OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

outreach and engagement

Parenting classes benefit all, especially lower-income families

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Parenting education can improve the skills of every mom and dad and the behavior of all children, and it particularly benefits families from low-income or otherwise underserved populations, a new study from Oregon State University suggests.

Researchers examined a sample of more than 2,300 mothers and fathers who participated in parenting education series in the Pacific Northwest between 2010 and 2012. The series, designed to support parents of children up to 6 years old, typically lasted nine to 12 weeks and consisted of one one-hour session per week led by a parent education facilitator. There was no fee for participants. 

The study, part of a growing partnership between the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences and the Oregon Parenting Education Collaborative to increase access to parenting education for all families, may remove some of the stigma attached to parenting education, which has historically been associated with court orders for parents who’ve run afoul of child-protective laws.

“Parenting education works across the board,” said John Geldhof, an OSU assistant professor of behavioral and health sciences. “All parents can benefit. The way people typically learn parenting is from their parents and from books, and often times what they’ve learned is out of date and not the best practices for today. All parents – high income, low income, mandated, not mandated – can benefit from evidence-based parenting education.”

Neglectful or otherwise ineffective parenting strategies, which can be heightened by economic strain, can put children in jeopardy. While many parenting practices can lead to favorable outcomes in children, research indicates that the optimal combination usually features high levels of support and monitoring and the avoidance of harsh punishment. Those positive outcomes include higher grades, fewer behavior problems, less substance use, better mental health and greater social competence.

Findings of the OSU research, recently published in Children and Youth Services Review, indicate that parent education series serving predominantly lower-income parents resulted in greater improvements in their skills and their children’s behaviors compared to series serving higher-income parents.

“The results provide preliminary evidence that parenting education may be most effective when it targets underserved populations,” said lead author Jennifer Finders, a graduate student in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. “Another thing that’s exciting - the Oregon Parenting Education Collaborative classes that are offered are general in content, and we’re seeing evidence that they’re being adapted for diverse families. This suggests that the local parenting educators are implementing the programs with fidelity and also with flexibility.”

Finders called the results “really great preliminary findings.”

“Now we need to better understand the mechanisms that underlie the findings so we can tailor programs to specific families in exciting ways for research and for practice,” she said. “This highlights the need for future research that continues to involve the Oregon Parenting Education Collaborative and other researchers at OSU and elsewhere. We think parents are gaining knowledge of child development, tools for dealing with the stresses of parenting, and social networks.”

The collaborative includes among its leadership Shauna Tominey, assistant professor of practice and parenting education specialist at OSU’s Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, part of the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. The parenting education series the collaborative offers are delivered at no cost to the parents.

“Given that the gap is widening between the white, middle-class population of children and children belonging to the growing low-income and Latino populations, examining the relative impact of parenting education programs across these diverse populations is essential,” Finders said. “We think parenting education can have the greatest impact by adapting existing curricula to be culturally relevant and sensitive to diverse children and families’ needs.”

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

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John Geldhof, Ph.D.

John Geldhof

OSU overall enrollment up 2.9 percent, Corvallis campus increases less than 1 percent

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Fall term 2016 enrollment at Oregon State University grew 2.9 percent from last year, as stable enrollment continued at OSU’s Corvallis campus and double-digit growth continued at the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend and within OSU’s nationally ranked Ecampus online degree program.

Oregon State’s overall fall enrollment is 31,303 – up 852 students from 2015 – making OSU the largest university in the state of Oregon for the third consecutive year.

Oregon State’s fall enrollment includes:

  • 24,672 students at the university’s main campus in Corvallis, an increase from fall 2015 of 205 students or 0.8 percent;
  • 5,682 students in Ecampus, an increase of 573 students or 11.2 percent over last year; and
  • 1,122 students at OSU-Cascades, an increase of 106 students or 10.4 percent more than a year ago.

“As Oregon’s statewide university, we are committed to serve all qualified Oregonians,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “This year, 74.2 percent of our degree-seeking undergraduates on our Corvallis campus are Oregon residents.

“We serve as the ‘people’s university’ of the state of Oregon by offering diverse, high-quality academic programs at our campuses in Corvallis, Bend and Newport, and through top-ranked online degree programs. We are seeing students literally choose where, how and when it is best for them to learn. Each year, more students choose Oregon State as their destination of choice.”

Oregon State continues to attract high-achieving students. Among first-time college students from Oregon high schools, 47 percent of OSU’s freshmen class are considered high-achievers – having graduated from high school with a cumulative grade point of 3.75 or higher.

As well, of OSU’s new students:

  • 21 had perfect SAT mathematics scores and 11 had perfect SAT verbal scores, compared with 17 and 8 students, respectively, in 2015.
  • Five are National Merit award winners, compared with four a year ago.
  • 225 – or 3.8 percent of Oregon State’s new undergraduates – were ranked number 1 in their high school graduating class, compared with 156 students in 2015.
  • 78 are Presidential Scholars – 20 more than a year ago.
  • 358 entered the university’s Honors College, compared with 265 in 2015;

“Oregon State is achieving excellence through inclusivity,” Ray said. “Twenty-five percent of this year’s entering Honors College students come from diverse backgrounds. I also am pleased with the continued growth of U.S. minority and first-generation students in Oregon State’s overall enrollment. And that 3.2 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment – 956 students – are veterans of U.S. military service.

This fall, OSU has enrolled 7,204 students representing U.S. minorities – an increase of 450 students or 6.7 percent over a year ago. In total, 23.7 percent of the students attending Oregon State in Corvallis or within Ecampus identify themselves as a U.S. minority, compared with 2,806 students and 14.5 percent a decade ago in fall of 2006.

Twenty-three percent – or 5,858 OSU undergraduates in Corvallis or within Ecampus – are first-generation students, an increase of nearly 1 percent over a year ago. At OSU-Cascades, first-generation students make up 35.4 percent of the enrollment.

“As a first-generation college student myself, these students are near-and-dear to my heart,” Ray said. “Increasing the enrollment of people of diversity, students from low-income families, and first-generation students by providing access to an excellent higher education and a college degree is essential for all Oregonians.”

OSU also continues to expand its global reach as an internationally recognized public research university. This fall, international student enrollment increased by 201 students to a total of 3,529 students or 11.6 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment. International students from 110 countries attend Oregon State this fall. A decade ago, OSU enrolled 897 international students – or 4.6 percent of its overall enrollment.

“We live and work in a global society,” Ray said. “It is essential that universities such as Oregon State bring people worldwide together to learn, pursue research and engage as a community.”

Oregon State’s commitment to graduate studies and graduate student engagement in research is evident in this year’s enrollment. Overall, the number of graduate students, including professional students in OSU’s colleges of pharmacy and veterinary medicine, increased by 1.3 percent this fall to total 5,027 students, compared with 4,964 students in 2015. 

Steve Clark, OSU’s vice president for University Relations and Marketing, said Oregon State intentionally manages its enrollment to achieve the university’s land grant mission; support the state of Oregon’s educational attainment goals; operate in a financially sustainable manner; and be a good neighbor in Corvallis, Bend and Newport.

“We manage enrollment very mindfully,” Clark said. “For example, we have promised to slow the growth of our Corvallis campus and not grow above 28,000 students by 2025 by limiting enrollment growth to 1-2 percent each year. We are doing so intentionally and with good results. The past three years, our enrollment growth has been well below 1 percent and with such a trend, OSU’s Corvallis campus may not reach 28,000 students until sometime in the early 2030s.”

“In Bend, we have committed to limit our new OSU-Cascades campus to between 3,000 to 5,000 students by 2025, and in Newport, to between 400 to 500 students. At the same time, we will provide higher education where students live and work by enrolling more distance online students through Ecampus,” Clark said.

At OSU-Cascades, 92.2 percent of the enrollment is composed of Oregonians, including 205 students who are U.S. minorities – a 17 percent increase from 2015 – and 323 are first-generation students – a 7.7 percent increase from a year ago. Overall, OSU-Cascades’ enrollment includes 912 undergraduate and 210 graduate students. Freshmen enrollment at the new campus, which opened in September, increased 17.7 percent from 2015.

More students are studying engineering than any other discipline. The College of Engineering has a total of 8,724 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled this fall. The next largest programs are the College of Liberal Arts, 4,178 students; the College of Business, 3,726; the College of Science, 3,503; the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, 3,009; and the College of Agricultural Sciences, 2,580.

