OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

Auditions for OSU’s one-act festival to be held April 8-9

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions for the annual student-directed Spring One-Act Festival will be held at 7 p.m. April 8 and 9 in Oregon State University’s Lab Theatre.

Auditions will consist of cold readings and no preparation is necessary. They are open to all OSU students, faculty and staff and to members of the Corvallis community. The theatre is located in Withycombe Hall, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The Spring One-Act Festival 2014, presented by OSU Theatre, will be held at 7:30 p.m. June 4, 5 and 6 and at 2 p.m. June 8. One-act plays will be directed by the students of an advanced directing class. Rehearsals will be scheduled with each director. Those auditioning are asked to bring their schedules and note any potential conflicts with rehearsals.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Contact: Elizabeth Helman, Elizabeth.Helman@oregonstate.edu

Documentary about 2012 Paralympic athletes to air in Corvallis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Free screenings of the 2012 documentary “Gold – You Can Do More Than You Think,” will be held April  6, 7 and 10 at Darkside Cinema in Corvallis.

“Gold” chronicles the journeys of three athletes as they prepare for and participate in the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. The screenings are sponsored by the School of Language, Culture and Society in the OSU College of Liberal Arts, and are co-sponsored by the OSU Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and by Parapictures Film Production.

“The motivational and intercultural aspects of the film make it a great piece for high school and college students, showing them how having a positive attitude helps you overcome obstacles in your life,” said Sebastian Heiduschke, coordinator of World Languages and Cultures at OSU.

“I was looking for something I could do in collaboration with OSU athletics, so I approached them with this film, and they were excited to join us as co-sponsor.”

The film follows Henry Wanyoike, a blind marathon runner from Kenya; Kirsten Bruhn; a paralyzed swimmer from Germany; and Kurt Fearnley, an Australian wheelchair racer, in their day-to-day personal and professional lives. Director Michael Hammon examines what makes these athletes role models to people in their countries. The film reaches its peak at the 2012 Paralympics in London.

Screenings will be held at 6 p.m. Sunday, April 6; 7 p.m. Monday, April 7; and 9 p.m. Thursday, April 10. To enhance accessibility for the visually-impaired, the April 6 screening will include audio descriptions of the scenes.

All screenings will be held at the Darkside Cinema, 215 S.W. 4th St., Corvallis. They are free and open to the public but attendees need to obtain a free pass at the snack bar after entering the theater. Movie posters signed by the three featured athletes and other prizes will be raffled at the screenings.

To watch a trailer for the film, visit: http://bit.ly/PBBzZe

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Sebastian Heiduschke, 541-737-3957, Sebastian.heiduschke@oregonstate.edu

‘Philosophy Talk’ to visit Oregon State April 2

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The nationally syndicated public radio show “Philosophy Talk” will visit Oregon State University on April 2 for a live taping.

Show hosts Ken Taylor and John Perry, both of Stanford University, will discuss “The New Surveillance Society: Big Brother Grows Up.” Their guest will be Christopher McKnight Nichols of the School of History, Philosophy and Religion in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts.

The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium at the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. It is free and open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for audience participation.

“One of the most pressing issues today is the increasing surveillance of individuals by the government as well as by corporate entities,” said Nichols, an assistant professor of history and author of Promise and Peril: America at the Dawn of a Global Age. “This is not new. It has a history that helps explain how and why we have arrived at this point.”

Among the questions to be considered on the show: How should we treat whistleblowers that break the law for moral or political ends? How do we strike a proper balance between national and corporate security and individual rights? What rights and responsibilities does a proactive citizenry have when confronted with transgressions committed by the state and others?

“The central issue is privacy rights and how very often in U.S. history those rights have been curtailed in wartime,” said Nichols. “I want us to interrogate the legal, diplomatic, and intellectual history of ‘wartime’ to better understand the decisions that have propelled the rise of a surveillance state.”

“Philosophy Talk” airs on dozens of public radio stations internationally, including on the radio network of Oregon Public Broadcasting. On OPB, the show is broadcast at 9 p.m. Thursdays.

Perry and Taylor will continue their trip to Oregon with two Portland events. They’ll take calls live on the air on OPB at 9 p.m. Thursday, April 3, when they talk about conspiracy theories with Brian Keeley of Pitzer College.

On Saturday, April 5, “Philosophy Talk” will record a new program at the First Congregation United Church of Christ in downtown Portland. The topic is “Remixing Reality: Art and Literature for the 21st Century," with special guest David Shields, author of Reality Hunger: A Manifesto.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Robert Peckyno, 541-737-8560

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Christopher Nichols

Christopher McKnight Nichols

Mistrust, discrimination influence Latino health care satisfaction

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Mistrust of the medical community and perceived discrimination by health care providers can affect how satisfied young adult Latinos in rural Oregon are with their health care, new research from Oregon State University shows.

Health care satisfaction, or the lack of, could influence health outcomes for patients, affect participation in health care programs under the new Affordable Care Act, and contribute to disparities in health care access for Latinos, said lead researcher Daniel López-Cevallos, associate director of research for the Center for Latino/a Studies and Engagement at OSU

“Health care reform is about people getting insurance so they have access to services, but mistrust may lead people to delay care,” López-Cevallos said.

Findings of the research were published recently in “The Journal of Rural Health.”  The article was co-authored by S. Marie Harvey, associate dean and professor of public health, and Jocelyn T. Warren, assistant research professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. Harvey received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the research.

Researchers surveyed 387 young adult Latinos, 18 to 25, living in rural Oregon. Patient satisfaction information was collected as part of a larger study about health issues among young, rural Latinos. Participants were not asked about their immigration status; more than half, about 58 percent, were born outside the U.S. and the average length of U.S. residency was 13.8 years.

The majority of participants, about 73 percent, reported being moderately or very satisfied with their health care. Among those who were not satisfied, medical mistrust and perceived discrimination were identified as factors. Other factors including age and health insurance did not affect satisfaction, the study showed.

The research suggests a need to improve “cultural competency” among health care providers, from the doctors to the receptionists to the lab technicians, so Latinos are treated with respect and dignity, the researchers said. A bilingual/bicultural workforce may be more effective in addressing health issues affecting a patient.

“Trust is huge; it allows patients to disclose concerns and be honest,” Harvey said. “In a previous study we conducted, young adult Latino men reported that ‘confianza,’ a term that encompasses trust, respect, level of communication and confidentiality, affected their access to and use of health care services.  

Efforts to enroll Latinos in health care programs under the Affordable Care Act won’t be successful if patients don’t feel comfortable at their doctor’s office, López-Cevallos said.

“These are young, healthy adults,” he said. “We want them in our health insurance pools to help average the risk and keep costs down. This is an opportunity, but we have a lot of work to do.”

Media Contact: 
Source: 

S. Marie Harvey, 541-737-3824, Marie.harvey@oregonstate.edu

Daniel López-Cevallos, 541-737-3850, Daniel.lopez-cevallos@oregonstate.edu

Student-directed comedy ‘Beyond Therapy’ opens March 6 in Lab Theatre at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Performances of the student-directed play “Beyond Therapy,” a comedic portrait of love and neuroses, will begin at 7:30 p.m. March 6-8 and at 2 p.m. March 9 in the Lab Theatre at Oregon State University.

OSU Theatre student Davey Kashuba directs the production. The show also serves as the official opening for the newly renovated Lab Theatre in Withycombe Hall, 30th and Campus Way.

“Beyond Therapy,” by Christopher Durang, is a quirky, modern love story about the ups and downs of love and dating. The play premiered in 1981 and remains one of Durang’s most frequently produced works.

The cast includes Oregon State students L.J. Duey as Bruce, Melissa Cozzi as Prudence, Sarah Sutton as Charlotte and Kolby Baethke as Bob. Corvallis community members Jonathan Thompson as Andrew and Chris Morrell as Stuart also join the cast.

Tickets are $8 for general admission, $6 for seniors, $5 for students/youth and $4 for OSU students. They are available for purchase through the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784 or online at http://www.oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre. There is no reserved seating.

Media Contact: 

Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784 or michelle.klampe@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Arts endowment chairman to speak at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – John Frohnmayer, former chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts, will speak about his life experiences and First Amendment issues on Thursday, Feb. 27, at Oregon State University.

The lecture, “Second Thoughts of a First Amendment Radical: Slathering Politics, Religion, Philosophy and Art on Burned American Toast,” will begin at 7 p.m. in the Agriculture Production Room at the LaSells Stewart Center. The event is free and open to the public.

Frohnmayer drew national attention during his tenure as endowment chairman because of his thoughts on the First Amendment. He served in the administration of President George H.W. Bush and was removed after he defended the endowment’s decision to grant money to controversial artists like Robert Mapplethorpe and Andres Serrano.

His books, “Leaving Town Alive,” and “Out of Tune: Listening to the First Amendment,” explore the national debate over free speech, government funding of the arts, censorship, politics and obscenity.

Frohnmayer is a former affiliate professor of liberal arts at Oregon State, where he taught about First Amendment issues and ethics. Frohnmayer also made a brief run as an independent candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2008.

Media Contact: 

Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784 michelle.klampe@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Marion Rossi, 541-737-4917, mrossi@oregonstate.edu

History of Oregon State’s African American football players featured in Feb. 18 discussion

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The history and impact of African American football players at Oregon State University is the focus of a panel discussion that begins at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 18, in The Loge at Reser Stadium on the OSU campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Panelists include former Oregon State players Earnel Durden, 1956-58, and Ken Simonton, 1998-2001. Emeritus OSU distinguished professor of English and football historian Michael Oriard, author Herman Brame and sociology professor Dwaine Plaza also will participate. The discussion will focus on the desegregation of football and what is has meant to the Oregon State program.

“Pioneers of Change: Black Football Players at OSU from 1951-Present,” also will include a posthumous tribute to Dave Mann, the first African American football player at the university, who was on the team from 1951-54.

Media Contact: 

Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784; michelle.klampe@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Dwaine Plaza, 541-737-5369, dplaza@oregonstate.edu

Pulitzer-winning play ‘How I Learned to Drive’ opens Feb. 13

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play “How I Learned to Drive” will show Feb. 13-15 and Feb. 21-22 beginning at 7:30 p.m. on the Withycombe Hall main stage.

A matinee performance will begin at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 23 – also at the Withycombe Hall main stage, which is located at 30th and Campus Way in Corvallis.

The powerful exploration of abuse and manipulation blends playwright Paula Vogel’s characteristic wit with raw emotion as she depicts the story of Li’l Bit, a young girl from rural Maryland. Set in the 1960s, Li’l Bit grows up under the shadow of sexual abuse at the hands of her Uncle Peck. The play explores themes of power and control.

“This is a drama about obsession which some compare to Nabokov’s ‘Lolita,’ ” said director Charlotte Headrick, a theater arts professor at OSU.  “But unlike ‘Lolita,’ Vogel has filled the play with sharp, biting humor, which makes the drama all the more powerful.”

OSU student Erin Wallerstein portrays Li’l Bit and Corvallis resident Charles Prince plays Uncle Peck in the production. OSU students Alex Reis, Elise Barberis and Annie Parham are featured as the “Greek Chorus,” and play multiple roles conjured from Li’l Bit’s memories.

The Friday evening performances will include post-show discussions that are open to the public.

The play contains subject matter that is not suitable for children, Headrick said.

Tickets are $12, $10 for seniors, $8 for youth/students and $5 for OSU students. They are available for purchase through the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784 or online at http://www.oregonstate.edu/dept/theatre

Media Contact: 

Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784; michelle.klampe@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Noted soprano and scholar of African-American music to come to OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Carren Moham, a professor of music at Illinois Wesleyan University, will come to Oregon State University to lecture on African-American spirituals and perform a concert of songs by African-American composers.

The lecture, “The Importance of Negro Spirituals to the Underground Railroad,” will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18, in the Construction and Engineering Hall at the LaSells Stewart Center. Moham, a soprano, will perform at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, in the Memorial Union lounge.

Both events are free and open to the public. They are sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts.

Moham also will appear with the Willamette Valley Symphony Feb. 22 and 23.

Moham’s research into the virtually unknown and unpublished art songs of African-American composers led her to devise two concert series, “Songs by African-American Women” and “Songs by African-American Composers.” She’ll perform the second series at Oregon State. She has performed the series in many major cities in the United States, Europe and South America, and has performed for former President Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton.

While at OSU, Moham also will visit classes in the ethnic studies and music departments.

Media Contact: 

Michelle Klampe, 541-737-0784; michelle.klampe@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Celene Carillo, 541-737-2137, celene.carillo@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Carren Moham
Carren Moham

Poet Gary Young to read at OSU on Feb. 7

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Poet and artist Gary Young will read at Oregon State University on Friday, Feb. 7, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library rotunda. A question and answer session and book signing will follow. This event is part of the 2013-14 Visiting Writers Series at OSU.

Young has authored seven volumes of poetry including his most recent collection, “Even So: New and Selected Poems” (2012).

Publisher’s Weekly notes that Young “writes with a unique combination of wisdom and terror, engendering a kind of sad calm, a hard-earned acceptance of life’s difficulty and openness to its beauty.”

Young’s honors include grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council, the 1992 Pushcart Prize, the James D. Phelan Award for his collection “The Dream of a Moral Life,” the William Carlos Williams Award for “No Other Life,” and the 2013 Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America.

In 2010 Young was named the Poet Laureate of Santa Cruz County, where he teaches creative writing and directs the Cowell Press at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

His print work is represented in collections including the Museum of Modern Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and The Getty Center for the Arts.

The Visiting Writers Series brings nationally-known writers to Oregon State. The program is supported by The Valley Library, the OSU Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele, and Grass Roots Books and Music.

Media Contact: 

Source: 

 Rachel Ratner, 516-652-5817; rachel.ratner@oregonstate.edu