OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

OSU's Fairbanks Gallery to exhibit 'VČELA: Blood & Honey'

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “VČELA: Blood & Honey,” an exhibit of sculpture, installation and language by artist Craig Goodworth, opens on Monday, Jan. 11, in the Fairbanks Gallery on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis.

A reception and artist’s talk will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 14. The event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit draws from the forests of the Willamette Valley and central Europe as well as village folklore and ecological concern. With elements of sculpture, installation and poetry/performance, Goodworth connects to place, memory, object and land. The exhibit is the result of his research and art practice, and explores such questions as art’s role in helping one feel physically connected to land, and how aesthetics can witness to crises that arise in the natural world.

The exhibit includes nine bronze casts from a decayed bee box that Goodworth collected in the Slovak Republic near the Hungarian border. Apiology, or the study of bees, is both an historic tradition of work and fare, and a contemporary icon for crisis in the natural world. The nine bee frames were cast directly, burning out the original forms, at the Bratislava Academy of Fine Art and Design in the summer of 2015. They are part of a larger project, titled “Blood and Honey,” that addresses ancestry and land.  

Goodworth began drawing individual honeybees in the spring of 2013 in his home in the Chehalem Valley of Oregon. In a previous installation, Goodworth used 90 individual bee drawings. This more recent exhibit expands on the subject. In “VČELA: Blood & Honey,” he has compiled an even larger drawing, expanding it to wrap around the gallery and crossing the boundary from the paper on the wall to the walls themselves.

Accompanying the works are poems Goodworth wrote in 2014 and 2015 while he was living in Oregon’s Willamette Valley and in the foothills of Europe’s Carpathian Mountains.  

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public. The exhibit concludes on Feb. 2.

Source: 

Doug Russell, 541-737-5009, drussell@oregonstate.edu

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Včela Study #33, graphite and resin on paper

Včela Study #33,

Joan Didion biographer Tracy Daugherty to discuss his work Dec. 2 at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host a conversation with Joan Didion biographer and OSU Professor emeritus Tracy Daugherty at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 2, at the CH2M HILL Alumni Center.

Daugherty’s latest book, “The Last Love Song,” is a biography of American author and journalist Didion. The book, which was published in August by St. Martin’s Press, debuted at No. 11 on the New York Times best-seller list for hardcover nonfiction.

“The Last Love Song,” is the first printed biography about the reclusive Didion, a narrative that traces her life from her youth in Sacramento to her marriage and partnership with her late husband, writer John Gregory Dunne, and beyond.

Keith Scribner, an author and professor in the School of Writing, Literature and Film in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts, will interview Daugherty about his work at the event, which is free and open to the public. Refreshments and a book signing will follow.

Daugherty is a professor emeritus of English and creative writing at OSU, where he helped found the Masters of Fine Arts program in creative writing. He is the author of four novels, five short story collections, a book of personal essays and three literary biographies. “Hiding Man,” his biography of Donald Barthelme, was a New York Times and New Yorker notable Book of the Year. 

His first collection of literary essays, “Let Us Build Us a City,” will be published by the University of Georgia Press in 2016. He recently completed several new short stories and novellas and has begun research on a new biography.

The event is being presented by the OSU Foundation. The Alumni Center is located at 725 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

Media Contact: 
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University Events, 541-737-4717, events@oregonstate.edu

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Tracy Daugherty

Tracy Daugherty

Oregon State University Opera Workshop presents scenes from ‘The Marriage of Figaro’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Opera Workshop will present “An Evening of Opera,” Tuesday, Nov. 24, in OSU’s new Learning Innovation Center.

The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. in LInC Room 128, 165 S.W. Sackett Place, Corvallis.

The program will be Acts I and II of Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro,” sung in English and set in a 1950s “Mad Men” era theme. The storyline involves Figaro, his fiancée, his boss, and a wedding day love triangle that makes his life complicated.

