OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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College psychology classes lack curriculum about disabilities

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Psychology classes are among the most popular courses on college campuses today, but new research shows that many of them lack important information about the largest single minority group in the U.S. – people with disabilities.

A review of hundreds of undergraduate course offerings from top-ranked universities found that many types of disability are underrepresented in psychology classes, including chronic health and physical disabilities, said Kathleen Bogart, an assistant professor of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University.

“About 57 million people in the U.S. have a disability, and it’s likely we will all interact with someone with a disability on a regular basis,” Bogart said. “Yet in terms of minority groups, we teach about disability the least. We are not properly preparing students to interact with this group.”

The findings, published in the latest issue of the journal Teaching of Psychology, indicate that students may not be learning valuable lessons about how to interact with people with disabilities as they move throughout life, she said.

“The goal of psychology education is to generate psychologically-literate citizens, people who are prepared to interact with, work with, educate or provide treatment for people of all types,” said Bogart, a co-author of the study. “When we design these courses, we want to make sure we are designing them to teach students how to respect diversity and understand differences.”

Researchers on this study included Bogart and co-authors Nicole Rosa of Worcester State University and OSU graduate and undergraduate students Amy Bonnett, Mariah Estill and Cassandra Colton. They analyzed the titles and descriptions of nearly 700 college psychology courses from 98 top-ranked undergraduate psychology programs in the U.S.

They found that all 98 colleges offered a course on psychiatric disability, but only eight offered courses in physical disability, even though it is far more common. Few colleges offered courses that represent a variety of disabilities.

In addition, psychology coursework appears to focus more on the least-common disabilities, including psychiatric disabilities and cognitive disabilities, rather than the most common disabilities, such as chronic health and physical disabilities.

“Ideally, disability should be infused throughout the psychology curriculum, and, in particular, it should be included in introductory, social and health psychology courses,” Bogart said. “And we should be seeing more course topics that reflect the most common types of disability.”

The researchers also found that psychology curriculum involving disability tends to focus on the medical model of disability, with a focus on diagnosis, treatment and cure. But a significant shift is underway in the psychological approach to disability, emphasizing a social model that focuses on coping, acceptance, reducing prejudice and social policy, Bogart said.

“The social model is a burgeoning area of research, so now is the time to begin making a shift in our curriculum and teaching,” she said.

Reworking psychology course content, particularly for the introductory classes that may be the only psychology course a student takes while in college, would help to address the deficiencies in current offerings, Bogart said.

Not all psychology faculty are experts in the area of disability and may need training or resources on incorporating disability into their classes, she said. A best practices manual, or in the longer term, new textbooks that include disability more prominently would also help.

“The goal is not to try to educate every person about every disability,” Bogart said. “The reasonable approach is to begin conversations around common experiences and concerns and use a range of examples, including a variety of disabilities.”

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Kathleen Bogart, 541-737-1357, Kathleen.bogart@oregonstate.edu

OSU and Majestic Theatre present musical drama 'Boldly Launched Upon the Deep'

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “Boldly Launched Upon the Deep,” a unique, radio-style live performance by the AnyWhen Ensemble and featuring the Oregon State University Jazz Ensemble, will be presented Wednesday, March 2, at the Majestic Theatre.

Part chamber music concert, part radio drama and part literary reading, “Boldly Launched Upon the Deep” is a collection of musical dramatic episodes for chamber ensemble, singers/speakers and tape. The work will use original music and text to present a contemporary interpretation of Herman Melville’s classic novel, “Moby Dick.” 

The production is sponsored by the Oregon State University School of Arts and Communication’s SAC Presents series in conjunction with the Majestic Theatre.  The show begins at 7:30 p.m. at the theater, 115 S.W. Second St., Corvallis.

Portland-based composer, trumpeter and writer Douglas Detrick, longtime leader of AnyWhen Ensemble, joined forces with Chicago-based writer, composer and violinist Ellen McSweeney to create this new work for six performers. 

Detrick originally commissioned McSweeney to write an original piece of prose and then composed music to surround a live reading of the essay. That project, “In a Past Life,” is now a part of “Boldly Launched upon the Deep,” It begins with an arresting moment in which Captain Ahab, consumed by his obsession with the whale, refuses to help a fellow captain whose son is missing at sea.

This poignant moment leads McSweeney to tell her own story of self-forgiveness about her divorce at the age of 29. Her text, surrounded by Detrick’s brooding and atmospheric score, sheds a fresh perspective on Melville’s story while exploring McSweeney’s personal connection to Ahab’s inner struggle. Other pieces include contemporary reflections on physical labor, inspired by the colorful description of the girding of the ship’s cooks, and music that explores the human connection to, and alienation from, the natural/nautical world. 

The production will feature McSweeney, Detrick and AnyWhen players Hashem Assadullahi (saxophone), Shirley Hunt (cello), Steve Vacchi (bassoon), and OSU Jazz Band and percussion instructor Ryan Biesack (drum set). The Oregon State University Jazz Ensemble will also perform.

Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door, all seats reserved. Majestic members, seniors, youth and non-OSU college students, $15 in advance, $20 at the door. OSU students will be admitted for free with a valid ID card at the door while seats last. Tickets can be purchased online: http://bit.ly/1STbClS

SAC Presents is supported in part by generous gifts from donors, including donations made during the Cornerstone for the Arts Challenge that raised more than $6 million to support the arts at OSU. For information on giving to the arts at Oregon State, go to: http://bit.ly/1TW5BUB.

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School of Arts and Communication - Music, 541-737-4061

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AnyWhen Ensemble

AnyWhen Ensemble

Resonance Jazz Ensemble to perform March 4 at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – San Francisco-based Resonance Jazz Ensemble will visit the Oregon State University campus for a free performance at noon on Friday, March 4.

The performance will be in the Memorial Union Lounge, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis, and is sponsored by the School of Arts and Communication’s SAC Presents series and Music à la Carte. The public is welcome to attend.

Bandleader and pianist Steve McQuarry and his eclectic chamber jazz ensemble (cello, bass, viola, violin, saxophones, flute, vocals, piano and drums) perform inspired originals and creative adaptations of jazz standards.

Naomi Bristow, an OSU graduate and violist, will join the ensemble as a guest performer. Originally from the Bay Area, Bristow was a member of Resonance Jazz for many years while living and performing in San Francisco. She now teaches elementary music in Polk County and is a member of the Corvallis-OSU Symphony Orchestra.

 Music à la Carte concerts have been a tradition at OSU since 1969. The informal, 45-minute performances are held most Fridays during the fall, winter and spring terms, and showcase a wide variety of musicians and performance ensembles. 

 Hourly parking is available a short distance from the Memorial Union at Reser Stadium, 606 S.W. 26th St. The Beaver Bus, a free shuttle on the OSU campus, services the lot approximately every 15 minutes.

 SAC Presents is supported in part by gifts from donors, including donations made during the Cornerstone for the Arts Challenge in which donors gave over $6 million to support the arts at OSU. For information on giving to the arts at Oregon State, go to: http://bit.ly/1TW5BUB.

 

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Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

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Resonance Jazz Ensemble

Bilingual play 'Broken Promises' performed at OSU Feb. 29

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University School of Arts & Communication’s University Theatre will host the Milagro Theatre’s bilingual play, “Broken Promises” by Olga Sanchez, on Monday, Feb. 29.

Currently on its world premiere tour, the production is directed by Francisco Garcia, and will be presented at 7:30 p.m. in the Withycombe Hall Lab Theatre, Room 173. It is presented in partnership with Planned Parenthood. 

The production is free, thanks to a Memorial Union Pepsi Foundation grant. Due to the architecture of the Lab Theatre, people arriving late cannot be seated.

The plot involves a girl meeting a boy at the mall. They begin dating, but things go wrong when alcohol and drug abuse enter the picture. The female character Adrienne finds herself trapped in a life of exploitation that is difficult to escape. 

Sanchez, the play’s author, was recently on campus to participate in the reading of Elaine Romero’s play, “Wetback.” Both presentations are part of University Theatre’s Latin@ Theatre Project. It will continue in the spring with readings of Josefina Lopez’s “Real Women Have Curves” and Carmen Rivera’s “La Gringa,” dates to be announced.

