college of liberal arts

OSU to mark ‘Banned Books Week’ with daily readings on campus

Faculty, students and staff from Oregon State University will read excerpts from challenged or banned books from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sept. 26-28 in the brick mall in front of Strand Hall, in recognition of Banned Books Week.

The readings are free and open to the public. Strand Hall is located on the northeast side of the Memorial Union Quad. The weeklong event is hosted by OSU’s School of Writing, Literature and Film, in conjunction with the Valley Library.

“Banned Books Week is really about celebrating the freedom to read,” said Susan Rodgers, associate professor of creative writing and one of the event’s organizers. “Most challenged books remain available, and that’s because librarians, teachers and community members stand up to defend our access to those books.”

Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to a surge in challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. Goals of the initiative are education and advocacy about the problem of book censorship.

In 2015, the top 10 most challenged books included “Fun Home” by Alison Bechdel and “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time” by Mark Haddon, which are current favorites of college students. In the last decade, most frequently challenged authors include Toni Morrison, Sherman Alexie, Mark Twain and Judy Blume.

Rodgers worked with Valley Library staff member Zac Laugheed to create the campus event, which was designed for the Corvallis-area community. The organizers hope the event will continue and grow in future years.

“It’s a moving experience to stand in a public space, and read out loud from a book you love that has been banned or challenged,” Rodgers said. “It doesn’t even matter if people are there to listen. Just the act of reading the words is powerful.”

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Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

Auditions for OSU production of ‘James and the Giant Peach’ to be held Oct. 3-4

CORVALLIS, Ore. –Auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s fall 2016 production of Roald Dahl’s “James and the Giant Peach” will be held at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 3 and 4 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The classic tale is told by James and the insect characters – Miss Spider, Old-Green-Grasshopper, Centipede, Ladybird and Earthworm. The play begins at the end of the story, when James and his friends are living in the giant peach stone in Central Park, New York.

A tour guide brings a party of tourists - the audience - to see this major attraction, and James and his friends tell the story of how they came to live in New York. The epic journey across the Atlantic is acted out with live action, puppetry and storytelling.

Auditions are open to all OSU students, staff, faculty, and area community members. Those planning to audition should be prepared to do cold readings from the script and group-building improvisational games. Rehearsals for “James and the Giant Peach” will run Mondays-Thursdays from 6-10 p.m. Show dates are Nov. 3-5 and 12-13.

For more information visit: http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/school-arts-and-communication/theatre/students/auditions, or contact the show’s director, Tinamarie Ivey at iveyt@linnbenton.edu.

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Oregon State University Theatre announces 2016-17 season

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The 2016-17 Oregon State University Theatre season will feature themes of imagination, collaboration and hope. The season, “Devising Our Dreams: Metamorphosis” includes five productions exploring a variety of performance styles and approaches to creating theater.

In theater, devised plays are those where the script originates from collaborative, often improvised work by a group of people, rather than by a writer or writers.

The season’s lineup includes:

  • “James and the Giant Peach” – A theatrical adaptation of Roald Dalh’s delightfully surreal children’s novel will run at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 3-5 and Nov. 12; and at 2 p.m. Nov. 12-13 on the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre.
  • “For the Love of Lies” – A wild romantic comedy based in the traditions of the Italian Renaissance will run at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 16-18 and Feb. 24-25, 2017; and at 2 p.m. Feb. 26 on the Main Stage.
  • “boom” - Peter Sinn Nachtrieb’s apocalyptic comedy, will run at 7:30 p.m. March 9-11 and 2 p.m. March 12 in the Lab Theatre.
  • “The Upward-Beating Heart” - An original devised play based on Rilke’s “Letters to a Young Poet,” offers a unique perspective into the hopes, fears, and dreams of Oregon State University students. It runs at 7:30 p.m. May 11-13 and May 19-20; and 2 p.m. May 21 on the Main Stage.
  • One-act plays - A collection of plays written and directed by OSU students will be performed at 7:30 p.m. June 1-3 and 2 p.m. June 4 in the Lab Theatre.

Season tickets will be sold Oct. 1 through Nov. 7 and can be purchased online at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/school-arts-and-communication/theatre; by calling the Theatre box office at 541-737-2784; or in person in Withycombe Hall, Room 145.

The Withycombe Hall Main Stage and Lab theatres are located at 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

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OSU’s Fairbanks Gallery to feature new work from Julia Bradshaw and Anna Fidler

CORVALLIS, Ore. – New work by Oregon State University art faculty members Julia Bradshaw and Anna Fidler will be exhibited Oct. 3 through Nov. 2 in the Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., on the Corvallis campus.

An artist’s talk and reception will take place from 4:30-8 p.m. Oct. 20 during the Corvallis Arts Walk. It is free and open to the public.

The exhibit is titled “Shapes and Séances.” Bradshaw, a photographic artist, and Fidler, a painter, share an interest in using photographs as source material.

Bradshaw treats photographs as malleable two-dimensional material, creating topographical landscapes and geometric shapes from source photographs that refer to the fore-edges and top-edges of paperback books.

She is interested in creating an infinite variety of forms and shapes that refer to the original photographed object but evoke a different sensibility. Segmented geometrical forms reference her interest in the roots of minimalist abstraction whereas horizontal stacks of books are combined to suggest gently rolling topographical landscapes. In making the work, Bradshaw uses a variety of photographic techniques, from historical darkroom techniques to current computer-based photographic imaging.

“As a photographer, I am envious of the playful methods of automatic drawing and geometrical abstraction practiced by painters,” Bradshaw said. “This is my response to that envy. By working with source photographs in a shape-shifting manner, in much the same way a ceramicist might use clay, the photographs become malleable and have infinite creative possibilities.”

Having spent most of her life in Oregon and Michigan, Fidler paints landscapes that allude to the woods found in those states. Her series for the exhibit references the four seasons and occurrences of energetic exchange between individuals and the forests that surround them. Using historical photographs as source material, Fidler constructs figurative silhouettes by gluing together many layers of paper to make dimensional, topographic forms. These forms are less about the specific individuals and more about the energy emanating from their actions.

“While making this exhibition I became aware of the artist, Hilma af Klint, who was one of the earliest artists to work with abstraction. She was a member of a female group of artists called ‘The Five,’ who were interested in complex spiritual ideas and practiced séances to be in touch with higher spirits,” Fidler said. “My painting of ‘The Five’ depicts these women working on their abstract paintings in a Swedish forest.”

The Fairbanks Gallery is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Admission is free.

Story By: 

Anna Fidler, 541-737-3876, anna.fidler@oregonstate.edu; Julia Bradshaw, 541-737-5014, julia.bradshaw@oregonstate.edu

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“Eclipse” by Anna Fidler, acrylic, colored pencil and gouache on paper, 2016


“Circle” by Julia Bradshaw, photograph, 2016


OSU’s Little Gallery to display work of artist Eileen Hinckle

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Drawn to Murals, an exhibit of photographs of murals painted by artist Eileen Hinckle, opens on Monday, Sept. 19, in The Little Gallery at Oregon State University.

An Oregon native, Hinckle graduated from Marist High School in Eugene in 2008 and attended Oregon State University’s JumpstART pre-college art camp during her junior year. She later pursued a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Northwestern University in Illinois. While working on her bachelor’s degree, Hinckle had the opportunity to live abroad in Lima, Peru, an experience that inspired her artistic style. 

“While immersed in a culture vastly different from my own, I became highly aware of my relationship with my surroundings,” Hinckle said. “I made the decision to focus my energy and efforts in developing my art as a means of exploring and bridging the space between cultures.”

Traveling with nothing more than a sketchbook and paintbrushes, Hinckle was drawn to murals as an inspiring and dynamic form of public art that can reach people during moments in their everyday lives. Initially she used brushes and latex house paint, but she has since started incorporating paint rollers and spray paint into her work. She is particularly attracted to public spaces such as transit, schools, and parks -  often incorporating local subjects into her murals along with other elements that are left open to interpretation. 

Hinckle has painted collaboratively with Peruvian, Argentinian, Mexican and American people, sometimes exchanging her artwork for accommodations, food and friendship, and learning something new from each experience. She describes her work as an “exploration of the convergence of personal experience with public space; a reflection on the complex web of geography, people and cultures that inhabit a specific place at a given time.”

The Little Gallery is managed by World Languages and Cultures in the College of Liberal Arts. It is located in 210 Kidder Hall, 2000 S.W. Campus Way on the Corvallis campus. 

The gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, closing over the noon hour for lunch. Admission is free. The Hinckle exhibit runs through Nov. 4.

Story By: 

Helen Wilhelm, 541-737-2146, helen.wilhelm@oregonstate.edu

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Subiendo by Eileen Hinckle

Eileen Hinckle - Subiendo

Constitution Day event Sept. 16 at OSU will focus on First Amendment issues

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The First Amendment will be the focus of a Sept. 16 panel discussion and town hall meeting at Oregon State University to mark Constitution Day.

Panelists will discuss issues related to First Amendment protections of freedom of expression. They also will engage the audience in a conversation about how universities, and in particular OSU, handle legal, social, pedagogical and political concerns related to academic freedom and free speech on campus, and in the university community, at a crucial time for free speech and activism in higher education.

Speakers include Vice Provost for Student Affairs Susie Brubaker-Cole; OSU General Counsel Rebecca Gose; Associate Professor of Political Science Andrew Valls; and Associate Professor of Philosophy Joseph Orosco, who also is president of the OSU chapter of American Association of University Professors.

