OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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OSU to host Marine Science Day at Hatfield Marine Science Center

NEWPORT, Ore. – The Hatfield Marine Science Center will hold its annual Marine Science Day on Saturday, April 11, commemorating the 50th anniversary of this unique Oregon State University facility.

Dedicated in 1965, the center has become an integral part of coastal development, education, research, tourism and economics. Marine Science Day runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the center, located southeast of the Hwy. 101 bridge over Yaquina Bay in Newport.

“Marine Science Day is how we give back to the coastal, statewide and international communities we serve, but it is also a way to honor the past and celebrate the future in this, our 50th year,” said Bob Cowen, director of the center. “We will have many of our former faculty, staff and students at HMSC for a reunion that weekend, which will be very meaningful.

“We will get to see the shoulders we are standing on and harness 50 years of momentum as we look to the future,” he added.

Marine Science Day, which is free and open to the public, will also feature special exhibits about OSU’s new Marine Studies Initiative, which calls for OSU to host 500 students-in-residence at the Oregon coast by the year 2025 for a new, highly experiential undergraduate and graduate program in marine studies.

Oregon State is raising funds for a new teaching and research facility on the Hatfield Marine Science Center campus.

Among the events during Marine Science Day are:

  • Interactive displays by researchers from Oregon State and its federal and state government agency partners;
  • Demonstrations from the OSU acoustics research group, where you will be able to “see” your voice on a spectrogram;
  • An opportunity to become a citizen scientist and learn how to monitor sea star wasting disease with researchers from PISCO – the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans;
  • Tidal touch pools with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s shellfish program;
  • Tours of the OSU animal husbandry program and the Oregon Coast Community College aquarium science program.

Several research groups at HMSC will offer unprecedented access to their studies, facilities and instruments during the event.

In addition to a see-your-voice exhibit, the acoustics group will have a display with a large hydrophone and sub-woofers so participants can hears actual sounds from the ocean. The Earth-Ocean interactions program will show video of undersea volcanoes and hydrothermal vents. The Plankton Portal program will show beautiful, fascinating images of plankton as part of a major international initiative to learn more about these small marine creatures.

OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute will help participants identify whales through binoculars, and the Molluscan Broodstock program will show its oyster and seaweed research projects.

Marine Science Day events:

  • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Open house and tours of the Hatfield Marine Science Center, hosted by Oregon Sea Grant and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service;
  • 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. – “Pumped up for Pinnipeds,” an presentation in the Visitor’s Center Auditorium by the Oregon Coast Aquarium for children and others interested in seals and sea lions;
  • 1 p.m. – A feeding of the octopus in the HMSC Visitors Center;
  • 3 to 4 p.m. – “Buy a Fish, Save a Tree,” a presentation in the Visitor’s Center Auditorium by Tim Miller-Morgan of OSU on fish health management and sustainable ornamental fisheries.

More information on Marine Science Day can be found at: http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/marinescienceday/

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Maryann Bozza, 541-867-0234; maryann.bozza@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Board of Trustees sets tuition, fees for 2015-16

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees voted 11-1 on Thursday to approve a tuition proposal that would complete the elimination of OSU’s undergraduate tuition “plateau” and set tuition rates and fees for the 2015-16 academic year.

Under the tuition plateau, students taking between 13-16 hours had paid the same amount as students taking 12 hours, essentially resulting in some students subsidizing others, according to Steve Clark, OSU vice president for University Relations and Marketing. Oregon State was the only public school in the state to have an undergraduate tuition plateau.

“Following approval by the state Board of Higher Education and Oregon State student leaders, the university has gradually phased out the tuition plateau over the past three years,” Clark said. “We recognize that this final step in phasing out the plateau may place a financial burden on students who will have to pay for the first time, the entire amount for a full course load.

“Consequently, we are also working to target an additional $1.5 to $1.8 million in financial aid for Oregon State’s most at-risk returning students, who may be most impacted by this final step in phasing out the tuition plateau,” Clark said.

