OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

people programs and events

Native American author Linda Hogan to read from her works at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Linda Hogan, a Chickasaw novelist, essayist, and environmentalist, will read from her work Friday, April 18, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the rotunda of the Valley Library at Oregon State University.

A reception and book signing will follow the reading, which is free and open to the public.

Hogan is author of seven poetry collections including “Seeing Through the Sun” (1985), which won the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation, and “The Book of Medicines,” a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist (1993).

Her collections of prose reflect Hogan’s interests in the environment and Native American culture. Her books include the essay collection “Dwellings: A Spiritual History of the Living World” (1995), “The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir” (2001), and, with Brenda Peterson, “Sighting: The Gray Whales’ Mysterious Journey” (2002).

Hogan’s novels include “Mean Spirit” (1990), “Solar Storms” (1995), “Power” (1998), and “People of the Whale: A Novel” (2008).

Active as an educator and speaker, Hogan taught at the University of Colorado and at the Indigenous Education Institute. 

In advance of her Corvallis visit, Hogan will be writer-in-residence for the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, which is co-sponsored by the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word and the U.S. Forest Service.  

This event is part of the OSU Visiting Writer Series., which brings nationally known writers to Oregon State University. The program is made possible by support from The Valley Library, OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

For more information, call 541-737-6198 or visit the Spring Creek website at http://springcreek.oregonstate.edu/

Source: 

Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198

OSU to host ‘Everybody Reads’ campaign in celebration of Tobias Wolff

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host an “Everybody Reads” program in April and May celebrating the work of award-winning American writer Tobias Wolff, who will visit Portland and the OSU campus later this spring.

The “Everybody Reads” campaign is designed to engage the community with Wolff’s writing in advance of his visit. The program is sponsored by the Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts. Students in the MFA program will lead readings and discussions about Wolff’s work, as well as Wolff-inspired writing workshops.

The program will culminate with a free public reading by Wolff, who will visit Oregon May 21-22 to receive OSU’s Stone Award for Lifetime Literary Achievement.

On May 21, Wolff will be honored at a ticketed event at the Portland Art Museum. The event begins at 7:30 p.m. and tickets are available at the museum’s ticket office or online: http://bit.ly/1hJXdVh. On May 22, Wolff will appear at a free public reading, lecture and book signing at OSU. The reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in the CH2M HILL Alumni Center, 725 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

Wolff is best known for his work in two genres: the short story and the memoir. His first short story collection, “In the Garden of the North American Martyrs,” was published in 1981. Wolff chronicled his early life in two memoirs, “In Pharaoh’s Army” (1994) and “This Boy’s Life” (1989).

The “Everybody Reads” events, all free and open to the public, are:

  • 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 16, public book club discussion of “Old School,” Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, 645 N.W. Monroe Ave.
  • 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 13, public reading group, “This Boy’s Life,” Grass Roots Books & Music, 227 S.W. Second St.
  • 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 13, young adult creative writing club, selected short stories; Corvallis-Benton County Public Library.
  • 2 p.m. Saturday, May 17, Tobias Wolff discussion group, led by OSU creative writing Professor Keith Scribner, Corvallis-Benton County Public Library.

 The MFA students also will visit classes at OSU, Linn-Benton Community College, Corvallis High School, Harding Alternative High School and Crescent Valley High School.

The biennial Stone Award recognizes a major American author who has created a body of critically-acclaimed work and has mentored young writers. Wolff is the second recipient; the first was Joyce Carol Oates in 2012.

The award was established in 2011 by Patrick and Vicki Stone to spotlight OSU’s Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing. The honorarium for the award is $20,000, making it one of the most substantial awards for lifetime literary achievement offered by any university in the country.

Media Contact: 
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Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817; rachel.ratner@oregonstate.edu

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Tobias_Wolff Tobias Wolff (Photo by Elena Seibert)

OSU to hold 59th annual Luau April 19

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host its 59th annual Luau on Saturday, April 19, at Gill Coliseum – an event that includes an authentic Hawaiian dinner, a show, and a concert by Eden Roc.

The luau, which has the theme, “Onboard to Paradise,” is presented by OSU’s Hui O Hawaii with the Polynesian Cultural Club. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. and dinner begins at 5 p.m. The show begins at 6 p.m.; the concert at 8:30 p.m.

Advance tickets are priced at $15 for the dinner, show and concert ($20 at the door); or $10 for the show and concert. Children under age 2 are free.

The dinner features Kalua pig, shoyu chicken, lomi salmon, rice, haupia, tossed salad, tofu stir fry, poi and fruit punch.

Tickets are available for purchase online here: https://secure.touchnet.net/C20159_ustores/web/store_main.jsp?STOREID=36

Media Contact: 
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Mandilyn Suzuki, suzukim@onid.oregonstate.edu

OSU to host screening, discussion of documentary ‘American Promise’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The award-winning documentary “American Promise,” about the struggles of two middle-class African American families as they educate and parent their sons, will be shown at Oregon State University on Tuesday, April 15.

The screening begins at 7 p.m. in the auditorium in Milam Hall, 2520 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session with filmmaker Michèle Stephenson will follow. The event is free and open to the public. Lead sponsors for the event are the College of Education and the Division of Student Affairs, with additional support from several other OSU programs.

A 30-minute version of the film will be shown at 4 p.m. Monday, April 14, in the theater at Corvallis High School, 1400 N.W. Buchanan Ave. A panel discussion about the African American male experience in predominately white schools will follow. That event is also free and open to the public.

“We hope the film will help us better understand some of the issues surrounding the black male achievement gap as it exists in our community,” said Felicia Reid-Metoyer, a faculty member in the College of Education and one of the organizers of the events.

“In particular, we would like for the two-day event to advance the discussion as it relates to teachers, administrators, and staff who work with underrepresented minorities in Corvallis and other local schools,” said Reid-Metoyer, who was inspired to bring the film to Corvallis after watching it in Los Angeles last year.

In “American Promise,” Stephenson and her partner, Joe Brewster, follow their son, Idris, and his best friend, Oluwaseun “Seun” Summers, as they move through school and confront issues of class, race and opportunity. The film begins with the boys’ entry into kindergarten at a prestigious private school and follows them through their school years to high school graduation.

“American Promise” premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won the Grand Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking. To learn more about the film or watch the trailer, visit www.americanpromise.org.

Media Contact: 
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Karla Rockhold, 541-737-2226, karla.rockhold@oregonstate.edu

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Idris and Seun-1

Idris Brewster and Oluwaseun “Seun” Summers are featured in the documentary 'American Promise.' Credit: Michèle Stephenson

Auditions for OSU’s one-act festival to be held April 8-9

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions for the annual student-directed Spring One-Act Festival will be held at 7 p.m. April 8 and 9 in Oregon State University’s Lab Theatre.

Auditions will consist of cold readings and no preparation is necessary. They are open to all OSU students, faculty and staff and to members of the Corvallis community. The theatre is located in Withycombe Hall, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The Spring One-Act Festival 2014, presented by OSU Theatre, will be held at 7:30 p.m. June 4, 5 and 6 and at 2 p.m. June 8. One-act plays will be directed by the students of an advanced directing class. Rehearsals will be scheduled with each director. Those auditioning are asked to bring their schedules and note any potential conflicts with rehearsals.

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Contact: Elizabeth Helman, Elizabeth.Helman@oregonstate.edu

Documentary about 2012 Paralympic athletes to air in Corvallis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Free screenings of the 2012 documentary “Gold – You Can Do More Than You Think,” will be held April  6, 7 and 10 at Darkside Cinema in Corvallis.

“Gold” chronicles the journeys of three athletes as they prepare for and participate in the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. The screenings are sponsored by the School of Language, Culture and Society in the OSU College of Liberal Arts, and are co-sponsored by the OSU Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and by Parapictures Film Production.

“The motivational and intercultural aspects of the film make it a great piece for high school and college students, showing them how having a positive attitude helps you overcome obstacles in your life,” said Sebastian Heiduschke, coordinator of World Languages and Cultures at OSU.

“I was looking for something I could do in collaboration with OSU athletics, so I approached them with this film, and they were excited to join us as co-sponsor.”

The film follows Henry Wanyoike, a blind marathon runner from Kenya; Kirsten Bruhn; a paralyzed swimmer from Germany; and Kurt Fearnley, an Australian wheelchair racer, in their day-to-day personal and professional lives. Director Michael Hammon examines what makes these athletes role models to people in their countries. The film reaches its peak at the 2012 Paralympics in London.

Screenings will be held at 6 p.m. Sunday, April 6; 7 p.m. Monday, April 7; and 9 p.m. Thursday, April 10. To enhance accessibility for the visually-impaired, the April 6 screening will include audio descriptions of the scenes.

All screenings will be held at the Darkside Cinema, 215 S.W. 4th St., Corvallis. They are free and open to the public but attendees need to obtain a free pass at the snack bar after entering the theater. Movie posters signed by the three featured athletes and other prizes will be raffled at the screenings.

To watch a trailer for the film, visit: http://bit.ly/PBBzZe

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Sebastian Heiduschke, 541-737-3957, Sebastian.heiduschke@oregonstate.edu

‘Philosophy Talk’ to visit Oregon State April 2

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The nationally syndicated public radio show “Philosophy Talk” will visit Oregon State University on April 2 for a live taping.

Show hosts Ken Taylor and John Perry, both of Stanford University, will discuss “The New Surveillance Society: Big Brother Grows Up.” Their guest will be Christopher McKnight Nichols of the School of History, Philosophy and Religion in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts.

The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium at the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. It is free and open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for audience participation.

“One of the most pressing issues today is the increasing surveillance of individuals by the government as well as by corporate entities,” said Nichols, an assistant professor of history and author of Promise and Peril: America at the Dawn of a Global Age. “This is not new. It has a history that helps explain how and why we have arrived at this point.”

Among the questions to be considered on the show: How should we treat whistleblowers that break the law for moral or political ends? How do we strike a proper balance between national and corporate security and individual rights? What rights and responsibilities does a proactive citizenry have when confronted with transgressions committed by the state and others?

“The central issue is privacy rights and how very often in U.S. history those rights have been curtailed in wartime,” said Nichols. “I want us to interrogate the legal, diplomatic, and intellectual history of ‘wartime’ to better understand the decisions that have propelled the rise of a surveillance state.”

“Philosophy Talk” airs on dozens of public radio stations internationally, including on the radio network of Oregon Public Broadcasting. On OPB, the show is broadcast at 9 p.m. Thursdays.

Perry and Taylor will continue their trip to Oregon with two Portland events. They’ll take calls live on the air on OPB at 9 p.m. Thursday, April 3, when they talk about conspiracy theories with Brian Keeley of Pitzer College.

On Saturday, April 5, “Philosophy Talk” will record a new program at the First Congregation United Church of Christ in downtown Portland. The topic is “Remixing Reality: Art and Literature for the 21st Century," with special guest David Shields, author of Reality Hunger: A Manifesto.

Media Contact: 
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Robert Peckyno, 541-737-8560

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Christopher Nichols

Christopher McKnight Nichols

NOAA planning leader to direct Oregon Sea Grant program

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Shelby Walker, a marine scientist and administrative leader with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has been named director of the Oregon Sea Grant College Program.

She will assume leadership of Oregon Sea Grant, the Oregon State University-based marine research, outreach, education and communication program, on July 7.

Walker has been the strategic planning team leader for the Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation in NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research since August 2009. In that role, she has been responsible for the agency’s research and development planning efforts.

She also has been associate director for the NOAA RESTORE Act Science Program, an initiative funded through civil penalties resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill that aims to increase scientific understanding of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem and improve the region’s sustainability.

“Oregon Sea Grant deals with a range of marine issues that impacts the lives and livelihoods of Oregonians,” said Rick Spinrad, vice president for research at Oregon State. “Shelby Walker is an experienced leader and a superb collaborator who will be able to develop partnerships in research, education, communications and outreach to address these issues, which include natural hazards, climate change and managing our marine resources in a responsible and sustainable manner.”

Prior to joining NOAA, Walker was associate program director in the National Science Foundation’s Ocean Sciences Division, where she worked in the Ocean Technology and Interdisciplinary Coordination Program. She served as program officer for the Ocean Observatories Initiative, one of the largest oceanographic infrastructure investments in history. The OOI is a $386 million project to monitor the world’s oceans for environmental changes and their effects on biodiversity, coastal ecosystems and climate, led by several universities including OSU.

Walker also has been project manager for the Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, a group of 25 federal agencies with responsibilities for ocean research and technology development.

Her research has focused on organic contaminants in coastal systems, including highly industrialized urban estuaries. Walker received her Ph.D. in marine science from the College of William and Mary, and worked as a post-doctoral researcher at the Naval Research Laboratory.

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Rick Spinrad, 541-737-0664; rick.spinrad@oregonstate.edu

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Shelby Walker
Shelby Walker

History of hops and brewing chronicled on new OSU archive

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon is at the epicenter of a thriving craft-brew industry, and Oregon State University is helping shape the movement – from creating new barley varieties, to offering courses for home brewers, to its growing fermentation science program, which has a Pilot Plant Brewhouse where student brewers create new beers.

Now, the university is going a step further as it actively preserves the rich history of hops and craft brewing.

Recognizing the need to document the intertwined story of hop production and the craft brewing movement in Oregon, the Special Collections & Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries & Press established the Oregon Hops & Brewing Archives in summer 2013. This month, the official launch of the online archives will be celebrated in appropriate style with “Tap into History” on March 28 at the McMenamins Mission Theater in Portland.

The archive’s goal is to collect and provide access to records related to hops production and the craft brewing industries in Oregon. The first archive in the United States dedicated to hops and beer, it will bring together a wealth of materials in hardcopy and digital formats enabling people to study and appreciate these movements. The work melds the social and economic aspects of brewing in Oregon with the hard science behind the beer research being done at OSU.

The university already has strong collections related to the history of hops, barley, and fermentation research at OSU, but scholars are gathering resources from beyond the campus as well.

“There are valuable items in historical societies, in the boxes of marketing materials in a brewer’s garage, in the computer records of operations at hop farms, on beer blogs, in social media communities, and in the stories that haven’t been recorded,” said Tiah Edmunson-Morton, archivist for the collection.

“While we are interested in adding new items to build the archive, we also want to be a portal to collections through the state, partnering with people in heritage and history communities, state agencies, hops farmers, craft brewers, home brewers, and the general community to think collectively about how to preserve and provide access to this history.”

The free "Tap into History" event at the Mission Theater, which begins at 7 p.m., includes a panel on brewing history in Oregon. Among the topics:

  • Edmunson-Morton will talk about the project and its impact.
  • Peter Kopp, an agricultural historian, will talk about his use of archival materials and the relevance for researchers.
  • John Foyston, an Oregonian writer since 1987 and noted beer columnist, will talk about his work documenting the Oregon beer scene.
  • Irene Firmat, CEO and co-founder of Full Sail Brewing Company, will talk about her work as a female brewing pioneer.
  • Daniel Sharp, a Ph.D. student in the OSU College of Agriculture's Fermentation Science program, will talk about his research and the program.

The event concludes with screenings from "Hopstories," a collection of short videos showcasing breweries in Oregon, and OPB's Beervana, a documentary about the history of beer and the rise of craft brewing in Oregon. The McMenamins Mission Theater is located at 1624 N.W. Glisan St., Portland.

For more information: https://www.facebook.com/brewingarchives

 

 

 

 

Media Contact: 
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Tiah Edmunson-Morton, 541-737-7387

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Grafting hop varieties

Oregon State University's KBVR FM wins top awards at national conference

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Intercollegiate Broadcasting System has named KBVR FM best college radio station at a university with more than 10,000 students. The station was one of three college radio stations in the country, and the only West Coast station, to be nominated for this category.

A number of KBVR programs and staff also won awards. Matt Walton and Josh Worden won the best play-by-play football broadcast, and Joey Hulbert and Zhian Kamvar won for most innovative radio program with their science program, “Inspiration Dissemination.” Additionally, Megan Cummings won for best production director, and Matt Walton won for best promotions director.

KBVR FM was also a finalist for best overall station. KBVR staff members were finalists for best community news coverage (Jodie Davaz), best program director, (Marissa Solini) and best engineer (Jack Kemp).

IBS, an educational association comprising more than a thousand high school and college broadcast stations and webcasters, announced the winners at its 74th annual IBS New York City conference. All winners and finalists were presented with IBS Golden Microphone Trophies. The conference was attended by KBVR station manager Davaz, KBVR promotions director Matt Walton, and broadcasting adviser Bill Gross.

“I am honored and humbled by receiving these awards,” Walton said. “Josh Worden is a rising star and I am so thankful to be able to work with him. The awards for best station are especially amazing, as they reflect the hard work that every KBVR DJ puts in every day.”

“Joey and I are honored to receive this award,” said Kamvar,  co-host for 'Inspiration Dissemination' and a Ph.D. student at OSU. “We want to thank all the guests we have featured for being as passionate as we are about science communication. They are the real inspiration.”

KBVR broadcasts 24/7 on 88.7 FM from the campus of Oregon State University. The station is student- managed and is programmed by more than 100 student volunteer DJs. Programming includes live music, local news, sports and talk radio shows.

Media Contact: 
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Julia Sandidge, 541-737-4615