OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Funding increases for innovative program to improve college success, retention

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Initiatives that are under way at Oregon State University and among other members of the University Innovation Alliance to produce more college graduates from low-income and first-generation families will be bolstered by an additional $3.85 million in funding.

The new support comes from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and USA Funds.

The University Innovation Alliance was founded in 2014 by OSU and 10 other top-tier research institutions, with the intent of sharing data and educational innovations to enhance college student success. Member universities have set a goal to graduate 68,000 more students over the next decade and so far are on track to graduate nearly 100,000 more during that time.

“These recent grant awards provide continued momentum to this important work, and will help strengthen the efforts of all of the partners involved in the University Innovation Alliance,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “At Oregon State University, we are committed to graduating more students of color and who come from low-income and first-generation families.”

With the latest investment, this alliance has received $18.45 million in funds, including support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, Lumina Foundation, the Markle Foundation, USA Funds, and the U.S. Department of Education.

Participants in this national program include OSU, Arizona State University, The Ohio State University, Georgia State University, the University of California/ Riverside, Iowa State University, the University of Central Florida, Michigan State University, the University of Kansas, University of Texas/ Austin, and Purdue University.

On a national level, college enrollment numbers are declining even though it’s estimated that the nation will face a shortage of 5 million college graduates by 2020.

A perceived need is not only to increase the overall number of graduates but to help ensure greater enrollment and academic success among those in lower socioeconomic levels. OSU is one of six participating universities in this initiative that have each increased the number of low-income graduates by at least 19 percent in the past two years.

Ray cited this issue as a critical concern in his recent State of the University Address in Portland, Ore., on Feb. 12.

“Forty years ago, the likelihood of getting a college degree if your family was among the upper quartile of the income distribution in this country was 44 percent,” Ray said in that address. “Today, that figure is 82 percent. Forty years ago, the likelihood of getting a college degree if your family was in the lowest quartile of the income distribution in America was 6 percent. Today that figure is only 9 percent.

“This is shameful. Higher education in America is deepening the divide in our nation between haves and have nots, and this chasm is tearing at the fabric of society and undermining our democracy.”

Initiatives made through the University Innovation Alliance will help address these concerns, officials said.

The University of California, Riverside, has redesigned its summer bridge program based on lessons learned from the University of Texas at Austin. A “retention grant” program started at Georgia State is expanding, which provides funds to students who are close to graduating but might otherwise be deterred by outstanding fees. All 11 universities participating in the program are now using predictive analytics, with positive student success and retention results.

OSU is working to share information about some of its more successful programs, such as the College Assistance Migrant Program for children of migrant families; the Educational Opportunities Program, a resource for students of color, students with disabilities, low-income students, veterans and others; and TRiO Student Support Services, a program aimed at boosting student retention.

“OSU expects that the learning from the partner institutions will also help us in our Student Success Initiative,” said Sabah Randhawa, provost and executive vice president. “This is focused on expanding strategies to recruit and retain diverse and high-achieving students, raise and equalize retention and success for all learners, and make high-impact learning the hallmark of OSU undergraduate education."

Oregon State’s Ecampus online education program is also an enormous success, and one key to providing higher education to students who need to control costs, cannot leave home to attend college, or have other constraints on conventional college attendance.

OSU Ecampus now delivers more than 40 degree and certificate programs to students in all 50 states and more than 40 countries, and in January 2016 its online bachelor’s degree programs were ranked in the top 10 in the nation by U.S. News and World Report for the second straight year. Its growth has been extraordinary. Just in the academic year 2014-15, the number of true distance students at OSU increased by 39 percent to 6,913.

“Many of our distance learners are first-generation college students who can’t attend classes on campus because of work or family obligations,” said Ecampus Executive Director Lisa L. Templeton. “We’re proud to give students worldwide a path forward by providing access to an Oregon State education at a sustainable cost.”

Officials of the University Innovation Alliance say it’s the first time a group of large, public research universities have proactively organized to identify solutions that could increase retention and graduation rates. Almost 400,000 students attend the 11 universities involved in this program.

“This level of collaboration among universities is unprecedented,” said Susana Rivera-Mills, OSU vice provost and dean for undergraduate studies.

“It is the way of the future. If we are to significantly increase the number of students who achieve a quality college education, and meet the demands of a growing global society, then our future as an institution of higher education will depend on the extent to which we can collaborate, innovate, and quickly move our goals forward in partnership with other institutions.”

 

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Susana Rivera-Mills, 541-737-4586

United States Poet Laureate to speak at OSU commencement

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Juan Felipe Herrera, a social activist and the first Mexican American to hold the position of United States Poet Laureate, will be the featured speaker on Saturday, June 11, at the 147th commencement ceremony of Oregon State University.

The son of migrant farmers in California, Herrera is the author of 30 books, including collections of poetry, prose, short stories, young adult novels and children’s books, and in 2015 was named as the nation’s 21st poet laureate.

Herrera has said he learned to love poetry by singing about the Mexican Revolution with his mother, a migrant farm worker. He later became a leader in the Chicano civil rights movement and a passionate writer about social issues. Herrera, an activist for migrant and indigenous communities and at-risk youth, is also a performance artist whose work has crossed genres into opera and dance theatre.

When announcing Herrera as poet laureate, Librarian of Congress James H. Billinton said that his poems “contain Whitman-esque multitudes that champion voice, traditions and histories, as well as cultural perspective” to help illuminate the larger American identity.

“We’re honored to have an inspirational writer, artist and social leader of the stature of Juan Felipe Herrera to speak to our 2016 graduates,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray.

“His life’s work is one of recognizing social problems, breaking down boundaries and bridging cultural divides, both through art and actions. He reminds us of the challenges we face as a society, of the richness and diversity of our history, and inspires us to confront habits and impediments to fundamental human decency that are found in higher education and throughout our society.”

Dana Gioia, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, has spoken of the significance Herrera had in connecting poetry with a younger generation.

“Herrera is the first U.S. laureate whose work has emerged from the new oral traditions that have been transforming American poetry over the past ­quarter-century,” Gioia said. “He can write traditional poems for the page, but many of his poems are designed primarily for spoken delivery. His work is performative and communal. In this sense, Herrera speaks powerfully to younger poets and audiences.”

Herrera has written extensively about topics related to children, such as the tragedy of 9/11 through the eyes of a young Puerto Rican girl. He also developed an anti-bullying poetry project in California while serving as the poet laureate of that state from 2012-14. In 2014, he released the nonfiction work “Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes,” which showcases 20 Hispanic and Latino American men and women who have made outstanding contributions to arts, politics, science, humanitarianism, and athletics.

Herrera was educated at UCLA, Stanford University and the University of Iowa. He has received fellowships and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the California Arts Council, the University of California at Berkeley, the Breadloaf Writers’ Conference, the Stanford Chicano Fellows Program, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

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Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-0733

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Juan Felipe Herrera
Juan Felipe Herrera

New “Student Success Initiative” to lower costs, increase graduation rates

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray today announced a new “Student Success Initiative” in his annual State of the University address in Portland, calling on the university within four years to make an OSU degree an affordable reality for every qualified Oregonian.

Ray also pledged that by 2020 OSU must better serve students of diverse backgrounds and ensure that all students attending Oregon State achieve success “regardless of their economic status, color of their skin or family background.”

In his presentation, made at the Oregon Convention Center to more than 700 community, business, educational and state leaders, Ray asked attendees, OSU alumni, donors and political leaders to join in this initiative to “help achieve by 2020 this new horizon of inclusive student success and excellence.”

Ray called upon Oregon State by 2020 to raise its first-year retention rate for all students from 83.8 percent to 90 percent, and its six-year graduation rate from 63.1 percent to 70 percent for all students.

Ray said the university must tackle the “near impossible” financial burdens and levels of debt that students and their families now face. The average Oregon resident undergraduate has an unmet annual need at OSU of $7,256, creating a legacy of debt and a serious obstacle to higher education.

Nationally, the pace of progress on this issue has been unacceptably slow and must no longer be tolerated, Ray said.

“Forty years ago, the likelihood of getting a college degree if your family was in the lowest quartile of the income distribution in America was 6 percent,” Ray said. “Today that figure is 9 percent.

“This is shameful. Higher education in America is deepening the divide in our nation between the haves and have nots, and this chasm is tearing at the fabric of society and undermining our democracy.”

In his address, Ray said that 2015 had been another year of notable achievements for Oregon State. Among these were:

  • Enrollment exceeded 30,000 students for the second year in a row, and 6,300 degrees were presented to OSU’s largest-ever graduating class;
  • The first freshman class started at OSU-Cascades in Bend, and construction began on Oregon’s first completely new college campus in the past half century;
  • OSU’s Ecampus online educational program continued to grow and was ranked seventh nationally by U.S. News and World Report, and fourth in the nation for veterans;
  • OSU faculty conducted $309 million in research, nearly double the combined total of the state’s six other public universities;
  • Donor gifts to the university continued with a total of $130.8 million, the OSU Foundation’s best fund-raising year ever, and built on the success of the hugely successful Campaign for OSU that raised $1.14 billion; and
  • Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and state legislators helped provide the first increase in state funding to higher education in nearly a decade.

During the past year, Ray said OSU launched the nation’s first graduate degree program in “environmental humanities,” to prepare students for careers in environmental policy, social justice and the arts. The university helped lead work to prepare the state for a massive subduction zone earthquake that lurks in its future. Additionally, significant biomedical advances were announced on Lou Gehrig’s disease, cancer and other health problems.

Oregon State’s Marine Studies Initiative also continues to move forward to help address some of the world’s most pressing issues such as climate change, ocean acidification, rising sea levels and degraded marine habitat. Ray indicated that over the next decade, the statewide cumulative impact of this initiative should exceed $280 million, helping to produce hundreds of needed graduates in these fields while boosting the economy of struggling coastal communities.

The College of Forestry at OSU is close to launching a new $60-70 million forest science complex that will accelerate the use of sophisticated new wood products in high-rise buildings.

Ray repeatedly praised the accomplishments and caliber of OSU students, many of whom attended the event. Last fall, more than 41 percent of entering freshmen had high school grade point averages of 3.75 or greater. By 2020, Ray said, OSU should become the school of choice for Oregon’s high-achieving and most accomplished students.

Ray also insisted that as part of each student’s future success, they have at least one “experiential” learning opportunity such as an internship, study abroad program, participation in original research or other club and leadership activities.

 “Let me assure you that while we know that we are not done, we can be confident that working together, the best is yet to come,” Ray said in closing.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

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OSU President Ed Ray
Ed Ray

OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center to hold Fossil Fest on Feb. 13

NEWPORT, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center will hold its annual Fossil Fest event on Saturday, Feb. 13, in Newport from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Fossils are top-of-mind for many Oregonians, following the discovery in late January of mammoth bones during a construction project at Reser Stadium on the OSU campus. Loren Davis of OSU and Dave Ellingson of Woodburn High School will be available during the day to talk about the find, share photos, and discuss other important fossil discoveries in the Northwest. They will give a talk on “Reser Fossils” at 3 p.m. in Hennings Auditorium.

Special guest lecturer William Orr, an emeritus anthropologist from the University of Oregon, will speak at 1:30 p.m. on “Lagerstatten: World Class Fossil Sites,” in the auditorium. The lecture will focus on what makes certain fossil sites so valuable, both in the United States and abroad. He also will sign copies of his books, “Oregon Fossils” and “Geology of Oregon.”

A lecture by Guy DiTorrice will focus on “Douglas Emlong – Fossil Pioneer, Fossil Dreamer.” It begins at 11:30 a.m. in the auditorium. DiTorrice will highlight Emlong’s contributions to the Smithsonian and other topics.

Fossil Fest also will include fossil displays and hands-on activities by the North American Research Group, fossil displays from Lincoln County presented by Kent Gibson, and information for participants on where to find fossils.

“We’d also encourage any visitors to bring in their own fossil specimens for identification help,” said Bill Hanshumaker, an OSU marine educator and outreach specialist with the Hatfield center.

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Bill Hanshumaker, 541-867-0167, bill.hanshumaker@oregonstate.edu

Award-winning food writer and critic Ruth Reichl to speak at OSU Feb. 17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Noted national food writer, critic and television personality Ruth Reichl will speak at Oregon State University on Feb. 17 as part of the Provost’s Lecture Series.

Reichl’s talk, “American Food Now: How We Became a Nation of Foodies,” begins at 7:30 p.m. in The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. The event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and a book-signing will follow.

Reichl was editor in chief at “Gourmet” from 1999 until the magazine’s closure in 2009. Before joining the magazine, she was restaurant critic at The New York Times and at the Los Angeles Times, where she also was food editor.

She has served as a judge on the television show “Top Chef Masters” on Bravo and hosted three Food Network specials that covered her culinary exploits in New York, San Francisco and Miami. Her 10-episode PBS show, “Gourmet’s Adventures with Ruth,” highlighted her trips to the best cooking schools on five continents with famous foodie friends such as actress Dianne Wiest and Chef Dean Fearing.

Reichl is the author of a novel and several memoirs. Her most recent work is “My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life,” a cookbook published in September 2015. She is the recipient of six James Beard Awards. The awards, considered the highest honor for food industry professionals in America, cover all aspects of the food industry, including cookbook authors and food journalists; chefs and restaurants; and restaurant designers and architects.

Reichl’s visit is supported by the Wait and Lois Rising Endowment and the College of Agricultural Sciences at OSU, which has become a leader in the nation’s food culture. The college is a strong partner with Oregon’s rapidly growing food and beverage industries.

Born and raised in New York City’s Greenwich Village, Reichl moved to Berkeley, California, in the early 1970s, where she played an integral role in America’s culinary revolution as chef and co-owner of The Swallow Restaurant.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the OSU Foundation, the Provost’s Lecture Series brings renowned speakers to the Oregon State University community to engage in thought-provoking discussions on topics of cultural and global significance.

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University Events, 541-737-4717, events@oregonstate.edu

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Ruth Reichl

Ruth Reichl

OSU trustees address compensation, equity and campus safety issues

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees on Friday re-elected officers, reviewed future business strategies for the university, and also explored ways to advance equity, social justice, campus safety and emergency response – issues that have been important both locally and nationally in recent months. 

Trustees heard from the three students who organized a “Speak Out” in November on racial injustice concerns, and from university student affairs and diversity officials regarding steps OSU is taking to build diversity awareness and improve inclusivity.

A presentation was also made on the Corvallis housing market and how OSU’s campus housing, local land use, economic conditions and other dynamics affect housing supply and prices in the Corvallis area.

The board approved a policy to guide how it will establish compensation for the university’s president. In setting compensation, the board agreed to consider the salaries, length of service, performance and other criteria of presidents at comparable universities.

A recent annual assessment of OSU President Edward J. Ray was made that cited significant university accomplishments, such as growth in enrollment, research funding, progress on the OSU-Cascades campus, the extraordinary success of the first-ever Campaign for OSU, and the Marine Studies Initiative. Based on those accomplishments and the new guidelines, the board recommended a 3 percent increase in Ray’s compensation to $699,876.

President Ray, in turn, said he intended to donate the increase to student scholarships and educational programs at Oregon State.

“When this Board asked me to sign on for up to five more years last spring, I made it clear that I will have a go at this because of my passion for the work we do at OSU,” Ray said.

“I will donate my annual compensation increase, and more, to the four scholarship and student program support funds that my late wife Beth and I established at OSU. I will do so this year and for as long as I am privileged to serve this great university.”

The board also re-elected Pat Reser as chair and Darry Callahan as vice chair for additional two-year terms.

In other action, board members discussed the university’s 10-year business strategy.

Components of the current business strategy include enrollment targets; contributions to Oregon’s 40-40-20 goals; staff and facilities support; funding for salaries and benefits, including increased PERS costs; the growth of OSU-Cascades to ultimately enroll more than 3,000 students; investments in research and scholarship; investments in access and affordability; and many other topics.

The plans make note of possible cost-reduction approaches, such as administrative efficiencies and alternative retirement or health care plans.

The board meeting concluded with a presentation on how OSU manages public safety throughout the university, and steps being taken to advance emergency response strategic planning.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

OSU names chief diversity officer, other campus leaders for equity and safety

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray announced this week the appointment of three campus leaders to direct OSU initiatives to combat racial injustice; better ensure inclusivity and safety for all OSU students; and engage the university with diverse communities throughout Oregon.

The appointments follow two months of conversations on the Oregon State campus between Ray and OSU students, faculty and staff. He made the announcement during the university’s annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Breakfast and followed up on Tuesday with a letter to all Oregon State students and employees.

“Business as usual is not acceptable and we need to restructure some university-level responsibilities,” Ray said. “We also need to listen to diverse perspectives and experiences throughout OSU while we define and implement our action plans.”

Angela Batista, the university’s associate vice provost for Student Affairs and dean of Student Life, has been named interim chief diversity officer at Oregon State. She will oversee a new Office of Institutional Diversity and direct the university’s institutional initiatives and communications on diversity, equity and inclusion. Batista also will work with the new Leadership Council for Equity, Inclusion and Diversity.

Angelo Gomez, the executive director for OSU’s Office of Equity and Inclusion, will serve in a new role as special assistant to the president for community diversity relations. Gomez will focus on building relationships between the university and diverse communities locally and throughout Oregon.

Clay Simmons, OSU’s chief compliance officer, will serve as interim executive director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access, which will oversee investigations involving discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, affirmative action, and access and accommodations for people with disabilities. 

“We have had several important campus community conversations initiated by students who courageously expressed their concerns of racial injustice occurring at our university,” Ray said. “I committed to them that the university will act promptly, effectively and collaboratively to ensure that OSU is a safer, more just, caring and inclusive community.”

Ray said the appointments of the three campus leaders are effective Feb. 1 and all three would report directly to the president. The university will launch an immediate national search for a full-time executive director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access.

A search for a full-time chief diversity officer will follow after Batista leads a campus-wide effort to assess the appropriate structure and resources needed for this important new leadership position, Ray said. 

Ray also announced that:

  • Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president, will chair an action committee to implement and monitor campus safety and diversity initiatives, and to identify resources needed to fund these efforts;
  • The university, led by Ray, will hold quarterly town hall meetings beginning in March to engage OSU students and others on civil and social justice matters, equity and inclusion;
  • The university will require online diversity educational and orientation programs for all entering students beginning in fall 2016.
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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU holds 34th annual celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Oregon State University’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr., celebration will be held Jan. 11-22 with the theme “Injustice Anywhere is a Threat to Justice Everywhere.”

This 34-year-old celebration is one of the longest continuous events in the state celebrating the civil rights leader. The events at OSU are open to the public and most are free.

Joseph Orosco, director of Oregon State’s Peace Studies Program, will kick off the celebration with a presentation and workshop on Monday, Jan. 11, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Horizon Room. The presentation is titled “Places of Injustice” and will focus on the question of places at OSU named after historical figures with ties to slavery and racism. Orosco is an associate professor of philosophy in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion, and studies social justice, political philosophy and Latin American philosophy.

That evening, a multi-faith prayer service will be held in the Memorial Union, Room 208, from 5-6 p.m.

A number of lectures, workshops and other events will be held throughout the two-week celebration. A full schedule is available online at http://oregonstate.edu/oei/mlk-events

Some highlights include:

  • Jan. 14, 1-2:30 p.m.: Untold Stories: Histories of Students of Color. A guided tour begins on the Memorial Union steps and follows the histories of students of color who have made positive changes to the OSU campus.
  • Jan. 16, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.: Martin Luther King Jr., Day of Service. The annual day of service offers 8-12 individual service projects.  Registration required. For more information and to register for a project, visit: http://sli.oregonstate.edu/mlk
  • Jan. 19, noon-1:30 p.m.: Making the Unknown Known: Exploring Implicit Bias in Everyday Life, in the Memorial Union, Room 206. This workshop will explore attitudes or stereotypes that influence perceptions, judgements, and behaviors in an unconscious manner.
  • Jan. 21, 7-9 p.m.: Speaking Justice: An annual night of spoken word poetry, in the Memorial Union lounge. The two-part event includes a community performance section that allows 6-8 performers the space to share their voice, and a contracted performance focused on social justice issues such as environmental, gender, racial, and queer justice.

Oregon State’s Peace Breakfast takes place Jan. 18, 8:30-10:30 a.m., in the Memorial Union Ballroom. The keynote speaker will be Jeff Chang, executive director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford University. The event also will feature the presentation of the Phyllis S. Lee & Frances Dancy Hooks Coalition Builder Awards.

Tickets will be available at the door, but organizers advise patrons to buy tickets in advance from the Memorial Union Information Desk, as the event regularly sells out. The cost is $10 for general admission and $5 for students; children ages 5-and-under will be admitted free.

These events are organized each year by a group of OSU community members convened by the Office of Equity and Inclusion.

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Binh Le, 541-737-4384; binh.le@oregonstate.edu

McComb named senior vice provost for Academic Affairs at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Brenda McComb, a longtime Oregon State University faculty member and dean of the Graduate School since 2011, has been named senior vice provost for Academic Affairs at OSU.

Before being selected to head the Graduate School, McComb led the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society in Oregon State’s College of Forestry.

As senior vice provost, McComb will support Provost and Executive Vice President Sabah Randhawa in matters related to faculty development, curricular operations, assessment and accreditation, strategic plan implementation, academic capacity planning, academic initiatives and special projects. She also will serve on the OSU President’s Cabinet and Provost’s Council.

Among the primary responsibilities for the senior vice provost:

  • Leadership and coordination of faculty matters, including shaping faculty hiring, support and development of OSU faculty;
  • Oversight of curriculum matters, including curriculum development and review;
  • Liaison with the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and the Higher Education Coordination Curriculum;
  • Oversight of institutional planning and research.

“Brenda McComb has invaluable experience both as a faculty member and as an administrator working with faculty in creating an environment that supports exceptional teaching, research and outreach,” Randhawa said. “Brenda provided exceptional leadership to the Graduate School, which is better-positioned now to meet the needs of our graduate students and support graduate faculty.”

McComb’s career began at the University of Kentucky’s Department of Forestry. She joined the Oregon State faculty, with joint appointments in forestry and fisheries and wildlife, in 1987. After nearly a decade at Oregon State, McComb left to become head of the Department of Natural Resources Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, and returned to OSU in 2009 to head the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.

In addition to her roles as department head and dean of the Graduate School, McComb has served as a founding member of the Oregon State University Board of Trustees since 2012.

McComb will begin her new position on Jan. 11. The appointment of senior vice provost is typically made for five years, though the length of appointment is at the discretion of OSU provost. McComb succeeds Rebecca Warner, who is returning to teaching and research in the College of Liberal Arts.

Randhawa said a leadership succession plan for the Oregon State University Graduate School will be forthcoming.

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Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.Randhawa@oregonstate.edu

Ford to leave Oregon State University for CFO position at Bastyr University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Glenn Ford, the vice president for finance and administration/CFO at Oregon State University since July, 2013, is leaving OSU to assume a similar position at Bastyr University in Kenmore, Wash.

Ford will begin his new position in mid-February at Bastyr, a private university that offers graduate and undergraduate education and research in naturopathic medicine.

Oregon State President Ed Ray on Monday appointed Ron Adams to serve as interim vice president of administration, and Michael Green to serve as interim vice president for finance, while OSU conducts a national search for a new vice president of finance and administration.

Green is associate vice president for finance and administration at Oregon State and previously served as associate vice chancellor for finance and administration for the Oregon University System. Adams, a former dean of the College of Engineering and interim head of OSU’s research office, is senior associate vice president for administration and strategic initiatives at OSU.

Adams and Green will assume their new duties on Jan. 4. Ford will work closely with them to ensure a smooth transition before his departure in mid-February, university officials said.

At Oregon State, Ford served as the university’s chief financial officer and oversaw all financial and administrative components of OSU, including capital planning and development, facilities, human resources and public safety. 

“It has been an honor and privilege to serve Oregon State University,” Ford said. “I am grateful to President Ed Ray for providing me the opportunity to be part of this great university and Beaver Nation. I will forever feel a part of the special community that makes up Oregon State.”

Ray acknowledged Ford’s many contributions while at OSU.

“Glenn ably helped Oregon State navigate becoming an independent public university with its own board of trustees,” Ray said. “He assembled a strong team of professionals and instituted procedures that will help successfully guide OSU’s fiscal management and capital planning for a long time into the future.”

Ford said he and his wife, Tammy, are looking forward to living closer to their two daughters and other family members. Prior to joining Oregon State, Ford served as the vice president for finance and administration/CFO at Linfield College in McMinnville, and vice president for business and finance/CFO at Utah State University.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

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Glenn Ford
Glenn Ford