OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Survey: Health care providers not checking for family food insecurity, barriers still exist

PORTLAND, Ore. – A survey of pediatric physicians and nurse practitioners in the Portland metro area shows that a majority are not regularly asking about household food practices, including nutritional quality or whether there is enough food in the home.

Oregon is one of the states ranked highest in “food insecurity,” or the proportion of households that have limited access to nutritionally adequate food on a regular basis. About 13.9 percent of households in Oregon are “food insecure” and Oregon also has one of the highest rates of childhood hunger.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has identified food security as one of the top health-related social issues that should be addressed in a pediatric visit. Yet, in a new study published online recently in the journal Preventive Medicine, only 13 percent of health care providers in the Portland area reported asking about household food sufficiency, and only 9 percent considered themselves knowledgeable about the prevalence of food insecurity in Oregon.

The study’s lead author, Anne Hoisington, an Oregon State University Extension specialist based at the Oregon Food Bank, said a positive aspect of the survey was that a large majority – almost 89 percent – of respondents said they would be willing to use a standardized screening question.

“A large percentage of our responding physicians and nurse practitioners were willing to engage, so I look at this as a huge opportunity that indicates that these providers want to learn more,” she said. “We already offer an online training class, and I’d like to see this taken a step further.”

The study showed that out of the 186 respondents, the health care providers who monitored food insecurity tended to be those with more years in practice.

Providers listed limited time available in the clinical visit as the main barrier to inquiring about the nutritional quality of their patients’ food. In contrast, however, the main barriers to inquiring about food sufficiency – whether everyone in the family has enough to eat – were discomfort in discussing food insecurity and inadequate knowledge about the topic.

“We found that the prospect of discussing food sufficiency seems to make some providers uncomfortable,” said Marc Braverman, a professor and Extension specialist in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at OSU, who coauthored this study. “The topic is largely outside of their common practice, because food scarcity is perceived as a social problem rather than a medical problem, even though it has real and serious impacts on health.”

Hoisington, who is also a nutrition specialist in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, said food scarcity taps into one of the most sensitive areas in parenting – a parent’s ability to care properly and provide resources for his or her child.

Ideally, Hoisington would like to develop a training video in collaboration with partners around Oregon that could be shared with pediatricians’ offices. The training video would help model how health providers could deal with this sensitive topic with an upset parent.

In addition, the researchers said doctors should have materials on hand about underutilized food assistance programs such as SNAP, so they can provide parents with resources.

Hoisington said since this survey was conducted several years ago, more than 2,000 Oregonians have gone through an online training course on food insecurity developed by OSU Extension. More than 10 percent of those were physicians, and most others are medical students, nurses, dieticians, and other health care providers.

The survey was a project of the Childhood Hunger Coalition, which includes OSU Extension, Oregon Food Bank, Oregon Health and Science University, the Oregon Health Authority’s WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) Program, Kaiser Permanente, and Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon.

The next step is to conduct intervention studies, which are already in the works. Members of the Childhood Hunger Coalition are conducting pilot screenings and designing an intervention model in two clinics where doctors will screen patients on food insecurity.

 “With health care reform now a reality, I think there will be more focus on prevention,” Hoisington said. “Hopefully that will mean we will become more attentive to issues such as health care disparity, hunger, and food insecurity.”

Coauthors of this study included pediatrician Dr. Dana Hargunani and assistant professor Elizabeth Adams, both with OHSU, and Cheryl Alto with the Oregon WIC.

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Anne Hoisington, 503-282-0624

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Anne Hoisington

Photo - Marc Braverman
Marc Braverman

OSU English instructor awarded Oregon Book Award

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon State University faculty member George Estreich was awarded the Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction at a ceremony last night in Portland for his memoir, "The Shape of the Eye: Down Syndrome, Family, and the Stories We Inherit.”

Estreich’s book focuses on the first year of his daughter’s life following her diagnosis of Down syndrome. He is an instructor of English at OSU.

Marjorie Sandor, professor of English and director of OSU’s Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing, was nominated for her book “The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction.”

