OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

people programs and events

Author Kazim Ali to read at Oregon State on Nov. 21

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Author Kazim Ali will read poetry at Oregon State University on Friday, Nov 21, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library Rotunda. A question and answer session and book signing will follow this free, public event.

Ali is a poet, essayist, fiction writer, and translator. He has written several volumes of poetry, including “Sky Ward,” “The Fortieth Day,” and “The Far Mosque,” which won the Alice James Books New England/New York Award.

Of “The Far Mosque,” Lucille Clifton said: “The author has managed to render into the English language the universal inner voice. These poems talk to the reader from the realm in which we are all human.”

Ali’s work in translation includes “Water's Footfall” by Sohrab Sepehri and, with Libby Murphy, “L’amour,” by Marguerite Duras. His novel, “Quinn’s Passage,” was named one of the “Best Books of 2005,” by Chronogram magazine. His books of essays include “Orange Alert: Essays on Poetry, Art and the Architecture of Silence,” and “Fasting for Ramadan.”

Ali, an associate professor of creative writing and comparative literature at Oberlin College, is also a contributing editor for AWP Writers Chronicle and associate editor for the literary magazine FIELD, as well as founding editor of the small press Nightboat Books.

The reading is part of the 2014-15 Visiting Writers Series sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings nationally known writers to Oregon State University.

The program is supported by OSU Libraries and Press, the School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, OSU’s Center for the Humanities, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele and Grass Roots Books and Music.

The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

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Contact: Karen Holmberg, Karen.holmberg@oregonstate.edu

Expert on subsurface life to present Condon Lecture

CORVALLIS, Ore. – T.C. Onstott, a geologist, geochemist, biogeochemist and expert on unusual microbial life forms in the Arctic and deep beneath the surface of the Earth, will present the 2014 Thomas Condon Lecture on Thursday, Nov. 20, at Oregon State University.

The lecture is free, open to the public and designed for a non-specialist audience. It is titled "The Hidden Universe."

The presentation will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Construction and Engineering Hall of the LaSells Stewart Center on the OSU campus, preceded by a reception with refreshments. The Condon Lecture, named after a pioneer of Oregon geology, helps to interpret significant scientific research for non-scientists.

Onstott is a professor of geochemistry in the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University. He has won numerous awards, and was named as one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2008.

Onstott studies subsurface microbial life and microbial ecosystems of permafrost, and its implications for global warming, petroleum biodegradation, life on Mars and the origin of life. The work also raises questions about how deeply into a planet life can penetrate and whether life could originate inside a planet.

This research has explored the Canadian High Arctic, the mines of South Africa to depths of more than two miles, and Yellowstone National Park. Onstott’s research also involves collaborations with NASA scientists on the development of space-flight capable instrumentation for detecting life. 

Onstott will also give a more technical presentation on a related topic, in the George Moore Lecture titled “Carbon cycling in the deep subsurface: Never was so much owed by so many to so few.” That event will be Friday, Nov. 21, at noon in Gilbert Hall, Room 124.

The presentations are sponsored by the OSU Research Office and the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.

Source: 

Rick Colwell, 541-737-5220

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T.C. Onstott
T.C. Onstott

Auditions for OSU production of ‘Anne Frank’ to be held Nov. 16 and 17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s winter production, “The Diary of Anne Frank,” will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Nov. 16 and 17 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

Auditions are open to all OSU students, staff, and faculty and Corvallis community members. Auditions will consist of cold-readings from the script. Scripts are available to check out from the Theatre Arts office in Withycombe 141.

The play is a new adaptation by Wendy Kesselman of the original by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. It tells the true story of a young Jewish girl and her family in hiding during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands from June, 1942, to August, 1944.

Roles include the title character, Anne Frank; her father, Otto; her mother, Edith; her sister, Margot; Miep Gies; Peter Van Daan; Mrs. Van Daan; Mr. Dussel; Mr. Kraler and three male Nazis.

A read-through of the play will be held in early December and regular rehearsals begin in January, 2015. Rehearsals will be held from 2-6 p.m. Sundays and 6-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday each week.  Performances will be held Feb. 12-14 and Feb. 20-22, 2015.  

For more information, contact Director Elizabeth Helman at Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Theatre to present ‘Mother Courage’ in November

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present Bertolt Brecht’s classic anti-war fable, “Mother Courage and Her Children.” Performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13-14 and Nov. 21-22, and at 2 p.m. on Nov. 16 and Nov. 23 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

“Mother Courage and Her Children” is the first production of the 2014-15 OSU Theatre season, which has the theme, “War and Remembrance.” The play, originally written in the late 1930s as an anti-war play, is a powerful and thought-provoking drama that grapples with themes of family, survival and the true cost of war.

The production captures the human drama and collateral damage of armed conflict through a tight ensemble of performers and embraces Brecht’s vivid, theatrical style.

“Indeed, Brecht tells us virtually nothing of the war, but rather uses it as a loose background to present the personal and emotional impact that battle has on its victims, perpetrators and especially profiteers,” said director George Caldwell, a member of the OSU Theatre faculty.

A small core of Oregon State Theatre ensemble players will portray a total of 36 characters. Never leaving the stage, ensemble members perform a variety of roles, change costumes, move scenery and create sound effects before the audience, creating a kind of dynamic production rarely seen on stage. The production also includes original music composed by OSU music faculty member Tina Bull and student J. Garrett Luna.

The cast features OSU students Kolby S. Baethke, Daniel Barber, Elise Barberis, Grant Burns, Burke DeBoer, Sidney King, Anna Elise Mahaffey, Luis Miranda, Alyssa Monning, Emily Peters, Alex Reis, Alexandria Shonk, Alex Small, Teri Straley, Sarah Sutton, Kelsea Vierra and Cory Warren. Community members Angie DeMorgan and Scott Trout also join the cast.

Tickets are $12; $10 for seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ  or by calling 541-737-2784.

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Top Oregon family businesses to be honored at Nov. 20 event

PORTLAND, Ore. – Several Oregon family businesses will be honored at the 2014 Excellence in Family Business Awards ceremony on Thursday, Nov. 20, at the Sentinel Hotel in Portland.

Bill Chambers, owner of Stahlbush Island Farms, Inc., and one of this year’s honorees, will speak at the event, which is sponsored by Oregon State University’s Austin Family Business Program. Chambers and his wife, Karla, of Corvallis, were selected as the Dean’s Family Business Leadership Award winners for 2014.

“We’re so fortunate that Bill will be joining us to share his advice and insights about three generations of enterprises in the Chambers family,” said Sherri Noxel, director of the Austin Family Business Program.

Founded in 1985, the Austin Family Business Program at OSU is a family business program providing inspiration, education, outreach and research to support the success and survival of family businesses.

The Excellence in Family Business Awards recognize the achievements of family businesses in entrepreneurship, community involvement and multi-generational planning. More than 200 companies have been honored since the awards began in 1988.

This year’s awards feature new categories that reflect sound family business practices. Two of those categories honor winners from both established and emerging family businesses. Honorees are:

  • Family Harmony: Second Glance, Inc., of Corvallis, emerging family business; and Unger Farms, Inc. of Cornelius, established family business. Finalists in the category were Jag Forms of West Linn, emerging; and WSC Insurance of Forest Grove, established.
  • Generational Development: Glory Bee of Eugene, emerging family business. Finalists were Advanced Wealth Management, Portland, emerging; and Blue Raeven Farmstand, LLC, of Rickreall, established.
  • Business Renewal: Willamette Valley Pie Company, Salem. Viewpoint Construction Software of Portland was a finalist in the category.
  • Student Award: Jake Thompson of Thompson Timber.

The event begins with a reception at 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6 p.m. and the program at 6:45 p.m. Tickets are $85, or $25 for children ages 3-10. The hotel is located at 614 S.W. 11th Ave., Portland.

To reserve a seat, register online at http://bit.ly/1yVW32k or contact Melissa Elmore at Melissa.elmore@bus.oregonstate.edu or 1-800-859-7609. The deadline to register is Nov. 7.

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Sherri Noxel, 541-737-6019, Sherri.noxel@bus.oregonstate.edu

Intel ‘futurist’ to speak Oct. 28 at Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Brian David Johnson, the ‘futurist’ at Intel Corp., will speak at Oregon State University Oct. 28 as part of the College of Business Dean’s Distinguished Lecture series.

As Intel’s futurist, Johnson’s charge is to develop a 10- to 15-year vision for the future of technology. His work, called futurecasting, uses ethnographic field studies, technology research, trend data and even science fiction to provide Intel with a pragmatic vision of consumers and computing.

