OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

portland

Urban areas tough on fish – but Portland leads way on mitigation

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The restoration of salmon and steelhead habitat in the Pacific Northwest has focused largely on rural areas dominated by agricultural and forested lands, but researchers increasingly are looking at the impact of urban areas on the well-being of these fish.

Metropolitan areas – and even small towns – can have a major impact on the waterways carrying fish, researchers say, but many progressive cities are taking steps to mitigate these effects. The issues, policies and impacts of urban areas on salmon, steelhead and trout are the focus of a new book, “Wild Salmonids in the Urbanizing Pacific Northwest,” published by Springer.

The influx of contaminants and toxic chemicals are two of the most obvious impacts, researchers say, but urban areas can heat rivers, alter stream flows and have a number of impacts, according to Carl Schreck, a professor of fisheries and wildlife at Oregon State University and a contributing author on the book.

“One of the biggest issues with cities and towns is that they have huge areas of compacted surfaces,” Schreck pointed out. “Instead of gradually being absorbed into the water table where the ground can act as a sponge and a filter, precipitation is funneled directly into drains and then quickly finds its way into river systems.

“But urban areas can do something about it,” Schreck added, “and Portland is very avant-garde. They’ve put in permeable substrate in many areas, they’ve used pavers instead of pavement, and the city boasts a number of rain gardens, roof eco-gardens and bioswales. When it comes to looking for positive ways to improve water conditions, Portland is one of the greenest cities in the world.”

The origin of the “Wild Salmonids” book began in 1997, when the Oregon Legislature established the Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team (IMST) to address natural resource issues. In 2010, the group – co-chaired by Schreck – created a report for Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber and the legislature that provided an in-depth look at the issues and policies affecting salmonid success in Oregon and the influence of urban areas. That report was so well-accepted by Oregon communities, the researchers wrote a book aimed at the public.

The new book, “Wild Salmonids in the Urbanizing Pacific Northwest,” is available from Springer at: http://bit.ly/J5Dn8x. Dozens of scientists contributed to the book, which was edited by Kathleen Maas-Hebner and Robert Hughes of OSU’s Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, and Alan Yeakley of Portland State University, who was senior editor.

“One of the things we’re trying to do is add the social dimension to the science,” said Kathleen Maas-Hebner, a senior research scientist and one of the editors of the book. “The science is important, but the policies and the restoration efforts of communities are a huge part of improving conditions for fish.”

Many Northwest residents are unaware of some of the everyday ways in which human activities can affect water quality and conditions, and thus fish survivability. Products from lawn fertilizers to shampoos eventually make their way into rivers and can trigger algal blooms. Even septic tanks can leach into the groundwater and contribute the byproducts of our lives.

“Fish can get caffeine, perfume and sunblock from our groundwater,” Schreck said. “The water that flows from our cities has traces of birth control pills, radiation from medical practice, medical waste, deodorants and disinfectants. We could go on all day. Suffice it to say these things are not usually good for fish.”

The most effective strategy to combat the problem may be to reduce the use of contaminants through education and awareness, and ban problematic ingredients, Maas-Hebner said.

“Phosphates, for example, are no longer used in laundry detergents,” she said. “Fertilizer and pesticide users can reduce the amounts that get into rivers simply by following application instructions; many homeowners over-apply them.”

Another hazard of urban areas is blocking fish passage through small, natural waterways. Many streams that once meandered are channeled into pipe-like waterways, and some culverts funnel water in ways that prevent fish from passing through, Schreck said.

“If the water velocity becomes too high, some fish simply can’t or won’t go through the culvert,” said Schreck, who in 2007 received the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award from the White House for his fish research.  “Some cities, including Salem, Ore., are beginning to use new and improved culverts to aid fish passage.”

Other tactics can also help. Smaller communities, including Florence, Ore., offer incentives to developers for maintaining natural vegetation along waterways, the researchers say.

Despite the mitigation efforts of many Northwest cities and towns, urban hazards are increasing for fish. One of the biggest problems, according to researchers, is that no one knows what effects the increasing number of chemicals humans create may have on fish.

“There are literally thousands of new chemical compounds being produced every year and while we may know the singular effects of a few of them, many are unknown,” Schreck said. “The mixture of these different compounds can result in a ‘chemical cocktail’ of contaminants that may have impacts beyond those that singular compounds may offer. We just don’t know.

“The research is well behind the production of these new chemicals,” Schreck added, “and that is a concern.”

