OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

people programs and events

NASA looks for citizen scientists to collect snowpack depth measurements

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is looking for snowshoers, backcountry skiers and snow-machine users in the Pacific Northwest to gather data to use in computer modeling for snow-water equivalent, or SWE.

SWE refers to how much water a particular amount of snow contains, information that’s important to scientists, engineers, and land and watershed managers.

NASA is funding a four-year project that involves an Oregon State University civil engineering professor, David Hill, and Ph.D. student, Ryan Crumley, as well as researchers at the University of Washington and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys.

The project is called Community Snow Observations and is part of NASA’s Citizen Science for Earth Systems program.

“Our initial model runs show that the citizen science measurements are doing an amazing job of improving our simulations,” said David Hill of the OSU College of Engineering. “NASA has an unbelievable number of satellite assets in the sky producing incredible information about what’s going on in the earth’s systems, and they’re leveraging information and expertise from the public to make their product even better.”

Getting involved in Community Snow Observations is easy. A smartphone, the free Mountain Hub application, and an avalanche probe with graduated markings in centimeters are the only tools a recreationist needs.

As citizen scientists make their way through the mountains, they use their avalanche probes to take snow depth readings that they then upload into Mountain Hub, a fully featured app for outdoor users.

That’s all there is to it.

“Traditionally, the types of models we run have relied on ‘point’ measurements, such as snow telemetry stations,” Hill said. “Citizen scientists who are traveling in backcountry snow environments can provide us with much more data than those stations provide.”

Community Snow Observations kicked off in February 2017. Led by Hill, Gabe Wolken of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Anthony Arendt of the University of Washington, the project has so far focused primarily on Alaskan snowpacks. Researchers are now looking to recruit citizen scientists in the Pacific Northwest as well, and if possible in the Rocky Mountain region also.

Alaska Fairbanks has spearheaded the public involvement aspect of the project, while the UW’s chief role is managing the data. Hill and Crumley are responsible for the modeling.

Which particular geographic areas get modeled “is kind of up to the public,” Hill said, adding that the more the data are spread out over time and space, the better.

“The models take into account the temporal densification of the snowpack and the spatial variability in snow-water equivalent and how snow properties are always changing, even in a given location,” he said. “If we get a whole bunch of measurements on one day in one spot, that has value, but the more we can get things stretched out, the more coverage we get, the better modeling products we can produce.”

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Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

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Snowpack research

Panel discussion on superbugs, art and music set for Nov. 15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A panel will discuss drug-resistant bacteria from the standpoints of science, art and music from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15, at the Corvallis Arts Center, 700 S.W. Madison Ave.

Hosted by Oregon State University’s colleges of Science and Liberal Arts, “Superbugs & Antibiotic Resistance: An Interdisciplinary Conversation” will focus on how a Harvard researcher’s “giant petri dish experiment” has inspired artists and helped scientists visualize the evolution of antibiotic resistance in E. coli.

Panelists for the free event include Michael Baym, professor of biomedical informatics at Harvard Medical School; Oregon artist Bets Cole; and composer Dana Reason of the OSU School of Arts and Communication.

Baym will talk about his research along with Cole, who will describe how that work inspired her charcoal drawing, “Evolution of a Superbug/11days 1000x Antibiotic Solution.” After learning about the drawing via a tweet from renowned science writer Ed Yong, Baym purchased it, and it now hangs outside his office.

Coincidentally, last spring Yong spoke at Oregon State as part of SPARK, a yearlong celebration of the interplay between art and science.

“It was very cool that I had created something that inspired someone else to do something so lovely,” Baym said.

Baym’s research had demonstrated how bacteria, as they reproduce across a giant petri dish, mutate over the course of 11 days to withstand antibiotics at 1,000 times the concentration normally used to fight infection.

The third panelist, Reason, will discuss how she is taking data from Baym’s research and converting it into sound. Her hope is to generate a new creative work that both stands alone and prompts insights into the data based on how it translates into sound patterns.

The back story behind Baym’s giant petri dish experiment is an example of how art can spark science. The impetus for the research was the film “Contagion,” which told the story of a deadly viral pandemic.

Baym and collaborators spent six months developing their Microbial Evolution and Growth Arena (MEGA-plate), a novel platform for microbial experimentation beyond the classic petri dish.

Not only has the MEGA-plate proved a highly effective teaching mechanism, the visualization tool has also yielded key insights into the behavior of bacteria.

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

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Superbug

Drawing by Bets Cole

Oregon State to host grid energy storage symposium

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Leaders in energy storage technology will converge on the Oregon State University campus Nov. 5-6 for a symposium to discuss opportunities and challenges for next-generation, large-scale grid energy storage systems in the Pacific Northwest and nationwide.

The meeting, expected to draw 100 to 150 participants, is intended to serve as a forum for industry representatives, utility companies, academic and government researchers, and policymakers to discuss energy storage and potential major applications in the region.

 “This meeting brings together the thought leaders who are driving the implementation of novel energy storage systems for the grid, wave power, and other sustainable energy technologies,” said conference chair Zhenxing Feng, assistant professor of chemical engineering in OSU’s College of Engineering. “These are the enabling technologies that can make the dream of 100 percent renewable energy into a reality.”

The symposium is being organized by Oregon State with assistance from the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, a public/private partnership established by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2012. Topics for discussion include the status of current battery technology, challenges and opportunities in the emerging sectors of transportation and the energy grid, energy resilience in the electrical grid, special needs in Oregon, and commercialization and manufacturing opportunities throughout the region.

Invited presenters include researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory, as well as representatives from industry, such as Lebanon, Oregon-based Entek International LLC.

The agenda includes keynote speakers, panel discussions, breakout sessions and a poster session networking event. Also planned are tours to a local utility company and Oregon State’s state-of-the-art facility for energy storage and materials characterization research.

More information and registration are available online at cbee.oregonstate.edu/energy-storage-symposium. 

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Keith Hautala, 541-737-1478

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Ocean Sentinel

Testing wave energy

Conference at OSU explores intravenous vitamin C as treatment for cancer, sepsis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Linus Pauling Institute will host its biennial “Diet and Optimum Health” conference Sept. 13-16 at Oregon State University, attracting an international audience of experts in nutrition, preventive medicine and oncology.

The conference will also honor recently retired Linus Pauling Institute director Balz Frei and welcome new director Richard van Breemen.

The ninth edition of the event takes place 100 years after Linus Pauling began his OSU studies as an undergraduate. It also coincides with the ramp-up of the university’s 150th anniversary celebration and the 20th anniversary of the Linus Pauling Institute’s move to Oregon State from Palo Alto, Calif.

The conference will include a day-long symposium on vitamin C with a focus on the micronutrient’s capabilities in treating cancer and sepsis, as well as sessions on dietary components and the microbiome; lipid metabolism; vitamin E; bioactives; and diet, neuropathy and dementia.

“Linus Pauling wanted to cure the common cold with vitamin C, and there’s some indication that by taking vitamin C you can shorten the duration of a cold – this is a natural progression of that idea to preventing bacteria from killing you,” said conference chair Maret Traber, principal investigator and Ava Helen Pauling Professor at the Linus Pauling Institute. “We really are changing people’s lives.”

In addition to the professional conference, the Linus Pauling Institute will host a free public session from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 16, at the CH2M Hill Alumni Center on the OSU campus. It will feature Emily Ho of the Linus Pauling Institute, who will talk about diet and cancer prevention, and Jeanne Drisko of the University of Kansas Medical Center, who will discuss treating cancer with intravenous vitamin C.

“Linus Pauling and his colleagues tried to show people in the 1970s that intravenous vitamin C was beneficial in treating cancer, and they forced the National Institutes of Health to do several clinical trials,” said Drisko, director of KU Integrative Medicine and the Riordan Endowed Professor of Orthomolecular Medicine.

“The Mayo Clinic ran the trials and said vitamin C showed no benefit in double-blind, placebo-controlled testing. It wasn’t until years later that it was found out that Linus Pauling and his colleagues had been giving it intravenously and the Mayo Clinic used only oral vitamin C, and that’s a huge difference. When it’s given in a vein, it makes hydrogen peroxide around the cancer cells, and the hydrogen peroxide kills them.”

Anitra Carr of New Zealand’s University of Otago, chair of the professional sessions on the mechanisms of vitamin C in cancer, said “vitamin C administration appears to have a clear impact on patient quality of life, particularly in those receiving chemotherapy.”

It’s not yet clear, though, which types of cancer respond best to intravenous vitamin C.

“There is also considerable debate around the potential anti-cancer mechanisms by which vitamin C works,” she said. “Future preclinical and clinical studies will help to elucidate these questions through clarifying the mechanisms by which vitamin C works and also if these vary depending on the type of cancer. This will facilitate personalized medicine, whereby the right treatment can be targeted to the right patient.”

Carr is also one of the presenters during the session on intravenous vitamin C therapy for sepsis, as is Berry Fowler of Virginia Commonwealth University.

“Over the past 30 years, over $2 billion has been spent by the National Institutes of Health and the pharmaceutical industry on over 15,000 patients with sepsis. No treatment has proven effective that doesn’t have side effects,” said Fowler, professor of medicine in the Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine Division and director of the VCU Johnson Center for Critical Care and Pulmonary Research.

“Trials have been predominantly performed with proteins like antibodies and inflammatory protein inhibitors. These protein treatments don’t get transported into the cell where they are needed. Vitamin C is a micronutrient – it’s effectively transported into every cell in the body.”

When vitamin C is infused intravenously, Fowler said, it’s actively moved from the bloodstream into the cells where the injury and damage are happening.

“When it’s there it acts as an antioxidant and, importantly, it decreases the inflammatory process that leads to injury,” he said. “This micronutrient theory may be the secret as to how vitamin C works so effectively. There’s finally a therapy that can be transported into places where it needs to be to be effective as opposed to remaining free in the plasma. That’s what differentiates vitamin C – it’s effectiveness is because the body moves it across tissue planes.”

Carr said critically ill patients with sepsis and septic shock have very low levels of vitamin C and that several recent clinical studies have shown that administration of vitamin C to these patients can significantly decrease organ failure and also decrease death rates by up to 80 percent.

“Sepsis and septic shock are the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and the incidence of severe sepsis continues to rise around the world,” she said. “If these results can be reproduced in other studies, this will be the biggest breakthrough in care for these patients since antibiotics.”

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

Participants sought for study on family dogs and physical activity for kids with disabilities

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University researchers are recruiting children with disabilities and their family dogs for a research study that will test a new intervention to see if pairing the dog and the child can help the child become more physically active.

The project is led by Megan MacDonald of OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences and Monique Udell of OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences. The researchers recently received a two-year, $375,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to support the project.

Children with disabilities spend less time participating in physical activity compared to their peers and are considered a health disparity group, meaning they generally face more health concerns than their peers. And physical activity tends to drop among all children around age 12. The goal of the study is to see if the partnership with the family dog leads to improvements in children’s physical activity levels, which in turn could lead to other health improvements.

“We need to find creative ways to engage kids in physical activity,” MacDonald said. “And beyond physical activity, animal companionship can have a significant impact on health and well-being.” 

The new study builds on the researchers’ earlier work exploring how a family dog might serve as a partner to help a child with disabilities become more active. In a recent case study of one 10-year-old boy with cerebral palsy and his family’s dog, the researchers found the intervention program led to a wide range of improvements for the child, including physical activity as well as motor skills, quality of life and human-animal interactions. They also found that the dog’s behavior and performance on cognitive and physical tasks improved alongside the child’s.

The new intervention is aimed at children with disabilities who are 10 to 16 years old and have a family dog that also could participate in the study. The children will learn how to train their dog in new behaviors with the “Do As I Do” method, which uses positive reinforcement. “Do As I Do” is similar to the game “Simon Says,” in which the dog follows the lead of the child.

“It’s really about the child and the dog being active together as a team,” MacDonald said. “The program also could help the relationship between the child and the dog grow.”

Families will come to OSU for one hour daily for two weeks during the study, which is expected to begin later this summer. There is some flexibility to the schedule depending on families’ needs. The children also will have homework such as walking the dog each day at home. Not all families selected for the study will participate in the “Do as I Do” training this year but all families will have a chance to participate in the training over the course of the two-year study.

“Participating children need to be able to follow basic instructions but beyond that, we want to be as inclusive as possible,” MacDonald said. “Parents who have questions about whether their child and their pet are a good fit for the study should feel free to give me a call so we can discuss their individual needs.”

Families interested in learning more about the study or participating in it should contact MacDonald at 541-737-3273 or Megan.MacDonald@oregonstate.edu

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Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784

OSU’s “Great Move-Out” donation drive expands off-campus; volunteers sought

CORVALLIS, Ore. – To reduce abandoned items in residential areas, increase neighborhood livability, and promote sustainability, Oregon State University and community stakeholders are coordinating two move-out donation drives for students living both on and off campus. 

