“We are all incredibly saddened by the tragic violence in Paris and the loss of life and suffering that has occurred,” said Mark Hoffman, vice provost of international programs at Oregon State. “We will remain in close contact with our students in France and support them and their families as best we can during this tragic time.”

Meanwhile, Oregon State University enrolls 25 students from France on its Corvallis campus.

In response to Friday’s violence, Oregon State International Program staff members are working collaboratively with OSU’s Division of Student Affairs and the Dean of Student Life Office to assist French students attending the university.

Hoffman said the students will be offered assistance by staff working in OSU Counseling and Psychological Services, Student Health Services, International Programs and INTO OSU. International students also will be invited to meet personally with international student advisors regarding their concerns.

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Steve Clark: office, 541-737-3808; cell 503-502-8217 or email steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU awarded prestigious honor society chapter

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has been awarded a Phi Beta Kappa chapter after a rigorous three-year application process.

Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest honor society for liberal arts and sciences. A total of 26 universities applied for the honor three years ago, and five were chosen for a site visit last year, including Oregon State.

This week, the Phi Beta Kappa Triennial Council voted to award a chapter to Oregon State and two other schools.

Phi Beta Kappa chapters exist at only about ten percent of colleges and universities, and only about ten percent of each institution’s arts and sciences graduates are invited to join Phi Beta Kappa each year.  Invitees must demonstrate not only outstanding academic performance but also a record of coursework in the liberal arts and sciences that shows depth as well as breadth.  Phi Beta Kappa members have included 17 U.S. Presidents, 39 U.S. Supreme Court Justices, and more than 130 Nobel Laureates. 

Oregon State President Edward J. Ray has been a member of Phi Beta Kappa since he was a senior at Queens College in the City University of New York, and there are more than 100 other Phi Beta Kappa members already among OSU faculty. Ray said he was excited about the prospect of offering membership to some of Oregon State’s many high-achieving students.

“Becoming a member of Phi Beta Kappa had a profound impact on my life and on my career as a leader of higher education,” Ray said. “When I was in college I couldn’t afford the $25 membership fee, but a family friend was generous enough to pay it for me. That’s why my late wife Beth and I set up a fund to make sure OSU students with similar financial limitations aren’t prevented from becoming members.”

The Kay Bowers Fund for Phi Beta Kappa Students, established by the Rays, will support eligible Phi Beta Kappa students who don’t have the resources to cover the expenses to join. Upon learning of the decision to award a chapter to Oregon State, Ray has just doubled the endowment.

Phi Beta Kappa schools generally invite only a small percentage of high-achieving, top students to join, which gives them a notable addition to their resumes as well as access to networking opportunities. A chapter at Oregon State has been a long time coming, supporters say, and the high prestige that goes along with a chapter cements Oregon State's legitimacy as a major national research and liberal arts university. 

Among the reasons the Phi Beta Kappa committee cited for approving Oregon State membership was the university’s ‘overwhelming commitment to student learning,” and “across-the-board respect for the values of liberal learning.”

Dean of the College of Liberal Arts Larry Rodgers noted Oregon State’s commitment to providing a foundational baccalaureate core for all Oregon State undergraduates.

“Becoming a Phi Beta Kappa chapter has been at the top of our wish list as we continue to enhance our arts and science curriculum at Oregon State,” Rodgers said. “We are thrilled that our students will have the chance to experience the benefits of being members of such a prestigious and respected honor society.”

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Tara Williams, 541-737-6412; tara.williams@oregonstate.edu