Two releases by OSU Press were also nominees: Glenn Anthony May’s book, “Sonny Montes and Mexican American Activism in Oregon,” and Portland author Brian Doyle’s book, “Mink River.”

The Oregon Book Awards is a program of Literary Arts, a statewide, nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the importance of language.

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Lawrence Rodgers, 541-737-4581

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George Estreich
George Estreich

Online/mobile architectural guide to Portland launched

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new mobile website provides a convenient way for visitors to Portland to learn about the city’s architectural variety and history.

Launched by Oregon State University Libraries and the OSU Press, “Bart King’s Architectural Guide to Portland” can be found at http://pdxarchitecture.library.oregonstate.edu/.

Architecturally, Portland strikes a graceful balance between the rich traditions of its past and the creative developments of modern design. This new mobile site features rotating content selected from An Architectural Guidebook to Portland, a popular resource rich with photographs and stories about Portland’s celebrated cityscape.

Portland’s civic planning, historic preservation, and overall attractiveness are explored in detailed profiles of structures ranging from 19th-century cast-iron front buildings to sleek modern skyscrapers. Arranged by district, the guide offers information on downtown Portland, the cultural district, government center, Yamhill, Old Town, the Pearl District, city bridges, and northwest, northeast, southwest and southeast Portland.

Portland visitors and explorers can access the site online or through any web enabled mobile device.  Within each entry, users will find King’s detailed and often witty narrative about the site, photographs, and an interactive map providing real-time walking or driving directions.

As mobile devices become more ubiquitous, providing new ways to present available content is increasingly important for publishers.

“Users don’t just want access to the core content in new formats, but access to the content in ways that make sense for how they use their mobile devices,” said Faye Chadwell, the Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian at OSU and director of the OSU Press. “‘Bart King’s Architectural Guide to Portland’ is the first example of numerous planned collaborations between OSU Press and OSU Libraries, leveraging the Libraries’ knowledge of mobile development and user-centered design with the press’ mission to provide better understanding of our region.”

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Faye Chadwell, 541-737-7300

Oregon CEO Summit to be held May 3

PORTLAND, Ore. – The third annual Oregon CEO Summit, which will include business leaders discussing the role real estate plays in the economy, will take place on Thursday, May 3, from 7:30 to 9:15 a.m. at the Governor Hotel in Portland.

Sponsored by Oregon State University’s College of Business, the event, “Real Estate Now: Rethinking, Renewing, Reinventing,” begins with a keynote address by Tom Toomey, president and CEO of United Dominion Realty, Inc. Toomey will speak about how the real estate industry is evolving and doing more with less in today’s economy.

Following the keynote, a panel discussion will discuss the role of real estate in the current economy, which continues to challenge the industry and local communities. Panelists include:

The panel will be moderated by Diane Detering-Paddison, chief strategy officer, Cassidy Turley.

With expertise in different segments of the real estate industry including capital markets, construction, institutional investment, design and sustainability, the diverse group of panelists will discuss new trends, opportunities and innovative solutions that drive the economy.

Registration for the summit is $50, which includes breakfast. The Governor Hotel is located at 614 S.W. 11th Ave., Portland. Registration closes on Thursday, April 26.

For more information and to register, go to: http://business.oregonstate.edu/CEOSummit

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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695

First Lady Michelle Obama to deliver commencement address at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – First Lady Michelle Obama, a national champion of promoting healthier communities and better childhood nutrition, will provide the commencement address at Oregon State University on Sunday, June 17.

OSU President Ed Ray extended the invitation to the First Lady to participate in Oregon State’s 143rd annual commencement ceremony.

“Mrs. Obama’s leadership to improve the health of our nation’s communities and reduce obesity among young people is outstanding,” Ray said. “And her efforts are very much in keeping with Oregon State’s overall mission.  As a top tier land grant university, we are focused on academic programs, research and outreach and engagement that promote healthy people, a healthy environment and a healthy economy.

“During her campaign for better childhood nutrition for improved community health, the First Lady has gained national insights, community perspectives and a passion for improved health that few can match,” Ray said. “We know that the 3,000 or so Oregon State bachelors, masters and doctoral degree graduates who will participate in this year’s commencement ceremony – and their guests and family members – will be inspired by Mrs. Obama’s address.”

