OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

students

New Centro Cultural Cesar Chavez building opens on campus

CORVALLIS – Latino students at Oregon State University now have a brand new home away from home, and the campus will celebrate the new Centro Cultural Cesar Chavez during a grand opening ceremony Monday, April 7, beginning at 5 p.m.

The new building is one of four new cultural centers being built on campus to replace aging structures. The centers provide space for students to socialize, celebrate and study, learn more about their own culture and explore the world of other students of different backgrounds.

“Oregon State does a great job in supporting students from diverse backgrounds, and the Centro provides a space for dialogue and an opportunity to share perspectives,” said Miguel Arellano, a graduate assistant who helps coordinate Centro activities. “That combined with the support services offered at OSU provides a place where students from different backgrounds are able to thrive. This is a welcoming space for all students to learn about or retain Latino culture.”

In 1971, a group of nine students met in the basement of Milam Hall in an effort to establish a Latino student organization. Originally called the Chicano Cultural Center, the basement location was less than ideal, and students eventually asked for a more permanent and independent location on campus. After temporarily moving into a house on Orchard Street, in 1977 they moved into an older, former family home on A Street.

After four decades, the house has finally been replaced. A crowded living room and sun-faded deck have been swapped for a spacious building that includes a large gathering hall, multiple office and study spaces and a large kitchen for hosting social events. The Centro is affiliated with 17 different student organizations on campus and is a popular spot for many different events, from cultural celebrations to social justice activities.

“It’s a space where students can gain a broader world view,” Arellano said, and the new building will offer many more opportunities to bring people from around campus into the Centro to celebrate Latino heritage.

“I grew up in Woodburn, and coming from a place that is 60 percent Latino to a place where the Latino population is around 6 percent, there’s a big difference,” Arellano said, which is why having a place like the Centro is so important to student retention. “When you’re participating in events here, you see people who look like you, and who share similar passions and experiences.”

Latino identity is broad and complex, and represents people from many different parts of the world, which can be difficult to encompass in one building. But the Centro staff tries to make the space welcoming not just for Latino students, but anyone on campus who wants to stop in.

For Joyce Contreras, a human development and family sciences major who grew up in Beaverton, the Centro has provided her the chance to explore aspects of her Mexican background that she had previously not been in touch with.

"I wanted to be involved with the Centro because I wanted to further my knowledge about my own heritage and be a welcoming individual to others. What we say about our center is 'This is a home away from home.' I wanted to be in that environment and learn more about my culture," she said. For Contreras, it was important to find her roots. Before she became involved with Centro, she didn't know whether to identify as Mexican or Hispanic, and often switched between the two. Now she proudly identifies as Latina, and understands the cultural and political context of the term.

The 3,565 square-foot building cost $2,521,051. It was designed by Seattle-based architects Jones & Jones, who also designed the Native American Longhouse, which opened the doors on its new building last spring. They are also designing new buildings for the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center and the Asian Pacific Cultural Center.

The four cultural centers are being funded with a combination of private gifts and university funds. The project got off the ground with a $500,000 gift from the late Portland philanthropist Joyce Collin Furman to create the OSU President’s Fund for Cultural Centers. The 1965 OSU alumna was a strong supporter of her alma mater and served on the steering committee for The Campaign for OSU.

The Centro is located at 691 S.W. 26th Street. For more information on the grand opening, go to https://www.facebook.com/events/754118061279312/

 

 

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Miguel Arellano, 541-737-3790

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OSU Board of Trustees endorses future tuition levels, funding requests

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees on Thursday unanimously endorsed a plan to continue phasing out the university’s tuition plateau, which gives undergraduate students who take from 12-15 credit hours a break on tuition.

The board vote on the tuition plateau Thursday was part of a broader approval by the OSU Board of Trustees to recommend to the Oregon State Board of Higher Education tuition rates and fees for the 2014-15 academic year. While OSU now has its own board, the Board of Higher Education, by law, must authorize any changes in tuition and fees through June 30.

OSU is the last public university in the state to offer the plateau, which has allowed students taking 13-16 hours a term to pay the same tuition as those students taking just 12 hours.

“What the plateau effectively has done is provided a higher tuition rate for students taking class loads above or below the plateau, and a lower rate for students taking 13-15 hours,” said Steve Clark, OSU’s vice president for University Relations and Marketing. “This is not equitable.”

Last year, the university’s budget committee, which included student representation, recommended a three-year phasing out of the tuition plateau and in fall 2013, the plateau was reduced from 13-16 credits hours to 13-15 credits. According to the plan endorsed by the OSU board, students next school year will pay reduced tuition for any courses between 13 and 15 credit hours, and then will pay full tuition for all credit hours in the 2015-16 academic year.

Meanwhile, the legislatively mandated tuition freeze will keep Oregon State’s resident undergraduate tuition rate at $189 per credit hour for 2014-15. There will be no increase in “differential tuition surcharges” for high-demand programs such as engineering.

What this means for students taking an average of 15 credit hours per term in 2014-15 is an annual tuition charge of $7,650.

“While this represents an increase from the 2013-14 tuition rate ($6,876 for the year), it is well below the median tuition for Oregon State’s peer institutions, and less than the tuition rate charged by the University of Oregon,” Clark said. The median tuition for OSU’s peer land grant institutions is $9,510; the University of Oregon’s rate in 2013 was $8,280.

The OSU board also voted to increase the tuition rate for most graduate students by 2.1 percent for in-state students, and 3.9 percent for out-of-state students. Tuition for students in pharmacy and veterinary medicine will increase by 3.0 percent, while differential tuition will remain at the same level.

The board also on Thursday unanimously voted to forward a capital projects funding request of $278 million for the 2015-17 biennium to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, which must review the plan and incorporate some or all of the recommendations to its budget request to the Oregon Legislature.

The request includes $171.5 million in state-paid bonds, $7.5 million in bonds that would be paid by OSU, and $99 million in projected grants and gifts. State-funded bond projects include campus accessibility improvements, technology infrastructure upgrades, building and program renewals, and renovation of Fairbanks and Magruder halls.

New building projects that would be funded in part by grants and gifts include a new center for advanced wood materials, a new engineering building, further development of the OSU-Cascades campus, and a new building in Newport that would launch the first phase of the marine studies campus initiative at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center.

In other action:

  • The board adopted its own policies related to: the roles and responsibilities of board members and officers, board committees, the board’s code of ethics, conflict of interest requirements, associated board travel expenses, attendance at university events, and the board calendar;
  • The board voted to ratify the university’s existing mission statement.
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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU Board of Trustees to consider tuition and fees for 2014-15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet Thursday, March 13, on the OSU campus to approve tuition and fee levels for the 2014-15 academic year.

The meeting, which is open to the public, will run from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Willamette Room of the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center, located at 725 S.W. 26th St. in Corvallis.

The board also will review the university’s funding request to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission for the 2015-17 biennium, and receive updates on OSU’s strategic plan revision and The Campaign for OSU, which recently topped the $1 billion landmark in fund-raising.

Additional reports to the board will be made by OSU President Edward J. Ray, the chairs of the board’s Executive and Audit Committee and the Finance and Administration Committee, and the chair and executive director of the Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

On Wednesday, March 12, a meeting of the board’s Finance and Administration Committee will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. in the President’s Conference Room on the sixth floor of Kerr Administration Building. The committee will discuss tuition and fee levels, and OSU’s funding request to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and then consider a resolution forwarding those recommendations to the full board on Thursday. This meeting is also open to the public.

People who wish to attend either meeting and need special accommodations should contact Mark Huey in the board’s office at 541-737-8260 at least 72 hours in advance.

Meeting materials for these and other meetings will be posted at:

http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees/meetings.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Study identifies high level of “food insecurity” among college students

 

The study this story is based on is available in ScholarsArchive@OSU: http://bit.ly/LCp10Y

 

CORVALLIS, Ore. – One of the few studies of its type has found that a startling 59 percent of college students at one Oregon university were “food insecure” at some point during the previous year, with possible implications for academic success, physical and emotional health and other issues.

Contrary to concerns about obesity and some students packing on “the freshman 15” in weight gain, another reality is that many students are not getting enough healthy food to eat as they struggle with high costs, limited income, and fewer food or social support systems than are available to other groups.

The findings were published recently in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, by researchers from Oregon State University, the Benton County Health Department, and Western Oregon University. Students at Western Oregon were surveyed as the basis for the study.

“Based on other research that’s been done, we expected some amount of food concerns among college students,” said Daniel López-Cevallos, associate director of research at OSU’s Center for Latino/a Studies and Engagement. “But it was shocking to find food insecurity of this severity. Several recent trends may be combining to cause this.”

