people programs and events

OSU’s Daily Barometer given top award by ONPA

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s student newspaper, The Daily Barometer, has been awarded the top prize by the Oregon Newspaper Publisher's Association. The honor was announced May 8 at the 2015 ONPA Collegiate Day conference.

The Barometer won first place in the “general excellence” category, which recognizes the overall achievements of student newspapers from universities and community colleges across Oregon.

Barometer sports writer Josh Worden also won top honors for best sports story, and Ryan Mason won best cartoon. A full list of awards are below.

First place:

‪General excellence, staff

‪Best sports story, Josh Worden

‪Best cartoon, Ryan Mason

Second place:

‪Best design, staff

‪Best writing, Sean Bassinger

Third place:

‪Best section (news), staff

‪Best columnist, Brooklyn Di Raffaele

‪Best sports story, Josh Worden

‪Best graphic, Eric Winkler

‪Best website, staff


Media Contact: 

Steven Sandberg, 541-737-3383 or steven.sandberg@oregonstate.edu; Sean Bassinger, 541-737-3191 or editor@dailybarometer.com

Oregon State University to host ‘The Co.’ – an interactive event focused on maker culture

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University on May 28 will host “The Co.,” an interactive event showcasing the wide array of “maker” activities happening in and around Corvallis.

The event, which is free and open to people of all ages, will run from noon to 6 p.m. in the Memorial Union ballroom, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

Maker culture is a popular movement that honors craftsmanship and technology. It brings together do-it-yourself enthusiasts, designers and engineers to share knowledge, skills and resources – and to collaborate, innovate and create.

The Co. was designed to honor the simple act of creating and to allow campus and community groups to network. It will feature an array of activities including a maker fair, speakers, interactive demonstrations, kinetic sculptures from the da Vinci Days festival and more.

“Our title stems from the prefix of applicable words such as collaborate, co-design, co-create,” said Charles Robinson, the event’s director. “Our goal is to promote an inclusive culture that knocks down barriers and offers instead a collaborative model for making, creating, and hands-on learning.”

Exhibitors at the maker fair include several OSU departments and programs such as wood science and art students from the College of Forestry, the College of Liberal Arts, the Craft Center, robotics, Precollege Programs, the College of Business, and the OSU Solar Vehicle Team.

Community exhibitors include Bricks 4 Kidz, da Vinci Days, NuScale Power, Corvallis Arts Center, the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library and the Pacific Slope Archaeological Laboratory. A “2-D room” presented by the OSU libraries will focus on print technologies.

Scheduled presenters include Frankie Flood, associate professor at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, who teaches jewelry and metal-smith and oversees a digital craft research lab; Barry Kudrowitz, a toy designer, musician and engineer from MIT and the University of Minnesota; and OSU robotics professor Yigit Mengüc. A full list of speakers, times and locations will be posted online: http://gototheco.tumblr.com.

A maker film festival will be held in advance of the event. Maker-themed films such as “Handmade Nation” and “Maker: A Documentary on the Maker Movement” will be screened.  On May 19 and May 26, films will be shown in Owen Hall Room 103; on May 20 and May 27, screenings will be held in Milam Auditorium. All screenings begin at 6 p.m.

Satellite events will be held May 28 in Hood River and in Tillamook through a partnership with OSU’s OPEN Campus network. The Hood River event will be held at Hood River Valley High School, 1220 Indian Creek Road.  The public is welcome from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. The Tillamook event will be held at Tillamook Bay Community College; details are still being finalized.

For a complete schedule and more information, or to sign up to exhibit at The Co., visit: http://gototheco.tumblr.com.

Media Contact: 

Charles Robinson, 541-737-6535, charles.robinson@oregonstate.edu

Auditions for ‘Romeo and Juliet’ to be held May 17-19 at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions will be held May 17 through May 19 for Oregon State University Theatre’s upcoming production of William Shakespeare’s quintessential tragedy of star-crossed lovers, “Romeo and Juliet.”

The play calls for a cast of about 25 actors but the spring auditions are to cast 12 principal roles for the production, which will be performed in November. Another round of auditions to fill out the cast will be held in September. Those cast for principal roles will rehearse individually until the end of the spring term, with rehearsals resuming in the fall.