In his lecture, “Humanity in the Machine: What Comes after Greed?” Johnson will explore the relationship between humanity and technology, and look at how technology reflects the mission and values of the societies that create it.

The lecture begins at 7 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. The event is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695.

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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695, jenn.casey@oregonstate.edu

Board hears report on student policies, sexual misconduct, OSU programs

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees on Friday heard a report outlining extensive efforts by the university to improve success for students while in school and following graduation.

Susie Brubaker-Cole, vice provost for student affairs, told the board that OSU is an increasingly diverse university and that pressures on students today require a vast array of programs focused on the “whole of student life: cultural, social intellectual, physical and emotional.”

Brubaker-Cole said Oregon State is emphasizing student learning and programs in and outside of traditional classrooms with the goal of providing students skills and knowledge to succeed in school, life and career.

Oregon State has expanded such efforts with programs such as a first-year experience initiative that requires freshmen students to live on campus and participate in expanded advising, community building and orientation programs. Brubaker-Cole said OSU is also increasing its efforts within student health and wellness; experiential learning; diversity training, student cultural resource centers; involvement in clubs and organizations; and community relations within the neighborhoods near OSU’s Corvallis campus.

Brubaker-Cole also outlined OSU policies and programs associated with student housing, conduct and student life assistance.

The board of trustees also heard a report on Title IX and the increased focus on addressing sexual misconduct at Oregon State – and learned that OSU is not immune to this growing national concern.

Angelo Gomez, executive director of the Office of Equity and Inclusion, outlined a suite of university resources and expanding initiatives, including specialized training for responders and investigators, mandatory education programs for new students, training for employees, the hiring of new investigative and other staff and others.

Reports of sexual misconduct and harassment to the university rose significantly during the 2013-14 academic year. Part of the increase stems from educational programs that encourage students and faculty to report incidents – and makes it easier for them to do so, Gomez pointed out.  He said the number of incidents is troublesome and mirrors national trends.

An estimated 19 percent of women nationwide report being the victims of sexual assault or attempted sexual assault while in college.

“Every case will be addressed,” Gomez said. “All incoming students and new employees will receive sexual violence and alcohol awareness and prevention education. Our prevention and education efforts will be enhanced and intensified, and we will dedicate more resources to response and prevention.”

The board also approved OSU President Edward J. Ray’s agenda for 2014-15, priorities which he said are based on a recent update of the university’s strategic plan. Ray pointed to three university-wide goals in that plan:

  • Provide a transformative educational experience for all learners;
  • Demonstrate leadership in research, scholarship, and creativity, while enhancing pre-eminence in the three signature areas of distinction – advancing the science of sustainable Earth ecosystems; improving human health and wellness; and promoting economic growth and social progress;
  • Strengthen OSU’s impact and reach throughout the state and beyond.

Ray said other priorities for the upcoming year include working toward raising first-year retention and graduation rates; diversifying faculty, staff and student populations; advancing the development of the four-year campus at OSU-Cascades and the Marine Studies Campus in Newport; and developing a proposal for deferred maintenance on campus, including disability access.

The board also approved a new compensation package for Ray, which includes a 9 percent raise in total salary from $485,082 to $528,739 annually. Approximately 56 percent of Ray’s salary is paid by the university and the balance by the OSU Foundation, a private non-profit organization that raises funds to support the university’s mission.

The board approved a resolution to accept on behalf of the university a gift of five parcels of timber property located in Washington County outside of Forest Grove. The property, which is a gift from the estate of Marion Matteson in memory of his mother, Rubie P. Matteson, was valued at $2.12 million during a December 2013 appraisal.

Board members also heard an overview report by Vice President of Research Ron Adams on the university’s research enterprise and participated with a number of university faculty and researchers in a tour of agricultural research facilities and the university’s Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing.

Source: 

 Steve Clark, 541-541-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Former OSU forestry dean Hal Salwasser dies at 69

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Harold J. “Hal” Salwasser, former dean of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, died at his home in Corvallis Wednesday night (Oct. 15) of apparent natural causes. He was 69 years old.

Salwasser had been an active member of the forestry faculty since stepping down as dean in 2012 after 12 years leading the college. He had planned to retire from Oregon State at the end of December.

“Hal was a wonderful colleague, a respected forester and an engaged Corvallis community member,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “His work leading the College of Forestry grew the university’s essential contributions in teaching and research concerning the world’s forests, watersheds, natural areas and the wood products industry.”