The researchers said a combination of rising college costs, more low-income and first-generation students attending college, and changing demographic trends are making this issue more significant than it may have been in the past.

“For past generations, students living on a lean budget might have just considered it part of the college experience, a transitory thing,” said Megan Patton-López, lead author of the study with Oregon’s Benton County Health Department.

“But rising costs of education are now affecting more people,” she said. “And for many of these students who are coming from low-income families and attending college for the first time, this may be a continuation of food insecurity they’ve known before. It becomes a way of life, and they don’t have as many resources to help them out.”

Most college students, with some exceptions, are not eligible for food stamps and many are often already carrying heavy debt loads. And the study found that even though many of them work one or more jobs, the financial demands are such that they still may not have enough money for healthy food at all times.

Food insecurity is defined as limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods, and the ability to acquire such food in acceptable ways. It has been associated with depression, stress, trouble learning in the classroom, and poor health. When similar issues have been addressed with elementary school students, improvements were seen in academic performance, behavior and retention of knowledge.

But these problems have received scarcely any attention in the 19-24 year old, young-adult demographic that predominates in college, the scientists said.

Among the findings of this study:

  • While about 14.9 percent of all households in the nation report food insecurity, the number of college students voicing similar concerns in this report was almost four times higher, at 59 percent.
  • In the past three decades the cost of higher education has steadily outpaced inflation, the cost of living and medical expenses.
  • Food insecurity during college years could affect cognitive, academic and psychosocial development.
  • Factors correlated with reports of food insecurity include fair to poor health, a lower grade point average, low income and employment.

Employment, by itself, is not adequate to resolve this problem, the researchers found. Students reporting food insecurity also worked an average of 18 hours a week – some as high as 42 – but the financial demands they faced more than offset that income.

These findings were based on a survey of 354 students at Western Oregon University, a mid-size public university in a small town near the state capitol in Salem, Ore. Students at Western Oregon supported and assisted in this research, and Doris Cancel-Tirado and Leticia Vazquez with Western Oregon co-authored the study.

The findings probably reflect similar concerns at colleges and universities across the nation, the researchers said, although more research is needed in many areas to determine the full scope of this problem.

“One thing that’s clear is that colleges and universities need to be having this conversation and learning more about the issues their students may be facing,” said López-Cevallos. “There may be steps to take locally that could help, and policies that could be considered nationally. But it does appear this is a very serious issue that has not received adequate attention, and we need to explore it further.”

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Daniel López-Cevallos, 541-737-3850

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Food assistance for students

Student food bank

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

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Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

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Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

OSU overall enrollment up 1.9 percent, Corvallis campus increases less than 1 percent

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Overall fall term 2017 enrollment at Oregon State University grew 1.9 percent from last year, while enrollment at OSU’s main campus in Corvallis continued to be stable.

Oregon State’s overall fall enrollment is 31,904 – up 601 students from 2016 – making OSU the largest university in the state of Oregon for the fourth consecutive year.

Oregon State’s fall enrollment includes:

  • 24,760 students at the university’s main campus in Corvallis, an increase from fall 2016 of 89 students or 0.4 percent;
  • 6,087 students in Ecampus, OSU’s nationally ranked online degree program, an increase of 405 students or 7.1 percent over last year; and
  • 1,204 students at OSU-Cascades in Bend, an increase of 82 students or 7.3 percent more than a year ago.

“We have served as Oregon’s statewide university for 149 years and this legacy of service to our state remains our priority,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “This year, 73 percent of our degree-seeking undergraduates on our Corvallis campus are Oregon residents.

“As part of our mission, OSU provides Oregonians access to an excellent education. That will continue with this incoming class of high-achieving students.”

Oregon State continues to attract top students. This fall, 371 students entered the university’s Honors College, compared with 358 in 2016. The average unweighted GPA of the new students entering the Honors College is 3.92.

 As well, of OSU’s new students:

  • Eleven are National Merit award winners, up from five last year.
  • 142 of Oregon State’s new undergraduates were ranked number one in their high school graduating class.
  • 35 are Presidential Scholars.

This fall, OSU has enrolled 7,660 students of color – Asian, African-American, Hispanic, Native American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander or students who identify as being of two or more races. This is an increase of 456 students or 6.3 percent over a year ago. In total, 24.8 percent of the Oregon State Corvallis and Ecampus enrollment identify themselves as a student of color, compared with 2,975 students and 15.1 percent of the OSU student body a decade ago.