Ray said Oregon State University and its students have long had a strong connection to fostering healthy communities and healthy lifestyle choices, including proper nutrition.

Members of SIFE – the Students in Free Enterprise team from Oregon State’s College of Business – earned first place in 2010 in the national “Let’s Can Hunger Challenge” sponsored by the Campbell Soup Co. and the national Students in Free Enterprise Organization.

OSU’s 14-person team conducted a tour of Oregon and U.S. cities to develop a greater understanding of model efforts to reduce hunger and build awareness about food insecurity. In each city they visited, team members rolled up their sleeves to volunteer and take an active role in understanding each community’s unique approach to battling hunger. Meanwhile, one Oregon State team member described team members as being jarred by learning during their tour that the state of Oregon ranked second in the nation for food insecurity.

OSU’s SIFE members said they were challenged by this unpleasant news and were “driven to make a difference” in Oregon communities. For their efforts to combat hunger, Campbell Soup featured the OSU students in a national print advertising campaign.

Ray said Oregon State researchers are also working to improve community health and prevent obesity among youngsters. Researchers Deborah John and Kathy Gunter have identified childhood obesity factors, including long bus rides; the existence of fewer resources to support physical activity among young people, such as recreational programs; and a lack of healthy food choices. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, John and Gunter are developing an obesity prevention program through the OSU Extension Service. The program will work in partnership with school districts, health care providers, parents and volunteers and will target children ages five to eight years old.

Volunteerism in reducing hunger has been a long tradition at Oregon State. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, university employees not only agreed to a salary cut, but each employee donated one day’s income each month for unemployment relief to assist those who had lost their jobs as a result of funding cuts. More recently, OSU has led all public campuses in Oregon in food donations as part of the annual Governor’s State Employee Food Drive. This year, more than 647,370 pounds of food were collected from donations made by faculty, staff, students and community members. This year’s collection dwarfed the 2011 Oregon State food drive by 71,695 pounds.

In addition to her strong commitment to healthy communities and proper nutrition, Ray said that Oregon State also enjoys another connection with the First Lady. Craig Robinson, OSU’s head men’s basketball coach, is Mrs. Obama’s brother.

This year’s commencement exercise is scheduled to be held at 3 p.m. on Sunday, June 17.

Oregon State has a unique and storied approach to commencement. It is one of the nation’s few universities to provide graduates with their own actual diploma during the commencement ceremony. Oregon State has a 140-year history of offering the oath of office to officers of the U.S. Armed Services, who graduate each year from OSU as part of a military service officer training program; and President Ray annually recognizes three to four students, who have remarkable stories of personal or academic achievement, or who have overcome adversity in life along their way to graduation.

In addition to visiting Oregon State, Mrs. Obama will deliver commencement addresses at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) on May 11 and at North Carolina Agriculture and Technical State University (North Carolina A&T) on May 12.

Mrs. Obama will begin her 2012 commencement addresses at Virginia Tech, where she was inspired by the resilience of the student body and community coming together to support each other during difficult times. The next day, the First Lady will travel to North Carolina to speak at North Carolina A&T, part of the rich legacy of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that have been instrumental in educating generations of African Americans.  The President and First Lady both have recognized the important contributions of HBCUs and have delivered commencement addresses to highlight their successes.

In 2009, Mrs. Obama spoke at the graduation of University of California Merced’s first full senior class. She also addressed the Washington Math and Science Tech Public Charter High School Graduation in Washington DC.  In 2010, Mrs. Obama addressed graduates of the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, the George Washington University, and the Anacostia Senior High School. In 2011, Mrs. Obama delivered commencement addresses at the University of Northern Iowa, Spelman College, and Quantico Middle High School. The First Lady also spoke to graduates and families at West Point.

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First Lady Michelle Obama joins students for a "Let's Move!" Salad Bars to Schools event in Miami, Fla. (Official White House Photo)

Michelle Obama

First Lady Michelle Obama after delivering the commencement address at the University of Northern Iowa in 2011 (Official White House Photo)

Alumni and Business Partner Awards held May 3 in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. – Five prominent business leaders and one Fortune 100 company will be recognized during the Oregon State University College of Business’ Alumni and Business Partner Awards on Thursday, May 3, at the Governor Hotel in Portland.


The annual event, established in 2002, recognizes outstanding professional achievements and services to the college by alumni and business partners.


The evening begins at 5:30 p.m. with a reception, followed by dinner and the awards presentation beginning at 6:30 p.m. Registration opens Friday, March 30, and will be open until Thursday, April 26. For ticket information visit http://business.oregonstate.edu/awards or contact Gwen Wolfram at 541-737-4330 or gwen.wolfram@oregonstate.edu


The 2012 award winners include:



  • Hall of Fame: Wayne Ericksen ’58, vice president and principal, Columbia Management Company (retired)

  • Innovative Business Leader: Tom Toomey ‘82, president and CEO, UDR, Inc.

  • Distinguished Business Professional: Diane Detering-Paddison ’81, chief strategy officer, Cassidy Turley; founder of 4word and author.

  • Distinguished Early Career Business Professional: Eric Winston ‘98, chief financial officer, Keen, Inc.

  • Distinguished Young Professional: Angelina Lusetti ‘07, store team leader, Target Stores.

  • Distinguished Business Partner: Boeing, Inc.
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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695

Roald Hoffmann to receive the 2012 Linus Pauling Legacy Award

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Roald Hoffmann, a professor of chemistry at Cornell University and co-recipient of the 1981 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, is the seventh recipient of the Linus Pauling Legacy Award, sponsored by the Oregon State University Libraries.


Hoffmann will deliver a free public lecture in downtown Portland on Thursday, April 19, beginning at 8 p.m. in the Colonel Lindbergh Room of the Embassy Suites Hotel, 319 S.W. Pine Street. His Legacy Award lecture is titled “Indigo - A Story of Craft, Religion, History, Science and Culture.”


The Pauling Legacy Award is granted every other year to an individual who has contributed to an area of interest to the late Linus Pauling, an OSU alumnus and winner both of a Nobel Prize for Chemistry and a Nobel Peace Prize.


A renowned speaker and writer, Hoffmann is best known within scientific circles for his work in applied theoretical chemistry.  With Kenichi Fukui, he received the 1981 Nobel award “for their theories, developed independently, concerning the course of chemical reactions.”


Like Pauling before him, much of Hoffmann’s career as a chemist has been devoted to determining the structure and properties of large molecules and to communicating these characteristics to both professional colleagues and students alike.


Hoffmann has also contributed significantly to improving science education for the general public.  He participated in the production of a popular television program titled “The World of Chemistry” and has published a number of books written for the lay science enthusiast.


Hoffmann has also written numerous collections of poetry as well as three plays. One theatrical production, “Oxygen,” was co-written with chemist Carl Djerassi and has been performed in 10 languages worldwide.


The public is encouraged to reserve seats for the Portland lecture by contacting the Oregon State University Libraries’ Special Collections & Archives Research Center at 541-737-2075 or special.collections@oregonstate.edu


Past recipients of the Linus Pauling Legacy Award have included Nobel laureates Joseph Rotblat, Roderick MacKinnon and Roger Kornberg, as well as Harvard University biologist Matthew Meselson and Caltech chemist John D. Roberts. 


For more information: http://osulibrary.orst.edu/specialcollections/events/2012hoffmann/index.html

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Larry Landis, 541-737-0540

College of Engineering honors alumni

CORVALLIS, Ore. - The Oregon State University College of Engineering recently honored some of its most distinguished alumni at the 14th annual Oregon Stater Awards.

These awards honor outstanding alumni who have used their education to excel professionally, provide inspirational leadership to others, and provide service that benefits OSU, the state of Oregon and beyond. 

These awards honor outstanding alumni who have used their education to excel professionally, provide inspirational leadership to others, and provide service that benefits OSU, the state of Oregon and beyond. There are three award categories determined by length of career and accomplishments: Engineering Hall of Fame, Academy of Distinguished Engineers, and Council of Outstanding Early Career Engineers.