A founding member of Milagro Theatre, Sanchez is now a theater doctoral student at the University of Oregon. OSU theater grad and Corvallis native Ajai Tripathi is in the acting ensemble of “Broken Promises.”

In addition to “Broken Promises,” a healthy relationships workshop will be conducted by trained members of the cast from 3:30-5 p.m., Feb. 29, at the OSU Women’s Center. That event is sponsored by the OSU President’s Commission on the Status of Women.  It is open to all. 

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Source: Erin Sneller, 541-737-5592; erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

SAC Presents series brings the Ivy Street Ensemble to Corvallis

CORVALLIS – The Oregon State University School of Arts and Communication, or SAC, is hosting the Ivy Street Ensemble of Colorado at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 25 in First Presbyterian Church, 114 S.W. 8th St.

The performance is part of the SAC Presents series. 

Based in Denver, the Ivy Street Ensemble is comprised of a trio of musicians from the Colorado Symphony: Catherine Peterson, flute; Erik Peterson, violin; and Phillip Stevens, viola. Erik Peterson, a Corvallis native, is the artistic director of the annual Chintimini Chamber Music Festival.

Frequently heard on National Public Radio in Denver, the ensemble has a diverse repertoire ranging from Baroque to contemporary chamber music. 

In 2015, the trio was awarded second place in the chamber music category for the American Prize, an award celebrating American excellence in the arts. In 2013, they won a grant from Chamber Music America to premiere a commissioned piece by composer Kenji Bunch. In 2008, the group was a finalist in the National Flute Association Chamber Music Competition.

In Corvallis, Ivy Street Ensemble will perform “Serenade for Flute, Violin and Viola” by Ludwig van Beethoven, “The Great Train Race” by Ian Clarke, “Three Madrigals” by B. Martinu and “Pennipotenti” by Maria Newmann. 

Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door, with open seating. Seniors, youth and non-OSU college students are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. OSU students will be admitted for free with a valid identification card at the door. Participants in the SNAP program may present their Oregon Trail card at the door and purchase up to two tickets for $5 each (Corvallis Arts for All program participant). Advance tickets are available at Gracewinds Music and online at tickettomato.com.

SAC Presents is supported in part by gifts from donors, including donations made during the Cornerstone for the Arts Challenge in which donors gave over $6 million to support the arts at OSU. For information on giving to the arts at Oregon State, go to http://bit.ly/1TW5BUB

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School of Arts and Communication: Music, 541-737-4061

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Ivy Street Ensemble

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OSU to perform Cole Porter musical comedy 'Kiss Me, Kate'

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University School of Arts and Communication will present Cole Porter’s jazzy musical comedy, “Kiss Me, Kate,” Feb. 26-28 and March 3-5.

Performances will be in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis, on Feb. 26-27 at 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 28 at 2 p.m., and March 3-5 at 7:30 p.m. Oregon State University Theatre and the OSU music department are collaborating on the production.

Featuring a script by Sam and Bella Spewack and some of Porter’s most memorable tunes, this madcap, romantic musical-within-a-musical is the story of the reluctant reuniting of a divorced couple to star in a musical adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew,” and a production held hostage by gangsters until a star dancer pays his gambling debt.

The principal cast includes OSU students Eldon de la Cruz as Paul; Steven Evans-Renteria as Nicely-Nicely; Taylor Fahlman as General Howell; Phillip Hommes as Harry the Horse; Samantha Johnson as Lois Lane; Quentin Kirk as Fred Graham; J. Garrett Luna as Bill Calhoun; Kimber Parker as Lilli Vanessi; Anna Patch as Hattie; Emily Saalfeld as Madam Baptisa; Cory Warren as Ralph; Alex Weingargen as Gremio; and Eric Zittel as Hortensio.

The ensemble cast includes OSU students Robert Best, Blair Bowmer, Caitlyn Douglas, Sedona Garcia, P.J. Harris, Jade Kasbohm, Sydney King, Pam Mealy, Sophia Morrow, Emma Nissen, Taylor Siling, Rachana Son, Kelsea Vierra, Yu Wang, Larissa Zens, and Wenqing Zhang. Community member Craig Farrell joins the cast as Pops.

The production is directed by Theatre Professor Charlotte Headrick with musical direction by music instructor and pianist Lauren Servias and choreography by Megan Skinner.

Tickets are $15 for general admission; $10 for seniors; $10 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ beginning Feb. 15 or by calling the box office at 541-737-2784. Contact the box office for disability accommodations, faculty/staff discounts or group ticket sales.

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Essayist and poet Maggie Nelson to read at Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Essayist, poet and critic Maggie Nelson will read on Friday, Feb. 19, in the Valley Library Rotunda on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis.

The event will begin at 7:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public. The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow the reading.

Nelson is the author of five books of nonfiction and four books of poetry. Her most recent book, the genre-bending “The Argonauts,” is a work about gender, sexuality, queer family, desire, marriage and the possibilities of love and language. The Los Angeles Times called the book “a magnificent achievement of thought, care and art.” 

Nelson’s 2011 book of art and cultural criticism, “The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning,” was named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Her other nonfiction books include “Bluets,” “Women, the New York School and Other True Abstractions,” and “The Red Parts: A Memoir.”

Her poetry books include “Something Bright, Then Holes,” “Jane: A Murder,” “The Latest Winter” and “Shiner.” Her poetry has been widely anthologized, including in the Best American Poetry series. Nelson has received numerous awards including a 2007 Arts Writers Grant from the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation; a 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship in nonfiction; a 2011 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in poetry; and a 2013 Innovative Literature grant from Creative Capital.

Nelson holds a doctorate in English literature from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and has taught literature and writing at Wesleyan University, Pratt Institute of Art and the New School Graduate Writing Program, as well as at Tinhouse Summer Writers Workshop. She now teaches at California Institute of the Arts.

The reading is part of the 2015-16 Visiting Writers Series, which is sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing with support from the OSU Libraries and Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

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Maggie Nelson

Maggie Nelson

Mammoth makes final touchdown in Reser Stadium end zone, construction reveals

CORVALLIS, Ore. – On Saturdays in the fall, cleats pound the turf at Reser Stadium at Oregon State University. But new evidence dug up during an expansion of the Valley Football Center has revealed that some much larger creatures once roamed this location more than 10,000 years ago.

Construction crews digging in the north end zone in Reser Stadium on Monday uncovered a large femur bone, likely from a mammoth. Further discovery revealed more bones from several extinct mammals.

“There are quite a few bones, and dozens of pieces,” said Loren Davis, an associate professor of anthropology at OSU who was called to the site after the initial discovery was made. "Some of the bones are not in very good shape, but some are actually quite well preserved."

There don’t appear to be any signs of human bones or artifacts at the site, Davis said. Further testing will be needed to determine the bones’ exact age.

The discovery of the ancient mammal bones is not unusual in the Willamette Valley, Davis said. The bones, including mammoth, bison and some kind of camel or horse, were discovered in a 10-foot deep plot in an area that could once have been a bog or marsh, Davis said.

 “Animals who were sick would often go to a body of water and die there, so it’s not unusual to find a group of bones like this,” Davis said. “We had all of these types of animals in the Willamette Valley back then.”

Crews are digging up a portion of the north end zone as part of the Valley Football Center expansion and renovation project. Work began after the fall football season ended and is slated for completion by the start of the 2016 home season.

A worker digging in the area made the initial discovery of the large femur bone and immediately stopped work in the area, said Tim Sissel, senior project manager for Hunt/Fortis, a joint venture, the general contractor on the project.

Company officials notified OSU officials, who brought in Davis and other experts to examine the bones and the site. Crews have moved to other areas of the construction project while Davis and others take a closer look at the find. The delay has been minimal so far, Sissel said.

The animals do not appear to have been killed, Davis said, and there is no other evidence of humans at the site. Since the find does not appear to involve humans or human artifacts, the bones are not considered part of an archaeological site, Davis said. Nonetheless, we can learn a great deal about what the ancient environment of the Willamette Valley was like from this discovery, he said.

The find does not appear to involve humans or human artifacts and there are no special rules or regulations in Oregon governing the preservation or protection of paleontology finds, Davis said.

In the short term, Davis plans to soak the discovered bones in water to prevent further deterioration, and hopes to send some out for carbon dating to determine more about their age. He and his students will also continue excavating a large pile of dirt pulled from the site, where more bones are believed to be buried.

“It’ll be a great learning experience for them, to learn how to identify extinct animal bones,” Davis said. “It’s really an amazing find.”

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

 

 

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Femur bone

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Loren Davis

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Nigel Poor to speak, exhibit work at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Renowned artist and photographer Nigel Poor will speak and exhibit work at Oregon State University as part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series.

Poor will speak about her experience teaching history of photography classes for the Prison University Project at California’s San Quentin State Prison at 7 p.m. on Feb. 10 in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. A reception will be held prior to the lecture at 6 p.m. The events are free and open to the public.

Poor’s work from the San Quentin Prison Report Archive Project will be on display in OSU’s Fairbanks Gallery from Feb. 8 through March 1. The exhibit consists of inkjet prints with handwritten text reflecting prisoners’ reactions to a variety of historical prison photographs.

Poor is an associate professor of photography at California State University, Sacramento. Since 2011, she has taught photo history at San Quentin. Her work with the inmates focuses on the various ways people leave behind evidence of their existence and how the U.S. manages crime, punishment and rehabilitation. She also produces a radio storytelling project called the San Quentin Prison Report Radio Project.

Poor’s work has been exhibited at the San Jose Museum of Art; the Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art; the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and the Haines Gallery in San Francisco. Her work is also featured in the collections of several museums and galleries.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

The School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to campus to interact with students so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar.

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Julia Bradshaw, julia.bradshaw@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-5014

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An example of work Nigel Poor does with inmates at San Quentin State Prison. Credit: Nigel Poor

Nigel Poor

No evidence that water birth poses harm to newborns, new OSU study finds

CORVALLIS, Ore. – There is no evidence that water births, where a baby is intentionally born under water in a tub or pool, poses any increased harm to the child, Oregon State University researchers have found.

Researchers examined outcome data for more than 6,500 midwife-attended water births in the United States and found that newborns born in water were no more likely to experience low Apgar scores, require transfer to the hospital after birth or be hospitalized in their first six weeks of life, than newborns who were not born in water.

The results were published this week in the Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health. The study is believed to be the largest study of water births to date and the first to examine the practice in the United States, said lead author, Marit Bovbjerg, an epidemiology instructor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at OSU. 

“The findings suggest that water birth is a reasonably safe, low-intervention option for women who face a low risk of complications during the birthing process,” Bovbjerg said. “These are decisions that should be made in concert with a medical professional.”

Co-authors of the study are Melissa Cheyney, a medical anthropologist and associate professor in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts, and Courtney Everson, a former OSU graduate student who recently completed her doctorate.

For the study, researchers analyzed birthing outcome data collected from 2004 through 2009 by the Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, commonly referred to as MANA Stats. Most of the nearly 17,000 women in the study were attended by Certified Professional Midwives, who provided detailed reports on their cases from their medical records.

More than 6,500 women in the database gave birth in water, either at home or in a free-standing birthing center. The outcomes in those births were compared to the outcomes for non-water births. The study compared only births at home or in a birthing center and not those in hospitals. 

The researchers found that babies born in water were no more likely to require transfer or admission to a hospital, nor were the mothers who gave birth in water. However, the researchers found an 11 percent increase in perineal tearing among mothers who gave birth in water.

“For some women, that potential risk of tearing might be worth taking if they feel they will benefit from other aspects of a water birth, such as improved pain management,” Bovbjerg said. “There is no one correct choice. The risks and benefits of different birthing options should be weighed carefully by each individual.” 

The researchers’ findings are congruent with outcomes reported in other water birth studies, Cheyney said, but are contrary to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ and the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee Opinion.

“Those groups support laboring in water, but caution against giving birth while immersed,” Cheyney said. “Our findings suggest that water birth is a reasonably safe option for low-risk women, especially when the risks associated with pharmacologic pain management, like epidural anesthesia, are considered.”

The researchers have shared their findings with a group that is developing a clinical bulletin designed to inform health care providers about the practice of water birth in both hospital and out-of-hospital settings.

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Melissa Cheyney, 541-737-4515, melissa.cheyney@oregonstate.edu; Marit Bovbjerg, 541-737-5313, Marit.Bovbjerg@oregonstate.edu