Twenty-three percent – or 5,939 OSU undergraduates in Corvallis and studying within Ecampus – are first-generation students, an increase of nearly 1.4 percent over a year ago. At OSU-Cascades, first-generation students make up 32 percent of the enrollment.

“Oregon State is achieving excellence through inclusivity,” Ray said. “Twenty-nine percent of this year’s entering Honors College students come from diverse backgrounds. I also am pleased with the continued growth of our diversity and first-generation students in Oregon State’s overall enrollment. And that 3.4 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment – 1,048 students – are veterans of U.S. military service.”

“These students are near-and-dear to my heart,” said Ray, who was the first in his family to graduate from college. “OSU is expanding its efforts to increase its enrollment of people of diversity, students from low-income families and first-generation students. And through our student success initiative, OSU is providing access to an excellent higher education for all Oregonians and assisting all students on through graduation.”

OSU also continues to expand its global reach as an internationally recognized public research university. This fall, international student enrollment increased by 27 students to 3,556 students or 11.5 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment. International students from 110 countries attend Oregon State this fall. A decade ago, OSU enrolled 928 international students – or 4.7 percent of its overall enrollment.

Oregon State’s commitment to graduate studies and engagement in research is evident with this year’s total of 5,058 graduate students in Corvallis campus enrollment, compared with 5,027 graduate students in 2016. Graduate and professional students in OSU’s colleges of pharmacy and veterinary medicine also increased by 31 students this fall.  

Steve Clark, OSU’s vice president for University Relations and Marketing, said Oregon State intentionally manages its enrollment to achieve the university’s land grant mission; operate in a financially sustainable manner; and be a good neighbor in Corvallis, Bend and Newport.

“We continue to observe our commitment to slow the growth of our Corvallis campus and not grow above 28,000 students by 2025,” Clark said. “We continue to manage enrollment intentionally. The past four years, enrollment growth has been below 1 percent. That trend would indicate OSU’s Corvallis campus may not reach 28,000 students until sometime in the early 2030s.

“In Bend, we are working with the city and community members to plan the expansion of our new OSU-Cascades campus,” Clark said. “All the while, we will serve higher education needs where students live and work by enrolling more distance online students through Ecampus.”

At OSU-Cascades, 92.4 percent of the enrollment is composed of Oregonians, including 198 students who are of color – 16.4 percent of total enrollment – and 306 who are first-generation students. OSU-Cascades’ enrollment includes 955 undergraduate and 249 graduate students. New freshmen enrollment at the new campus is 81, a 37.3 percent increase from 2016.

More students are studying engineering than any other discipline. The College of Engineering has a total of 8,932 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled this fall. The next largest programs are the College of Liberal Arts, 4,182 students; the College of Business, 3,731; the College of Science, 3,533; the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, 2,841; and the College of Agricultural Sciences, 2,539.

Enrollment in other colleges and programs includes: College of Forestry, 1,118, University Exploratory Studies, 945; Graduate School, 763; College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, 803; College of Pharmacy, 390; College of Education, 295; and College of Veterinary Medicine, 243. 

Oregon State’s Honors College enrolls 4.7 percent of all undergraduates with a total of 1,187 students – a 12.3 percent increase over 2016.

The most popular undergraduate majors at OSU are computer science, followed by business administration, mechanical engineering, biology and kinesiology.

Media Contact: 

Sean Nealon, 541-737-0787, sean.nealon@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University ranked among the top 1 percent of world universities

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has been ranked in the top 1 percent out of more than 27,000 degree-granting institutions of higher education worldwide in this year's CWUR (Center for World University Rankings) World University Rankings. The CWUR rankings are the largest academic ranking of global universities. Oregon State came in at 257.

This year, 27,770 degree-granting institutions of higher education worldwide were evaluated. The top 1,000 research-intensive institutions received rankings. The rankings measure the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.

Oregon State University was given a national rank of 99, and ranked high in quality of education, alumni employment, quality of faculty, publications and influence, as well as citations, broad impact and patents.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Auditions for OSU’s fall production, ‘Inherit the Wind,’ to be held Sept. 24-25

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s fall production, “Inherit the Wind,” will be held at 6 p.m. Sept. 24 and Sept. 25 in the Withycombe Hall main stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

“Inherit the Wind” is a classic American play based on the Scopes Monkey Trial of 1925. The play’s fictional account of the historic trial has been a popular fixture of the American stage since its debut in 1955 and has been the basis for multiple film adaptations.