Christopher McKnight Nichols, associate professor of history and director of the OSU Citizenship and Crisis initiative, will moderate the event. A town hall discussion will follow.

Constitution Day is an American federal observance that commemorates the formation and signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787.

The event will be held from 10-11:30 a.m. in the Pan-African Sankofa, Room 213, at the Memorial Union on the Corvallis campus. It is free and open to the public.

Story By: 

Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

OSU announces lineup for second season of ‘SAC Presents’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “SAC Presents,” a visual and performing arts events series sponsored by the School of Arts and Communication at Oregon State University, will return for its second season in 2016-17.

The goal of SAC Presents is to bring well-known headliners, rising stars and unique, lesser known artists and ensembles to the community. The lineup of artists ranges from country music to jazz musicians, chamber music to rock, as well as visual artists and guest lecturers. 

This year’s performances include:

  • Sunday, Oct. 2, at 7 p.m. - San Francisco-based Kronos Quartet, known for its unpredictable and electric performances of contemporary classical music.
  • Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017, at 7 p.m. – David Sedaris, the popular radio humorist, comedian, bestselling author and master of satire, will give a talk followed by a book signing.
  • Friday, April 7, at 7 p.m. - “A Call to Life: Variations on a Theme of Extinction,” featuring Rachelle McCabe, music professor and OSU director of piano studies, and OSU philosophy Professor Emeritus Kathleen Dean Moore in a powerful music and spoken word program on species extinction.
  • Friday, April 14, at 7:30 p.m. - The Northwest Dance Project of Portland will present a program of all-original, contemporary dance works.
  • Wednesday, May 24, at 7:30 p.m. - Boston Brass will bridge the gap between classical formality and boisterous fun with their signature blend of burning jazz standards, the best of brass quintet repertoire and their own exciting take on familiar classical arrangements.

All performances will be held in Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. The April 7 “A Call to Life” performance is free, with open seating and no ticket necessary.

Seats are reserved for all other shows. Tickets are available online at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/school-arts-and-communications-presents. Tickets may also be purchased in person at The LaSells Stewart Center between noon and 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays, starting Sept. 22.

A limited number of tickets will be available for OSU students to purchase in person at The LaSells Stewart Center, during listed hours, for $10 each, one per student, balcony seating only, with OSU ID card, while seats last.

 The Northwest Dance Project and Boston Brass performances are eligible for Corvallis Arts for All – up to two tickets at $5 each may be purchased by individuals in the SNAP program, with an Oregon Trail Card, in person only at the LaSells Stewart Center during listed hours.

 For more information and for accommodations for people with disabilities, call 541-737-5592.

SAC Presents is funded in part by donations made during the Cornerstone Campaign for the Arts and by OSU Friends of the Arts. The series is sponsored in part by the Oregonian/Oregon Live.

Story By: 

Erin O’Shea Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads

Kronos Quartet


David Sedaris

David Sedaris

Screening, discussion of “World Peace” film on Aug. 5

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A screening of the filmWorld Peace and Other 4th-Grade Achievements,” will be held at Linus Pauling Middle School in Corvallis on Friday, Aug. 5. A panel discussion featuring the film’s subject, World Peace Game creator John Hunter, as well as Mary Yates, former U.S. ambassador to Burundi and Ghana, will follow.

The event, sponsored by Oregon State University’s School of History, Philosophy and Religion, begins at 7 p.m. at the school, 1111 N.W. Cleveland Ave. It is free and open to the public.

The film focuses on Hunter’s work with his fourth-grade class as the students participate in an exercise called the World Peace Game, and discover that they share a deep interest in taking care of the world and each other.

OSU is hosting a World Peace Game camp for area students – enrollment for the camp is full – as well as training for teachers Aug. 1-5. The screening and panel discussion conclude the week’s activities.

Yates, an OSU graduate who served as a U.S. ambassador to the countries of Burundi and Ghana, will join Hunter and students and teachers who have participated in the World Peace Game for a discussion about the diplomacy of the game and diplomacy in the real world.


Natalia Bueno, 541-737-8560, Natalia.bueno@oregonstate.edu

Bard in the Quad at OSU to present ‘Love’s Labour’s Lost’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s popular Bard in the Quad program returns for its 11th season in August with a production of Shakespeare’s witty and romantic, “Love’s Labour’s Lost.”

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. August 4-7 and August 11-14 on OSU’s Memorial Union Quad, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

Bard in the Quad brings innovative Shakespeare productions to Corvallis in a casual, fun summer atmosphere. Performances are held outdoors and no seating is provided. Attendees are encouraged to bring low lawn chairs and/or blankets, warm clothing and a picnic dinner if desired. Seating begins at 6:30 p.m. and no one will be seated prior to that time.

“Love’s Labour’s Lost” is the story of King Ferdinand and his three companions who vow to dedicate their lives to study and forbid the presence of women within the court. Their resolve is soon tested when the Princess of France and her three beautiful ladies in waiting arrive to Navarre. Love games quickly ensue as Ferdinand, Biron, Longaville and Dumain attempt to win the hearts of their guests through a series of ridiculous courtship rituals.

The play is set in an elegant garden inspired by the 18th-century French court of Versailles and will feature original music composed for the production.

The cast features Oregon State University students, staff, alumni and community members, including: Stuart Ashenbrenner as Longaville; Blair Bowmer as Maria; Grant Davis as Biron; Ariel Ginsburg as Boyet; PJ Harris as Dull; Joseph Hill as Costard; Matt Holland as Don Armado; Diana Jepsen as Princess; Reed Morris as Ferdinand; Alycia Olivar as Mote; Emily Peters as Jaquenetta; Mike Stephens as Holofernes; Kelsea Vierra-Ashenbrenner as Rosaline; Alex Weingarten as Dumain; and Reneé Zipp as Catherine.

Tickets are $15 for general admission, $10 for students and seniors, and $5 for OSU students. Tickets are available for purchase online at bardinthequad.org. An “early Bard special” discount is available now through July 22 on tickets purchased online.

For questions regarding tickets, seating, group ticket discounts and other accommodations, contact Marissa Solini, the box office manager, at 541-737-2784.

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When kids learn to conserve energy, their behavior also spreads to parents

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Girl Scouts and their parents reported increases in energy-saving behaviors, such as turning off power strips at night and washing clothes in cold water, after the children participated in an intervention program, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Energy.

The new energy conservation program was developed by researchers from Oregon State University and Stanford University, who designed and tested the program’s effectiveness with 30 Girl Scout troops in northern California.

The researchers found that the increased energy-saving behavior, as self-reported by the children, continued for more than seven months after the trial program ended. They also found that the intervention had an effect on parents’ energy-saving behavior for more than eight months. The findings suggests that these kinds of educational programs could have a significant and lasting impact on family energy consumption, said Hilary Boudet, an assistant professor of climate change and energy at Oregon State University and lead author of the paper.

“Children are a critical audience for environmental programs, because their current behavior likely predicts future behavior,” said Boudet, who teaches in the School of Public Policy at OSU’s College of Liberal Arts. “By adopting energy-saving behaviors now and engaging family and community members in such efforts, children can play an important role in bringing about a more sustainable future.”

The study was supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy Program, the California Energy Commission, the Child Health Research Institute and the Precourt Energy Efficiency Center. Co-authors of the study are Nicole Ardoin, June Flora, K. Carrie Armel, Manisha Desai and Thomas N. Robinson of Stanford University.

The researchers set out to develop a new energy conservation intervention program for children, using best practices from social cognitive theory and public health interventions to guide the program’s design.
“The goal of the program was to get the girls actively practicing and mastering the skills, and modeling the behaviors that would lead to reduced energy use,” Boudet said. “But we also recognized the importance of making the project fun and engaging.”
The program, called Girls Learning Environment and Energy, or GLEE, offered two interventions designed to promote energy-saving behaviors either at home or in food and transportation decisions. Using a randomized control trial, the 318 participating girls, all fourth- and fifth-graders, were randomly assigned to one of the programs.
In 50- to 60-minute lessons once a week for five weeks, the Girl Scouts learned about different ways to save energy in their assigned intervention group and participated in activities designed to support the lessons.
The girls and their parents completed surveys about their energy-saving behaviors in those areas at the beginning and end of the five-week program and again several months later.
The study’s authors estimate that the reported behavior changes associated with the home energy savings intervention represent an annual household energy savings of approximately 3-5 percent immediately following the intervention and 1-3 percent at follow-up. If magnified across the population, those savings become quite significant, Boudet said.
Girls participating in the food and transportation intervention also reported a significant increase in energy-saving behavior at the end of the program, but there was no significant change noted at the seven-month follow-up or among parents.
Boudet said the food and transportation program may have proved more challenging for the children, in part, because they have less control over the types of transportation used by their families or the types of food their families buy and eat. Additional study could help researchers understand which pieces of the program worked best and which could be improved, she said.
Based on GLEE’s initial success, researchers are working to disseminate the curriculum to Girl Scout leaders around the country. They are also hoping to adapt the program for other groups, including schools and youth-focused organizations such as 4-H. More information is available online at  https://sites.stanford.edu/glee/.

Story By: 

Hilary Boudet, 541-737-5375, hilary.boudet@oregonstate.edu

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Girl Scouts participate in the Girls Learning Environment and Energy program, or GLEE. Credit: Oregon State University