Enrollment in other colleges and programs includes: College of Forestry, 1,093, University Exploratory Studies, 1,081; Graduate School, 830; College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, 739; College of Pharmacy, 370; College of Education, 300; and College of Veterinary Medicine, 221.

Oregon State’s Honors College enrolls 4.2 percent of all undergraduates with a total of 1,057 students – a 3.6 percent increase over 2015.

The most popular undergraduate majors at OSU are computer science, followed by business administration, mechanical engineering, kinesiology and biology.

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-4875

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Robotics program expanding
Robotics program expanding

OSU Ecampus named nation’s best value in online education

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s distance education program has been named the nation’s best online college in terms of value by ValueColleges.com, an organization that provides in-depth analysis and rankings on affordability and quality in higher education.

Oregon State Ecampus ranks first on a list of the Top 50 Best Value Online Colleges for 2017. The rankings assess online bachelor’s programs based on tuition costs, reputability, and return on investment using data from the website Payscale.com.

In its evaluation, the organization noted that Ecampus delivers the most online undergraduate major and minor programs in Oregon, and that OSU is a leader in STEM research and boasts the Carnegie Foundation’s highest research activity classification.

“This ranking speaks to our mission to provide learners with access to a high-quality Oregon State education,” said Ecampus Executive Director Lisa L. Templeton. “The value comes in the form of highly engaging programs that give our students opportunities for career advancement.”

All Ecampus students pay the same tuition rate no matter where they live. Ecampus serves adult learners in all 50 states and more than 40 countries by delivering 21 undergraduate degrees and 27 graduate programs online.

During the 2015-16 academic year, more than 19,000 OSU students took at least one Ecampus class.

Oregon State has developed a reputation as a leader in online education, having been ranked in the top 10 by U.S. News & World Report each of the past two years. In 2014, Ecampus won the Online Learning Consortium’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Development for Online Teaching – one of the industry’s most prestigious awards.

Media Contact: 

Tyler Hansen, 520-312-1276

Source: 

Lisa L. Templeton, 541-737-1279

lisa.l.templeton@oregonstate.edu

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Ecampus graduate
Ecampus graduate

OSU adaptation of free biology textbook may annually save students $100K

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University is increasing its efforts to make college more affordable for its students, particularly through the use of free, open access, online textbooks and other essential course materials.

The initiatives should reduce student costs, enhance graduation rates, increase flexibility and allow the use of innovative and interactive online instruction techniques. 

The latest example was begun this month with an award of $30,000 by the state of Oregon for an open textbook project.

With this support, OSU faculty will collaborate with those from other state institutions to adapt a biology textbook that now will be freely accessible to OSU students and learners worldwide.

It is estimated the textbook, being adapted by Lindsay Biga and Devon Quick, instructors in Oregon State’s Department of Integrative Biology, will eliminate $100,000 in OSU student spending each year. It’s one of 16 open online textbooks already in use by OSU students or in production by OSU faculty.

“Oregon State is proactively developing and adapting open textbooks on students’ behalf because the cost savings are tremendous,” said Dianna Fisher, who coordinated the grant application effort as director of Open Oregon State.

“Research shows that textbook costs are a primary roadblock to degree completion. The more affordable we can make course materials, the more likely students are to graduate.”

The findings of a study released earlier this year by the U.S. Public Interest Research Groups show that America’s 5.2 million undergraduate students spend $3 billion of their financial aid on textbooks every year. In a 2013 study by the same group, 65 percent of students who responded to the survey said they decided against buying a textbook because it was too expensive.

Oregon State’s attempts to stem the tide include open books that are being used or developed in a variety of subject areas, including business, plant science, oceanography, hydrology and computer science.

The grant for the biology textbook was awarded by the state’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission as part of its Open Educational Resources (OER) Grant Program. Open Oregon State, which works with faculty to create OER, will provide some matching funds.

At OSU, the textbook will be used for a biology course sequence on human anatomy and physiology. Biga, Quick and the other faculty partners will work to illustrate course concepts through interactive animations so students can visualize molecular, cellular and organismal processes and improve their content knowledge and retention.

The textbook to be adapted is “Anatomy and Physiology” by publisher OpenStax College. The modifications to the anatomy and physiology book will be completed by next summer in time for students to use it fall term 2017.

The project is expected to involve faculty from the University of Oregon, Western Oregon University, Portland State University, and Linn-Benton, Lane and Portland community colleges. 

“To me, open textbooks are about flexibility, access and interactivity,” Biga said. “Through this grant program, we have the opportunity to invest time and resources into customizing a resource to fit the schedule and curricular needs of our courses and provide free digital access to every enrolled student.”

Open textbooks are just one facet of OSU’s efforts to make learning opportunities freely accessible to learners. In May, more than 15,800 learners worldwide enrolled in a massive open online course, or MOOC, on permaculture. It was the first MOOC to be developed in-house at OSU, and will be offered again this fall. Due to its far-reaching success, instructor Andrew Millison plans to convert all course materials into an open textbook.

Media Contact: 

Tyler Hansen, 520-312-1276

Source: 

Dianna Fisher, 541-737-8658

dianna.fisher@oregonstate.edu

Personalized learning systems to boost education of college students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University is beginning a new three-year, $515,000 initiative that will use interactive computer software to help improve the learning and knowledge retention of college students, especially to overcome the hurdles of highly complex mathematics and science.

The project is part of a major national program announced today by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. It will offer some alternatives to the traditional classroom concept of lecture, textbook, and “everyone moves along at the same speed” – an approach that in some courses is largely failing across the United States.

New technologies, interactive learning systems and short quizzes can help ensure a student understands the material being studied, as they move ahead. If they are confused or still struggling to learn the subject, the software system will help identify the problem, allow them to back up, go through things again, and provide additional support and knowledge until they do understand.

If a student just needs more basic information, they can get it. If they need a contextual explanation, that will be available as well.

“We’re facing a societal problem in a range of educational approaches, especially where class sizes are large and there’s less individual assistance,” said Julie Greenwood, associate dean for undergraduate studies at OSU and project manager of this new grant.

“For instance, almost all students have to take college algebra, and in some cases the failure rate can approach 50 percent. We believe that modern computer software can help address this problem, especially in math and the sciences, but also in liberal arts, social sciences and almost any field of study. We’re really optimistic this is going to be a success.”

Other collaborators in this program include Arizona State University, Colorado State University, Georgia State University, Northern Arizona University, Portland State University and the University of Mississippi.

OSU educators, Greenwood said, will help students work with existing software systems, find out which seems to work best or fit with the university’s culture and approach to learning, and which approaches are most appropriate for different disciplines.

University officials say this project, called “All Hands on Deck,” is an embrace of a new trend toward “adaptive,” or personalized learning approaches. They believe it can improve both the rate of first-year student retention and the university’s six-year graduation rate. It will initially be used in eight high-enrollment, general education courses, in such fields as mathematics, biology and psychology.

“This national grant will kick-start our efforts to move more aggressively toward personalized learning,” said David King, special assistant to the provost for learning innovation at OSU. “The initiative will also provide our faculty with insight and information on a learner-by-learner basis, and give them the opportunity to develop more individual and unique student-teacher relationships.”

OSU has been a national leader in new educational approaches and innovations, especially through its widely-recognized program of extended online education, or E-campus, and more recently through construction of a $65 million Learning Innovation Center to conduct research on new approaches to collaborative learning and education.

The most promising findings and practices emerging from this initiative will be shared among 200 public university members across the country, officials said, to better meet the general educational needs of today’s undergraduate college students.

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Julie Greenwood, 541-737-1190

Julie.greenwood@oregonstate.edu

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OSU online bachelor’s programs ranked top 10 nationally by U.S. News

CORVALLIS, Ore. - For the second straight year Oregon State University has been ranked in the top 10 nationally for online education by U.S. News & World Report, according to the 2016 rankings released today. 

Oregon State Ecampus, the university's online education division, is ranked seventh out of nearly 300 higher education institutions in the category of Best Online Bachelor’s Programs. Among land grant universities on the list, OSU is third.

The full rankings are available online at http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education

“Oregon State’s land grant mission calls us to provide educational opportunities to people throughout Oregon and beyond, and Ecampus continues to excel in that endeavor,” OSU President Ed Ray said. “With more than 600 faculty partners and 10 academic colleges offering degrees online, this national honor is shared by all of OSU.”

Oregon State scored 93 points out of 100 in the rankings. Schools were assessed based on student engagement; faculty credentials and training; student services and technology; and peer reputation.