Story By: 
Source: 

Carl Schreck, 541-737-1961; carl.schreck@oregonstate.edu; Kathy Maas-Hebner, 541-737-6105; kathleen.maas-hebner@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

DeltapondsEugene Delta Ponds, Eugene

riparianCorvallis Corvallis wetland

 

urban pollution sources

DJ Spooky to bring ‘Heart of a Forest’ performance to four Oregon cities

CORVALLIS, Ore. – New York-based composer, artist and author Paul Miller, also known as DJ Spooky, will perform “Heart of a Forest,” a multimedia show inspired by seasonal artist residencies at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, in four Oregon cities Nov. 6-11.

Miller, a composer, multimedia artist and author, will mix live, recorded and electronic music with aerial video of Oregon forests, along with an on-stage conversation with a forest ecologist during the performances. The score, which was debuted and recorded with the Oregon State University Wind Ensemble earlier this year, explores spring, summer, fall and winter through sound and imagery.

The "Heart of a Forest" tour is a collaboration between the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word at OSU and the four regional host organizations. Show ticket prices vary by location.

The show schedule is:

  • 4 p.m. Nov. 6 at the Josephy Center for Arts and Culture in Joseph. Co-hosted by Fishtrap; for additional information, visit www.fishtrap.org.
  • 7 p.m. Nov. 9, in Cheatham Hall at the World Forestry Center in Portland. Co-hosted by the World Forestry Center; for more information, visit http://bit.ly/2eEwm2h.
  • 7 p.m. Nov. 10, at the Newport Performing Arts Center in Newport. Co-hosted by the Newport Performing Arts Center; for more information visit http://bit.ly/2e5Omly.
  • 6 p.m. Nov. 11, at the High Desert Museum in Bend. Co-hosted by the High Desert Museum; information, http://bit.ly/2eEx8Mz.

Funding for the events was provided by the Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights program and the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.

In addition to his work as a composer, Miller is also a multimedia artist and author whose work has appeared at the Venice Biennial for Architecture, the Andy Warhol Museum, the Whitney Biennial and others.

Miller spent 2012-2013 as the first artist-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and has collaborated with a diverse array of popular musicians, including Yoko Ono, Chuck D and Thurston Moore. His website is: http://djspooky.com/

Story By: 
Source: 

Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198, charles.goodrich@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Paul Miller, also known as DJ Spooky

Paul Miller

OSU to host presidential election discussion in Lake Oswego

LAKE OSWEGO, Ore. – “Making sense of the Presidential Election,” a panel discussion featuring faculty members from Oregon State University’s College of Liberal Arts, will be held from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Lake Oswego.

The moderated panel conversation will include discussion about how foreign policy challenges, rising populism, race, ethnicity and economic changes have combined to upend the political norms of the last half century. The event is the open to the public, but tickets are required.

The panelists are: Christopher McKnight Nichols, an associate professor of history and 2016 Andrew Carnegie Fellow; Andrew Valls, associate professor of political science; Rorie Solberg, associate professor of political science; and Kara Ritzheimer, assistant professor of history.

Tickets are $5 for members of the Oregon State University Alumni Association and $10 for the general public. Space is limited and registration is required by Wednesday, Oct. 26. For more information or to register, visit http://bit.ly/2dJBOO8.

Appetizers and refreshments will be served. The Crowne Plaza Hotel is located at 14811 Kruse Oaks Blvd.

Story By: 
Source: 

Top Oregon family businesses to be honored at Nov. 2 event

PORTLAND, Ore. – Several Oregon family businesses will be honored at the Oregon State University College of Business’ 2016 Excellence in Family Business Awards ceremony on Wednesday, Nov. 2, at the Portland Hilton and Executive Tower.

Bill Stoller, co-founder of Express Employment, will speak at the event, which is sponsored by the college’s Austin Family Business Program. Domonic Biggi, president of Beaverton Foods, will emcee. There are fees for attendance.

“Our Excellence in Family Business Awards recognize the achievements of family businesses in entrepreneurship, community involvement and multigenerational planning,” said Mitzi Montoya, dean of OSU’s College of Business. “With upwards of 80 percent of Oregon’s businesses being family-owned, it is really important that we honor the hard work and drive of these families and continue to foster a culture of support and shared-learning within the family business community.” 

Founded in 1985, the Austin Family Business Program provides inspiration, education, outreach and research to support family businesses.

“We want everyone to access these stories and learn why these businesses are so successful.” said Sherri Noxel, director of the Austin Family Business Program.

