OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

people programs and events

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

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Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

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Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

Celebrated memoirist Nick Flynn to read at OSU on Oct. 11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Writer Nick Flynn will read from his work on Friday, Oct. 11, at Oregon State University’s Valley Library rotunda. The free public event begins at 7:30 p.m. and will be followed by a question and answer session and book signing.

Flynn is the author of three memoirs including “The Reenactments” (2013), “The Ticking is the Bomb: A Memoir of Bewilderment” (2010) and “Another … Night in Suck City” (2004). Flynn is also the author of three books of poetry.

Of Flynn’s most recent memoir, “The Reenactments,”  Kirkus Reviews wrote: “Flynn’s determination to better understand his life through the act of writing and remembering has yielded a truly insightful, original work.” Clea Simon of The Boston Globe said Flynn’s writing is “always specific and honest” and “dryly funny.”

His award-winning memoir “Another … Night in Suck City” was turned into the movie “Being Flynn,” starring Robert De Niro and Paul Dano. That book recounted his unusual relationship with his alcoholic father and the suicide of his mother.

Flynn, 52, is a professor of poetry and married to actress Lili Taylor.

Flynn has been awarded fellowships from The Guggenheim Foundation, The Library of Congress, The Amy Lowell Trust, and The Fine Arts Work Center.

The Visiting Writers Series brings nationally-known writers to Oregon State University. The program is made possible by support from The Valley Library, OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817

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NickFlynn
Nick Flynn

Online map offers opportunities to explore gardens, farms and history

CORVALLIS, Ore. — The public can explore Oregon’s forests, farms, history, public gardens and more this summer through an online map assembled by Oregon State University.

From the Visitors Center at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport to the Summer Farm Festival and Annual Field Day in Ontario, there are multiple opportunities to learn about Oregon’s natural heritage.

The map includes updated descriptions of events and self-guided tours across the state. Among the entries are demonstration gardens created and tended by volunteers in the Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardener program, the Fort Yamhill summer archaeology field school, the annual Blueberry Field Day in Aurora and dinners inspired by local food crops in Astoria and Hermiston.

Visitors to the Cooper’s Ferry archaeology dig along the Lower Salmon River in Idaho can learn about artifacts left by ancient Americans at the end of the last ice age.

The map is online at http://bit.ly/1S2EqSE 

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Nick Houtman, nick.houtman@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-0783

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SummerMap2

Fairbanks Gallery to host summer-long art faculty exhibit at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Fairbanks Gallery is hosting a summer-long art faculty exhibit at Fairbanks Gallery from June 14 through September 28.

The exhibit will be in Fairbanks Hall, 220 S.W. 26th St., on the OSU campus. It will include work by Evan Baden, Michael Boonstra, Julia Bradshaw, Kay Campbell, Anna Fidler, Julie Green, Stephen Hayes, Yuji Hiratsuka, Shelley Jordon, Andy Myers, Kerry Skarbakka and John Whitten.

A broad array of styles and approaches to creating art will be featured, in photography, painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking and video.

Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, with extra hours during the Corvallis Arts Walk. A closing reception, open to the public, will be held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. on Sept. 28.

For information on the CAW go to www.corvallisartswalk.com.

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Erin Sneller, 541-737-5592

erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

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Majestic Cascadia
Majestic Cascadia

OSU selects noted oceanographer to head Marine Studies Initiative

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Jack Barth, an Oregon State University oceanographer known for his teaching, research, and public engagement related to marine low-oxygen zones, and his leadership in the national Ocean Observatories Initiative, has been named executive director of the Marine Studies Initiative at OSU.

The MSI is a comprehensive, university-wide effort by Oregon State to address ocean health and coastal challenges by creating a global education and research program that blends the science of oceanography with business, engineering, education, the arts and humanities, agriculture sciences, forestry and social sciences, according to Oregon State President Edward J. Ray.

“The world’s oceans are facing unprecedented challenges and the need to address this range of issues – and educate the next generations of an ocean-literate citizenry – is a major focus of this initiative,” Ray said. “Jack Barth is uniquely qualified to lead the enterprise, as a respected scientist, an outstanding educator and collaborator.”

Barth has been on the OSU faculty since 1989 and has been associate dean for research in the university’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences for the past four years. He also has been co-lead of the Marine Studies Initiative since its inception in 2014, with Bob Cowen, director of OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Oregon.

“In appointing Jack Barth -- and with the strong leadership provided by Bob Cowen as director of the Hatfield Marine Sciences Center -- Oregon State is doubling down,” said Ray.  “Jack will lead our overall MSI activities and link those initiatives to research, teaching and public engagement conducted at OSU and globally. Bob will drive Oregon State’s Newport-based efforts along the Oregon coast.”

Ray said Cowen will continue to direct Oregon State’s HMSC facilities, fundraising and coastal community relations, and will share in the development of Newport-based academic and research programs.

