OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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OSU students to run across Oregon this summer promoting health and physical activity

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students and brothers Jeremiah and Isaiah Godby will spend their summer running across Oregon in an effort to encourage Oregonians to improve their health through better eating and exercise.

The “Health Extension Run 2014” was designed to inspire Oregonians to take charge of their health and educate community residents about the role the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences and OSU Extension Service offices in each county play in building healthy communities. The event coincides with the recent accreditation of the College of Public Health and Human Sciences.

The run begins July 7 on the Oregon State campus in Corvallis and is expected to finish Sept. 5 at OSU. The Godbys plan to run 1,675 miles through 30 Oregon counties, with stops in many communities along the route for public events such as health festivals and county fairs. OSU students, alumni and all other supporters are encouraged to run or walk with the brothers in their communities.

Jeremiah, 21, and Isaiah, 23, are exercise and sports science majors in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. They said they are motivated to run in hopes that they can inspire others to get more exercise, eat better and make other health improvements.

Jeremiah Godby is an example of the difference exercise can make. After he decided to cut back on video-game playing and began running in high school, he lost 45 pounds.

“I feel so much better,” he said. “I just enjoy life more.”

He and his brother took up long-distance running as a form of advocacy and, after completing similar long runs in the past, volunteered for this summer’s Health Extension Run. 

“We just want to inspire people to live a balanced life,” said Isaiah Godby. “It’s not as complicated as people think. Walk an extra block or park your car further away in the parking lot.”

The run will kick off at 9:30 a.m. on July 7 with a short send-off ceremony on the steps of the Memorial Union quad on the Oregon State campus in Corvallis. The Godbys will then run around the OSU campus before heading north on Highway 99.

The brothers will run about 32 miles a day, traveling north from Corvallis to Astoria, down the Oregon Coast, across to Eugene and then south to Medford before heading east to Klamath Falls, where they’ll participate in the 100th anniversary celebration of the Klamath Basin Research & Extension Center. From Klamath Falls, they’ll run to Bend, Prineville, John Day, Burns and Ontario.

The Godbys also will spend a day in Boise, Idaho, where they’ll run through the city and participate in a Beavers alumni event. For more information or to register for that event, visit http://bit.ly/1rf1gOT.

From Boise, the runners will head back to Ontario, where they’ll head north to Baker City and LaGrande, then work their way back west through towns including Pendleton, Heppner, Condon, The Dalles and Hood River. They’ll be in Portland for a few days before running to Salem for the Oregon State Fair, then to Albany before wrapping in Corvallis on Sept. 5.

Find more information about events in the community at http://bit.ly/V9zK8a and follow along with the Godbys on their blog, http://bit.ly/1z65ue8.


Editor's note: Video b-roll is available to download for use with this news release: http://health.oregonstate.edu/broll/healthextensionrun.
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Isaiah Godby, 530-574-7420 or godbyi@onid.oregonstate.edu; Jeremiah Godby, 530-574-7421 or godbyj@onid.oregonstate.edu; Kathryn Stroppel, 541-737-6612 or Kathryn.Stroppel@oregonstate.edu

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Jeremiah, left, and Isaiah Godby

Health Extension Run 2014

OSU to observe Veterans Day as official holiday beginning in 2015

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will begin observing Veterans Day as an official holiday beginning in 2015.

The decision was announced today by OSU President Edward J. Ray, after consultation with both the OSU Faculty Senate and the Associated Students of Oregon State University.

“I am proud that the university will begin honoring our veterans with the observance of this national holiday,” Ray said. “This is a meaningful decision. Last year, Oregon State had 1,025 students who received veteran educational benefits – the most of any university in Oregon – and it is important that we recognize and honor the many sacrifices that our nation’s veterans have made.”

Veterans now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU. A range of programs have been initiated or expanded to help support the university’s student veterans.

Ray also announced that the university will begin its academic year earlier in 2015, with the first day of classes scheduled on Wednesday, Sept. 23, that year.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Veterans Day Parade
OSU students, supporters at

2013 Veterans Day parade

New ‘Philosophy of Phish’ course at OSU aims to engage students in curriculum

CORVALLIS, Ore. – In an effort to make a challenging curriculum more accessible and engaging for students, a professor at Oregon State University will teach a philosophy course on the band Phish this summer.

Stephanie Jenkins, an assistant professor of philosophy in the College of Liberal Arts at OSU, plans to explore the relationship between philosophy, music and social change with her students in a course she has dubbed “Philosophy School of Phish.”

“I have to find what students are passionate about in order to speak to them about philosophy,” Jenkins said. “Phish, or any pop culture topic, elicits interest and engages them. It’s really about teaching effectively in ways that students will remember and use for the rest of their lives.”

The course begins June 23 and runs for eight weeks. It is a distance education course offered online through Oregon State University Ecampus and enrollment is not limited to Oregon State students. Phish fans from all over the country could participate in the course. For information, visit http://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/.

The course, a special section of PHL 360: Philosophy and the Arts, was designed as a philosophy of music class. Other musicians could easily be substituted as case studies, but Jenkins chose Phish because she’s a fan and is familiar with the group’s large and loyal following.

“One of the benefits of doing a rigorous philosophical study of a band is that it gives students tools to articulate why they like the concerts and how the band’s music has philosophical and spiritual components,” Jenkins said.

The practice of philosophy involves exploring questions about ethics, politics, beauty and more. Students learn to clarify and articulate their own beliefs, analyze ideas and acquire critical thinking skills.

Along with required readings from philosophers such as Kant, Tolstoy and Nietzsche, students in Jenkins’ class will be required to attend Phish concerts during the band’s summer tour or watch them via webcasts online. The experiential component is critical to engaging students with the curriculum, Jenkins said.

“I can lecture forever, but they’ll never remember it,” she said. “When you give students an experience, you give them a basis for relating to the content. It’s like field work.”

Phish is known for improvising and blending elements of a variety of musical genres. Fans follow the group from concert to concert and each show can vary widely as the musicians improvise. The band, which was founded in the 1980s, is releasing a new album later this month and will launch a new tour July 1 in Massachusetts. Other stops include New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Charlotte, N.C., and more. 

Jenkins will follow the tour. She’ll attend concerts, teach, conduct research on the practice of public philosophy and hold philosophy events at concert venues along the way. Students from outside Oregon who are taking the course online would have a chance to meet their professor in person during the tour.

The public events also are an opportunity for Jenkins to discuss Phish and the philosophy of music with fans or anyone else who might to join in the discussion.

“It’s a way for people to engage in academic conversations and maybe inspire people to actually read philosophy,” she said. “Today, we think of philosophy as something really abstract that scholars do. But Socrates and others did philosophy in the city, in the public square.”

To find out more about the public events, visit Jenkins’ website, http://philosophyschoolofphish.com/ or follow her on Twitter: @scjenkins.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Stephanie Jenkins, 541-737-6517, Stephanie.jenkins@oregonstate.edu

OSU seeks participants for new health promotion program

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Researchers who are organizing Physical Activity Centered Education, a new health promotion program aimed at people with physical mobility issues, are seeking participants from the Corvallis area.

Megan MacDonald, assistant professor in exercise and sport science at Oregon State University, is creating the program based on a successful model developed at a medical facility in Texas.

The program is aimed at people ages 18 and older who have limited mobility – defined as having difficulty walking one block, or using an assistive device such as a walker, cane or wheelchair.

Participants must be able to communicate in English, attend the program once a week for 90 minutes during an eight-week period, and will receive up to $75 for taking part. It will take place in the Movement Studies in Disabilities Lab in the Women’s Building on the OSU campus.

This is part of a research project on how a health promotion program can influence the physical activity of people with a mobility disability. It helps people learn social and behavioral skills to become healthier, such as setting goals, rewarding themselves for making their goals, and how to overcome barriers to being healthy and active.

To learn more information on qualifications for the program and to sign up to participate, email health.disability@oregonstate.edu or call 541-737-6928.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Megan MacDonald, 541-737-6928; megan.macdonald@oregonstate.edu

OSU names Jonathan Stoll director of Corvallis community outreach

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Jonathan Stoll, who has spent much of his career facilitating collaborative partnerships and communication among organizations and individuals, has been named the director of Corvallis Community Outreach at Oregon State University.

In this new position, Stoll will be responsible for helping to for develop and implement programs and activities that foster positive relationships between the university, OSU students and the Corvallis community.

Stoll most recently has been the manager of Associated Students’ Diversity Center at California State University, East Bay, where he directed campus diversity efforts, launched several programs to support multiculturalism and student retention, and led a number of outreach and engagement initiatives. He has been with CSU-East Bay, which is located in Hayward, since 2007.

He will begin his new duties at Oregon State immediately.

“Oregon State and the Corvallis community intersect on many different levels and having a point person to facilitate discussions on key issues was one of the key recommendations from the Collaboration Corvallis process,” said Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at OSU. “Creation of this position was first recommended through the Collaboration Corvallis process.”

“Jonathan Stoll has a background that is ideally suited for this new position,” Clark added, “and we look forward to his leadership in continuing the university’s efforts in creating an environment where students engage in productive and civil behaviors both on and off campus.”

Stoll said he was pleased to join the Oregon State community and anxious to begin meeting people throughout Corvallis.

“I am ready and eager to begin working closely with students, campus partners, the City of Corvallis, community residents, organizations and businesses to foster stronger community relations,” Stoll said. “It is an opportunity not only to address problems, but to create and achieve new opportunities.”

“Collaboration Corvallis has provided a wonderful roadmap to build upon,” he added.

Stoll will report both to OSU’s dean of Student Life and the vice president for University Relations and Marketing. Among his duties:

  • Develop and implement programming to create positive relationships between the university, OSU students and the community;
  • Collaborate with established work teams already created to address commonly identified goals between OSU and the community;
  • Serve as the liaison with off-campus living groups, neighborhood associations, city governments, student living groups and others;
  • Participate in aspects of university/city activities to improve relations, and attend appropriate meetings for the City of Corvallis, the university, neighborhood groups, and associations.

Stoll is a graduate of San Jose State University, where he received bachelor of arts degrees in humanities and economics. He earned a master’s degree in public administration at California State University East Bay.

He began his career working as controller and chief financial officer for the Associated Students of San Jose State University in 2003, and then founded the Cesar Chavez Community Action Center there two years later. Serving as development coordinator, he oversaw eight service programs and activities within the center that engaged more than 350 university students to partner with 23 community organizations for community service.

“That is the kind of partnership we can envision between Oregon State University students and the community,” Clark said.

Media Contact: 
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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217

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jonstoll3

Jonathan Stoll

OSU faculty art exhibit on display at Fairbanks Gallery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Artwork by members of the art faculty at Oregon State University will be on display in the Fairbanks Gallery on campus, June 19 through Oct. 8.

The exhibit demonstrates a broad diversity of styles and approaches to the making of art, with faculty members working in the areas of photography, painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking, installation and video. 

Works from Michael Boonstra, Julia Bradshaw, Sandra Brooke, Kathleen Caprario, Julie Green, Stephen Hayes, Yuji Hiratsuka, Shelley Jordon, Nathan Langner, Andy Myers, Felix Oliveros, Kerry Skarbakka and Lorenzo Triburgo are included in the exhibit.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

A closing reception will be held from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Oct. 8 at the gallery. The public is welcome to attend.

Media Contact: 
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Douglas Russell, 541-737-5009, or drussell@oregonstate.edu

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“Guardian,” mixed-media on paper by Andy Myers "Guardian"

Untitled, ink jet on aluminum, by Michael Boonstra

Untitled Ink jet on aluminum

Exhibit featuring graduating seniors’ artwork on display at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. — “So Long, Suckers,” an exhibit featuring the artwork of graduating seniors, will be on display in the Fairbanks Gallery at Oregon State University from June 2 through June 13.

A reception will be held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 4. Exhibit awards, including the President’s Award for Excellence in Art, the Provost's Purchase Award and the College of Liberal Arts Dean's Purchase Award will be announced at the event, which is free and open to the public.

Seven graduating art students from different disciplines will participate in this year’s exhibit. They are:

  • Savannah Youngquist, silk-screen printing. Using her family and friends as influences for her work, she has been working with patterning using foods that remind her of her family members.
  • Allison Yano, ink drawings, painting and monotype printmaking. The driving force behind her work lies in the concept of spaces and their occupants and the forming of relationships between people and the impermanence of their presence.
  • Alice Marshall, three-dimensional drawings. She emphasizes the relationship between human and nature, exploring what happens when the intention is to preserve a part of the natural world.
  • Daniel Johnson, landscape painting. Working primarily in oil, he draws inspiration from his scenic hometown of Moab, Utah.
  • Alyssa Elkins is exploring the connections between the human and our natural environment. She is interested in the way we alter our world to better fit our needs and the ways in which the world reacts and changes itself to compensate for our adjustments.
  • Kusra Kapuler, sculpture and video addresses core human experiences. Focusing on emotions, reactions and thoughts, the work has different mediums. These include paper, bronze and fabric.
  • Darlayne Buys, who is exploring the discarded nature of objects and the obsessive or emotional associations we make with objects through a series of paintings of wedding dresses.

At the reception, scholarships for the upcoming year will be announced and senior of distinction certificates will be presented to outstanding seniors. Community-sponsored awards acknowledging outstanding artwork in the exhibit will also be presented. Blick Art Materials, the OSU Bookstore and Peak Sports are sponsors.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Douglas Russell, 541-737-5009, drussell@oregonstate.edu

Student-directed one-act play festival opens June 4

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s annual Spring One-Act Festival will run June 4 through June 8 in the Lab Theatre in Withycombe Hall, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The festival includes ten one-act plays featuring an eclectic mix of comedy and drama directed by advanced directing students. The plays will be presented in two panels. Panel A runs June 4 and June 6 at 7:30 p.m., and June 7 at 2 p.m. Panel B will run June 5 and June 7 at 7:30 p.m., and June 8 at 2 p.m.

Plays in Panel A are:

  • “Check Please!” directed by Deborah Shapiro, is a series of blind dinner dates that turn into comic chaos. It features Joe Hill, Caitlin Reichmann, Renee Zipp, Brice Amarasinghe, Mike Turner, Beth Kowal, Scott D. Shapton and Sarah Koonse.
  • “Judgment Morning,” directed by Mark McIntyre, is the story of a trio of siblings facing judgment on the morning of a funeral. It features Reed Morris, Blair Bowmer and Elise Barberis.
  • “Heart of Hearing,” directed by Sam Zinsli, is a classic “will-they-or-won’t-they” drama featuring Alex Graham and Bria Love Robertson.
  • “The Worker,” directed by Troy Toyama, portrays a dystopian future and a man with a secret featuring Melissa Cozzi, Kolby Baethke and Joe Hill.
  • “The Merchandise King,” directed by Teri Straley, is a comic parody of Disney’s “The Lion King,” featuring Mike Stephens, Kyle Stockdall, Erin Wallerstein, Alex Toner and Annie Parham.

Plays in Panel B are:  

  • “The Problem,” directed by Anna Mahaffey, features Chris Peterman and Arin Dooley as a married couple from the late 1960s.
  • “Evanescence, or Shakespeare in the Ally,” directed by Ricky Zipp, is about a woman who faces an existential crisis after sudden life changes and features Sarah Clausen and Bryan Smith.
  • “Murder by Midnight,” directed by Bryanna Rainwater, is a clever campy murder mystery featuring students J. Garrett Luna, Sarah Sutton and Kolby Baethke.
  • “The Sign,” directed by Joseph Workman, is the poignant story of two childhood friends reunited at a funeral. It features Bryan Smith and Thoman Nath.
  • “The Lifeboat is Sinking,” directed by Sam Thompson, is a quirky comedy about marriage and compromise featuring Elise Bareris and Alex Small.

Tickets are $8 for general admission, $6 for seniors, $5 for youths and students, and $4 for OSU students. For information or to purchase tickets, contact the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784 or visit the website at http://bit.ly/1jdKUgy.

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OSU Ballroom Dance Company to perform showcase in Corvallis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Ballroom Dance Company will perform May 30 and 31 at Corvallis High School.

The company’s showcase, “Swingin’ Ballroom,” will feature two pieces with country western flair. Other numbers include a West Coast Swing interpretation of the movie “Men in Black” and a Lindy hop, as well as dances featuring salsa, fox trot, cha cha, tango and more.

The 42-member company is comprised of the original Cool Shoes Dance Troupe and an additional team, New Shoes. The company is sponsored by the Physical Activity Course Program in OSU’S College of Public Health and Human Sciences.

The OSU Ballroom Dance Company, under the direction of Cathy Dark and Mark Baker, has toured throughout the Pacific Northwest. This spring, Cool Shoes toured southern Oregon and San Francisco, receiving numerous accolades for their performances.

The performances begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Corvallis High School Auditorium, 1400 N.W. Buchanan Ave. Tickets are $10 for general admission or $8 for students and seniors, and can be purchased at the door the nights of the performances.

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Cathy Dark, 541-737-5929 or cathy.dark@oregonstate.edu

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Cool Shoes Ballroom Dance Troupe

 

Cool Shoes Cool Shoes

OSU College of Liberal Arts hosts scholarship and creativity fair

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University will host a Scholarship and Creativity Fair to showcase the research and creative accomplishments of its faculty on Thursday, May 29.

The fair runs from 5 to 8 p.m. on the Club Level in Reser Stadium in Corvallis. It is free and open to the public.

The event will include interactive displays, demonstrations, musical performances and more. Each of the college’s six schools will have a space to feature two or three projects. Faculty will compete in a 60-second “lecture slam,” where they present important findings and insights in a minute or less. Creative writers will team with a wind instrument group to perform. 

“The goal of the fair is to bring the work of humanities faculty to the public in an accessible way,” said Peter Betjemann, an associate professor of English in the School of Art, Literature and Film and a coordinator of the event. 

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/1jyUizI.

Media Contact: 
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Shelly Signs, 541-737-0724, Shelly.signs@oregonstate.edu