The awards feature categories that reflect sound family business practices. Honorees are:

  • Family Harmony: The Charlton Kennels & Farm, Portland. Finalists in the category included C & D Landscaping, Dayton, and Jag Forms, West Linn.
  • Generational Development: Benchmade Knife Company, Inc. C & R Remodeling, Salem, was a finalist in this category.
  • Business Renewal: GK Machine, Inc., Donald. Finalists included The Cronin Company, Portland, and Pride Disposal Company, Sherwood.
  • Student Award: Nicholas Strebin, Strebin Farms, Troutdale.

Stoller will receive the 2016 Dean’s Award for Family Business Leadership.

The event begins with a reception at 4 p.m. and the program at 5:50 p.m. Tickets are $45 for the reception alone, $75 for the reception with a buffet or $25 for children ages 3-10. The Portland Hilton and Executive Tower is at 921 S.W. 6th Ave., Portland.

Tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/2cNO3ga, by calling 1-800-859-7609 or by contacting Melissa Elmore at Melissa.elmore@bus.oregonstate.edu. The deadline to register is Oct. 26.

Story By: 
Source: 

Sherri Noxel, 541-737-6019, Sherri.noxel@bus.oregonstate.edu

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Rita Dove to be honored with OSU’s Stone Award

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Rita Dove, the recipient of Oregon State University’s Stone Award for Lifetime Literary Achievement, will be honored at a pair of events in Corvallis and Portland in April.

Dove, who served as poet laureate of the United States from 1993 to 1995, is the 2016 recipient of the biennial Stone Award, which recognizes a major American author who has created a body of critically-acclaimed work and mentored young writers.

On Thursday, April 14, a reading and question-and-answer session with Dove will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the CH2M HILL Alumni Center, 725 S.W. 26th Ave., Corvallis. Dove also will be presented with the Stone Award at the event, which is free and open to the public. A book signing will follow.

On Friday, April 15, OSU will host a reading and conversation with Dove at 7:30 p.m. at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 1126 S.W. Park Ave., Portland. The event is free and open to the public, and a reception will follow.

Karen Holmberg, a poet and associate professor of English and creative writing at OSU, will lead the on-stage conversation with Dove at the Portland event.

“Rita Dove's work immerses us in the most profound human questions,” Holmberg said. “What parts of our identity do we inherit, and what parts can we build from within? What drives humans not only to love beauty but to want to create it through art and craft, even when the conditions for such creation are hostile? How are our personal histories interwoven with history?

“She's been an astute and profound teacher to some of our most remarkable younger poets, while many other readers – I count myself among them – have been inspired by her dogged pursuit of her poetic obsessions and by her poetry's warmth and imaginative reach.”

Dove has received numerous awards, including the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry, the 1996 National Humanities Medal and the 2011 National Medal of Arts. She is the only poet to receive both the National Humanities Medal and the National Medal of Arts. She holds the chair of Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.

This year’s Stone Award events coincide with National Poetry Month, celebrated each year in April. 

The Stone Award was established in 2011 by Patrick and Vicki Stone to spotlight OSU’s Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing. The honorarium for the award is $20,000, making it one of the most substantial awards for lifetime literary achievement offered by any university in the country.

 

Story By: 
Source: 

University Events, 541-737-4717, events@oregonstate.edu; Karen Holmberg, Karen.holmberg@oregonstate.edu 

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Rita Dove (Photo by Fred Viebahn)

Rita Dove

OSU College of Business establishes Portland headquarters, launches innovation MBA

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Oregon State University College of Business is launching a new MBA in innovation and establishing a Portland headquarters in the Pearl District.

The new space, located at 220 N.W. Eighth Ave., will be celebrated with several events, including informational meetings for the new MBA track in innovation as well as an upcoming open house for alumni, students, prospective students and industry representatives. 

“It’s an exciting time for us to grow in the Portland market,” said Dean Mitzi Montoya, who joined OSU’s College of Business in September.

OSU’s hybrid MBA program, based in Portland, offers a mix of online and in-person work. The innovation MBA will focus on one of Portland’s core values, entrepreneurial business growth, as it pertains to starting new businesses and advancing existing Oregon companies.

The MBA program in Portland also includes tracks in executive leadership and business analytics. Tracks in supply chain and logistics management and a certificate in financial planning will be offered beginning in the fall.

The flexible hybrid program format makes it accessible for the working professional. It involves working online about 80 percent of the time and gathering twice per 10-week term for team and faculty meetings, professional development, alumni networking and applied project work.

“OSU is an engine of innovation, and Portland is an exciting and growing innovation economy,” Montoya said. “I am excited about the tremendous potential of our work to grow Portland’s capacity to innovate even further.”

The College of Business’ new Portland headquarters will be located in the WeWork building in the Pearl District. WeWork is a national chain of shared office buildings and offers “co-working communities” that house multiple ventures, often startups. The businesses share office space, equipment and related amenities.

“WeWork’s entrepreneurial environment and its mission, to support hard-working members who produce results, aligns with the culture of the College of Business, our alumni and our programs,” Montoya said. 

The open house will be held on Feb. 18 from 4-6 p.m. Alumni, industry representatives, current MBA students, prospective students and community members are invited to attend the free event, which will be hosted by Montoya and other college leaders.

Information sessions for the new MBA track in innovation will be held on Feb. 11 from noon to 1 p.m. and from 4-5 p.m. The track will be offered starting in fall 2016. Business professionals in the metro area are invited to attend. RSVPs are appreciated but not required and can be made at osumba@oregonstate.edu.

In addition to the new WeWork space, the College of Business will continue to offer courses at the Collaborative Life Sciences Building in Portland’s South Waterfront district and expand its collaboration with OSU’s Food Innovation Center in Northwest Portland.

Story By: 
Source: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039, steve.lundeberg@oregonstate.edu

Top Oregon family businesses to be honored at Nov. 19 event

PORTLAND, Ore. – Several Oregon family businesses will be honored at the 2015 Excellence in Family Business Awards ceremony on Thursday, Nov. 19, at the Sentinel Hotel in Portland. 

Shobi Dahl, co-founder of Dave’s Killer Bread, will speak at the event, which is sponsored by Oregon State University’s Austin Family Business Program. Nik Blosser, chairman of Sokol Blosser Winery and CEO of Celilo Group Media, will emcee.

“After 30 years of family business education at Oregon State we continue to meet new and inspiring families running successful businesses in our communities,” said Sherri Noxel, director of the Austin Family Business Program. 

Founded in 1985, the Austin Family Business Program  provides inspiration, education, outreach and research to support family businesses.

The Excellence in Family Business Awards recognize the achievements of family businesses in entrepreneurship, community involvement and multigenerational planning. More than 200 companies have been honored since the awards began in 1988. 

This year’s awards feature new categories that reflect sound family business practices. Honorees are:

  • Family Harmony: Roe Motors of Grants Pass. Finalists in the category included Lee Farms of Tualatin and Nicholas Restaurant, which has three locations in the Portland area.
  • Generational Development: David H. Sutherland & Co., Inc. Finalists include Hagan Hamilton Insurance, McMinnville, and Newberg Steel & Fabrication, Inc.
  • Business Renewal: Rose City Label Company, Portland. Hillsboro Implants & Periodontics was also a finalist in the category.
  • Student Award: Mackenzie Day of Estacada, Day Wireless Reliance Connects.

The event will also feature the designation of Oregon’s Oldest Family Business, which will be recognized and announced with the Dean’s Family Business Leadership Award.

The event begins with a reception at 4:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6 p.m. and the program at 6:45 p.m. Tickets are $30 for the reception alone, $90 for the reception and dinner, or $25 for children ages 3-10. The Sentinel Hotel is at 614 S.W. 11th Ave., Portland.

To reserve a seat, register online at http://bit.ly/1yVW32k or contact Melissa Elmore at Melissa.elmore@bus.oregonstate.edu or 1-800-859-7609. The deadline to register is Nov. 6.

Story By: 
Source: 

Sherri Noxel, 541-737-6019, Sherri.noxel@bus.oregonstate.edu

Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives seeks crowd-funding support

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Lovers of beer and history now have an easy way to support the preservation of Oregon beer history.

The Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives at Oregon State University Libraries and Press has launched a crowd-funding campaign to help expand their hops and brewing collection at OSU’s Valley Library in Corvallis.

Begun in 2013, the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives preserves the story of hop production and the craft brewing movement in Oregon. It’s the first archive in the United States dedicated to preserving and telling the intertwined story of hops and beer, documenting all facets of the craft brewing industry, and uniting the social and cultural aspects of brewing with the sciences of OSU.

“We are really proud of all the work we’ve already done highlighting OSU’s archival collections,” said OHBA archivist, Tiah Edmunson-Morton, “ learning more about OSU’s talented scientists, hosting researchers, working with the public, meeting with the community, and attending a wonderfully wide variety of events and conferences.”

The launch of the crowd-funding campaign will help support the work of OHBA, and organizers hope to meet a $5,000 goal by the end of October.

The Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives has been able to attract state, national and international attention and been featured in publications as varied as Draft Magazine and Library Journal, as well as on radio programs such as “Think Out Loud” and “Beer Radio.” More information about OHBA’s crowd-funding effort is available at bit.ly/fundOHBA

Media Contact: 

Daniel Moret, 541-737-4112 or Daniel.moret@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Tiah Edmunson-Morton, 541-737-7387 or tiah.edmunson-morton@oregonstate.edu

Portland workshop to explore modified toy cars for children with disabilities

PORTLAND, Ore. ­– Oregon State University will host a “Go Baby Go” workshop on Friday, May 1, in Portland, as part of a national program that provides modified, ride-on toy cars to young children with disabilities so they can move around independently.

The event is the first to be held in Portland since Go Baby Go expanded to OSU last year, and will be from noon to 4:30 p.m. at Jefferson High School. Spaces are still available, and attendance is free but advance registration is required.

Parents, volunteers and clinicians such as physical therapists will learn to adapt toy cars for children with a variety of special needs. Some cars also will be available for children and their families to test-drive and take home that day.

The modified cars give children with spina bifida, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other mobility disabilities a chance to play and socialize with their peers more easily, said Sam Logan, an assistant professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, and OSU leader of the Go Baby Go project.

Being pushed in a stroller or being carried from one place to another is fundamentally different from having active control over one’s own exploration, which is where the developmental gains are seen, Logan said.

“We want to provide that movement experience as early as possible, so they can reap the benefits,” said Logan, whose research focuses on providing technology and training to children with disabilities to promote social mobility. “Beyond mobility and socialization, we hope that the ride-on cars provide children with disabilities a chance to just be a kid.”

There are no commercially available devices for children with mobility issues to get around on their own, and power wheelchairs usually aren’t an option until the children are older. The modified cars provide them independence at a much younger age and at a relatively low cost.

At the workshop, people can attend simply to get more information; to learn how to build a car; or even to build and take home a car at the end of the day. Parents who can’t attend the building workshop, but would like a car for their child, can arrive at 3 p.m. for a fitting and test-driving session with the child. 

Anyone interested in obtaining a car at the event is asked to purchase a car and switch in advance. All other supplies will be provided. For additional information about the car options and the switch needed, contact Logan at Sam.logan@oregonstate.edu. Families who need financial assistance to purchase a car should also contact Logan.

The workshop will be held in the Jefferson High School old gym, Room B24, 5210. N. Kerby Ave. Reservations must be submitted by Monday, April 27, to Logan and event coordinator Juli Valeske, jvaleske@pps.net.

Additional workshops are expected to be held in the Portland area in the coming months. Family members, clinicians or others interested in attending a future workshop or obtaining a car should contact Logan.

 

Story By: 
Source: 

Sam Logan, 541-737-3437, sam.logan@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Sam Logan and volunteers modify a car.

GoBabyGo at Oregon State

OSU to host screening, discussion of ‘Paths of Glory’ in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon State University will host a screening and discussion of the 1957 Stanley Kubrick film, “Paths of Glory,” beginning at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 24, at the NW Film Center at the Portland Art Museum.

The film will be introduced by Jon Lewis, professor of film studies at OSU and author of eight books on cinema and cultural studies. Lewis will give a brief talk and then he and OSU history professor Christopher McKnight Nichols will lead a discussion with the audience on the film, Kubrick’s work and World War I following the screening.

“Paths of Glory” tells the story of a unit commander in the French army who must deal with the mutiny of his men after a failed attack during World War I. The film stars Kirk Douglas as Colonel Dax, Adolphe Menjou as General Broulard and George Macready as General Mireau.

The screening is part of a larger initiative at OSU to commemorate the centennial of World War I and to explore that bloody conflict in light of its implications for citizenship in the United States and the world. The OSU series, “Citizenship and Crisis: On the Centenary of World War I," is led by the School of History, Philosophy and Religion in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts, with additional support from the School of Writing, Literature and Film.

The screening will be held in the Whitsell Auditorium at the museum, 1219 S.W. Park Ave., Portland. Tickets are $9 or $8 for seniors and students. Admission is free for OSU students with valid ID. Tickets can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1HP8e2T or at the door. A reception co-hosted by the OSU Alumni Association and the School of Writing, Literature, and Film will follow the film screening.

For more information on the screening or the event series, visit http://bit.ly/1yAFdps.

Story By: 
Source: 

Christopher McKnight Nichols, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu