people programs and events

Oregon State University celebrates record year for fundraising

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Foundation closed the books June 30 on its best fundraising year in history, with gifts totaling $130.8 million to advance university priorities.

The fiscal-year total eclipsed the previous record set in 2007-08 by $4 million, when the university publicly launched its first comprehensive campaign. The Campaign for OSU concluded on Dec. 31, 2014, with gifts totaling $1.14 billion from more than 106,000 donors.

“While this level of philanthropic support for Oregon State is historic, the lasting impact it represents is truly amazing,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “OSU has become an internationally recognized public research university, and the incredible momentum driving our work today has been powered by unprecedented support from Beaver Nation.

“Thanks to our supporters, the best is yet to come for this university and all those we serve.”

Donors are supporting high-achieving and diverse OSU students at record levels, creating more than 600 new scholarship funds over the last 10 years – an increase of 45 percent. Donor-funded scholarships coupled with other awards like Pell Grants allow OSU to provide more scholarships and grants to undergraduates than any other institution in the state, university officials say. More than 13,500 undergraduates at Oregon State receive support from these sources annually.

Donors are also boosting the university’s research enterprise through investments in facilities, programs and faculty. Since 2004 Oregon State’s number of endowed faculty funds has grown from 47 to 128. These prestigious positions support global leaders in teaching and research, with earnings from the endowments also creating opportunities for students they mentor.

“Our donors see the university’s potential for leadership on issues critical for Oregon’s future as well as key challenges facing our world,” said OSU Foundation CEO and President J. Michael Goodwin. “Their investments in Oregon State build the critical mass and excellence that make real progress possible.”

Building on this momentum, the OSU Foundation has launched the first in a planned series of strategic fundraising initiatives designed to support the university’s areas of distinction and its goals for student success. These include plans to advance the university’s marine studies program; accelerate forestry education and research on advanced wood products; and renovate the Valley Football Center.


Molly Brown, 541-737-3602

OSU names ASU vice president as dean of the College of Business

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Mitzi Montoya, vice president and university dean of Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Arizona State University, has been named the Sara Hart Kimball Dean of the College of Business at Oregon State University.

Montoya begins her new duties on Aug. 31. She succeeds Ilene Kleinsorge, who announced her retirement earlier this year after 12 years as dean.

As dean at OSU, Montoya will oversee a growing College of Business that has 3,900 students seeking business majors, 850 students with business and entrepreneurship minors, and more than 800 design students. The college just moved into its new headquarters - the 100,000-square-foot, $55 million Austin Hall, which opened last year.

In her position at Arizona State, Montoya has been responsible for advancing entrepreneurship and innovative collaborative initiatives across the ASU campuses. She also has been dean of the College of Technology & Innovation there, and vice provost of the ASU Polytechnic campus.

“We are very excited about Mitzi joining OSU – her candidacy generated a tremendous amount of enthusiasm and excitement across the campus community, and I am thrilled that she will join our leadership team,” said Sabah Randhawa, Oregon State’s provost and executive vice president.

“She has a background that dovetails nicely with the strengths of OSU’s College of Business – including entrepreneurship and innovation – and she also has the vision and experience to help the college grow in other areas,” Randhawa added. “The college is seeking to expand its graduate programs and work more collaboratively with other units on campus, and with private, public and non-profit organizations.”

“She also has done a lot of work in the aerospace industry and with clean energy – two initiatives that Oregon State University has become deeply involved with in recent years.”

Montoya established the Aerospace & Defense Research Collaboratory in Arizona, a statewide platform for collaboration across the aerospace and defense supply chain and research institutions.  She also has been leading ASU’s global training program for clean energy, sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Montoya is a professor in the Management Department of ASU’s W.P. Carey School of Business. Before coming to ASU, she worked for 15 years at North Carolina State University, where she held the Zeinak Chair in Marketing and Innovation in the Poole College of Management. She also founded and led the Innovation Lab, a collaborative effort between different NC State colleges and private industry.

An international scholar, Montoya has taught courses on innovation and marketing strategy – at the undergraduate, graduate, and executive levels – in Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, England, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Panama, Russia, Switzerland and the United States.

Her research has focused on innovation processes and strategies, and the role of technology in team decision-making. She has received research funding from numerous institutions, including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Education, USAID, the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation and others.

Montoya has a bachelor’s of science degree in applied engineering science, and a Ph.D. in marketing and statistics – both from Michigan State University.