The Great Move-Out: Off-Campus Donation Drive will help students donate and recycle items they no longer want. A range of items will be accepted, including mattresses, furniture, electronics, office/school supplies, books, and kitchen and household wares. This effort is modeled after the annual Residence Hall Move Out Donation Drive that diverted 23,000 pounds of materials from landfills last year. This year’s on-campus goal is 24,000 pounds.

Both drives begin in June.

The off-campus event is June 14, from 4-8 p.m., and June 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the Grace Lutheran Church Parking Lot at the corner of Kings Boulevard and Harrison Street, and is for OSU students only. 

The residence hall drive takes place May 30 through June 20. Discarded items will benefit local non-profits and other charity organizations. Items accepted for donation include: clothing, unopened and non-perishable food, toiletries (may be partially used), household items like décor or lamps, electronics (broken or otherwise) and furniture.

Sierra Prior, a first-year master of public health student in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences, and special project assistant for Corvallis Community Relations, is spearheading the inaugural off-campus drive.

“Our first step was to bring together stakeholders from the OSU and Corvallis communities to mitigate one of the biggest problems in Corvallis at the end of spring – trash,” Prior said. “Then we started brainstorming ways to divert as much as possible from ending up in a landfill.”

Due to the high volume of donations that are anticipated, Corvallis Community Relations, Campus Recycling and Surplus Property are seeking volunteers to assist by sorting incoming items or by going out with the crew to collect donated items and recyclables from the residence halls.

  • Volunteers are needed for the Residence Hall event for various shifts between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. June 8-20;
  • Volunteers are need for the off-campus event, with shifts from 3 to 9 p.m. on June 14, and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on June 15. Volunteer training will be provided on site. 

Information on how to volunteer or donate items for the residence hall drive, as well as a full list of the donation recipients, may be found at http://tiny.cc/donation-drive

Donations for the residence hall drive may be put into donation bins, which are located on the ground floor of every residence hall. Food and toiletries must be bagged. Larger items that do not fit in hall lobbies, such as wood bed loft kits and furniture, may be set next to dumpsters outside.

“We have heard from students that they often have more in their room than they can or wish to bring home with them at the end other year,” said Andrea Norris, marketing and development coordinator for Campus Recycling and Surplus Property. “This program makes it easy for them to donate those items in their hall and relay them to non-profits that can keep them in use and benefit the community.”

This year the off-campus event is working with Benton Habitat for Humanity, Furniture Share, Old Mill Center, Community Outreach Inc., and OSU Folk Club Thrift Store. These organizations also previously participated in the residence halls event. Key community stakeholders including Republic Services, Corvallis Sustainability Coalition, Rental Property Management Group, and the City of Corvallis guided the planning process for establishing the new off-campus event.

For more information on the off-campus drive, see  http://studentlife.oregonstate.edu/ccr or contact CCR (ccr@oregonstate.edu) or OSU Campus Recycling (Andrea.Norris@oregonstate.edu).

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Andrea Norris, 541-737- 5398, Andrea.Norris@oregonstate.edu

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OSU to hold public forum May 24 in Corvallis on new building at Hatfield Marine Science Center

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A community forum regarding Oregon State University’s engineering and construction plans for a marine studies building on the Hatfield Marine Science Center campus in Newport will be held Wednesday, May 24, in Corvallis.

The meeting will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on OSU’s Corvallis campus in LaSells Stewart Center’s Agricultural Sciences Room. The meeting also will be live streamed at: ­­­­­http://bit.ly/2rjRmC5

Oregon State University has launched a Marine Studies Initiative, a new research and teaching model to help sustain healthy oceans and ensure wellness, environmental health and economic prosperity for coastal communities.

“A component of the Marine Studies Initiative includes the construction of a research and teaching facility – the Marine Studies Building on the HMSC campus – and student housing at another location in Newport,” said Steve Clark, vice president for university relations and marketing.

“The workshop is an opportunity to hear how the university will ensure that the design, engineering and construction of the Marine Studies Building and student housing meet or exceed the earthquake and tsunami performance and safety commitments that OSU President Ed Ray has made.”

The workshop will include an update on the work of a project oversight committee, as well as updates by the project’s architect and the chair of an independent, third-party technical peer review panel, Clark said.

The meeting also will include an opportunity for attendees to ask questions.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State alum, noted philanthropist to give OSU commencement address

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Hüsnü M. Özyeğin, who headed to Oregon State University in 1963 with only $100 in his pocket and graduated to become a highly successful business leader and philanthropist in Turkey and throughout Europe, will return to his alma mater to give the 2017 commencement address.

OSU’s commencement will begin at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, June 17, at Reser Stadium. Tickets are not required; more information is available at: http://commencement.oregonstate.edu//

Özyeğin, who was born in Turkey, came to the United States after graduating from Robert College, an elite academy in Istanbul. He graduated from OSU with a degree in civil engineering in 1967 after serving as president of the Associated Students of Oregon State University his senior year, and went on to earn an MBA at Harvard University.

The OSU alumnus has made significant contributions to the global community with extensive work in social entrepreneurship, education, women’s rights, equity, child and youth development, and arts and cultural preservation.

Scott Ashford, dean of OSU’s College of Engineering, said he “is thrilled” Özyeğin is returning to Corvallis.

“He’s been a gracious host to me in Turkey, and very willing to provide me with advice for the college as an industry mentor,” Ashford said. “Corvallis is still dear to his heart – in fact, he keeps a photo in his office of him and Bobby Kennedy at the Corvallis airport. Every time I’ve traveled to Turkey, he’s made time for me and asked my advice on his new university.

“Our OSU students have spent summers doing research at his university, and we have hosted his students here.”

After completing his degrees, Özyeğin returned to Turkey and began his career in banking. In 1974, he was appointed managing director of Pamukbank, and in 1987, he founded Finansbank, which quickly become one of Turkey’s most prominent and respected banks. He served as chairman of the bank between 1987 and 2010, during which it grew substantially in size and influence.

Özyeğin today is chairman of Fiba Holding A.S., Fibabanka A.S., and Credit Europe Bank (Suisse) S.A. in Geneva.

The Oregon State alumnus has not forgotten his academic origins, and in 2008 he and his foundation established Özyeğin University in Istanbul, building and fully staffing the institution from the ground up. The state-of-the-art undergraduate and graduate university is re-envisioning higher education as both highly entrepreneurial and financially accessible, and already has become Turkey’s fourth largest private university.

Özyeğin is involved in numerous civic activities, including chairing the Hüsnü M. Özyeğin Foundation, serving on the board of the Mother and Child Education Foundation, and serving on the board of dean’s advisers for the Harvard Business School.

Oregon State will present Özyeğin with an honorary doctorate in civil engineering at commencement. The Oregon Stater alumni magazine profiled him in 2012: http://bit.ly/2qX33uH

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Hüsnü M. Özyeğin

Hüsnü M. Özyeğin

OSU to hold three-day eclipse celebration

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will be directly in the path of this summer’s rare total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, and as a NASA Space Grant university the university is hosting a three-day eclipse celebration that includes educational events, music, movies, art and more.

From Aug. 19-21, the public is welcome to attend a series of family-friendly events culminating in a community-wide eclipse viewing party on Oregon State’s Corvallis campus. OSU also will open its residence halls for lodging reservations for the eclipse weekend.

OSU’s Corvallis campus is in the path of totality, where the sky will go dark for about two minutes starting at 10:17 a.m. The last coast-to-coast solar eclipse took place in the United States in 1918.

The OSU150 Space Grant Festival: A Total Eclipse Experience is the first in a yearlong series of events commemorating the 150th anniversary of Oregon State’s founding in 1868. Beginning with the eclipse celebration, the events will culminate in a fall 2018 symposium.

“OSU is hosting this event as the lead institution for the Oregon NASA Space Grant and to deliver on its mission of providing education, research and public outreach to inspire the next generation of explorers,” said event organizer Jill Peters. “As Oregon’s statewide university, we also designed the event activities to share Oregon State’s enthusiasm and research and teaching expertise around the eclipse with the public and ensure they can fully experience it in a safe manner.”

For out-of-town visitors looking to secure hard-to-find accommodations during the week of the eclipse, Oregon State is offering a limited number of residence hall rooms on a first-come, first-served basis starting May 23. Those interested in reserving a lodging/dining package for Aug. 19-21 can visit oregonstate.edu/eclipse after May 23, when access to the reservation site will be available.

The package includes a minimum two nights’ lodging, dinner and breakfast in the dining halls, tickets to the concert, access to pool and gym facilities, and a commemorative tailgate blanket. As campgrounds and local hotels are already reserved for the event, visitors are encouraged to book their lodging package as soon as they are available. Two-night package prices range from $265 for a single room to $1,275 for a six-person suite. Up to two additional nights may be purchased.

The three-day eclipse celebration kicks off Aug. 19 with a photography class for those interested in capturing the eclipse, followed by exhibits and activities centered on science, space, art and astronomy. Highlights include a Mars Rover replica, an art exhibit, and a series of lectures on topics ranging from how bones are affected in space flight to how different cultures interpret astronomy. A BBQ/cocktail party, outdoor movie night and a chance to view the stars with Oregon State astronomer Randall Milstein rounds out Saturday.

Another series of activities, events and lectures will be held on Sunday, Aug. 20, including an evening outdoor concert with award-winning rock and soul band Lady Dottie & the Diamonds. Attendees will be able to dance or sing along to hits from Stevie Wonder, Buddy Holly, Otis Redding, Diana Ross, and more. Beer, wine and food will be available for purchase. 

On the day of the eclipse (Monday, Aug. 21) OSU will host a campus viewing party. The total solar eclipse can be experienced from the fields at Student Legacy Park just north of Gill Coliseum and attendees will receive free solar eclipse glasses.

The party will begin at 9 a.m. as the moon begins covering the sun, and will include outdoor games and activities for the family. After totality, attendees can view NASA's live broadcast of the eclipse as its continues east across the country. NASA-TV will be live streaming video shot from weather balloons across the country, starting from the Pacific Coast with support from a student-led team on an OSU research vessel.

Additionally, the Center for Research on Lifelong STEM Learning at Oregon State is collaborating with Google on the Eclipse Megamovie 2017, a project gathering images of the solar eclipse from more than 1,000 volunteer photographers and amateur astronomers across the nation. The images will be pieced together to create a continuous view of the eclipse as it passes over the United States.

For a full list of activities, times and locations, see: http://oregonstate.edu/eclipse

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Jill Peters, 503-551-2900; jill.peters@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University to hold “Take Back the Night” event

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will hold a march, rally and survivor speak-out on Thursday, April 27, in recognition of “Take Back the Night,” an event held in many locations throughout the world to raise awareness about sexual violence.

The OSU event begins at 7:30 p.m., in the Student Experience Center Plaza on the Corvallis campus. Speakers featured at this event include Brenda Tracy, Jackie Sandmeyer, and Rachel Grisham. Additionally, there will be a talk by Tracy and Sandmeyer about sexual violence on college campuses April 27, 4 p.m., in the MU Horizon Room.

“Take Back the Night” is just one event of many being held in April at Oregon State to acknowledge Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Organizers say the events provide opportunities for students, staff and faculty to declare as a community that sexual violence will not be tolerated on the OSU campus.

Oregon State is not only committed to preventing all forms of sexual violence and providing a safe campus atmosphere but also fosters a compassionate response to those who have experienced this type of violence, according to Judy Neighbours, associate director of the Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center (SARC) at Oregon State.

 Sexual violence – in the form of sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking – negatively impacts the lives of survivors and those around them, Neighbours pointed out. People of all genders, races, cultural backgrounds, religions, socioeconomic levels, marital status, abilities or levels of education can experience sexual violence.

Nationally, one in five women and one in 16 men experience sexual violence while attending college. There are additional students who have experienced other forms of violence, including stalking and dating violence. 

“We know that many will not report their assault, and OSU wants students and the community to know that the university provides numerous services to students exposed to this tragic experience, regardless of their choice about reporting,” Neighbours said.

SARC offers students a safe and confidential place to discuss their experience with an advocate. The advocate can help them understand their rights for reporting and for safety, assist with any housing or academic needs that arise as a result of their experience, and refer them to Student Health Services and/or Counseling and Psychological Services.

When students do want to report their experience to the university, the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access assists with investigating complaints of sexual misconduct.

For additional information, call Neighbours at 541-737-2030 or visit http://tbtn.oregonstate.edu

Media Contact: 

Gina Flak: 541-737-2715; gina.flak@oregonstate.edu

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Judy Neighbours, 541-737-2030; judy.neighbours@oregonstate.edu