The board-approved plan actually reduces the credit hour fee for undergraduate Oregon resident students on the Corvallis campus from $189 per credit to $183, while establishing a tuition charge of $100 per term for all students. The net effect would be to increase overall tuition by 1.2 percent for those resident undergraduates taking 12 credit hours per term. Non-resident undergraduates taking 12 credit hours will see a 0.5 percent decrease.

Students taking 15 hours will pay a total of 11.6 percent more than last year – with the actual tuition increases accounting for $30 and the phasing out of the plateau discount resulting in an additional $855, Clark said.

The board set annual tuition for Oregon State resident undergraduates taking 15 credit hours at $8,535 for 2015-16. That amount is below the national average for OSU’s strategic peer universities ($10,098), as well as below the national average for Land Grant institutions ($9,817); and for public universities in the Pacific-12 Conference ($9,931), Clark said.

The new annual tuition rate for non-resident undergraduate students will be $27,195, which is lower than the University of Oregon (estimated at $30,239), and the average for public universities in the Pac-12 Conference ($30,846).

The board also approved a 2 percent increase for resident graduate student tuition; approved a 5 percent increase for non-resident graduate students; and approved tuition rates for OSU-Cascades, Ecampus online distance learning classes, and summer education courses.

According to state law, any increases in student fees or tuition in excess of 5 percent must be approved by the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

In other action, the OSU Board of Trustees voted to approve the issuance of not more than $57.5 million in university revenue bonds. The bonds will be used to finance a number of projects, including:

  • The Learning Innovation Center, also known as the new classroom building on campus. Revenue bonds totaling $32.5 million will help pay for the $65 million project, which is scheduled to be completed by mid-August.
  • Acquisition of the former Nypro Manufacturing Facility: Revenue bonds of $5.88 million will allow the university to purchase this off-campus site that will provide space for research, offices and storage.
  • OSU-Cascades expansion: Revenue bonds totaling $5.43 million will help fund the expansion of the state’s first branch campus through real estate acquisition and development of facilities. An additional $2 million in bonds will support a long-range development campus plan for OSU-Cascades.
  • Space improvement project: $11 million in revenue bonds will be issued to finance a series of renovation and relocation projects to provide additional space for administrative offices and functions.

The board also heard reports on OSU-Cascades and the university online distance learning program, Ecampus.

Becky Johnson, the university’s vice president of OSU-Cascades, reported that the branch campus has 1,172 students enrolled this year and will welcome its first class of undergraduate students beginning this fall when it becomes a four-year program. About 77 percent of OSU-Cascades students are from Central Oregon, though that profile may change as the campus grows.

By 2025, Johnson said, OSU-Cascades plans to enroll 3,000 to 5,000 students.

Oregon State’s Ecampus program has grown by an average of 18 percent annually over each of the past three years, and now offers more than 900 courses in 90 subjects. The award-winning program had more than 15,000 students take more than 156,000 credit hours last year, with about 4,500 students registered in one of 38 online degree or certificate programs.

Many students are attracted to the program because they started a degree and couldn’t finish, are place-bound, need additional training, or like the flexibility of online education, said Dave King, associate provost for outreach and engagement.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Nuclear “forensics” program will aid national security efforts

CORVALLIS, Ore.  – Oregon State University is helping to bolster U.S. anti-terrorism and nuclear security efforts through a new graduate student training initiative in nuclear forensics.

A new option in an existing degree program will train the next generation of nuclear forensics professionals, giving them the technical expertise needed to identify pre- or post-detonation nuclear and radiological materials, and determine how and where they were created.

Training in this field, university officials said, will create experts with the skills to provide proof of those responsible for any attack or potential attack. Funding for the graduate student emphasis, which is one of the first of its kind in the nation, will be provided by the Department of Homeland Security through the Nuclear Forensics Education Award Program.

"The use of nuclear materials in several capacities is being pursued, and the reality of the world is that not everyone doing so has honorable intentions," said Brittany Robertson, the first student pursuing the emphasis. "I believe in being proactive, so that we don’t have to be reactive. A nuclear tragedy anywhere, whether intentional or accidental, has the potential to affect everywhere."