Media Contact: 

 Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.randhawa@oregonstate.edu

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Mitzi Montoya, dean of the OSU College of Business

OSU names Hoffman vice provost for international programs

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Mark Hoffman, associate dean in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, has been named vice provost for international programs at Oregon State University. He will begin his new duties July 15.

Hoffman, an Exercise and Sport Science faculty member since 2000, has provided leadership for the college’s international education and student services efforts, including collaborations on campus-wide student success initiatives.

The vice provost for international programs plays a key role in the development and implementation of programs that further the university’s internationalization goals, according to Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president.

“Mark has been an active leader for the college and university in our internationalization efforts, and he will be able to focus on and expand those efforts in his new role,” Randhawa said. “We want to provide the best possible experience for international students who come to Oregon State and for OSU students who study in other countries.”

As vice provost, Hoffman will provide strategic direction for OSU’s internationalization efforts, coordinate relevant campus activities, facilitate integration of international students and scholars into OSU, support and expand education abroad opportunities for students and faculty, and oversee INTO Oregon State University academic programs and the OSU Office of International Admissions.

Hoffman is a certified athletic trainer with expertise in the human sensory and motor systems, and has focused his scholarship on understanding and preventing injuries of the lower extremity in active individuals. He has a Ph.D. in motor control with a minor in neuroscience from Indiana University, where he also earned a bachelor’s degree. He has a master’s from San Jose State University.

“I strongly share OSU’s aspiration to be a top international research university,” Hoffman said. “Comprehensive campus internationalization is critical for the development of globally-minded students. It’s not just about increasing our international enrollment, but we need to strengthen our education abroad opportunities and promote global learning and appreciation for global diversity among all students and create strategic international partnership opportunities for our faculty.”

Media Contact: 

Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.randhawa@oregonstate.edu;

Mark Hoffman, 541-737-6787, mark.hoffman@oregonstate.edu

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Mark Hoffman

                  Mark Hoffman

OSU’s Abbott named president and director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Mark Abbott, dean of the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University, has been appointed president and director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution effective Oct. 1.

Abbott, who has been dean of the OSU college since 2001, is a national leader in marine science research and education. He has been a member of the National Science Board, which oversees the National Science Foundation and advises Congress and the president on science issues; and he is past-president of The Oceanographic Society.

“Oregon State has developed into a highly regarded marine science institution with an international reputation in coastal processes, ocean mixing, paleoclimate, geohazards, and ocean biogeochemistry, among other fields,” Abbott said. “The faculty here are extraordinary and it will be difficult to leave.

“Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is one of the top institutions in the world in ocean science and engineering, and I’m looking forward to this new challenge and opportunity.”

Abbott came to Oregon State in 1988 with a background in using satellites and remote sensing techniques to study biological processes in the oceans. With a 10-year, $10 million grant from NASA, he helped the college create one of the world’s most sophisticated supercomputer networks dedicated to marine science, capable of analyzing enormous amounts of data.

He was named dean of what was then the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences in 2001 and led significant growth in research funding, graduate education and overall impact. The college has developed a reputation for its work in understanding climate change, analyzing the near-shore oceans, paleoclimatology, and other fields.

“Mark Abbott has led the phenomenal growth of marine sciences at Oregon State and helped establish the university as one of the top such programs in the world,” said Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president. “His leadership will be greatly missed, but the foundation that he helped build will serve the university going forward.”

In 2009, the National Science Foundation announced that OSU would be one of the lead institutions on the $386.4 million Ocean Observatories Initiative that since has established a system of surface moorings, seafloor platforms and undersea gliders to monitor the ocean. One such array is off the coast of Oregon and Washington.

In 2013, the NSF selected Oregon State as the lead institution on a project to finalize the design and coordinate the construction of as many as three new coastal research vessels to bolster the marine science research capabilities of the United States – a project that could bring in as much as $290 million over 10 years if all three vessels are built.

Abbott was appointed in 2006 by President George W. Bush to a six-year term on the National Science Board; and appointed in 2008 by Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski as vice chair of the Oregon Global Warming Commission. He is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Consortium for Ocean Leadership as well past member of the Board of Trustees for the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.

He also is a member of the Board of Trustees for NEON, Inc., which is constructing the National Ecological Observatory Network for the National Science Foundation.

In 2011, Microsoft Research awarded him the Jim Gray eScience Award, which recognizes innovators whose research on data-intensive science – sometimes known as “big data” – is revolutionizing scientific approaches to a wide range of issues.

Prior to joining the OSU faculty, Abbott spent six years as a member of the technical staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Jolla, Calif., and was an adjunct faculty member at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

He is a 1974 graduate of the University of California-Berkeley, where he received a bachelor’s degree in conservation of natural resources. He also has a Ph.D. in ecology from University of California-Davis.

Randhawa said OSU will begin the process to identify an interim dean and launch a national search for Abbott’s successor in August.

Media Contact: 

Mark Abbott, 541-737-5195, mark.abbott@oregonstate.edu

Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.randhawa@oregonstate.edu;

WHOI Media Relations, 508-289-3340

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OSU to hold 146th commencement on Saturday in Reser Stadium

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Class of 2015 will top 6,000 graduates for the first time in the university’s history – and many of the newest members of Beaver Nation will be on hand this Saturday, June 13, when OSU holds its 146th commencement.

The ceremony will begin at 10:30 a.m. in Reser Stadium on campus. No tickets are required for the event, which also will be shown on Oregon Public Broadcasting.

A total of 6,038 graduates will receive 6,317 degrees this year, according to OSU Registrar Rebecca Mathern. They will add to the ranks of Oregon State alumni, which have earned a total of 230,136 degrees over the university’s history.

Howard K. Koh, director of the Leading Change Studio at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, will deliver the commencement address. Koh also will receive an honorary doctorate from Oregon State. He is a former member of the Obama Administration, serving as the nation’s 14th Assistant Secretary for Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Some facts and figures about OSU’s Class of 2015:

  • Of the 6,317 degrees that will be awarded, 4,981 will go to students receiving baccalaureate degrees; 960, master’s degrees; 232, doctor of philosophy degrees; 83, doctor of pharmacy degrees; and 61, doctor of veterinary medicine degrees.
  • A total of 590 graduates earned degrees in distance education in 33 different degree programs.
  • OSU’s 2015 graduates come from all 36 Oregon counties, 49 of the 50 states, four U.S. territories or commonwealths, and 63 nations around the world.
  • The oldest graduate is 70 years of age; the youngest is 20.
  • The graduating class includes 121 veterans of U.S. military service.

Each of the 6,038 OSU graduates has a compelling story. Take, for instance, Claire Ostertag-Hill, who moved to Corvallis from Germany so she could be part of the University Honors College at OSU. She pursued three majors simultaneously – biology, psychology and international studies – with support from an OSU Presidential Scholarship. As part of her honors senior thesis, she conducted research on cattle disease and discovered mutations in several genes that may be the cause of Bovine HPV-1 disease.

Now Ostertag-Hill is taking her studies to the prestigious Wake Forest Medical School in North Carolina, where she will pursue her dream of becoming a pediatric surgeon.

Michael Davis, who hails from the tiny farm town of Ramsey, Indiana, joined the U.S. Army in 2001 and served in Iraq, where he sustained injuries. At the age of 28, he retired from the military and began driving trucks for a living. Interested in bettering his career, he discovered OSU’s Ecampus distance learning program and enrolled as an agricultural sciences student.

The flexibility and challenging coursework appealed to the veteran, who sandwiched his studies around 50-hour weeks of driving trucks and vocational rehabilitation sessions at the Veterans Affairs office. Davis and his family are traveling the 2,000 miles to Corvallis to attend commencement.

Mathern said OSU expects about 3,800 students – and more than 23,000 friends and family members – to attend commencement. Oregon State is one of the only universities of its size to hand out actual diplomas to students as they graduate.

Media Contact: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Arkansas administrator to head research program at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Cynthia Sagers, the associate vice provost for research and economic development at the University of Arkansas, has been named vice president for research at Oregon State University.

Sagers succeeds Richard Spinrad, who resigned last summer to take a position as chief science officer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Ron Adams has since served as interim vice president.

As vice president, Sagers will provide leadership to OSU’s vast research enterprise, which last year brought in $285 million in research grants and contracts in areas including agriculture, forestry, marine sciences, public health, and engineering. Sagers also will work with academic leaders and the university community to expand OSU’s entrepreneurial and economic development activities with industry and other public and private partners.

“Cynthia Sagers is a dynamic leader who understands the needs of a comprehensive international research university,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “Her experience as a program officer for the National Science Foundation in international science and engineering will be an important asset as we grow OSU’s research impact in Oregon – and globally.”