“Among the goals of the Marine Studies Initiative is to greatly broaden and better connect various marine studies disciplines across the university,” Barth said.

“We’ll still focus on oceanography, fisheries, marine biology, and other science-related issues, but we see some exciting areas into which we could expand including economics, social and public policies, ocean engineering, business and others.”

By 2025, the Marine Studies Initiative seeks to teach 500 students annually at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center and up to 800 more marine studies-related students in Corvallis.

A critical first step in the initiative is a new $50 million, 100,000-square-foot building that could open as early as 2018 in Newport. The Oregon Legislature approved $24.8 million in state bonding for the facility, and the OSU Foundation will raise an additional $40 million in private funding - $25 million to match the state funds and another $15 million to support-related projects.

“The new Newport academic and research facility will be a world-class teaching and research center where OSU will address many of the most pressing problems facing the Oregon coast and the world’s oceans,” said Cowen. “This center will drive discovery; expand learning; and serve as an essential coastal community asset and economic driver.”

Barth is a 1982 graduate of the University of Colorado, where he received a bachelor’s degree in physics. He has a Ph.D. in oceanography in 1987 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

An expert in coastal oceanography, Barth led an $8.4 million interdisciplinary program to study the coastal upwelling marine ecosystem off Oregon. Near-shore studies are critical because much of the world’s population lives near coastal areas, and these marine ecosystems face myriad issues, including sustainable fisheries, ocean acidification, harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, sea-level rise and erosion.

Barth was a member of the National Science Foundation’s Observatory Steering Committee that launched the $386 million Ocean Observatories Initiative. He co-wrote the proposal that resulted in Oregon and Washington being selected as the site for the OOI’s Endurance Array, a sophisticated network of underwater sensors designed to monitor changing ocean conditions.

He also has been a co-principal investigator for the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO), which has received more than $56 million to conduct nearshore research and educate students.

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Jack Barth, 541-737-1607

barth@coas.oregonstate.edu

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Jack Barth
Jack Barth

Oregon Hatchery Research Center to host annual free fishing day June 4

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon Hatchery Research Center will offer a free fishing day and open house on Saturday, June 4, at the center, which is located just off Highway 34 about 13 miles west of Alsea. The event will run from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

A small pond for children ages 5 and under will be set up at the center and it will have access for the disabled. It will be stocked with rainbow trout and fishing gear. Bait and assistance will be provided, if needed.

The free fishing day extends to nearby Thissel Pond, located approximately one half-mile from the center. A free shuttle will transport anglers to Thissel Pond, which is also stocked with trout, but does not have disability access.

The center will also be open for tours and exhibits. Concessions will be available.

Free fishing day at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center coincides with the free fishing weekend established by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. No licenses are necessary.

To reach the center, travel about 13 miles past the town of Alsea on Highway 34 and turn north at milepost 27 onto East Fall Creek Road. Drive about 2.5 miles on that road to reach the center.

Hatchery managers caution visitors to drive carefully on the gravel road; obey the 25-mile-per-hour speed limit; and be aware of pedestrians – especially children – on or near the road.

The center is a collaborative project between ODFW and Oregon State University. The free fishing day is sponsored by ODFW, Siuslaw National Forest, and the Alsea Sportsman’s Association.

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Ryan Couture, 541-487-5510, ext. 100; ryan.b.couture@state.or.us

Exhibit featuring graduating seniors’ artwork on display at OSU May 31-June 12

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students who are completing their bachelor of fine arts degrees will present their thesis work May 31 through June 12 in the Fairbanks Gallery.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open to the public Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will also be open from noon to 4 p.m. June 11 and June 12. The exhibits are free and open to the public.

Thirteen students graduating from various art disciplines will be exhibiting. They are: Abigail Losli, painting; Alisa Vernon, etching; Angela Perviance, etching; Ashley Howarth, silkscreen; Claire Elise Harden, ink; Daniel Henry Melancon, acrylic; Francisco Morales, mixed media; Heather Marie March, photo; Kaitlyn Carr, collage; Merri Madalynne Long, lenticular photo installation; Natasha Anismova, monotype; Paulina Teresa Ruize, charcoal, graphite and watercolor; and Teresa Yoshiura, mixed media.

A show featuring the work of students graduating with a bachelor of arts degree will run simultaneously in the west gallery of Fairbanks Hall. Students exhibiting in that show are: Erika Carlson, printmaking; Tanner Henderson, drawing/mixed media; and Nicolette Silva, photography.

A reception will be held in the gallery at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 1. Awards for the College of Liberal Arts Purchase Award, the President’s Award for Excellence in Art and the Provost’s Purchase Award will be announced. Seniors of Distinction awards and community sponsored awards also will be presented.

In addition, scholarships will be awarded to returning students, freshmen and transfer students selected through a competitive portfolio review. They include the Stone/Sponenburgh Scholarship, the Joyce Dickerson Printmaking Award, the Norma Seibert Print Scholarship, the Yaquina Art Association Scholarship, the Freshman Foundation Award, the Helen E. Plinkiewisch Scholarship and more.

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Doug Russell, 541-737-5009, drussell@oregonstate.edu

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Artwork by Teresa Yoshiura

Teresa Yoshiura

Artwork by Kaitlynn Carr

Kaitlyn Carr


Artwork by Francisco Morales

Francisco Morales

OSU one-act play festival runs June 2-5

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s annual Spring One-Act Festival returns June 2-5 with six student-directed one-act plays.

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. June 2-4, and 2 p.m. June 5, in the Withycombe Hall Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. 

This year’s festival includes an eclectic selection of one-act plays:

  • “Cake Top Follies,” by John Twomey, features two bridesmaids hashing out their differences after the wedding reception. The director is Kelsea Vierra.
  • “Dark King Kills Unicorn,” by Reina Hardy, is a swashbuckling fable about the nature of love and sacrifice. The director is Reed Morris.
  • “Funeral Tea,” by Pat Wilson, is a wry comedy about a group of funeral crashers. It is directed by Sedona Garcia.
  • “The Goon,” by Pete Malicki, is a comic exposé about the lives of a super-villain’s loyal henchmen. It is directed by Brian Greer.
  • “The Hardy Boys and the Mystery of Where Babies Come From,” by Christopher Durang, is a funny exploration of misunderstandings about sex. It is directed by Emily Peters.
  • “Knockers,” by Chris Sheppard and Jeff Grove, comically explores themes of religion, privacy, and sexuality. The director is P.J. Harris.

Tickets for the 2016 One-Act Festival are $8; $6 for seniors; $5 for students/youth; or $4 for OSU students. Tickets will be sold online starting at 9 a.m. on May 30 at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ.

For additional information or disability access requests, contact the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784 or visit http://bit.ly/1jdKUgy.

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Environmental writer, photographer Elizabeth Rush to read at OSU May 27

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Environmental writer and photographer Elizabeth Rush will give a free public reading at Oregon State University on Friday, May 27.

The event will at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library rotunda on the OSU campus, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session will follow.

Rush is the author of many books including the recently released “Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon, Myanmar.” Her work chronicles communities being irrevocably changed by late capitalist industrialization and has appeared in Granta, Orion, The New Republic, Le Monde Diplomatique, Frieze and other publications.

She is the recipient of the Andrew Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities at Bates College (2015-2017) and the Metcalf Institute Climate Change Adaptation Fellowship. Rush received her bachelor’s degree in English from Reed College and her master of fine arts in nonfiction from Southern New Hampshire University.

Her current book project, “When the Seas Rise,” is an on-the-ground investigation of five North American coastal communities adapting to climate change. Instead of predicting the negative effects of climate change, the book focuses on the lived experiences, both past and present, of those already dealing with the results of a warming planet.

Rush is the spring writer-in-residence at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. These residencies are part of the long-term ecological reflections program sponsored by the Spring Creek Project for Nature, Ideas and the Written Word, in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service, with aims to encourage writing and thinking that is finely attuned to place and to the deep continuity of natural and human processes.

The reading is sponsored by the Spring Creek Project and the 2015-2016 Visiting Writers Series, supported by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film.

The mission of the Spring Creek Project is to bring together the practical wisdom of the environmental sciences, the clarity of philosophical analysis, and the creative, expressive power of the written word, to find new ways to understand and re-imagine our relationship to the natural world.

The Visiting Writers Series brings writers to Oregon State University. This program is made possible by support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

Rep. Peter DeFazio to present annual OSU McCall Lecture June 1

CORVALLIS, Ore. – U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio will deliver the annual Gov. Tom McCall Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, June 1, at Oregon State University.

His lecture, “The Future of Our Representative Democracy,” will discuss the challenges facing U.S. democracy from a variety of negative factors, including gerrymandering; special interest money; partisan polarization; voter apathy; and voter disenfranchisement. He will also discuss ways in which citizens can take action to safeguard the democracy and strengthen political institutions. 

The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Construction and Engineering Hall in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. It is free and open to the public, and presented by the OSU College of Liberal Arts and the School of Public Policy.

DeFazio, of Springfield, represents Oregon’s 4th District in Congress. He was first elected in 1986 and is now the longest serving member of the U.S. House of Representatives in Oregon’s history. 

The OSU lectureship in public affairs is named after Tom McCall, who was Oregon’s governor from 1967-75. Past lecturers have included several Oregon governors; Washington Post columnists David Broder and William Raspberry; political analyst Floyd McKay; Dennis Dimick of National Geographic magazine; and Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

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David Bernell, 541-737-6281, david.bernell@oregonstate.edu

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Rep. Peter DeFazio

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