Ecampus delivers 20 bachelor’s programs online, including an undergraduate degree in business administration that launched last fall and already has admitted more than 130 students. An additional 23 OSU graduate degree and certificate programs are offered online.

In the 2014-15 academic year, nearly 17,500 Oregon State students took at least one Ecampus class. That number is expected to approach 20,000 this year, with OSU’s distance learners in all 50 states and more than 40 countries.

“Providing an Oregon State education online helps the university serve a wider range of students and gives our learners the ability to advance their careers without uprooting their lives,” said Ecampus Executive Director Lisa L. Templeton. “We view this ranking as validation of OSU’s tireless efforts to develop high-quality learning experiences for students everywhere.”

Media Contact: 

Tyler Hansen, 520-312-1276

Source: 

Lisa L. Templeton, 541-737-1279

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OSU opens research unit for online teaching, learning

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University is increasing its commitment to online education with a new research unit to focus on online teaching and learning at OSU and across the nation.

The OSU Extended Campus Research Unit is designed to create an accessible and inclusive online learning environment for these types of programs. Last month it received its first national grant and named eight OSU faculty members as its inaugural research fellows.

“At this stage in higher education, research about online education still has a lot of gaps,” said Extended Campus research director Katie Linder. “There are many questions remaining about different technologies and how they impact student learning. The goal of these new initiatives is to ignite some excitement among faculty in a more collaborative fashion and answer those questions.”

The research unit builds on Oregon State’s reputation as a national leader in online education. OSU Ecampus is ranked fifth nationally for online bachelor’s programs by U.S. News & World Report, and delivers more than 40 programs at a distance.

But Internet-based learning is still in its infancy compared to brick-and-mortar education, and Extended Campus executive director Lisa L. Templeton sees this as an opportunity for the university to perfect its online delivery methods.

“Oregon State is in a position to build a robust research pipeline that ultimately will improve the access and quality of online teaching and learning for our adult learners,” Templeton said. “It will allow the university to expand its reach even further and give students more opportunities to succeed.”

The research unit has received a grant from The National Research Center for Distance Education and Technological Advancement. It’s a joint endeavor with other universities to investigate college students’ experience with video captions and determine the impact of captioning use on student learning in a college-level, fully online environment.

The Extended Campus Research Fellows Program funded five research projects that will be conducted by eight OSU faculty and staff members in 2016-17. They include:

  • Mary Nolan and Brenda Kellar (College of Liberal Arts): “Community in an Online Anthropology Program: Friend or Faux?”
  • Ping-Hung Hsieh, Xiaohui Chang and Andrew Olstad (College of Business): “Early Detection of Placement for Success in an Online Quantitative Class” 
  • Karen Thompson (College of Education): “Analyzing Learning in a Massive Open Online Course for Teachers”
  • Kathy Becker Blease (College of Liberal Arts): “Modules to Teach Scientific Literacy in Ecampus Introductory Psychology Classes” 
  • Stephanie Jenkins (College of Liberal Arts): “Evaluating the Impact of Engaged Philosophy in the Online Classroom” 
Media Contact: 

Tyler Hansen, 520-312-1276

Source: 

Katie Linder, 541-737-4269

OSU Libraries forms sister relationship with Nigerian university library

CORVALLIS, Ore. -  Oregon State University Libraries has forged a connection with a university library in Nigeria that will make it one of only a small group of existing “sister” university library relationships.

The collaboration will take place with the Federal University of Agriculture’s Nimbe Adedipe Library, in Abeokuta, Nigeria. It will establish an ongoing collaboration between librarians and staff at both universities, including exchange of library staff, joint research activities, participation in virtual seminars and academic meetings, and the exchange of library materials and other information.

“There are many benefits for OSU Libraries to seek out an international sister library relationship,” said OSU librarian Laurie Bridges, the coordinator of the OSU side of the project. “It helps raise awareness of issues and needs facing libraries internationally, it helps us share techniques and technologies to solve problems, and it increases the information, resources, and expertise between both libraries. It also increases the diversity of interaction between professionals.”

Bridges said the initiative also meets one of Oregon State’s strategic goals, which is promoting international education, research and engagement.

The Federal University of Agriculture is a public university in Nigeria consisting of nine colleges, with about 60 percent of majors focused on agriculture. It has about 19,000 students.