“She is also a collaborator who can build upon this university’s strong foundation of partnerships with state and federal agencies, as well as the business sector,” Ray added. “We share a common goal of expanding OSU’s research impact in Oregon, nationally and internationally.”

A biological scientist by training, Sagers earned two bachelor’s degrees from the University of Iowa, and a Ph.D. from the University of Utah. She launched her academic career in 1994, joining the faculty of the University of Arkansas, where she has remained except for leaves of absence to work on leadership initiatives.

Beginning in 2005, Sagers worked in Corvallis, Ore., for two years as senior research associate with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Research Council. In 2007, when she returned to Arkansas, she served as state commissioner for the governor’s Global Warming Commission and in 2010, she was named program officer for the National Science Foundation’s Office of International Science and Engineering.

She also has been a Fulbright Fellow in Panama and a visiting faculty member in Costa Rica; and she chaired the board of directors for the Organization for Tropical Studies. Sagers is a well-published scholar in the area of evolutionary ecology.

In 2012, Sagers was named associate vice provost for research and economic development at the University of Arkansas. In just two years, she helped the university increase research awards by 30 percent.

Media Contact: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu; Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.randhawa@oregonstate.edu

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Cynthia Sagers

OSU President Ed Ray names search committee for new athletic director

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Ed Ray on Monday named a committee to assist him in a national search to select a new director of intercollegiate athletics. The search process includes noted OSU alumni, national leaders in college sports, a head coach, faculty, students and university leaders.

The search committee will be led by Joey Spatafora, an OSU professor and the university’s faculty athletic representative to the PAC-12 conference.

The committee includes Oregon State alumni Marty Reser, vice president of retail sales for Reser’s Fine Foods, and John Stirek, regional president of Trammell Crow; OSU women’s basketball coach Scott Rueck; Erika Aufiero, an OSU student-athlete competing in gymnastics; Colleen Bee, associate professor in OSU’s College of Business, who serves as co-chair of OSU’s student athletics advisory committee; Glenn Ford, OSU vice president of finance and administration; Jim Patterson, OSU senior associate athletic director; Taylor Sarman, OSU student body president; and Marianne Vydra, senior associate athletic director/senior woman administrator.

OSU will engage national sports management consultants Jeff Schemmel, president of College Sports Solutions; and Kevin Weiberg, former commissioner of the Big 12 Conference, to assist with the search.

The search for a new athletic director began last week after Bob De Carolis announced on May 11 that he would leave Oregon State after serving as director of OSU intercollegiate athletics for nearly 13 years and working in athletics administration at the university for 17 years. The search committee will begin meeting this week, and Ray said he hopes to have a new athletic director named by June 30 when De Carolis departs Oregon State.

“I am very impressed by the number of high-level candidates that are expressing strong interest in working at OSU,” Ray said. “Our new athletic director will add to the success of Oregon State’s men’s and women’s athletics and grow fan excitement and engagement. He or she will be committed to our student-athletes and to all OSU students.

“The new director will contribute to the remarkable transformation that is occurring at Oregon State where everything we do is about excellence and leadership.”

Ray said the new athletic director will help build on his own personal commitment to high level athletic success at the university. “Oregon State will compete and will win championships. We will win the right way – the Oregon State way,” Ray said. “Count on it. You have my word on it.”


Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU’s Aaron Wolf receives prestigious Heinz Award

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Aaron Wolf, an internationally recognized expert on water conflict resolution, has been named a 2015 recipient of the Heinz Award in the category of public policy.

Established to honor the memory of U.S. Sen. John Heinz, the awards recognize significant contributions in arts and humanities, environment, human condition, public policy, and technology, the economy and employment. Wolf’s award, given by the Heinz Family Foundation, includes an unrestricted cash award of $250,000.

Wolf was cited for “applying 21st-century insights and ingenuity, as well as ancient wisdoms, to problems that few are paying attention to for the security of the planet.”

“In a world where water is rapidly becoming the most precious of resources and most geopolitical of issues, Aaron Wolf has found practical solutions to protect our water resources and find common ground on water-centered conflicts,” said Teresa Heinz, chairman of the Heinz Family Foundation.

“Water issues cross state and national boundaries, and his advocacy has driven treaties and agreements that recognize our competing demands on water resources and the vital importance of protecting those resources from a modern-day ‘tragedy of the commons.’”

A professor of geography in Oregon State’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Wolf decided early in his career to find ways to ease the tension over water rights, developing a negotiation approach that emphasizes listening and finding shared values among competing users.

Wolf also was cited for working to prepare future generations of scholars and leaders in water conflict resolution. He and other leading academics founded a consortium of 10 universities on five continents that seeks to build a global water governance culture focused on peace, sustainability and human security.

He also helped develop a new partnership between Oregon State, the UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education in The Netherlands and the University for Peace in Costa Rica that will offer a joint master’s degree program on water cooperation and peace.

“One thing I’m struck by over and over is what people of goodwill and creativity can accomplish, even in situations where everybody feels like they’re going to lose something,” Wolf said. “As I’ve watched the discourse change from water wars to water cooperation and peace, I’ve learned firsthand that people will resolve seemingly intractable problems when they’re given the space and the opportunity.”

Other Heinz Award winners include:

  • Roz Chast of Ridgefield, Connecticut, best-selling illustrator and cartoonist, the arts and humanities category;
  • Frederica Perera of New York, and environmental health researcher at Columbia University, the environment category;
  • William McNulty and Jacob Wood, founders of Team Rubicon in Los Angeles – which engages returning veterans to help in global relief efforts – the human conditions category;
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, a bioengineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in the technology, economy and employment category for pioneering efforts to cultivate liver cells outside the human body.

Wolf and the other winners will be honored at a ceremony on May 13 in Pittsburgh.

Media Contact: 

Aaron Wolf, 541-737-2722; wolfa@geo.oregonstate.edu

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Natural Resources Leadership Academy 2012
OSU's Aaron Wolf

OSU to host Marine Science Day at Hatfield Marine Science Center

NEWPORT, Ore. – The Hatfield Marine Science Center will hold its annual Marine Science Day on Saturday, April 11, commemorating the 50th anniversary of this unique Oregon State University facility.

Dedicated in 1965, the center has become an integral part of coastal development, education, research, tourism and economics. Marine Science Day runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the center, located southeast of the Hwy. 101 bridge over Yaquina Bay in Newport.

“Marine Science Day is how we give back to the coastal, statewide and international communities we serve, but it is also a way to honor the past and celebrate the future in this, our 50th year,” said Bob Cowen, director of the center. “We will have many of our former faculty, staff and students at HMSC for a reunion that weekend, which will be very meaningful.

“We will get to see the shoulders we are standing on and harness 50 years of momentum as we look to the future,” he added.

Marine Science Day, which is free and open to the public, will also feature special exhibits about OSU’s new Marine Studies Initiative, which calls for OSU to host 500 students-in-residence at the Oregon coast by the year 2025 for a new, highly experiential undergraduate and graduate program in marine studies.

Oregon State is raising funds for a new teaching and research facility on the Hatfield Marine Science Center campus.

Among the events during Marine Science Day are:

  • Interactive displays by researchers from Oregon State and its federal and state government agency partners;
  • Demonstrations from the OSU acoustics research group, where you will be able to “see” your voice on a spectrogram;
  • An opportunity to become a citizen scientist and learn how to monitor sea star wasting disease with researchers from PISCO – the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans;
  • Tidal touch pools with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s shellfish program;
  • Tours of the OSU animal husbandry program and the Oregon Coast Community College aquarium science program.

Several research groups at HMSC will offer unprecedented access to their studies, facilities and instruments during the event.

In addition to a see-your-voice exhibit, the acoustics group will have a display with a large hydrophone and sub-woofers so participants can hears actual sounds from the ocean. The Earth-Ocean interactions program will show video of undersea volcanoes and hydrothermal vents. The Plankton Portal program will show beautiful, fascinating images of plankton as part of a major international initiative to learn more about these small marine creatures.

OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute will help participants identify whales through binoculars, and the Molluscan Broodstock program will show its oyster and seaweed research projects.

Marine Science Day events:

  • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Open house and tours of the Hatfield Marine Science Center, hosted by Oregon Sea Grant and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service;
  • 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. – “Pumped up for Pinnipeds,” an presentation in the Visitor’s Center Auditorium by the Oregon Coast Aquarium for children and others interested in seals and sea lions;
  • 1 p.m. – A feeding of the octopus in the HMSC Visitors Center;
  • 3 to 4 p.m. – “Buy a Fish, Save a Tree,” a presentation in the Visitor’s Center Auditorium by Tim Miller-Morgan of OSU on fish health management and sustainable ornamental fisheries.

More information on Marine Science Day can be found at: http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/marinescienceday/

Media Contact: 

Maryann Bozza, 541-867-0234; maryann.bozza@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Board of Trustees sets tuition, fees for 2015-16

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees voted 11-1 on Thursday to approve a tuition proposal that would complete the elimination of OSU’s undergraduate tuition “plateau” and set tuition rates and fees for the 2015-16 academic year.

Under the tuition plateau, students taking between 13-16 hours had paid the same amount as students taking 12 hours, essentially resulting in some students subsidizing others, according to Steve Clark, OSU vice president for University Relations and Marketing. Oregon State was the only public school in the state to have an undergraduate tuition plateau.

“Following approval by the state Board of Higher Education and Oregon State student leaders, the university has gradually phased out the tuition plateau over the past three years,” Clark said. “We recognize that this final step in phasing out the plateau may place a financial burden on students who will have to pay for the first time, the entire amount for a full course load.

“Consequently, we are also working to target an additional $1.5 to $1.8 million in financial aid for Oregon State’s most at-risk returning students, who may be most impacted by this final step in phasing out the tuition plateau,” Clark said.

The board-approved plan actually reduces the credit hour fee for undergraduate Oregon resident students on the Corvallis campus from $189 per credit to $183, while establishing a tuition charge of $100 per term for all students. The net effect would be to increase overall tuition by 1.2 percent for those resident undergraduates taking 12 credit hours per term. Non-resident undergraduates taking 12 credit hours will see a 0.5 percent decrease.

Students taking 15 hours will pay a total of 11.6 percent more than last year – with the actual tuition increases accounting for $30 and the phasing out of the plateau discount resulting in an additional $855, Clark said.

The board set annual tuition for Oregon State resident undergraduates taking 15 credit hours at $8,535 for 2015-16. That amount is below the national average for OSU’s strategic peer universities ($10,098), as well as below the national average for Land Grant institutions ($9,817); and for public universities in the Pacific-12 Conference ($9,931), Clark said.

The new annual tuition rate for non-resident undergraduate students will be $27,195, which is lower than the University of Oregon (estimated at $30,239), and the average for public universities in the Pac-12 Conference ($30,846).

The board also approved a 2 percent increase for resident graduate student tuition; approved a 5 percent increase for non-resident graduate students; and approved tuition rates for OSU-Cascades, Ecampus online distance learning classes, and summer education courses.

According to state law, any increases in student fees or tuition in excess of 5 percent must be approved by the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

In other action, the OSU Board of Trustees voted to approve the issuance of not more than $57.5 million in university revenue bonds. The bonds will be used to finance a number of projects, including:

  • The Learning Innovation Center, also known as the new classroom building on campus. Revenue bonds totaling $32.5 million will help pay for the $65 million project, which is scheduled to be completed by mid-August.
  • Acquisition of the former Nypro Manufacturing Facility: Revenue bonds of $5.88 million will allow the university to purchase this off-campus site that will provide space for research, offices and storage.
  • OSU-Cascades expansion: Revenue bonds totaling $5.43 million will help fund the expansion of the state’s first branch campus through real estate acquisition and development of facilities. An additional $2 million in bonds will support a long-range development campus plan for OSU-Cascades.
  • Space improvement project: $11 million in revenue bonds will be issued to finance a series of renovation and relocation projects to provide additional space for administrative offices and functions.

The board also heard reports on OSU-Cascades and the university online distance learning program, Ecampus.

Becky Johnson, the university’s vice president of OSU-Cascades, reported that the branch campus has 1,172 students enrolled this year and will welcome its first class of undergraduate students beginning this fall when it becomes a four-year program. About 77 percent of OSU-Cascades students are from Central Oregon, though that profile may change as the campus grows.

By 2025, Johnson said, OSU-Cascades plans to enroll 3,000 to 5,000 students.

Oregon State’s Ecampus program has grown by an average of 18 percent annually over each of the past three years, and now offers more than 900 courses in 90 subjects. The award-winning program had more than 15,000 students take more than 156,000 credit hours last year, with about 4,500 students registered in one of 38 online degree or certificate programs.

Many students are attracted to the program because they started a degree and couldn’t finish, are place-bound, need additional training, or like the flexibility of online education, said Dave King, associate provost for outreach and engagement.

Media Contact: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu