OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

people programs and events

OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center to hold Fossil Fest on Feb. 13

NEWPORT, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center will hold its annual Fossil Fest event on Saturday, Feb. 13, in Newport from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Fossils are top-of-mind for many Oregonians, following the discovery in late January of mammoth bones during a construction project at Reser Stadium on the OSU campus. Loren Davis of OSU and Dave Ellingson of Woodburn High School will be available during the day to talk about the find, share photos, and discuss other important fossil discoveries in the Northwest. They will give a talk on “Reser Fossils” at 3 p.m. in Hennings Auditorium.

Special guest lecturer William Orr, an emeritus anthropologist from the University of Oregon, will speak at 1:30 p.m. on “Lagerstatten: World Class Fossil Sites,” in the auditorium. The lecture will focus on what makes certain fossil sites so valuable, both in the United States and abroad. He also will sign copies of his books, “Oregon Fossils” and “Geology of Oregon.”

A lecture by Guy DiTorrice will focus on “Douglas Emlong – Fossil Pioneer, Fossil Dreamer.” It begins at 11:30 a.m. in the auditorium. DiTorrice will highlight Emlong’s contributions to the Smithsonian and other topics.

Fossil Fest also will include fossil displays and hands-on activities by the North American Research Group, fossil displays from Lincoln County presented by Kent Gibson, and information for participants on where to find fossils.

“We’d also encourage any visitors to bring in their own fossil specimens for identification help,” said Bill Hanshumaker, an OSU marine educator and outreach specialist with the Hatfield center.

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Bill Hanshumaker, 541-867-0167, bill.hanshumaker@oregonstate.edu

Award-winning food writer and critic Ruth Reichl to speak at OSU Feb. 17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Noted national food writer, critic and television personality Ruth Reichl will speak at Oregon State University on Feb. 17 as part of the Provost’s Lecture Series.

Reichl’s talk, “American Food Now: How We Became a Nation of Foodies,” begins at 7:30 p.m. in The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. The event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and a book-signing will follow.

Reichl was editor in chief at “Gourmet” from 1999 until the magazine’s closure in 2009. Before joining the magazine, she was restaurant critic at The New York Times and at the Los Angeles Times, where she also was food editor.

She has served as a judge on the television show “Top Chef Masters” on Bravo and hosted three Food Network specials that covered her culinary exploits in New York, San Francisco and Miami. Her 10-episode PBS show, “Gourmet’s Adventures with Ruth,” highlighted her trips to the best cooking schools on five continents with famous foodie friends such as actress Dianne Wiest and Chef Dean Fearing.

Reichl is the author of a novel and several memoirs. Her most recent work is “My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life,” a cookbook published in September 2015. She is the recipient of six James Beard Awards. The awards, considered the highest honor for food industry professionals in America, cover all aspects of the food industry, including cookbook authors and food journalists; chefs and restaurants; and restaurant designers and architects.

Reichl’s visit is supported by the Wait and Lois Rising Endowment and the College of Agricultural Sciences at OSU, which has become a leader in the nation’s food culture. The college is a strong partner with Oregon’s rapidly growing food and beverage industries.

Born and raised in New York City’s Greenwich Village, Reichl moved to Berkeley, California, in the early 1970s, where she played an integral role in America’s culinary revolution as chef and co-owner of The Swallow Restaurant.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the OSU Foundation, the Provost’s Lecture Series brings renowned speakers to the Oregon State University community to engage in thought-provoking discussions on topics of cultural and global significance.

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University Events, 541-737-4717, events@oregonstate.edu

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Ruth Reichl

Ruth Reichl

OSU trustees address compensation, equity and campus safety issues

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees on Friday re-elected officers, reviewed future business strategies for the university, and also explored ways to advance equity, social justice, campus safety and emergency response – issues that have been important both locally and nationally in recent months. 

Trustees heard from the three students who organized a “Speak Out” in November on racial injustice concerns, and from university student affairs and diversity officials regarding steps OSU is taking to build diversity awareness and improve inclusivity.

A presentation was also made on the Corvallis housing market and how OSU’s campus housing, local land use, economic conditions and other dynamics affect housing supply and prices in the Corvallis area.

The board approved a policy to guide how it will establish compensation for the university’s president. In setting compensation, the board agreed to consider the salaries, length of service, performance and other criteria of presidents at comparable universities.

A recent annual assessment of OSU President Edward J. Ray was made that cited significant university accomplishments, such as growth in enrollment, research funding, progress on the OSU-Cascades campus, the extraordinary success of the first-ever Campaign for OSU, and the Marine Studies Initiative. Based on those accomplishments and the new guidelines, the board recommended a 3 percent increase in Ray’s compensation to $699,876.

President Ray, in turn, said he intended to donate the increase to student scholarships and educational programs at Oregon State.