"Myself and my colleagues are most excited about networking with our new friends and colleagues from Oregon State University Libraries," said Fehintola Nike Onifade, a librarian from Nigeria. "This will help us to track trends and keep up with changes in librarianship and information science. In fact we are hoping that the relationship will lead us to best practices in library and information science service delivery."

OSU officials have signed a formal letter of understanding with FUA, formalizing the relationship between the two universities. A small group will be formed within the library to start working on outreach and exchange possibilities with FUA. 

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Laurie Bridges, 541-737-8821

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OSU’s statewide programs meet more needs with legislature’s support

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s three statewide public service programs received a boost from the Oregon legislature with $14 million additional funds to support up to 40 new positions and stimulate new research and extension projects across the state.

The new funding package increases the programs’ base budget to $118 million for the biennium. Of that increased funding, $6 million will go to OSU’s Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station; $4.5 million to the OSU Extension Service; and $3.5 million to OSU’s Oregon Forest Research Laboratory.

“Oregonians everywhere in the state will see benefits from these expanded programs with new OSU faculty focused on important issues in their communities,” said Scott Reed, director of the OSU Extension Service and vice-provost for Outreach and Engagement at OSU.

Examples include:

  •  Urban communities: more local programs focused on healthy living and nutrition education; expanded programs to support small-scale farming and community food systems; and increased research and development in fermentation sciences.
  •  Willamette Valley: increased research and extension on honey-bee and pollinator health; integrated pest management and slug control in commercial crops; specialty seed breeding; and timber harvest management.
  •  Coastal communities: increased research and extension in seafood and shellfish safety; near-shore fishery management; increased support for the dairy industry and commercial cheese-making; and new research focused on managing forest lands that are also habitat for marbled murrelet, a threatened seabird that nests in coastal forests.
  •  Eastern Oregon: increased research and extension focused on rangeland ecology to support sage-grouse conservation; juniper harvest and manufacturing; and water and nutrient management in rotation cropping.

Throughout Oregon, there will be increased opportunities for students to participate in research and outreach through experiential learning programs in real-world settings.

“We are deeply grateful for the legislature’s support, which allows us to address more needs in more communities across the state,” said Dan Arp, director of the Agricultural Experiment Station and dean of OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

The statewide programs will begin the hiring process this summer.

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Source: 

Dan Arp, 541-737-2331, dan.arp@oregonstate.edu;

Scott Reed, 541-737-2713, scott.reed@oregonstate.edu;

Thomas Maness, 541-737-1585, thomas.maness@oregonstate.edu

OSU online bachelor’s programs ranked fifth nationally by U.S. News

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has bolstered its reputation as one of America’s best providers of online education, with its online bachelor’s degree programs today being ranked fifth in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

OSU’s Ecampus online education program scored 95 points out of 100 in the rankings, which include nearly 300 higher education institutions. Schools were assessed based on student engagement; faculty credentials and training; peer reputation; and student services and technology. The full list is available online at http://bit.ly/1tKZqTz

“As Oregon State strives to improve the lives of citizens around the world, this recognition reinforces our commitment to expand and enrich learning experiences for all of our students,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “Ecampus and its faculty partners continually demonstrate that our university is a leader in the creation and use of the best new learning technologies.”

Ecampus delivers 19 undergraduate programs online, with new bachelor’s programs in business administration and Spanish launching this year. An additional 22 OSU programs are available at the graduate level.

Ecampus serves adult learners in all 50 states and more than 40 countries, and nearly 15,500 students took one or more Ecampus classes in 2013-14. The number of online learners at Oregon State has grown by 395 percent in the past five years, making it one of the fastest-growing segments of the university’s enrollment.

“Our mission is to provide learners with access to engaging, quality programs that help them finish their degrees and advance in their careers,” said Ecampus executive director Lisa L. Templeton. “Being highly ranked is particularly gratifying because the methodology weighs student engagement as the most important factor.”

Oregon State has been recognized as one of the country’s best online universities by a variety of publications in each of the past five years. Last September, OSU was named the No. 1 online college in Oregon by TheBestSchools.org.

Media Contact: 

Tyler Hansen, 520-312-1276

Source: 

Lisa L. Templeton, 541-737-1279

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