OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

outreach and engagement

OSU to host events celebrating hands-on learning and maker culture April 14-15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host The Co., a  two-day event celebrating hands-on learning and maker culture, April 14-15 on the Corvallis campus.

“SEA Through the Eyes of an Artist” will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. April 14 at Furman Hall. The fourth-annual Corvallis Maker Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 15 in the Memorial Union Ballroom and the Student Experience Center Plaza. Both events are free and open to the public.

“Maker” culture is a popular movement honoring craftsmanship and technology and the sharing of knowledge, skills and resources. The Co. event offers the OSU community and the public an opportunity to collaborate, innovate and create. The event also provides a forum for teaching the value of hands-on learning in classrooms from kindergarten through college.

“SEA Through the Eyes of an Artist” is a new event this year, hosted by the College of Education in conjunction with The Co. and SPARK, OSU’s year-long celebration of the arts and science. All events are free and open to the public. The schedule is:

  • 9:30 a.m. to noon: Activities for K-12 students including a Muddy Creek project demonstration; SMILE (Science and Math Investigative Learning Experiences);  StreamWebs; Art at Sea; and Storytime with Judy Li. Furman Hall.
  • 1-2 p.m.: Keynote speaker, Brownwyn Bevan of the University of Washington College of Education, who will deliver an interactive keynote presentation on makerspace research in the Learning Innovation Center, Room 100.
  • 2-5 p.m.: Activities for the OSU community, including an earthquake/tsunami activity station; an “interpret your research” competition for graduate students to demonstrate their dissertation or capstone projects through music, dance, painting or other art forms; and happy hour with Bevan. Furman Hall.
  • 5-9 p.m.: Activities for families and the community, including a COSIA activity station. Furman Hall.

Other activities include an arts and science geocaching quest throughout the OSU campus; panels to inspire women and girls to enter STEM fields, presented by the campus groups Women in Science and Women in Engineering; and a show focused on arts and science presented by the Corvallis Public Library. A full schedule of events is available online: http://www.corvallismakerfair.org/the-co-2017/sea-through-the-eyes-of-an-artist/.

At Saturday’s Maker Fair, attendees can talk to experts in the arts, crafts, technology, and sciences and leave with unique souvenirs such as Michael Boonstra’s laser-etched cedar selfies.

Visitors can also tie flies with OSU Fly Fishing, experience virtual reality gaming with Solid Fuel Studios, help build a Mars lander based on the actual Viking design plans with the Viking Mars Mission Preservation and Education Team, learn basic programming concepts with the OSU Open Source Lab, find out about the process of creating pigments with the Mobile Color Lab and more.

The Co. is organized by a team of OSU faculty, staff, and students and professionals from the Corvallis area. Sponsors and partners for the 2017 event include HP, Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, OSU College of Education, OSU College of Forestry, OSU Division of Outreach and Engagement, OSU College of Liberal Arts, OSU Libraries and Press, and SPARK.

Registration information, a complete schedule, exhibitor list and additional details about the events are available on the event website, www.corvallismakerfair.org.

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Charles Robinson, 541-737-6535, charles.robinson@oregonstate.edu

Healthy recipes and effective social marketing campaign improve eating habits

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Food Hero social marketing campaign is an effective way to help low-income families eat more nutritious meals through fast, tasty, affordable and healthy recipes, two new research studies from Oregon State University have found.

Food Hero was launched by the OSU Extension Service in 2009 in an effort to encourage healthy eating among low-income Oregonians. The initiative includes several components, such as a website, www.foodhero.org, with information in both English and Spanish; Food Hero recipe taste-tasting events in schools and communities across Oregon; and a library of healthy recipes that have all been taste-tested and many approved by children.

“The success of the program is by far exceeding the scope of what we envisioned when we started,” said Melinda Manore, a professor of nutrition in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at OSU and co-author of the studies. “Getting people to change their diet and eating behavior, especially when they do not have much money, is very difficult, and this program is helping to do that.”

The social marketing program is led by Lauren Tobey of Extension Family and Community Health at OSU, and Tobey is lead author of the studies. Food Hero is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – Education, or SNAP-Ed. SNAP-Ed focuses on obesity prevention within low-income households.

One of the new studies, published in the journal Nutrients, explores how Food Hero was developed and tested. The goal of the program is to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among those eligible for SNAP benefits in Oregon, with a particular focus on low-income mothers.

The campaign’s strategy includes providing clearly focused messages, writing in plain language, being positive and realistic with the messaging, and offering simple tools for action that include an explanation of what to do and how to do it. The campaign has been effective in part because educators stayed focused on their target audience, the researchers said.

The other study, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, examines Food Hero’s recipe project in more depth. The recipes used in the Food Hero campaign are formulated to be healthy, tasty and kid-friendly. To date, the Food Hero recipes have been accessed millions of times via the website and social media sites such as Pinterest.

“All of the recipes are simple to make and cost-effective for families on tight budgets,” Tobey said. “Many families can’t afford to have a recipe fail or try an untested recipe the family may not end up liking.”

The recipes also are being tested with children who complete surveys or participate in a vote. If at least 70 percent of participating children say they “like the taste” of a recipe, it is considered “kid-approved.” The program has collected more than 20,000 assessments from kids who have tried Food Hero recipes at school or at community events. About 36 percent of the tested recipes have received the “kid-approved” rating to date.

“When our nutrition educators say to the children, ‘Would you like to try this for us and tell us what you think?’ it empowers them,” Manore said. “It also is a way to expose kids to foods they may not have tried before.”

Parents and caregivers are also surveyed after their children participate in tasting exercises. Of those who completed surveys, 79 percent said their child talked about what they had learned in school about healthy eating; 69 percent reported that their child asked for specific recipes; and 72 percent reported making at least one Food Hero recipe, the research showed.

As Food Hero’s tips, tools and recipes get shared in person, online, through the media and via social media, the program’s reach also expands beyond the initial audience, the researchers said. Recipes from the program are now being used around the world, and in 2015, the recipes on the Food Hero website received more than 290,000 page views.

Anyone interested can also subscribe to Food Hero Monthly, an electronic magazine that includes recipes and tips. To sign up, visit https://foodhero.org/monthly-magazine.

In addition to their collaborations with Oregon partners such as the Department of Human Services, Department of Education and Oregon Health Authority, Food Hero program leaders are sharing materials and ideas with public health and SNAP-Ed programs in other states.

“Since 95 percent of the Food Hero recipes contain fruits and/or vegetables, people who try the recipes are helping us meet the primary goal of the campaign, which is to encourage more fruit and vegetable consumption, especially among low-income families,” Tobey said.

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Melinda Manore, 541-737-8701, Melinda.manore@oregonstate.edu; Lauren Tobey, 541-737-1017, lauren.tobey@oregonstate.edu

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Cowboy salad

Cowboy Salad

Magical fruit salad

Magical Fruit Salad

Southwestern stuffed potatoes

Southwestern Stuffed Potatoes

Entrants sought for healthy tailgate recipe contest; 5k fun run at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Recipes are now being sought for the 2016 GridIron Chef healthy tailgate recipe contest sponsored by the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health and the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University.

Contestants are encouraged to enter a favorite original recipe for a healthy snack, appetizer or other tailgate food in the annual contest. Entrants do not need to submit a prepared dish, only the recipe. The contest is open to anyone interested in participating, including alumni, students, staff, faculty and community members. The deadline is Oct. 24.

The top five recipes will be chosen by food experts and showcased at the College Tailgate and 5K GridIron Challenge fun run held Saturday, Nov. 19, at the Women’s Building, 160 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. For additional information and recipe contest submission guidelines, visit http://bit.ly/2dTkszg.

The finalists’ recipes also will have a nutrition analysis performed by the Moore Family Center and will be included on the Moore Family Center and College of Public Health and Human Sciences websites. Prizes will include Bob’s Red Mill prize packages, Beavers football tickets and gift cards.

The tailgate event will include food, drinks, adult beverages and samples of the finalists’ recipes. The winning recipe also will be available to taste outside Reser Stadium before that day’s football game.

Registration also is underway for the 5k GridIron Challenge fun run. The run, which starts at 9:45 a.m., includes football skills challenge stations. A 1k fun run for children will also be held at 9:30 a.m.

Entry is $35, or $30 for OSU faculty, staff, students and alumni, or $15 for children under 18, and includes admission to the GridIron Chef tailgate event, which begins at 10:15 a.m. For more information or to register, visit http://bit.ly/2dLmHEl. Proceeds from the run benefit OSU’s KidSpirit and Faculty Staff Fitness programs.

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Writer Eileen Pollack to speak at Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Writer Eileen Pollack, whose nonfiction book, “The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science is Still a Boys’ Club,” explores the challenges facing women in the sciences, will visit Oregon State University’s Corvallis campus Oct. 21 for a pair of talks about her fiction and nonfiction work.

Pollack will speak about “The Facts Behind the Fiction: Research and Creative Writing” at 4 p.m. in the Journey Room in the Memorial Union, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way.

Later that evening, she will speak about her 2015 book, “The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science is Still a Boys’ Club.” The talk begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library Rotunda, 201 S.W. Waldo Place. Both talks are free and open to the public. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow the evening event. 

“The Only Woman in the Room” explores the social, interpersonal and institutional barriers confronting women and minorities in the science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The book is based on Pollack’s own experience and six years of interviews with her former teachers and classmates, as well as dozens of other women who had dropped out before completing their degrees in science or found their careers less rewarding than they had hoped.

Pollack’s latest novel, “A Perfect Life,” was published in May. The book explores the moral complexities of scientific discovery and the sustaining nature of love in a novel about a young researcher at MIT who is obsessed with finding the genetic marker to a disease that threatens her family and future.

Her other books include “Breaking and Entering,” a New York Times Editor’s Choice selection, and “Paradise, New York.” Her work has appeared in “Best American Essays and “Best American Short Stories.”

Pollack is a professor on the faculty of the Helen Zell MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Michigan. She divides her time between Manhattan and Ann Arbor, Michigan. She earned her bachelor’s degree in physics at Yale University and later earned a master of fine arts from the University of Iowa.

Pollack’s visit is part of the 2016-17 Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writers Series and SPARK, a yearlong series of events celebrating the convergence of the arts and science.

Sponsors for this event include the OSU President’s Commission on the Status of Women; the College of Liberal Arts; the School of Writing, Literature, and Film; OSU Libraries and Press; Oregon State ADVANCE, a National Science Foundation grant-funded program aimed at increasing the participation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

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Eileen Pollack

Eileen Pollack

The Only Woman in the Room

The Only Woman in the Room

A Perfect Life

A Perfect Life

Tours available on OSU research vessel to dock in Portland at end of STEM cruise

NEWPORT, Ore. – For three days this week, Oregon high school students and teachers are joining scientists at Oregon State University aboard the research vessel Oceanus to gain at-sea research experience off the Oregon coast as part of a project to enhance their STEM, or science, technology, engineering and math skills.

This Friday, the young scientists and their professional partners will journey up the Columbia River aboard the R/V Oceanus and dock at Riverplace Marina in Portland, where they will spend the weekend doing a series of activities, including tours for K-12 students and the public.

The public tours will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17. Space is limited and advance registration is required. For more information or to register for a tour, visit: http://bit.ly/2bTKyQ0.

The project is a collaborative effort from Oregon Sea Grant and the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, which serves educators, students and communities along the Oregon coast and is located at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. The students and high school teachers participating in the cruise are from Bandon, North Bend, Waldport, Newport and Warrenton.

“This is an opportunity for Oregon high school students and teachers to work with marine researchers and really dig into investigative scientific methods,” said Tracy Crews, marine education manager for Oregon Sea Grant. “It also provides an opportunity for graduate students to work as mentors with these young students alongside top scientists addressing some very real issues facing our oceans.”

Leigh Torres, a principal investigator with OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute, will serve as chief scientist on the cruise, which will include line transect surveys for marine mammals and seabirds off the Oregon coast.

“We will record where and when we observe different species assemblages of marine mammals and seabirds off the Oregon coast, and link this data with habitat and prey data collected during the cruise,” Torres said. “This will demonstrate the patchiness of ocean resources and how species are distributed differently relative to their particular needs.”

“We’re really hoping that this hands-on experience will trigger interest in STEM and enthusiasm for working on environmental challenges,” added Stacia Fletcher, director for the Oregon Coast STEM Hub.

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Tracy Crews, 541-867-0329, tracy.crews@oregonstate.edu

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Research vessel Oceanus; photos by Pat Kight

R/V Oceanus

Oceanus004PK

Spring town hall to be held May 4 at Oregon State University

A Spring Term town hall meeting will be held from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4, at Oregon State University in the Memorial Union Horizon Room.

Oregon State University is committed to hosting town halls each quarter as part of an ongoing discussion on equity, inclusion, and civil and social justice at OSU. Last term’s event was hosted by President Ray and Interim Chief Diversity Officer Angela Batista. More than 150 OSU community members attended the inaugural town hall and many more community members participated through the online live-stream.

During the spring town hall, a team of students, faculty and staff led by Jennifer Dennis, Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School, will provide an update on the development of an online social justice training module for all entering OSU students and gather feedback on training content.

Town hall attendees will have the opportunity to communicate concerns, feedback and suggestions about the online training plan within small discussion groups. This feedback will directly inform further development of the training, which is scheduled for implementation in the Fall 2016. For those unable to attend the town hall, an opportunity to provide feedback online will be provided following the event.

During the second half of the town hall, there will be time for open questions and comments by community members about other topics and issues.

The town hall will be streamed live at http://live.oregonstate.edu. No online chat services will be provided. For accommodations related to disability please contact diversity@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-1063.

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Angela Batista, 541-737-5936; angela.batista@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State Ecampus launches podcast on research literacy in higher education

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s top-rated online education program has launched a weekly podcast, “Research in Action,” to address topics and issues facing researchers across the nation.

“Research in Action” features interviews with experts across a range of disciplines who share their expertise on qualitative, quantitative and mixed research methods. Guests also discuss their personal experiences as researchers; research and writing practices; organizational and productivity strategies; and more. 

“The goal of the podcast is to do two things – increase research literacy and build community among researchers,” said Katie Linder, podcast host and research director at Oregon State Ecampus, a national leader in online education.

“Many episodes are focused on helping people understand a particular method or kind of role a researcher might have, while other episodes are meant to break researchers out of isolation and allow them to continue training in new methods or try new skills.” 

With more than 40 undergraduate and graduate degrees, OSU Ecampus is currently ranked seventh out of nearly 300 higher education institutions in the category of Best Online Bachelor’s Programs by U.S. News and World Report.

Available on iTunes, SoundCloud and Stitcher, the “Research in Action” podcast features occasional solo episodes with Linder that focus on practical topics, such as organizing research and juggling multiple projects, and are designed for listeners to reflect on their own experiences. 

The podcast is primarily designed for those conducting research in higher education, those who teach research methods and for undergraduate and graduate students who are considering a career involving research. However, with a variety of both broad and niche topics, the podcast also offers value for anyone with a desire to learn more about the scientific process and research conducted at universities.

“We are here to provide practical advice that people could put into practice immediately to impact their research,” Linder said. “My hope is that anyone who has an interest in learning more, or engaging with those who are conducting research in higher education will listen because there is a little bit of something for everyone.” 

In addition to featuring guests from across the country, the podcast is uniquely positioned to engage with OSU experts conducting research around the world through Oregon State’s land, sea, sun and space grant status.

“No researcher has all of the skills or expertise, and it’s incredibly valuable to have researchers come in with a diverse range of experiences and talk about these niche areas,” Linder said. 

The podcast features a dynamic website, which includes audio downloads, episode transcriptions, show notes and resources, an episode guide and more.

Listeners can engage with the podcast via email, on Twitter, through the comments and suggestions boxes, and by calling in to the voicemail line. 

“Research in Action” has already published four episodes and has received more than 500 downloads. Over a dozen guests have been pre-recorded and more than 10 episodes are in production.

Upcoming “Research in Action” episodes include: 

  • Jim Kroll, Office of the Inspector General, National Science Foundation, discussing research misconduct.
  • Nina Huntemann, researcher at edX, learning new research skills at mid-career.
  • Joshua Weller, psychology researcher from OSU, discussing psychometrics.
Media Contact: 

Heather Turner, 541-737-3297, heather.turner@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Katie Linder, 541-737-4629, kathryn.linder@oregonstate.edu

OSU 4-H to induct four honorees into Hall of Fame

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Extension Service's 4-H youth development program will induct four longtime volunteer leaders or retired staff into its Hall of Fame on Wednesday, Dec. 9.

This year's inductees are Mary Mosier of Coburg, Barbara Sawer of Corvallis, Sherri Jensen of Yamhill, and Sue Weinbrecht of Lebanon. They will be honored at a ceremony during the OSU Extension Annual Conference in Corvallis.

“It is such an honor to recognize these four individuals who have made such an imprint on the Oregon 4-H program,” said Pamela Rose, state 4-H youth development program leader. “We are grateful for their service and incredible contributions to improving 4-H for so many young people.”

The Oregon 4-H Hall of Fame was established in 2004 to recognize people who have made a significant impact on the Oregon 4-H program.

Mosier has contributed to Oregon 4-H for more than 20 years as a leader in Lane County and in many roles at the state level. As a superintendent and clerk in the 4-H/FFA youth program at the Lane County Fair, she coordinated the fiber arts and clothing exhibits and competitions, as well as the fashion review and food contests.

Mosier served on the state’s 4-H Home Economics Development Committee from 2001-2009 and helped revise the state’s sewing and clothing program. She was also involved in modernizing the crocheting and knitting projects to include current trends like loom knitting and felting. For 10 years, she taught 4-H leaders in home economics. Mosier, who grew up participating in 4-H in Kansas, has served as chair of the food and nutrition exhibit at the Oregon State Fair and was a member of the fair’s board of trustees.

Sawer was involved in 4-H for 10 years as a youth in Kansas and translated that experience to a 21-year career as a state 4-H specialist with OSU’s Extension Service, making significant contributions in leadership and winning numerous awards that include the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents Distinguished Service Award. She helped run the Oregon State Fair 4-H program and Oregon 4-H Summer Week, which drew more than 1,000 kids.

During her time with OSU, Sawer became heavily involved in the Oregon 4-H Latino Outreach project as an expert in the design of culturally responsive approaches to program evaluation. She also had a significant impact on the Judges Are Teachers, Too initiative and Parents and Adolescents Can Talk program.

For 29 years, Jensen has dedicated many hours as a 4-H leader in Yamhill County, primarily in the horse club Saddle Dusters, which she founded, but also in leadership, veterinary science and horticulture. A former 5-year Yamhill County 4-H member, Jensen served as president and secretary of the county’s 4-H Horse Leaders. She is a member of the county’s 4-H Advisory Board and state’s Horse Development Committee. For most of her time as a leader, Jensen acted as Yamhill County Fair superintendent. Her extensive volunteer work was recognized with the Yamhill County 4-H Distinguished Service Award and Horse Leader of the Year.

Weinbrecht, a lifelong 4-H volunteer, continues a tradition that stretches back two generations. For 43 years, she has mentored youth in projects such as rabbits, clothing, photography and food as a leader in Oregon, Utah, Washington, Maryland, Iowa and Idaho. She’s chaired a three-state 4-H conference and co-chaired the North Central Regional 4-H Leaders Conference that encompasses 17 states.

In Linn County, Weinbrecht took on the responsibility of county fair photography superintendent, which she’s done since 2002. She serves as president of the 4-H Leader’s Association Executive Council. In 2011, she was awarded the Linn County 4-H Outstanding Leader Award.

4-H is the largest out-of-school youth development program nationwide. The OSU Extension Service oversees Oregon's 4-H program, which reached nearly 94,000 youth in kindergarten through 12th grade via a network of 10,410 volunteers in 2014. Activities focus on areas like healthy living, civic engagement and science. Learn more about 4-H on this OSU website.

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Pamela Rose, 541-737-4628, Pamela.rose@oregonstate.edu

White House commends OSU's educational outreach to Hispanic youth

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The White House today recognized Oregon State University for its efforts to provide underserved Hispanic students with educational opportunities.

OSU's Fiestas, Tech Wizards, Juntos and 4-H Oregon Leadership Institute programs each received a Bright Spot in Hispanic Education award during a press conference in Washington, D.C. OSU joins more than 230 other programs that received the award.

“There has been notable progress in Hispanic educational achievement, and it is due to the efforts of these Bright Spots in Hispanic Education, programs and organizations working throughout the country to help Hispanic students reach their full potential," Alejandra Ceja, executive director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics.

“It is a distinct honor to be recognized for our innovative programs reaching Hispanic audiences,” said Scott Reed, OSU's vice provost for outreach and engagement and director of the OSU Extension Service. “Each of the four projects recognized meets a specific need within a growing and important population in our state. Much additional work is needed, and we will continue to invest in the success of all of our state’s residents.”

OSU's 4-H Oregon Leadership Institute empowers Oregon high school students to pursue a post-secondary education and professional career. At workshops, they write essays and complete college applications; learn about college requirements and possible majors; discuss current events; and find out about the value of networking. They also develop leadership skills serving as camp counselors and role models for younger 4-H youth at international summer camps.

At Lincoln and Garfield elementary schools in Corvallis, OSU's Fiestas program aims to increase knowledge and interest in science, technology, engineering and math for students in grades 3-5. Launched in 2011, the program is a joint project of 4-H, OSU’s College of Education and the Science and Math Investigative Learning Experiences program.

“The Fiestas program has been instrumental in providing a rich educational experience at two of our highest-needs schools," said Ana Lucia Fonseca, OSU's 4-H Latino outreach coordinator.

Launched in Washington County in 1998, the bilingual, afterschool Tech Wizards program teaches science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) to low-income students, particularly Latinos, in grades 9-12 who are considered at risk of dropping out of school. Students in the program learn to create websites, produce videos and podcasts, make computerized maps and build robots. They are also required to perform 30 hours of community service each year in STEM-related fields.

The program has been replicated in more than 100 counties in more than 20 states. In Oregon, about 1,000 students have participated in the program. About 95 percent have graduated from high school, and about 70 percent of those have pursued more education in science, technology, engineering or math.

Juntos, which means “together" in Spanish, is a college-readiness program for first-generation college students and their families. Originally developed by North Carolina State University, Juntos was launched in Madras in 2012 by the Jefferson County school district and OSU. The Juntos program, taught in English and Spanish, connects participants with success coaches and college-age mentors who facilitate weekly afterschool clubs and activities. Besides Madras, Juntos is also offered in Culver, Tillamook, Sisters, Warm Springs, McMinnville, The Dalles, Hood River, Mosier, Corvallis, Redmond, Hillsboro, Newport and Dayton. 

The White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics was established in 1990 to address the educational disparities faced by the Hispanic community. To learn more about it and to view the award recipients, visit the initiative’s website.

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Ana Lucia Fonseca, 541-766-6249, analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu

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Ana Lucia Fonseca helps students during a class of Fiestas. Photo by Stephen Ward.
 Fiestas program

Media advisory: Oregon State wildfire experts

MEDIA ADVISORY

The following Oregon State University faculty members have expertise related to wildfire issues and are willing to speak with journalists. Their specific expertise, and contact information, is listed below.  For help with other OSU faculty experts, contact Mark Floyd, 541-737-0788, mark.floyd@oregonstate.edu.

OSU wildfire experts

John Bailey, 541-737-1497, john.bailey@oregonstate.edu

Bailey studies the role of forest management in accomplishing landowner objectives, including fire resilience, habitat and restoration. His areas of expertise include:

  • Fuels management for fire risk reduction
  • Wildland fire ecology
  • Prescribed fire

Stephen Fitzgerald, 541-737-3562, stephen.fitzgerald@oregonstate.edu

Amy Jo Detweiler, 541-548-6088, amyjo.detweiler@oregonstate.edu

Detweiler and Fitzgerald are faculty members in the OSU Extension Service and co-authors of a publication, Fire-Resistant Plants for Home Landscapes, published in 2006 and due to be updated next year. They can discuss ways for homeowners to reduce fire risk to their homes.

  • Types of shrubs and trees that are less likely to burn
  • Maintenance tips for fire resistant plantings
  • Bark mulches and other ground covers
  • Fuel reduction around homes

 

Beverly Law, 541-737-6111, bev.law@oregonstate.edu

Law is a professor in the OSU Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society and former Science Chair of the Ameriflux network. She studies carbon and water cycling in ecosystems and exchange with the atmosphere, including the forests of the Pacific Northwest. She has focused on, among other topics, the role of fire in the carbon cycle. She can comment on:

  • Modeling ecosystem responses to disturbances such as fire and insects
  • The effects of climate change, fire and forest management on carbon and water cycles
  • The combination of remote sensing and field observations to understand regional ecosystem processes

 

Claire Montgomery, 541-737-1362, claire.montgomery@oregonstate.edu

Montgomery studies the economic implications of fire management decisions, from the initial determination whether to let a fire burn or to put it out. She can address the likely impacts of fire management decisions on the value of timber and other forest resources in the future.

  • Incentives for cost-effective wildland fire management
  • Community considerations of forest fuel treatments
  • The opportunity costs of fire suppression

 

Roger Hammer, 541-760-1009, rhammer@oregonstate.edu

Hammer is a professor in the School of Public Policy and studies the interface between communities and undeveloped lands such as forests. He studies strategies to mitigate fire risk in the face of urban development. He can comment on:

  • U.S. demographic trends at the urban-wildland interface
  • Fire risk and development at the urban-wildland interface
  • New construction after a fire

Kathie Dello, 541-737-8927, kdello@coas.oregonstate.edu

Dello is the deputy director of the Oregon Climate Service and associate director of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute. She studies Pacific Northwest weather patterns and compiles reports for use by businesses and government agencies. She can comment on weather patterns as they influence fire risk, including:

  • Long-term trends in Pacific Northwest weather
  • The impact of landscape features (mountains, forests) on weather
  • Weather data collection by citizens

 

Compiled by Nick Houtman

541-737-0783, nick.houtman@oregonstate.edu

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Nick Houtman, 541-737-0783