“When this Board asked me to sign on for up to five more years last spring, I made it clear that I will have a go at this because of my passion for the work we do at OSU,” Ray said.

“I will donate my annual compensation increase, and more, to the four scholarship and student program support funds that my late wife Beth and I established at OSU. I will do so this year and for as long as I am privileged to serve this great university.”

The board also re-elected Pat Reser as chair and Darry Callahan as vice chair for additional two-year terms.

In other action, board members discussed the university’s 10-year business strategy.

Components of the current business strategy include enrollment targets; contributions to Oregon’s 40-40-20 goals; staff and facilities support; funding for salaries and benefits, including increased PERS costs; the growth of OSU-Cascades to ultimately enroll more than 3,000 students; investments in research and scholarship; investments in access and affordability; and many other topics.

The plans make note of possible cost-reduction approaches, such as administrative efficiencies and alternative retirement or health care plans.

The board meeting concluded with a presentation on how OSU manages public safety throughout the university, and steps being taken to advance emergency response strategic planning.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

OSU names chief diversity officer, other campus leaders for equity and safety

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray announced this week the appointment of three campus leaders to direct OSU initiatives to combat racial injustice; better ensure inclusivity and safety for all OSU students; and engage the university with diverse communities throughout Oregon.

The appointments follow two months of conversations on the Oregon State campus between Ray and OSU students, faculty and staff. He made the announcement during the university’s annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Breakfast and followed up on Tuesday with a letter to all Oregon State students and employees.

“Business as usual is not acceptable and we need to restructure some university-level responsibilities,” Ray said. “We also need to listen to diverse perspectives and experiences throughout OSU while we define and implement our action plans.”

Angela Batista, the university’s associate vice provost for Student Affairs and dean of Student Life, has been named interim chief diversity officer at Oregon State. She will oversee a new Office of Institutional Diversity and direct the university’s institutional initiatives and communications on diversity, equity and inclusion. Batista also will work with the new Leadership Council for Equity, Inclusion and Diversity.

Angelo Gomez, the executive director for OSU’s Office of Equity and Inclusion, will serve in a new role as special assistant to the president for community diversity relations. Gomez will focus on building relationships between the university and diverse communities locally and throughout Oregon.

Clay Simmons, OSU’s chief compliance officer, will serve as interim executive director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access, which will oversee investigations involving discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, affirmative action, and access and accommodations for people with disabilities. 

“We have had several important campus community conversations initiated by students who courageously expressed their concerns of racial injustice occurring at our university,” Ray said. “I committed to them that the university will act promptly, effectively and collaboratively to ensure that OSU is a safer, more just, caring and inclusive community.”

Ray said the appointments of the three campus leaders are effective Feb. 1 and all three would report directly to the president. The university will launch an immediate national search for a full-time executive director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access.

A search for a full-time chief diversity officer will follow after Batista leads a campus-wide effort to assess the appropriate structure and resources needed for this important new leadership position, Ray said. 

Ray also announced that:

  • Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president, will chair an action committee to implement and monitor campus safety and diversity initiatives, and to identify resources needed to fund these efforts;
  • The university, led by Ray, will hold quarterly town hall meetings beginning in March to engage OSU students and others on civil and social justice matters, equity and inclusion;
  • The university will require online diversity educational and orientation programs for all entering students beginning in fall 2016.
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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU holds 34th annual celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Oregon State University’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr., celebration will be held Jan. 11-22 with the theme “Injustice Anywhere is a Threat to Justice Everywhere.”

This 34-year-old celebration is one of the longest continuous events in the state celebrating the civil rights leader. The events at OSU are open to the public and most are free.

Joseph Orosco, director of Oregon State’s Peace Studies Program, will kick off the celebration with a presentation and workshop on Monday, Jan. 11, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Horizon Room. The presentation is titled “Places of Injustice” and will focus on the question of places at OSU named after historical figures with ties to slavery and racism. Orosco is an associate professor of philosophy in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion, and studies social justice, political philosophy and Latin American philosophy.

That evening, a multi-faith prayer service will be held in the Memorial Union, Room 208, from 5-6 p.m.

A number of lectures, workshops and other events will be held throughout the two-week celebration. A full schedule is available online at http://oregonstate.edu/oei/mlk-events

Some highlights include:

  • Jan. 14, 1-2:30 p.m.: Untold Stories: Histories of Students of Color. A guided tour begins on the Memorial Union steps and follows the histories of students of color who have made positive changes to the OSU campus.
  • Jan. 16, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.: Martin Luther King Jr., Day of Service. The annual day of service offers 8-12 individual service projects.  Registration required. For more information and to register for a project, visit: http://sli.oregonstate.edu/mlk
  • Jan. 19, noon-1:30 p.m.: Making the Unknown Known: Exploring Implicit Bias in Everyday Life, in the Memorial Union, Room 206. This workshop will explore attitudes or stereotypes that influence perceptions, judgements, and behaviors in an unconscious manner.
  • Jan. 21, 7-9 p.m.: Speaking Justice: An annual night of spoken word poetry, in the Memorial Union lounge. The two-part event includes a community performance section that allows 6-8 performers the space to share their voice, and a contracted performance focused on social justice issues such as environmental, gender, racial, and queer justice.

Oregon State’s Peace Breakfast takes place Jan. 18, 8:30-10:30 a.m., in the Memorial Union Ballroom. The keynote speaker will be Jeff Chang, executive director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford University. The event also will feature the presentation of the Phyllis S. Lee & Frances Dancy Hooks Coalition Builder Awards.

Tickets will be available at the door, but organizers advise patrons to buy tickets in advance from the Memorial Union Information Desk, as the event regularly sells out. The cost is $10 for general admission and $5 for students; children ages 5-and-under will be admitted free.

These events are organized each year by a group of OSU community members convened by the Office of Equity and Inclusion.

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Binh Le, 541-737-4384; binh.le@oregonstate.edu

McComb named senior vice provost for Academic Affairs at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Brenda McComb, a longtime Oregon State University faculty member and dean of the Graduate School since 2011, has been named senior vice provost for Academic Affairs at OSU.

Before being selected to head the Graduate School, McComb led the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society in Oregon State’s College of Forestry.

As senior vice provost, McComb will support Provost and Executive Vice President Sabah Randhawa in matters related to faculty development, curricular operations, assessment and accreditation, strategic plan implementation, academic capacity planning, academic initiatives and special projects. She also will serve on the OSU President’s Cabinet and Provost’s Council.

Among the primary responsibilities for the senior vice provost:

  • Leadership and coordination of faculty matters, including shaping faculty hiring, support and development of OSU faculty;
  • Oversight of curriculum matters, including curriculum development and review;
  • Liaison with the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and the Higher Education Coordination Curriculum;
  • Oversight of institutional planning and research.

“Brenda McComb has invaluable experience both as a faculty member and as an administrator working with faculty in creating an environment that supports exceptional teaching, research and outreach,” Randhawa said. “Brenda provided exceptional leadership to the Graduate School, which is better-positioned now to meet the needs of our graduate students and support graduate faculty.”

McComb’s career began at the University of Kentucky’s Department of Forestry. She joined the Oregon State faculty, with joint appointments in forestry and fisheries and wildlife, in 1987. After nearly a decade at Oregon State, McComb left to become head of the Department of Natural Resources Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, and returned to OSU in 2009 to head the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.

In addition to her roles as department head and dean of the Graduate School, McComb has served as a founding member of the Oregon State University Board of Trustees since 2012.

McComb will begin her new position on Jan. 11. The appointment of senior vice provost is typically made for five years, though the length of appointment is at the discretion of OSU provost. McComb succeeds Rebecca Warner, who is returning to teaching and research in the College of Liberal Arts.

Randhawa said a leadership succession plan for the Oregon State University Graduate School will be forthcoming.

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Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.Randhawa@oregonstate.edu

Ford to leave Oregon State University for CFO position at Bastyr University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Glenn Ford, the vice president for finance and administration/CFO at Oregon State University since July, 2013, is leaving OSU to assume a similar position at Bastyr University in Kenmore, Wash.

Ford will begin his new position in mid-February at Bastyr, a private university that offers graduate and undergraduate education and research in naturopathic medicine.

Oregon State President Ed Ray on Monday appointed Ron Adams to serve as interim vice president of administration, and Michael Green to serve as interim vice president for finance, while OSU conducts a national search for a new vice president of finance and administration.

Green is associate vice president for finance and administration at Oregon State and previously served as associate vice chancellor for finance and administration for the Oregon University System. Adams, a former dean of the College of Engineering and interim head of OSU’s research office, is senior associate vice president for administration and strategic initiatives at OSU.

Adams and Green will assume their new duties on Jan. 4. Ford will work closely with them to ensure a smooth transition before his departure in mid-February, university officials said.

At Oregon State, Ford served as the university’s chief financial officer and oversaw all financial and administrative components of OSU, including capital planning and development, facilities, human resources and public safety. 

“It has been an honor and privilege to serve Oregon State University,” Ford said. “I am grateful to President Ed Ray for providing me the opportunity to be part of this great university and Beaver Nation. I will forever feel a part of the special community that makes up Oregon State.”

Ray acknowledged Ford’s many contributions while at OSU.

“Glenn ably helped Oregon State navigate becoming an independent public university with its own board of trustees,” Ray said. “He assembled a strong team of professionals and instituted procedures that will help successfully guide OSU’s fiscal management and capital planning for a long time into the future.”

Ford said he and his wife, Tammy, are looking forward to living closer to their two daughters and other family members. Prior to joining Oregon State, Ford served as the vice president for finance and administration/CFO at Linfield College in McMinnville, and vice president for business and finance/CFO at Utah State University.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

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Glenn Ford
Glenn Ford

OSU Board of Trustees Committees to meet in December

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees’ standing committees will hold meetings in December. These meetings are open to the public:

  • The Academic Strategies Committee will meet on Dec. 4 from 9 to 11 a.m. to consider the committee’s work plan for 2016. The public can attend the meeting in the President’s Conference Room located on the sixth floor of the Kerr Administration Building, 1500 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.
  • The Finance and Administration Committee will meet on Dec. 8 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. to consider quarterly management, investment and endowment reports. The public can attend the meeting in conference room B102 located on the first floor of the Kerr Administration Building, 1500 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.
  • The Executive and Audit Committee will meet on Dec. 15 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. to assess the board composition and consider potential candidates to recommend to the governor for the vacant board position. The public can attend the meeting in conference room B102 located on the first floor of the Kerr Administration Building, 1500 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

Meeting agendas and materials will be posted online as they become available at: http://leadership.oregonstate.edu/trustees/meetings.

If special accommodation is required, contact Marcia Stuart at 541-737-3449 or marcia.stuart@oregonstate.edu at least 72 hours in advance.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu 

OSU to honor Veterans Day by closing, beginning this year

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will observe Veterans Day (Nov. 11) as an official holiday beginning this year.

No classes will be held that Wednesday and the university will be closed.

The decision to observe Veterans Day was announced last year by OSU President Edward J. Ray, after consultation with both the OSU Faculty Senate and the Associated Students of Oregon State University. OSU began fall term earlier this year to accommodate the change.

Oregon State has more than a thousand students who receive veteran educational benefits – the most of any university in Oregon. “It is important that we recognize and honor the many sacrifices that our nation’s veterans have made,” Ray said.

A range of programs have been initiated or expanded to help support the university’s student veterans, according to Steve Clark, OSU vice president for University Relations and Marketing.

“We are proud to honor our veterans and their contributions to America,” Clark said. “This is a meaningful decision by Oregon State – a university with some 3 percent of our overall enrollment made up of veterans. OSU has long been known as the ‘West Point of the West’ due to Oregon State’s historic U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Program. OSU proudly also has ROTC programs with the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps.”

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Presidential historian Michael Beschloss gives Provost’s Lecture at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Historian Michael Beschloss will deliver the 2015 Provost’s Lecture at Oregon State University in the Austin Auditorium of The LaSells Stewart Center on Tuesday, Nov. 10, beginning at 7:30 p.m.

 Beschloss will speak on “Leadership Under Pressure: A Historian’s Close-up Look at Presidential Decision-Making.” It is free and open to the public.

 A preeminent presidential historian, Beschloss is the author of eight books and frequently serves as an analyst on Meet the Press, The Daily Show, The PBS NewsHour and other shows. He is the author of a regular column in the New York Times, and is the first presidential historian ever appointed by NBC News.

Since he was 10 years old, poring over history books, Beschloss knew he wanted to become a historian.

 “I loved to read history books about presidents and also felt I was living through a period in American history in which whoever happened to be president had a big influence on how Americans lived,” he said.

 Beschloss arrives at OSU in the midst of a heated and divisive presidential primary season, but said the current animosity is less about a rift in the general population and more about the nature of modern American politics.

 “The antagonisms are great, but if you compare the political differences of our time to earlier periods, there have been other times when the differences were much greater – such as the debates over slavery in the 1850s, economics and whether to fight Hitler in the 1930s,” Beschloss said.

 “The point is that hostility between the two parties is now built into our modern political process, no matter how deep the actual divisions in the country.”

 That said, the more divisive candidates, while attracting a certain demographic in the primaries, are unlikely to move forward if history is any predictor.

 “Unifiers tend to have an easier time getting elected president than dividers,” Beschloss said. “It’s hard to think of anyone in recent times who succeeded in winning the presidency on a platform that preeminently pitted groups against one another.”

 An interesting facet of the current presidential race is that the field is appears open to more than just white males, Beschloss noted. With the first African-American president serving his second term, and both women and a non-Christian vying for a spot in the coming primaries, the presidency is looking like a possibility for a broader group of people.

 “One of the glories of America is that the gates to the White House are always opening wider, and that process is likely to speed up as demographic changes make the composition of American society look very different from the way it did even 20 years ago,” Beschloss said.

 Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for the lecture, which will be followed by a book signing.  

 

 

 

 

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Shelly Signs, 541-737-0724; shelly.signs@oregonstate.edu