The courtroom drama depicts the complicated intersections of faith, science and identity in a changing modern world in the tight-knit community of Hillsboro.

Auditions are open to all OSU students, staff, faculty and community members of all ages. The cast features six principal roles and a large ensemble that will portray multiple characters, for a total of 29 roles available.

Those auditioning should be prepared for cold readings from the script, which will be available Sept. 20. Callbacks will be held Sept. 26 if needed.

Rehearsals will be held from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. Technical/dress rehearsals will be held from Nov. 4 through Nov. 8. Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9, 11, 16 and 17 and at 2 p.m. Nov. 12 and 19.

All performers must be available for all technical/dress rehearsals and performances.

For more information about the production, contact the director, Nathan Bush at Nathan.bush@oregonstate.edu

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More than 3,600 students expected to move into OSU Sunday, Sept. 17

Oregon State University will host the main day of new resident move in Sunday, Sept. 17, for students living on campus.

More than 3,600 residents are expected to arrive Sunday, many with family and friends. Increased traffic and congestion are expected around campus. More than 500 volunteers will help with move in.

In addition, more than 400 international student residents arrived on Sept. 11 and 12. And, with other students who arrived early, more than 1,000 students will already have moved into their residence halls before Sept. 17. In total, more than 4,700 students will be living on campus this year.

OSU will offer some new options in housing and dining this year, including:

-        A Living-Learning Community (LLC) in McNary Hall focused on the practice of mindfulness. OSU’s LLCs are academic programs that partner with a residential community to enhance students’ academic and leadership pursuits.

-        A new transfer student lounge in Halsell Hall, providing a community and study space for transfer students, regardless of if they live on campus..

-        Monthly sustainable seafood specials in every dining center as part of a larger initiative to source local, sustainable and organic foods whenever possible. Campus dining is open to the public, and campus visitors are encouraged to try the featured dishes, which will range from fish florentine to beer battered sole with chips.

For more information on these events and initiatives, or on volunteering to help welcome new students on Move-In Day, contact University Housing & Dining Services at 541-737-4771 or housing@oregonstate.edu.

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Jennifer Viña, 541-737-4771, Jennifer.vina@oregonstate.edu

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Oregon State receives high “Cool School” ranking from Sierra Club

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Sierra Club has released its “Cool Schools” rankings based on the ‘greenness’ of participating universities, and Oregon State has the highest green ranking of any public college in the state (private college Lewis & Clark came in 5th). Oregon State is listed as 20th in the nation.

The Cool Schools ranking is open to all four-year undergraduate colleges and universities in the nation. The award honors more than 200 colleges that are helping to solve climate problems and making significant efforts to integrate sustainability into their teaching, research and engagement and to operate sustainably. Evaluations were based on survey information provided by the participating schools. The raw data for scoring came from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) STARS self-reporting tool, plus a supplemental question about fossil fuel investments.

Brandon Trelstad, sustainability officer for Oregon State, said that the university’s continued commitment to sustainability has led to a number of honors from national organizations over the years.

“We continue to prioritize our work to reduce our carbon footprint. Things like conserving energy and recycling and repurposing materials to keep them out of the landfill help support carbon emission reductions and offer numerous co-benefits,” Trelstad said. “I continue to consider myself lucky to do sustainability work at Oregon State and in the Pacific Northwest. Being green is part of OSU’s ethos, we consider ourselves good stewards of the planet and being a ‘Cool School’ highlights this work.”

The Sierra Club noted innovative research at OSU, calling out assistant professor Chad Higgins’ research into the impact on soil moisture from ground mounted solar panels, and the benefits of growing food there. Higgins’ preliminary findings indicated a co-benefit for the panels as well – cooler temperatures, which means more electricity production from the panels.

“Based on my casual summertime observations at our six-acre solar array,” Trelstad said, “it didn’t surprise me that the ground under panels might be good for some food crops. But I was elated to learn that growing crops could also increase solar production. This is the kind of synergy we look for in sustainability work; systems thinking and looking for co-benefits across those systems.”

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Brandon Trelstad, 541-737-3307; brandon.trelstad@oregonstate.edu

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Solar panels at OSU