The nuclear forensics emphasis is led by Camille Palmer, research professor and instructor at OSU’s Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics. It draws on faculty expertise in nuclear engineering, radiation health physics, radiation detection and radiochemistry, and utilizes state-of-the-art laboratory and spectroscopy facilities in OSU’s Radiation Center.

New courses are being created in nuclear materials science, nuclear forensics analysis, and detection of special nuclear material, which will build on existing courses in radiophysics, radiochemistry, and applied radiation safety.

“Oregon State is one of a handful of universities in the world positioned to make a significant impact in nuclear forensics education and research,” Palmer said. “Our human capital, facilities, and proximity to national laboratories make us a natural fit for a forensics program; and our goal is to continue to strengthen research collaborations to ensure that we are consistently relevant and productive in this field.”

Media Contact: 

Jens Odegaard, 541-737-2644

Source: 

Camille Palmer, 541-737-7059

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New analysis puts OSU’s economic impact at more than $2.37 billion

CORVALLIS, Ore. – An analysis of Oregon State University’s economic impact released today estimates that Oregon’s largest university contributed $2.371 billion to the global economy last year – an economic footprint that has grown by $311 million, or 15 percent, since 2011.

The greatest impact is in Oregon, where OSU was responsible for adding an estimated $2.232 billion to the state’s economy in 2014 – a figure that accounts for 31,660 jobs.

The analysis was conducted by the economic consulting firm ECONorthwest, based on OSU expenditure data, visitor data, student enrollment and a 2013 Oregon Travel Impacts study.

The ECONorthwest analysis looked for the first time at OSU’s contribution in Portland, where OSU contributed $401.9 million to the economy in 2014, along with 2,350 jobs.

The economic impact of OSU in Benton and Linn counties was $1.334 billion, along with 25,110 jobs.

Oregon State’s impacts come in three ways, direct impacts ($973 million), indirect impacts ($424.2 million) and induced impacts ($834.8 million). Direct impacts include spending on operations, goods and services, and capital construction; indirect impacts result from companies purchasing additional supplies or hiring additional employees to support spending by OSU; and induced impacts result from the purchasing power of the university’s employees.

The total does not include other significant OSU influences to the state, regional and national economies, including the contributions by university graduates or the benefits of OSU research, such as improved varieties of wheat and other crops used by Oregon farmers; spinoff companies that have major economic impacts; and scholarship that has improved public health and environmental stewardship.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU President challenges state to improve access to higher education

PORTLAND, Ore. – In his annual State of the University address in Portland on Friday, Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray challenged politicians, education and business leaders to help address the growing issue of Oregonians’ access to higher education.

He also said OSU is committed to helping the state meet Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber’s goal of bringing economic prosperity to more Oregonians, particularly in rural communities still suffering effects of the recession.

Ray told the more than 700 people in attendance that inequality in higher education is creating a society of haves and have-nots, which “tears at the fabric of our society and undermines our democracy.” Nationally, a student from an annual household income of $90,000 or more has a one-in-two chance of graduating from college, Ray pointed out. Conversely, a student from a family with a household income of $30,000 a year has only a 1-in-17 chance to earn a college degree.

“As a first-generation college graduate myself, I know firsthand how important a college education is to one’s future as well as the collective future of our society,” Ray said. “One solution is to take a fresh look at attracting and retaining students” by having colleges and universities partner with others, including national foundations.

Late last year, Oregon State and 10 other major research universities formed the University Innovation Alliance, which seeks to raise admission numbers, retention rates and graduation rates for low-income students, students of color, and first-generation students. Some of the nation’s most prominent foundations have committed millions of dollars to match the investments made by member universities in the alliance, which will create and share new strategies to meet its goals of access and student success.

“We are doubling down,” Ray said. “I intend that Oregon State will be a showcase of access to higher education and programs that significantly improve retention and graduation rates. There is much to learn from other universities and I’m happy to say that the work is under way, as we collaborate with high school and community college partners.”