Salwasser guided the OSU College of Forestry through a period of immense transition in forest policies and management nationally and globally. He led efforts to maintain forest production while incorporating new concerns about biodiversity, climate change, wildfire, stream health protection, and other issues.

As dean, Salwasser oversaw a forestry program that is more than 120 years old and is consistently ranked as one of the best forestry programs in the country. Today the OSU College of Forestry has an annual budget of some $25 million, with more than a thousand undergraduate and graduate students and an internationally recognized faculty.

Salwasser also directed the Forest Research Laboratory at OSU, which spans a broad range of disciplines, while incorporating social, economic and policy aspects of forests.

Before coming to Oregon State, Salwasser was the chief executive officer of the Pacific Southwest Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. There he supervised the natural resources research and development of Forest Service activities in California, Hawaii and the Pacific Islands. He previously was regional forester for the northern region of the U.S. Forest Service, which included Idaho, Montana, and the Dakotas.

The Salwasser family has requested that in lieu of flowers, contributions be made to the Hal Salwasser Fellowship Fund through the OSU Foundation.

Plans for a celebration of life will be announced later.

 

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu;

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Hal Salwasser
Hal Salwasser

OSU Press publishes new book by Portland author Brian Doyle

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Award-winning Portland author Brian Doyle has written a new book that explores encounters with astounding animals and humans through a series of short vignettes that feature sons and daughters, inebriated robins, Charles Darwin and roasting squirrels, among others.

His book, “Children and Other Wild Animals,” has been published by the Oregon State University Press. It is available in bookstores, or may be ordered online at www.osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/children-and-other-wild-animals, or by calling 1-800-426-3797.

Doyle will read from his new book on Tuesday, Oct. 21, at OSU’s Valley Library Rotunda. The reading, which is free and open to the public, begins at 7:30 p.m. The event kicks off the 2014-15 OSU Presss Authors Across Oregon reading series. For more information on the series, visit www.osupress.oregonstate.edu/AuthorsAcrossOregon

Doyle is the editor of Portland Magazine at the University of Portland. He is the author more than books, including “Mink River, “The Plover” and “The Grail,” with its lengthy but descriptive subtitle, “A year rambling & shambling through an Oregon vineyard in pursuit of the best pinot noir wine in the whole wild world” (OSU Press, 2006). His essays have been published in Best American Essays and Best American Spiritual Writing anthologies.

“Children and Other Wild Animals” combines previously unpublished works with vignettes that have appeared in Orion, The Sun, Utne Reader, and other publications. Doyle’s trademark, quirky prose has been described as “at once lyrical, daring and refreshing; his essays are poignant but not pap, sharp but not sermons, and revelatory at every turn.”

One essay in the new book is “The Creature Beyond the Mountain,” which won the John Burroughs Award for outstanding nature essay. It is, Doyle says, his tribute to all things “sturgeonness.”

Sometimes you want to see the forest and not the trees. Sometimes you find yourself starving for what’s true, and not about a person but about all people. This is how religion and fascism were born, but it’s also why music is the greatest of arts, and why stories matter, and why we all cannot help staring at fires and great waters.”

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Marty Brown, 541-737-3866; marty.brown@oregonstate.edu

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Brian Doyle
Brian Doyle

Oregon Hatchery Research Center to host open house, festival

CORVALLIS, Ore – The Oregon Hatchery Research Center will hold its annual Fall Creek Festival on Saturday, Nov. 1, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The center, which is jointly operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Oregon State University Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, is located 13 miles west of Alsea on Highway 34. The event is free and open to the public.

The center is an important research site for studying similarities and differences between hatchery-raised and wild salmon and steelhead. It is located on Fall Creek, a tributary of the Alsea River.

“There has been a strong run of salmon this year throughout the Northwest, and festival participants should have an opportunity to view a number of fish,” said David Noakes, a professor of fisheries at OSU and science director for the center.

A free lunch will be provided during the festival, which also includes a number of children’s activities and workshops. Workshops begin at both 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m., with topics including fish printing, water color painting, wire wrap jewelry-making, salmon cycle jewelry, bird house building, and stamping.

Registration for the festival is required since space is limited. Call 541-487-5512, or email oregonhatchery.researchcenter@state.or.us

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David Noakes, 541-737-1953, david.noakes@oregonstate.edu