Auditions will be held from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. each day in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. Auditions are open to all OSU students, faculty and staff and to the community and those interested may attend one or all of the audition sessions.

Those auditioning are asked to read “Rome and Juliet” in advance. Scripts are available online and in libraries and bookstores. Tryouts will consist of group readings from the script. Participants also will be asked to prepare a short, one-minute monologue from any Shakespeare play. The monologue does not need to be memorized.

The performances will be held Nov. 12-14 and Nov. 19-22.

For additional information contact George Caldwell, george.caldwell@oregonstate.edu, 503-931-4222, or Arin Dooley, arin.dooley@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-2853.

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Auditions for OSU’s summer Bard in the Quad production to be held May 10-11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Open auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s popular summer event, Bard in the Quad, will take place on May 10 and May 11 at 6 p.m. in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. Call-backs may be held May 12, if needed.

Bard in the Quad is an annual production featuring Shakespeare plays in a casual, outdoor summer atmosphere. The 2015 production will be the romantic comedy, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

Auditions are open to all OSU students, staff, and faculty and community members. They will consist of cold readings and movement exercises. Director Elizabeth Helman will be casting for a company of 12-14 players.

Performance dates for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” are Aug. 6-9 and Aug. 13-16. Rehearsals will begin with a read-through on June 14. Generally, rehearsals will be scheduled 5 to 9 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays until early August. Technical rehearsals will begin at 9 a.m. Aug. 1.

All cast members must be available to attend all technical rehearsals and performances. Some conflicts can be worked around during the early rehearsal process. Performers should bring their schedules to the auditions.

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/1NbuaeH or contact Helman at Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu.

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Ambitious unmanned vehicle program outlined at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – This year the Autonomous Systems Research Group at Oregon State University will significantly expand its activities with unmanned vehicles for air, marine and terrestrial applications, including development of a local test field and a range of training and certification programs.

The initiative is part of OSU’s efforts to become both a state and national leader in the evolution of these new technologies, working in partnership with private industry and government agencies. It hopes to capitalize on Oregon’s advantages in technological expertise, history of skills in remote sensing, and broad range of geographic land features that rival any in the world.

A session for OSU participants to discuss some of the newest plans, and seek further input and involvement from the campus community, will be held on Monday, April 27, in Memorial Union, Room 213, from 10-11 a.m.

“This is an important future strength area for OSU and an economic opportunity for Oregon,” said Rob Holman, a professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at OSU, and co-director of this initiative.

“It’s surprising how far flight and control systems have already progressed,” Holman said. “The industry is developing very rapidly, so timeliness of action is important. But there are still challenges in how to perfect technologies, most intelligently use the new systems, manage the data they produce, and train and certify both the aircrafts and people who will operate them.

“We believe there’s a great deal OSU can contribute,” he said.

The technologies being developed, commonly called drones, will have applications both in the air and also underwater or on land. A myriad of uses in agriculture, forestry and environmental sciences are possible, all of which are traditional areas of strength for OSU.

OSU is a participant in the “Pan-Pacific UAS Test Range Complex,” one of six FAA-approved test ranges designed to explore unmanned aerial systems use, safety, certification, technological development, environmental and human factors, and other topics. The university is part of a competitive, multi-university proposal to be designated as an FAA Center of Excellence. And OSU recently made an agreement with an Oregon economic development organization, SOAR Oregon, to promote commercial application of unmanned aircraft systems in the state.

A natural strength of Oregon, experts say, is that within a few miles unmanned vehicles could explore terrain ranging from oceans to coastal dunes, temperate rain forests, valleys, urban areas, volcanos, lava fields, glaciers and high desert – along with an unusually diverse range of forestry and agricultural crops.

One of the priorities this year, Holman said, is development of a local test field near Corvallis for training, testing, and certification of both pilots and new technologies. It might include a netted area that would allow test flights for multi-rotor vehicles without the need for FAA permission.

Other plans include:

  • Acquire a small fleet of aerial vehicles that can be used for training, testing and contract research flights;
  • Organize a flight operations group to help develop training and certification standards, and safe flight policies;
  • Develop written and operation testing for flight operations;
  • Create privacy and data use policies.

Experts say that unmanned aerial systems in civilian use are expected to become a multi-billion dollar industry while opening new opportunities in scientific research and student education.

A multitude of devices may ultimately fly, walk, swim or crawl to perform valuable or dangerous tasks at very modest expense.

Media Contact: 

Rob Holman, 541-737-2914

Multimedia Downloads

UAV with fiber optic cable

UAV monitoring

Glider on Elakha
Undersea glider

April 27 talk at OSU to focus on ethical challenges in international business

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University alumnus and longtime business consultant Joe Lobbato will speak on “Ethical Challenges in International Business” Monday, April 27, at OSU.

The presentation will run from 6:15 to 7:30 p.m. in the Stirek Auditorium in Austin Hall, 2751 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis. The talk is free and open to the public.

Lobbato graduated from OSU’s College of Business in 1981 and added an MBA the following year. He then went to work in Copenhagen, Denmark, as a management consultant with Arthur Andersen, which became Andersen Consulting and later Accenture.

He spent 13 years in Europe before taking on the oversight of Accenture's Change Management Services in an array of regions ranging from Scandinavia to South Korea to Australia. Lobbato retired from Accenture as a managing partner in 2004 after 22 years with the firm. He then became chief operating officer of one of the largest companies in Thailand, Central Retail Corporation Ltd., an $8 billion retail and real estate conglomerate.

Now retired from full-time work, Lobbato is involved with ad hoc projects, board work and venture capital opportunities and also teaches business ethics at a university in Thailand one semester each year.

For more information on the talk, or to request accommodations for disabilities, call 541-737-6648.

Media Contact: 

Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695, jenn.casey@oregonstate.edu

Writing, publishing a first book the focus of April 24 Editorial Festival at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Visiting Writers Series will host its fifth Editorial Festival on Friday, April 24, in the Memorial Union, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

The annual event is designed to engage students and community members in discussions about contemporary writing, publishing and media studies. This year’s theme is writing and publishing a first book.

At 4 p.m., professional writers and editors Geffrey Davis, T Clutch Fleischmann and Nina McConigley will participate in a roundtable discussion about how their first books came to be, from manuscript to editorial meetings to book launch. Caroline Casey, managing director of Coffee House Press, will moderate the discussion.

At 7:30 p.m., the authors will give readings from their first books. Both events will take place the Memorial Union’s Journey Room and are free and open to the public.

Davis is an OSU alumnus who teaches in the MFA program at the University of Arkansas. His collection, “Revising the Storm,” won the Poulin Poetry Prize. His other honors include the Halley Poetry Prize, the Dogwood Prize in Poetry, the Wabash Prize for Poetry, the Steinberg Memorial/Academy of American Poets Prize, and a fellowship from the Cave Canem foundation.

Fleischmann, of Seattle, is the author of “Syzygy, Beauty” and a nonfiction editor at DIAGRAM. A contributing editor at EssayDaily, Fleischmann’s critical and creative work has appeared in places such as The Brooklyn Rail, the PEN Poetry Series, and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

McConigley is the author of the story collection “Cowboys and East Indians,” which won the 2014 PEN Open Book Award and the High Plains Book Award. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Orion, Salon, Virginia Quarterly Review, American Short Fiction and The Asian American Literary Review. She teaches at the University of Wyoming and at the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Houston.

Casey has a background in marketing, publicity, and acquisitions, including stints at Sarabande Books and Stanford University Press, and holds an MFA from the nonfiction writing program at the University of Iowa.

The Visiting Writers Series is supported by the Valley Library and the OSU Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Portland workshop to explore modified toy cars for children with disabilities

PORTLAND, Ore. ­– Oregon State University will host a “Go Baby Go” workshop on Friday, May 1, in Portland, as part of a national program that provides modified, ride-on toy cars to young children with disabilities so they can move around independently.

The event is the first to be held in Portland since Go Baby Go expanded to OSU last year, and will be from noon to 4:30 p.m. at Jefferson High School. Spaces are still available, and attendance is free but advance registration is required.

Parents, volunteers and clinicians such as physical therapists will learn to adapt toy cars for children with a variety of special needs. Some cars also will be available for children and their families to test-drive and take home that day.

The modified cars give children with spina bifida, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other mobility disabilities a chance to play and socialize with their peers more easily, said Sam Logan, an assistant professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, and OSU leader of the Go Baby Go project.

Being pushed in a stroller or being carried from one place to another is fundamentally different from having active control over one’s own exploration, which is where the developmental gains are seen, Logan said.

“We want to provide that movement experience as early as possible, so they can reap the benefits,” said Logan, whose research focuses on providing technology and training to children with disabilities to promote social mobility. “Beyond mobility and socialization, we hope that the ride-on cars provide children with disabilities a chance to just be a kid.”

There are no commercially available devices for children with mobility issues to get around on their own, and power wheelchairs usually aren’t an option until the children are older. The modified cars provide them independence at a much younger age and at a relatively low cost.

At the workshop, people can attend simply to get more information; to learn how to build a car; or even to build and take home a car at the end of the day. Parents who can’t attend the building workshop, but would like a car for their child, can arrive at 3 p.m. for a fitting and test-driving session with the child. 

Anyone interested in obtaining a car at the event is asked to purchase a car and switch in advance. All other supplies will be provided. For additional information about the car options and the switch needed, contact Logan at Sam.logan@oregonstate.edu. Families who need financial assistance to purchase a car should also contact Logan.

The workshop will be held in the Jefferson High School old gym, Room B24, 5210. N. Kerby Ave. Reservations must be submitted by Monday, April 27, to Logan and event coordinator Juli Valeske, jvaleske@pps.net.

Additional workshops are expected to be held in the Portland area in the coming months. Family members, clinicians or others interested in attending a future workshop or obtaining a car should contact Logan.


Media Contact: 

Sam Logan, 541-737-3437, sam.logan@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads

Sam Logan and volunteers modify a car.

GoBabyGo at Oregon State

“Beyond Earth Day” celebrations begin at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University is expanding this year’s Earth Day celebration into 11 days of festivities.

“Beyond Earth Day” will include 24 events from April 18-28. The events will include a wide range of sustainability-related topics, as well as activities related to the environment and social justice, film showings, educational events and service projects.

Many of the events occur annually, such as the 15th annual Community Fair on April 21 from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Student Experience Center Plaza. With more than 40 booths from local student and community organizations, students can learn about sustainability topics through interactive games and activities.

The celebrations will begin on April 18 with the fourth annual Earth Day of Service, where students can help at one of five projects. Last year, more than 100 volunteers provided a total 400 hours of service.

The celebration concludes April 28 with a screening of the film “Food Chains” about the impact and buying power of major supermarkets. The film’s producer and several local organizations will hold a dialogue after the film. It takes place from 6 to 8:15 p.m., in the Memorial Union Horizon Room.

Visit the official calendar at http://bit.ly/1JQCyuL for a full list of events, locations and times.


Media Contact: 

Andrea Norris, andrea.norris@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-5398

OSU Theatre to present ‘Dolly West’s Kitchen’ in May

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will stage a production of “Dolly West’s Kitchen,” May 7-9 and May 15-17 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The World War II-era play by Frank McGuinness explores how Ireland’s neutrality in the war created a difficult atmosphere. It continues the 2014-15 theater season theme of “War and Remembrance.”

In the play, the witty and educated Dolly West has returned to her hometown from Italy to care for her elderly mother and siblings. The town of Buncrana in Northern Ireland sits close to the British port of Derry, where American and British soldiers are gathered in case Hitler makes it that far. In Dolly’s kitchen, Irish men and women, an English soldier and two G.I.s struggle with love, the disastrous effect of the war and the difficult position of remaining neutral.

Guest director Jade Rosina McCutcheon said she is drawn to the blending of human relationships with real world issues in the production. “The cost of war is enormous but so is the cost of losing your country to another,” she said. “This play will give us all plenty to reflect on.”

The cast features Oregon State students Joe Cullen as Marco; Burke De Boer as Jamie; Diana Jepsen as Dolly; Pamela Mealy as Esther; Reed Morris as Justin; Annie Parham as Anna; Alex Small as Alec; and Cory Warren as Ned. OSU Theatre Arts faculty member Charlotte Headrick joins the cast as Rima West.

Show times are 7:30 p.m. May 7-9 and May 15-16, with a 2 p.m. matinee on May 17. Tickets are $12 for general admission; $10 for seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ  or by calling the box office at 541-737-2784. Contact the box office for disability accommodations, faculty/staff discounts or group ticket sales.

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