OSU is addressing the rural economy challenge in different ways, Ray said. In 2017, Oregon State will open a $60 million forest science complex in Corvallis to study and help implement the use of advanced wood products in construction of high-rise buildings in Portland – and around the world.

“This very exciting initiative will help restore high-paying jobs to rural Oregon; it will increase the value of Oregon’s natural resources across the nation; it will showcase how engineered wood products can improve the sustainability of urban cities; and it will connect the quality of Oregon wood products and pioneering know-how to fast-growing nations in Asia,” Ray said.

Also helping the state economy will be the launch of OSU’s Marine Studies Initiative, which will result in 500 students studying at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport by 2025. An anonymous donor already has pledged $20 million for a new building there. Coastal communities will benefit from the research, education and outreach efforts of the initiative, Ray noted.

The OSU president called 2014 a year of “landmark achievement” for his university. Oregon State’s enrollment exceeded 30,000 students for the first time, making OSU the state’s largest university. And in December, the university concluded The Campaign for OSU, which raised $1.14 billion – the most in Oregon history.

“As an economist who likes numbers, I can tell you that the .14 figure makes me chuckle since it represents $140 million,” Ray said.

More than 106,000 donors contributed to the campaign, which achieved many highlights, including:

  • Building or renovating 28 OSU buildings;
  • Endowing 79 new faculty positions;
  • Creating more than 600 new scholarships and fellowships serving 3,200 students.

Ray said OSU continues to lead the state in addressing research needs, garnering $285 million in total grants and contracts, including a record $37 million from industry. Over the past 18 months, the OSU Advantage Accelerator accepted and supported development of 21 business concepts into companies, and 12 grew into viable businesses, which have generated $5 million in revenues and government grants.

U.S. News and World Report ranked OSU’s online Ecampus program as the fifth best undergraduate program in the nation. At the same time, the quality of students entering OSU remains high as more Portland metro area high school valedictorians chose OSU over any other college or university. Last fall, 44 percent of the freshmen entering OSU had high school grade point averages of 3.75 or higher.

And this fall, the first freshmen class will enroll at OSU-Cascades in Bend, the state’s first branch campus.

Ray told the Portland audience that Oregon State engineering graduates have helped to build the city through working at firms including Hoffman Construction, Andersen Construction, PacificCorp, Portland General Electric and Kiewit Construction. OSU is also working to improve the metro region’s community health through the state’s first accredited public health school, as well as partnership programs in pharmacy and veterinary medicine. OSU has also established programs in the region in apparel design, business, forestry and agriculture.

“We don’t do this work alone,” Ray emphasized, “but with partners such as Intel, Nike, IBM and Boeing; with non-profit organizations and education colleagues like OHSU and Portland State.”

“The best,” Ray said, “is yet to come.”

The full text of Ray’s speech is available at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/speeches-and-statements/state-u-pdx-2015.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU Board of Trustees approves new degree, bond sales

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University plans to launch the state’s only four-year degree in hospitality management beginning this year at the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend. The proposal was approved Friday by the OSU Board of Trustees.

The multi-disciplinary degree will include options for eco-tourism and sustainability, a business minor, and practicum/internship requirements.

In Oregon, hospitality is a $9.2 billion industry that directly generates more than 91,000 jobs and indirectly creates another 41,000 jobs, officials say. In Central Oregon, tourism and hospitality are particularly important and continue to be the region’s largest source of jobs, growing at a rate of nearly 13 percent every year.

“It will create significant higher education opportunities for place-bound Oregonians in an area of the state reliant on the hospitality industry,” said Rebecca Warner, senior vice provost for Academic Affairs at Oregon State.

Warner said the proposed program has received statewide support from the hospitality industry.

Now the proposal will go to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission for review and consideration for approval at HECC’s February meeting in Corvallis.

The board on Friday also approved a resolution requesting the State Treasurer to issue bonds previously authorized by the Oregon Legislature in 2013 and 2014 for real estate and expansion of OSU-Cascades, renovation of Strand Agricultural Hall, partial funding for the construction of the Learning Innovation Center (also known as the new classroom building), and partial funding for construction of Johnson Hall – a new $40 million, 60,000-square-foot engineering building.

The board also approved a process to annually determine student tuition and fees. The board will receive a recommendation on tuition and fees from OSU President Edward J. Ray, who first will consult with student government leaders and other students on the Corvallis campus as well as the OSU-Cascades campus.

The board also heard reports from OSU administrators on risk management, long-range facilities planning, state funding for higher education, accreditation, educational goals and ways the university measures academic progress. Members also heard a presentation from OSU College of Liberal Arts Dean Larry Rodgers and liberal arts students on the growth, reorganization and expansion of academic programs and degrees, along with personal overviews of student experiences within the college,

The board also approved the appointment of Debbie Colbert, a former administrator with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, as new board secretary. She will assume her new duties on Jan. 26.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

College of Business Dean Ilene Kleinsorge announces retirement

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Ilene Kleinsorge, dean and Sara Hart Kimball chair of the College of Business and executive dean of the Division of Business and Engineering at Oregon State University announced today that she will retire from OSU effective June 30.

“The significant impact of Dean Kleinsorge’s contributions to the College of Business, the university and the local and regional business communities will continue long after she retires,” said Provost Sabah Randhawa. “Her commitment to alumni, students, faculty and staff is reflected in the enduring relationships she has cultivated, the college’s collaborative community, the business partnerships she has created and students who are graduating and entering the work force prepared and ready to make an immediate impact.”

Under her leadership, the college raised more than $78 million in private philanthropy during The Campaign for OSU. More than $30 million of those gifts were for the construction of Austin Hall, the new 100,000-square foot home for the College of Business that opened in fall 2014. It was under Kleinsorge’s guidance that the funding was secured; the building was planned for, designed, built and opened.

Austin Hall accommodates more than 5,800 students each year, which includes 3,900 business majors and pre-majors, nearly 850 business and entrepreneurship minors and more than 800 design students. The college also teaches service courses for more than 1,500 students from outside of the College of Business. 

Kleinsorge, who started at OSU as an assistant accounting professor in 1987, was appointed dean in March 2003. Other accomplishments achieved under her tenure as dean include: 

  • Revising curriculum to create discipline specific majors and establishing a competitive professional school model, which requires students to apply for and be accepted into the college;
  • Growth of graduate programs including the launch of the first business doctoral program and the diversification of the MBA program to meet market demand;
  • Integrating the design majors into the College of Business;
  • Establishing a college specific Career Success Center;
  • Launching the Austin Entrepreneurship Program;
  • Collaborating with the university and the Office of Commercialization and Corporate Development to launch the Advantage Accelerator.

“It has been a privilege to lead, serve and be a part of such an accomplished community of alumni, students, faculty and staff,” said Kleinsorge. “Together we have evolved our curriculum, experiential learning opportunities and programs to provide a business education that prepares our graduates to be ready to work in the local, regional, national and global economies.”

Kleinsorge served as department chair of Accounting, Finance and Information Management from 1995-2001 and again from 2001-02. She serves as a technical adviser for the Governor’s Oregon Innovation Council; is the treasurer for Benton Hospice Board of Directors; and she is a member of the Advantage Accelerator Advisory Board; the University Budget Committee; and the Campus Planning Committee. She is also the university representative for the local Economic Vitality Partnership in Corvallis.

She has served as past chair of the Western Association of Collegiate Schools of Business; as a member of the Executive Commercialization Advisory Council; and has been active in community service including being on the Corvallis Chamber board of directors; co-chaired a capital campaign for an advocacy center for the Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence; and held various positions on the Majestic Theatre board.   

Kleinsorge earned her Ph.D. from the University of Kansas and her B.S. from Emporia State University in Emporia, Kansas. As an associate professor her teaching and research focused on cost and managerial accounting systems, with an emphasis on multi-national companies and health care.

Randhawa said a national search will be conducted for a new dean.

Media Contact: 

Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695, jenn.casey@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Ilene Kleinsorge

OSU celebrates newest student resource, Ettihad Cultural Center

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s newest cultural center is having a grand opening celebration on Tuesday, Oct. 28, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Memorial Union Horizon Room (49).

The Ettihad Cultural Center, located in Snell Hall 424, is a cross-cultural resource for OSU students who have a cultural or ethnic background in central and southwestern Asia and northern Africa, and for those who are interested in learning more about those cultures and regions.

Ettihad means “union“ in Arabic, but the root word is also found in Hebrew and Urdu. Because the center serves Muslim, Hindu and Christian students from countries as diverse as India, Morocco and Saudi Arabia, this cross-cultural word is a good representation for the diverse swath of students who will find a ‘home away from home’ at the center, officials say.

Rayan AlRasheed, student leadership liaison for the Ettihad Cultural Center, said the effort originated as a student group two years ago and its annual cultural events were so well-attended – the last event attracted more than 2,000 attendees – that students convinced OSU administrators that creating a cultural center would serve a growing group of underrepresented students.

Exactly how many students is hard to assess, AlRasheed said, because there are so many countries and groups involved.

“We have to deal with a lot of misconceptions,” AlRasheed said. “We don’t just represent the Middle East, and we’re not solely an Arab or Muslim student group.” In fact, due to the regional nature of the center, AlRasheed said Ettihad is the first cultural center of its kind on the West Coast.

“We’re a prototype,” he said. “We want to show that we can be united, and that we want to work together.”

The center has a close relationship with a number of student groups, as well as INTO OSU, which serves a large number of international students from the represented regions. AlRasheed said students coming from central and south Asia often have trouble knowing how to connect with the broader OSU and Corvallis community, and his hope is Ettihad can bridge that gap.

The center has no paid staff director or faculty adviser, and its housing in Snell is temporary. Plans call for the center to move into the building now housing the Asian & Pacific Cultural Center once the students move into their newly constructed home during Winter Term. Eventually, AlRasheed hopes the ECC will have its own new building, but for now their staff’s focus is on spreading word that the center exists.

“We want people to come to the center and meet people they don’t know, and to allow us to show the community who we are, what our mission is and what our vision is for the future.”

For more information: https://www.facebook.com/ECC.OSU

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OSU campaign celebration to feature N.Y. Times columnist

CORVALLIS, Ore.: Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times will be the keynote speaker at an event on Friday, Oct. 31, celebrating the success of Oregon State University’s billion-dollar campaign.

The public is invited to this free celebration, which will be held at the LaSells Stewart Center on the OSU campus beginning at 4 p.m.

A seasoned journalist and native of Yamhill, Oregon, Kristof has traveled the major roads and minor byways of China, India, South Asia and Africa, offering a compassionate glimpse into global health, poverty and gender in the developing world.

He and his wife Sheryl Wudunn co-authored the best-selling “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide,” which inspired a four-hour PBS series of the same name. In their new book, “A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity,” they look around the world at people who are working to make it a better place, and show readers the numerous ways this work can be supported.

Kristof’s remarks will conclude an hour-long multimedia showcase of the impact of The Campaign for OSU on students, Oregon and the world. Publicly launched in October 2007, the campaign has raised more than $1.096 billion to support university priorities. To date, more than 105,000 donors to the campaign have:

  • Created more than 600 new scholarships and fellowship funds – a 30 percent increase – with gifts for student support exceeding $180 million;
  • Contributed more than $100 million to help attract and retain leading professors and researchers, including funding for 77 of Oregon State’s 124 endowed faculty positions;
  • Supported the construction or renovation of more than two dozen campus facilities, including Austin Hall in the College of Business, the Linus Pauling Science Center, new cultural centers, and the OSU Basketball Center. Bonding support from the state was critical to many of these projects.

"In his world travels, Nicholas Kristof has seen incredible examples of people who are transforming lives and creating opportunity,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “Though on a different level, that’s what’s happening at Oregon State University, with the help of our growing philanthropic community. We couldn’t be more pleased to welcome one of Oregon’s native sons to our campus to celebrate our progress over the last decade and look together to the future.

“The contribution this university makes to our state and to our world is extraordinary and this campaign has expanded future opportunities tremendously.”

Several additional activities are planned on campus for Oct. 31, which is part of Homecoming week. The grand opening celebration for Austin Hall, the new home of the College of Business, will take place at 1:30 p.m. A full schedule of Homecoming events, including lectures, open houses and a Thursday evening Lights Parade and Block Party, is available at osualum.com/homecoming.

Source: 

Molly Brown, 541-737-3602, molly.brown@oregonstate.edu

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Nicholas Kristof

Thursday night football game will impact OSU parking

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students, staff and faculty should plan ahead as parking on campus will be a challenge on Thursday, Oct. 16, due to a 7 p.m. home football game against Utah.

Employees and students are encouraged to find alternative transportation to campus Oct. 16 or to park strategically, as some lots will be restricted to those with game day passes only after 1 p.m. On game day, OSU parking permit holders will be allowed to park in any A, B, or C zone, regardless of their permitted zone, but some parking lots will be closing midday to employees and students to accommodate parking by football game ticketholders.

OSU department heads and business unit directors are encouraged to be more flexible with employees to accommodate the influx of cars and visitors to campus.

A free shuttle to and from campus will be offered to anyone who parks at the Benton County Fairgrounds beginning at 6 a.m. Thursday morning through 2 a.m. Friday morning after the game. The fairgrounds are located west of campus along Southwest 53rd Street just south of Harrison Boulevard. During peak hours, the fairgrounds shuttle will run at least every 30 minutes. The OSU Beaver Bus service will run on its normal schedule on game day.

Beginning at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 16, some parking lots will be open only to those with athletics-issued game-day parking passes and must be vacated by OSU permit holders. These include:

  • All Reser Stadium parking lots;
  • The Gill Coliseum lot;
  • The parking garage at 26th Street and Washington;
  • South Farm parking lot off Brooklane Road.

Other parking areas (listed below) will be available until 3 p.m. for regular faculty/staff business day parking. After 3 p.m., however, entrance to these areas will be limited only to people with athletics-issued game-day parking permits. Employee and student vehicles already parked in these lots may remain until 5 p.m., at which time all vehicles without athletics-issued passes must vacate. Signs will be posted at the entrance of these lots. These include:

  • Lots between 15th Street and 11th Street, off Washington Way;
  • The Benton Place parking lots east of Goss Stadium;
  • Lots off Washington Way adjacent to the Student Legacy Park (intramural fields);
  • The 30th Street parking lots around Peavy Hall, between Jefferson Street and Washington Way;
  • The 30th Street parking lot by Magruder Hall;
  • The 35th Street parking lot at the OSU Foundation building;
  • The lot off 15th Street and Western Boulevard at the University Plaza building

All other Faculty/Staff parking lots that are designated as “Athletics Event” parking on game days are available for regular business-day parking. However, they will have attendants starting at 4 p.m. Employees are encouraged to vacate these lots by 5 p.m. and will be required to vacate those lots by 6 p.m.

RVs are only allowed after 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 15, in the gravel lot off 35th and Campus Way, next to the Motor Pool. Employees and students who normally park in this location, should give themselves extra time Thursday morning to locate a parking space as many may be filled with recreational vehicles. RV’s are not permitted on campus in any other lot on Wednesday.

A game-day parking map is available to help visitors, students and employees better understand designated lots. It is available online at:  http://www.osubeavers.com/pdf9/2778891.pdf

For additional information regarding game-day parking on campus, visit the OSU athletics website at www.osubeavers.com or for offering thoughts and concerns, e-mail eventmanagement@oregonstate.edu; wecare@oregonstate.edu or contact Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at steve.clark@oregonstate.edu. For suggestions on alternative transportation: 

http://transportation.oregonstate.edu/ 

The Corvallis Transit System map is accessible at: http://www.corvallisoregon.gov/index.aspx?page=884

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu