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OSU surpasses fundraising milestone of $1 billion

 

A copy of President Ray’s speech is available online: http://bit.ly/1dRiaHx

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray announced today that the university’s first comprehensive campaign has surpassed its $1 billion fund-raising goal – 11 months ahead of schedule.

Ray made the announcement at his annual “State of the University” address in Portland to an audience of more than 600 business, political, civic and education leaders, alumni and friends of the university. He encouraged contributions through the remainder of the year to further deepen the university’s impact on students, the state, nation and world. Gifts to The Campaign for OSU now total $1,012,601,000.

“While this is a remarkable milestone, this campaign has never been about the big number,” Ray said. “Our generous donors are committed, as is the university, to transforming Oregon State into a top-10 land grant research university to significantly advance the health of the Earth, its people and our economy.”

Donors have brought private support for Oregon State to an all-time high, with annual totals exceeding $100 million for the last three years. More than 102,000 donors to the campaign have:

  • Created more than 600 new scholarships and fellowship funds – a 30 percent increase – with gifts for student support exceeding $170 million;
  • Contributed more than $100 million to help attract and retain leading professors and researchers, including funding for 77 of Oregon State’s 124 endowed faculty positions;
  • Supported the construction or renovation of more than two dozen campus facilities, including Austin Hall in the College of Business, the Linus Pauling Science Center, new cultural centers, and the OSU Basketball Center. Bonding support from the state was critical to many of these projects.

 

Business leaders Pat Reser, a 1960 OSU alumna; Patrick Stone, a 1974 graduate; and Jim Rudd have co-chaired the campaign since its public launch in 2007. All three have been trustees of the OSU Foundation, and Reser, board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, also serves as chair of Oregon State’s new Board of Trustees that was appointed by Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber.

“Our donor community is growing because people are deepening their ties to Oregon State – and that helps make us a better university,” said J. Michael Goodwin, CEO and president of the OSU Foundation, the nonprofit organization charged with raising, administering and stewarding private gifts to the university.  “This broad base of support positions Oregon State well for future philanthropic support and engagement from our alumni, parents and friends.”

Donors from every state and more than 50 countries have invested in OSU as part of the campaign. Almost 40 percent of these campaign donors are first-time donors to the university. More than 1,000 donors have made campaign gifts of more than $100,000, including 177 donors who have made gifts of $1 million or more. Oregon State joins only 34 other public universities in the country to have crossed the billion-dollar mark in a fund-raising campaign.

“The campaign is about developing and energizing a community of dedicated advocates, people who share our vision of what Oregon State can accomplish,” Ray said. “These partners have changed Oregon State forever – and I believe the best is yet to come.”

In his State of the University address, Ray said Oregon needs to quit talking and start planning to meet its goal of a more educated citizenry to achieve economic and social prosperity. He cited the state’s lack of apparent focus on reaching Oregon’s “40-40-20” educational achievement goal, which calls for 40 percent of adult Oregonians to hold a bachelor’s or advanced degree, 40 percent to have an associate’s degree or a meaningful postsecondary certificate, and all adult Oregonians to hold a high school diploma or equivalent by the year 2025.

OSU has developed a plan to do its part and is committed to those goals, already demonstrating success, Ray said. But more is needed.

“Beyond Oregon State University’s own enrollment management and strategic plan, I have no idea how the state will get to 40-40-20, which could require as many as 35,000 more students annually enrolled in our four-year universities and colleges,” Ray said. “There is no statewide blueprint.”

Ray went on to describe how OSU’s enrollment grew by 1,532 students in Corvallis and online and by another 135 students at OSU-Cascades in Bend.

“Despite those gains, the net increase in enrollment among all Oregon public universities outside of Oregon State totaled 14 students,” Ray pointed out. That includes an enrollment increase at the Oregon Institute of Technology of 413 students.

OSU has been following a plan for the past two years to help the state achieve its goals. Ray said the university expects to educate 28,000 students in Corvallis, 3,000 to 5,000 students at OSU-Cascades by 2025; and grow its online enrollment to more than 7,000 students. The university also plans to educate another 500 students annually by 2025 at a new marine studies campus located in Newport.

Ray, who recently completed his 10th year as OSU president, pointed to several Oregon State University initiatives that will help boost the economy:

 

  • OSU will lead a new national effort through its College of Forestry to advance the science and technology necessary to utilize wood in the construction of taller buildings in a public-private partnership that will advance manufacturing in Oregon and boost rural economies;
  • The university launched the OSU Advantage last year – a one-stop shop for linking businesses with the students and researchers of Oregon State to accelerate new business development and spinoff companies;
  • OSU’s research enterprise continues to grow and reached $263 million in 2013 – a 70 percent increase over the last decade. Two major initiatives include the selection of Oregon State to lead the design and construction of the next generation of ocean-going research vessels for the United States, and the selection of OSU, along with partners in Alaska and Hawaii, to operate one of six national sites for unmanned aircraft systems.

Industry-sponsored research is up 60 percent in five years, Ray pointed out, and licensing agreements with industry have increased 83 percent. Since 2006, OSU has helped launched 20 startup companies, which have raised $190 million in venture capital and created hundreds of jobs.

“Economic development,” Ray said, “is part of our DNA.”

Story By: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217

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Kearney Hall

Kearney Hall

 

Video that could be downloaded for B-roll is available online: http://bit.ly/1frg9Xc

OSU Board of Trustees elects initial leadership

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees, in its first meeting since being confirmed by the Oregon Senate in November, on Thursday unanimously elected Patricia “Pat” Reser of Beaverton, Ore., as initial chairwoman.

The board also voted Darald “Darry” Callahan of San Rafael, Calif., as initial vice-chairman. The positions are being listed as “initial” until the board becomes official under state law on July 1.

Reser is board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, Inc., a family-owned fresh refrigerated food company. A retired employee of the Beaverton School District, she is one of three co-chairs of OSU’s Capital Campaign Steering Committee and is serving her third term as an OSU Foundation Trustee.

Callahan is former president of Chevron Chemical Company, and served as executive vice president of Power, Chemicals and Technology for ChevronTexaco Corp. from 2001 until his retirement in 2003. He is a former chair of the OSU Foundation Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees also created three initial committees:

  • The Academic Strategies Committee will be chaired by Paul Kelly of Portland; Orcilia Zúñiga Forbes of Portland is vice chair;
  • The Finance and Administration Committee will be chaired by Kirk Schueler of Bend; Elson Floyd of Pullman, Wash., is vice chair;
  • The Executive and Audit Committee will be chaired by Reser; Callahan is vice chair.

The board approved Meg Reeves, OSU’s general counsel, as board secretary. It also approved a series of bylaws guiding its actions.

Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at OSU, said the primary purpose of this first meeting of the board has been to orient the board with the university, introduce the members to their roles and responsibilities, and allow them to get acquainted with one another.

The board meeting will continue on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center.

More information about the OSU Board of Trustees is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees

Story By: 
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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Pat Reser, OSU Board

Pat Reser

 

Darry Callahan and Ed Ray
Darry Callahan and
OSU President Ed Ray

Amber fossil reveals ancient reproduction in flowering plants

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A 100-million-year old piece of amber has been discovered which reveals the oldest evidence of sexual reproduction in a flowering plant – a cluster of 18 tiny flowers from the Cretaceous Period – with one of them in the process of making some new seeds for the next generation.

The perfectly-preserved scene, in a plant now extinct, is part of a portrait created in the mid-Cretaceous when flowering plants were changing the face of the Earth forever, adding beauty, biodiversity and food. It appears identical to the reproduction process that “angiosperms,” or flowering plants still use today.

Researchers from Oregon State University and Germany published their findings on the fossils in the Journal of the Botanical Institute of Texas.

The flowers themselves are in remarkable condition, as are many such plants and insects preserved for all time in amber. The flowing tree sap covered the specimens and then began the long process of turning into a fossilized, semi-precious gem. The flower cluster is one of the most complete ever found in amber and appeared at a time when many of the flowering plants were still quite small.

Even more remarkable is the microscopic image of pollen tubes growing out of two grains of pollen and penetrating the flower’s stigma, the receptive part of the female reproductive system. This sets the stage for fertilization of the egg and would begin the process of seed formation – had the reproductive act been completed.

“In Cretaceous flowers we’ve never before seen a fossil that shows the pollen tube actually entering the stigma,” said George Poinar, Jr., a professor emeritus in the Department of Integrative Biology at the OSU College of Science. “This is the beauty of amber fossils. They are preserved so rapidly after entering the resin that structures such as pollen grains and tubes can be detected with a microscope.”

The pollen of these flowers appeared to be sticky, Poinar said, suggesting it was carried by a pollinating insect, and adding further insights into the biodiversity and biology of life in this distant era. At that time much of the plant life was composed of conifers, ferns, mosses, and cycads.  During the Cretaceous, new lineages of mammals and birds were beginning to appear, along with the flowering plants. But dinosaurs still dominated the Earth.

“The evolution of flowering plants caused an enormous change in the biodiversity of life on Earth, especially in the tropics and subtropics,” Poinar said.

“New associations between these small flowering plants and various types of insects and other animal life resulted in the successful distribution and evolution of these plants through most of the world today,” he said. “It’s interesting that the mechanisms for reproduction that are still with us today had already been established some 100 million years ago.”

The fossils were discovered from amber mines in the Hukawng Valley of Myanmar, previously known as Burma. The newly-described genus and species of flower was named Micropetasos burmensis.

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George Poinar, 541-752-0917

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Ancient flowers

Ancient flower


Pollen tubes

Pollen tubes

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

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Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

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Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

Celebrated memoirist Nick Flynn to read at OSU on Oct. 11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Writer Nick Flynn will read from his work on Friday, Oct. 11, at Oregon State University’s Valley Library rotunda. The free public event begins at 7:30 p.m. and will be followed by a question and answer session and book signing.

Flynn is the author of three memoirs including “The Reenactments” (2013), “The Ticking is the Bomb: A Memoir of Bewilderment” (2010) and “Another … Night in Suck City” (2004). Flynn is also the author of three books of poetry.

Of Flynn’s most recent memoir, “The Reenactments,”  Kirkus Reviews wrote: “Flynn’s determination to better understand his life through the act of writing and remembering has yielded a truly insightful, original work.” Clea Simon of The Boston Globe said Flynn’s writing is “always specific and honest” and “dryly funny.”

His award-winning memoir “Another … Night in Suck City” was turned into the movie “Being Flynn,” starring Robert De Niro and Paul Dano. That book recounted his unusual relationship with his alcoholic father and the suicide of his mother.

Flynn, 52, is a professor of poetry and married to actress Lili Taylor.

Flynn has been awarded fellowships from The Guggenheim Foundation, The Library of Congress, The Amy Lowell Trust, and The Fine Arts Work Center.

The Visiting Writers Series brings nationally-known writers to Oregon State University. The program is made possible by support from The Valley Library, OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817

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NickFlynn
Nick Flynn

Bard in the Quad at OSU to present ‘Two Gentlemen of Verona’ for 12th season

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s Bard in the Quad returns for its 12th season this August with a western-themed production of Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, “Two Gentlemen of Verona.”

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. nightly from Aug. 3-6 and Aug. 10-13 in the Memorial Union Quad, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis. 

Bard in the Quad performances are held outside and no seating is provided, creating a fun, laid-back atmosphere. Attendees are encouraged to bring low lawn chairs and/or blankets, warm clothing and food if desired. Seating begins at 6:30 p.m. and no one will be seated prior to that time.

“Two Gentlemen of Verona” is a romantic comedy about Proteus and Valentine, two inseparable friends living happily in Verona. When Valentine seeks his fortune in Milan and ends up leaving Proteus behind, promises are broken as Proteus finds himself suddenly infatuated with Valentine’s love-interest, Sylvia. 

With a new setting in the American Wild West and music presented by Miss Kitty and the Barn Bangerz, the story of action, disguise, mistaken identity, and a scene-stealing dog unfolds.

This summer’s production will feature adoptable dogs playing the role of a senior dog named Crab for each performance. The dogs will be provided by Heartland Humane Society and Heartland volunteers will join the cast and crew in promoting the organization’s work caring for homeless animals in Benton County. 

The cast features Oregon State University students, staff, alumni and community members including: Stuart Ashenbrenner as Valentine; Sedona Garcia as Sylvia; Forest Gilpin as Thurio; Matt Holland as Launce; Emily Peters as Miss Kitty; Andrew Schiek as Speed; Cheyenne Dickey as Antonia/Bandit; Matt Easdale as Bandit; Genesis Hansen as Julia; Kay Keegan as musician; Grace Klinges as Lucetta/Bandit; Mac Powers as musician; Mike Stephens as Duke of Milan; and Kyle Stockdall as Proteus.

Tickets are $15 for general admission, $10 for students and seniors, and $5 for OSU students. Tickets are available online at http://oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre/ or available by phone at the Theater Arts Box Office at 541-737-2784. A box office also will be available in the MU quad at 6:30 p.m. on performance evenings.

For disability access accommodations or information about group sales call Marissa Solini, the box office manager, at 541-737-2853.

Media Contact: 

Lanesha Reagan, 541-737-4611, oregonstateuniversitynews@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Elizabeth Helman, 541-737-3067, Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu

OSU veterinary students to treat neglected animals in Nicaragua

CORVALLIS, Ore – A group of veterinary students from Oregon State University will travel to Nicaragua this summer to conduct six days of free clinics on a rural island that has no regular veterinary care.

The contingent, members of the OSU chapter of the International Veterinary Students’ Association, will pay their own way to spend the first week of August on Ometepe Island, home to an estimated 10,000 people and 50,000 animals.

The clinics include physical exams, deworming, vaccinations, spays, neuters and public health education. 

The Ometepe residents rely on pigs, cows, donkeys, horses and chickens for food, transport and work. In addition, there is a large population of stray dogs and cats that can spread disease.

OSU students, under the supervision of volunteer veterinarians, spay and neuter hundreds of dogs and cats on Ometepe every summer. This is the 10th year of the program, and it’s made a difference, said Sue Tornquist, the Lois Bates Acheson Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine and a longtime volunteer on the trip. 

“We now see many dogs that come to the clinic and only need preventive care, since so many have been spayed and neutered already,” she said.

In addition to funding their own travel costs, students raise money to purchase veterinary supplies such as vaccines, needles, syringes, gauze and sutures. The total averages about $1,500 per student.

Anyone interested in helping to support the students can “adopt” a Nicaraguan animal for $20.

“In exchange, you will receive a photo and story about the animal that was in our care, including a description of the type of care provided for the animal,” said Kristin Wineinger, co-chair of Oregon State’s IVSA chapter.

For more information or to donate, visit http://stuorgs.oregonstate.edu/ivsa/donate.

Media Contact: 

Lyn Smith-Gloria, 541-737-3844

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Treating a cow in 2016

12th Annual Community Art Show

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Annual Community Art Show is back again to celebrate its 12th year at the Giustina Gallery in The LaSells Stewart Center. The exhibit runs from July 5 – 27 and participation is open to the general public.

The public is invited to a free reception on Tuesday, July 13, from 6 to 8:30 p.m., to celebrate the show’s opening and meet the artists. There will be complimentary appetizers and a no-host bar.

This non-juried exhibit is a great opportunity for anyone in the community—regardless of age or skill level—to submit any art piece they’ve created to showcase in the gallery. There is no cost to submit artwork. For new artists that want to take that first step into the art world, this is their chance to show the community their artistic style and have it displayed in an exhibit.

All artists are limited to one piece per person of any medium. The deadline to submit and drop-off artwork is Friday, June 30.  You may enter the show online at http://lasells.oregonstate.edu/current-future-exhibits or bring your piece in to The LaSells Stewart Center in person and fill out a submission form.

The Giustina Gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and is located on the Oregon State University campus at 875 SW 26th Street, Corvallis, Ore. Parking is available across the street in the Reser Stadium parking lot for $1 per hour from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. (free after 5).

For more information about this show and other upcoming exhibits go to http://oregonstate.edu/lasells/gallery

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Media Contact: 

Mary McKillop, 541-737-2402, mary.mckillop@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Tina Green-Price, 541-737-3116, tina.green-price@oregonstate.edu

OSU Chamber Choir honors Ed and the late Beth Ray at annual President’s Concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Steven M. Zielke, will present the 13th annual President’s Concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 10, at First United Methodist Church, 1165 N.W. Monroe Ave. in Corvallis. 

The “Music of Spheres” concert revolves around Ola Gjeilo’s 2008 “Sunrise Mass,” for mixed choir and string orchestra. The film score-influenced work is a unique fusion of Latin Mass text and English titles in five sections: “The Spheres – Kyrie”; “Sunrise – Gloria”; “The City – Credo”; “Identity – Sanctus” and “The Ground – Pleni Sunt Coeli/Agnus Dei.”

The program also includes Michael Barrett and Ralf Schmitt’s arrangement of “Indonana,” a traditional South African folk song; “Sainte-Chappelle” by Eric Whitacre; a Craig Hella Johnson adaptation of Dolly Parton’s “Light of a Clear Blue Morning”; “Balleilakka,” by A.R. Rahman; and “Pseudo-Yoik” by Jaakko Mäntyjärvi. 

In 2004, OSU President Ed Ray and his late wife, Beth, established the Ed & Beth Ray Endowment for Choral Leadership Scholars. Each year since, four students – a soprano, alto, tenor and bass – who display excellent musicianship, leadership and vocal ability, have been honored with this award.

The following year after being selected, these students serve as section leaders in the OSU Chamber Choir. At the 2017 President’s Concert, four new students will be honored to continue this tradition. 

General admission seating is $10. OSU students with ID and K-12 youth are admitted free. Advance tickets are available online at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACevents. Corvallis Arts For All discounts apply. For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671, preferably one week in advance.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

Exhibit featuring graduating students’ thesis artwork at Fairbanks Gallery in June

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students completing their Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees will present their thesis work in an exhibit June 5-17 at the Fairbanks Gallery on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Twenty students graduating from various art disciplines will be exhibiting in the show. They are: Milla Oliveira, Mike Chasco, Angelica Ingeman, Diana Robbins, Kelsey Carruth, Ariyon Kawai, Brooklyn Cochran, Kiana McCurry, Mai Xee Yang, Johnny Beaver, Reid Dehle, Lily Hudnell-Almas, Koa Tom, Kaylee Weyrauch, Kody Kirkpatrick, Cat Fitzsimmons, Tiffany Cha, Madelaine Corbin, Alexandra May, Caroline Moses.

A reception will be held in the gallery at 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 6. OSU Provost Edward Feser will present the President’s Award for Excellence in Art and the Provost’s Purchase Award. Larry Rodgers, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, will present the College of Liberal Arts Purchase Award. Seniors of Distinction Awards also will be presented to outstanding graduating seniors in studio art, photography and art history.

Also at the reception, scholarships will be awarded to returning students, freshmen and transfer students selected through a competitive portfolio review. The scholarships include the Stone/Sponenburgh Scholarship, Joyce Dickerson Printmaking Award, Norma Seibert Print Scholarship, Yaquina Art Association Scholarship, Freshman Foundation Award, Helen E. Plinkiewisch Scholarship and others.

The Fairbanks Gallery is located at 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. Exhibits are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. It will also be open for special hours 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 15 and noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 17.

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Andrew Nigon, 541-737-4880, andrew.nigon@oregonstate.edu

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Tongue and Hip by Milla Oliveira

Tongue and Hip

Transcontinental by Milla Oliveira

 

Transcontinental