More details on the awards and individuals being honored are available online at http://bit.ly/wdTUoL in a tribute magazine published by the event’s premier sponsor, the Portland Tribune and Community Newspapers.

The 2012 honorees from the Pacific Northwest include:

Hall of Fame

Portland                        Stephen R. Hawke, B.S., electrical engineering ’71, B.S. mathematics ’71, retired senior vice president of customer service, transmission and distribution, Portland General Electric

Umpqua                        C. Scott Henry III, B.S. mechanical engineering ’58, M.S. mechanical engineering ’59, president of Henry Estate Winery

Vancouver, Wash.         Robert L. Chapman, B.S. civil engineering ’65, M.S. civil engineering ’67, retired senior vice president at CH2M HILL

Academy of Distinguished Engineers

Bend                            Leonard Weitman, B.S. industrial engineering ’78, vice president of technical operations at Bend Broadband

Hillsboro                       John D. Barton, B.S. computer science engineering ’80, vice president of architecture group, general manager of platform validation engineering, Intel Corporation

Portland                        Ron Khormaei, B.S., electrical engineering ’88, M.S. electrical engineering ’89, Ph.D. electrical engineering ’95, general manager of Lensbaby, LLC

Kennewick, Wash.        Rick S. Heath, B.S. nuclear engineering ’91, B.S. health physics ’91, director of business development, AREVA Federal Services

 

Council of Outstanding Early Career Engineers

Clackamas                    Ian C. Wendler, B.S. industrial and manufacturing engineering ’00, director of research, development and strategic sourcing, Warn Industries, Inc.

Corvallis                       Randy Hoffman, B.S. electrical engineering ’00, M.S. electrical engineering ’02, senior engineer at Hewlett-Packard Company

Portland                        Bryan D. Kirkpatrick, B.S. nuclear engineering ’94, attorney/partner at Stolowitz Ford Cowger LLP

Portland                        Brian Hales Timmins, M.S. environmental engineering ’01, director of ETEC LLC

Vancouver, Wash.         Stacy J. Frost, B.S. civil engineering ’01, senior engineer at Maul Foster & Alongi, Inc.

Redmond, Wash.           Andrew Hill, B.S. mechanical engineering ’00, lead mechanical engineer at Microsoft Corporation

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Thuy Tran, 541-737-6020

Scientists discover reason for Mt. Hood’s non-explosive nature

CORVALLIS, Ore. – For a half-million years, Mount Hood has towered over the landscape, but unlike some of its cousins in Oregon’s Cascade Mountains and many other volcanoes around the Pacific “Rim of Fire,” it doesn’t have a history of large, explosive eruptions.

Now a team of scientists has found out why.

In new research just published online in the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, lead author Alison Koleszar of Oregon State University and her colleagues describe how mixing of magma deep beneath Mount Hood appears to have prevented it from blowing its top over the millennia. Their research has been funded primarily by the National Science Foundation.

Volcanic eruptions are usually described as “high-explosivity” or “low-explosivity” events, said Koleszar, who is a post-doctoral researcher in OSU’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences. Many volcanoes have experienced both. High-explosivity events are often referred to as Plinian eruptions, named after Pliny the Younger who described the eruption of Mount Vesuvius that destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii in AD 79. During these eruptions, large amounts of magma are ejected into the atmosphere at high velocity – such as Mount St. Helens in 1980 and Mount Pinatubo in 1992.

But studies of the rocks around Mount Hood show that the volcano has never experienced a Plinian eruption despite having similar chemical magma composition and gas contents as other volcanoes that have gone through these violent episodes.

The reason, Koleszar says, is that eruptions at Mount Hood appear to be preceded by episodes of intense mixing between magmas of different temperatures. Hot magma rises from deep below Mount Hood and mixes with the cooler magma that underlies the volcano. Heat from the deeper, hotter magma increases the temperature and lowers the viscosity of the magma that eventually erupts.

Instead of exploding, a la Mount St. Helens, magma at Mount Hood oozes out the top of the volcano and piles up to form a lava dome.

“If you take a straw and blow bubbles into a glass of milk, it will bubble up and allow the pressure to escape,” Koleszar said. “But if you blow bubbles into a thick milkshake you need more pressure and it essentially ‘erupts’ with more force as bits of milkshake get thrown into the air. Add a little heat to the milkshake, though, and it thins out and bubbles gently when you blow into it, more like the glass of milk.

"That what Mount Hood has been doing – heating things up enough to avoid a major explosion.”

What happens instead of an explosive eruption is more of a hiccup, according to Adam Kent, an OSU volcanologist who was Koleszar’s major professor when she earned her doctorate. The researchers analyzed three eruptive events on Mount Hood from the past 30,000 years, the last of which occurred about 220 years ago. These low-explosivity events resulted in the formation of lava domes near Mount Hood’s summit. Crater Rock, on the south side of the mountain, is a remnant of one of these lava domes.

“Instead of an explosion, it would be more like squeezing a tube of toothpaste,” said Kent, who also is an author on the study. “Lava piles up to form a dome; the dome eventually collapses under its own weight and forms a hot landslide that travels down the side of the volcano. In contrast, during a Plinian event such as the kind seen at other volcanoes, ash and rock are blown high into the air and distributed all over.”

Although Mount Hood lacks an explosive history, it doesn’t mean the 11,240-foot peak is completely docile. Collapses of the lava dome at Crater Rock about 1,500 years ago, and again 220 years ago, sent scalding landslides of hot lava blocks down the south side of the volcano, Kent pointed out.

“These types of events have dominated the eruptive activity at Mount Hood for the past 30,000 years,” Kent said. “The other danger is from lahars, which are major mudflows that stream down the side of the mountain at some 50 miles-an-hour, with the consistency of cement. They result when heat from the magma melts snow and mixes it with the volcanic ash and rock.

“Lahars probably accompany most eruptions of the volcano, and can even occur between eruptions after heavy rains or rapid snowmelt,” Kent added. “And they can go quite a ways – all the way to the Columbia River, for instance.”

Koleszar said few other volcanoes around the world act quite like Mt. Hood. It is, she said, a poster child for low-explosivity eruptions.

“Mount Hood is really cool because it is such a model for one extreme of volcano behavior,” Koleszar pointed out. “It may not have the colorful history of Mount Mazama or St. Helens, but it has its own niche among volcanoes – and now we better understand why it behaves the way it does.”

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Alison Koleszar, 541-737-1232

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OSU accounting students take first place in tax competition

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A team of accounting students from Oregon State University’s College of Business won first prize in the 2012 Foster School of Business Master of Professional Accounting Tax Case Competition held in Seattle.

John Baglien, Kathryn Cook, Victoria Uong, and Brittany Weede solved complex tax-planning problems and took home a $2,400 grand prize after competing against nine teams from the Northwest.

In four tries at this event, OSU students have won twice (2008 and 2012) and came in second in 2009.

The competition was a two-day event sponsored by the University of Washington and KPMG, an audit, tax and advisory firm. On the first day, the students analyzed the tax-relevant activities of a fictional couple and solved various compliance- and planning-related problems. On the second day, the students created a tax plan for the fictional couple and then presented their solutions to actors playing the clients as well as a panel of judges. 

The presentation was structured as a client interview, with the couple frequently interrupting to ask questions or argue with each other about various things, including long-term objectives, when and where they wanted to retire, and whether to keep or sell specific investments.

OSU accounting faculty members Jared Moore and Larry Brown advised the student team.

“My sense is that the quality and depth of their tax planning suggestions along with their professional and positive handling of the difficult clients are what won over the judges,” said Moore, the Mary Ellen Phillips Assistant Professor of Accounting.

OSU accounting students have surpassed the national average on the Certified Public Accounting Exam for the last seven years. Recently, a Master of Business Administration and Accountancy program (MBAA) that will begin in fall 2012 was approved by Oregon State Board of Higher Education.

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Jared Moore, 541-737-2517