The performance is directed and designed by Marc Callahan, visiting professor of opera and voice. Oregon State student Anna Patch is the assistant director. Music is directed by David Servias. The costume and set crew is comprised of Callahan and Patch with assistance from DeMara Cabrera, Alec Zinsli, Ken Richardson, Kathi Halloran and Taylor Siling.

The role of Figaro will be sung by Mason Cooper. The role of Susanna will be shared by Emma Nissen, Logan Stewart, Carolyn Poutasse, Jenna Skarphol and Taylor Siling. Other roles are: Bartolo by Jeramie Gajan; Marcellina by Larissa Zens and Diana Alarcon; Cherubino by Blair Bowmer, Anna Patch and Sara Engle; Count by David Zielke; Countess by Clarissa Clark and Grace Weaver; Antonio by Taylor Fahlman; and Basilio by Michael Ripp and Alex Weingarten.

Tickets are $7 in advance or $10 at the door, with open seating. Advance tickets may be purchased online at TicketTomato.com. OSU students will be admitted free with a valid student ID card. Tickets will be sold at the Learning Innovation Center beginning at 6:30 p.m. on the evening of the performance.

OSU Opera Workshop is a participant in Corvallis Arts for All, a program which offers up to two tickets for $5 each to participants in the SNAP Program with a valid Oregon Trail Card. 

Source: 

Erin Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

Violinist Frank Almond to perform with Lipinski Stradivarius Nov. 17 at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Concert violinist, recording artist and Milwaukee Symphony Concertmaster Frank Almond will perform at Oregon State University on Tuesday, Nov.17.

Almond will perform with OSU music professor and pianist Rachelle McCabe in a concert to commemorate the 300th anniversary of his rare and celebrated instrument, a 1715 Lipinski Stradivarius. The event begins at 7:30 p.m. in The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th Street.

The concert is part of the new SAC Presents performing arts series sponsored by the School of Arts and Communication at OSU.

Almond made international headlines when his Stradivarius was stolen in an armed robbery following a concert in January 2014. The violin was recovered nine days later, and the story was featured on NPR’s “All Things Considered,” the BBC World Service, and Vanity Fair, among others.

Almond and McCabe will perform some of the works from his Avie label recording “A Violin’s Life.” The recording was funded through a successful Kickstarter campaign and debuted on the Billboard Top Ten Classical chart in its first week of release.

The program includes the Sonata in A Major for Violin and Piano by César Franck, considered a classic in the violin and piano sonata repertoire and probably Franck’s best-known composition. Also on the program is Bach’s Ciaccona from the Partita No. 2 in D minor, BMV 1004.

Almond holds the Charles and Marie Caestecker Concertmaster Chair at the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. He is a former concertmaster of the Rotterdam Philharmonic and has been a guest concertmaster with the London Philharmonic. He is an active solo and chamber musician, performing in the U.S. and abroad.

McCabe appears frequently as a solo recitalist and chamber musician and has performed in the U.S., Canada, Southeast Asia and England. At Oregon State, McCabe directs the piano program and is the artistic director of Corvallis-OSU Piano International and its Steinway Recital Series.

Tickets are $25 in advance or $28 at the door for general admission; and $20 in advance, $23 at the door for seniors, youth and non-OSU college students. OSU students will be admitted free with a valid student ID card. Advance tickets are available at Gracewinds Music and online at TicketTomato.com. Any remaining tickets will be sold at The LaSells Stewart Center beginning at 6:30 p.m. the night of the show.

SAC Presents is a participant in Corvallis Arts for All, a program which offers up to two tickets for $5 each to participants in the SNAP Program with a valid Oregon Trail Card. The tickets may be purchased at The LaSells Stewart Center the night of the concert.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Erin Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu

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Frank Almond. Credit Nigel Parry, CPI.  

Frank Almond

OSU Theatre opens 2015-16 season with ‘Romeo and Juliet’ in November

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre’s 2015-16 season will begin this month with a production of William Shakespeare’s enduring tale of young love, “Romeo and Juliet.” 

Performances will be held beginning at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 12-14 and Nov. 19-20 and at 2 p.m. Nov. 22 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

OSU theater arts professor George Caldwell is directing the familiar tale of star-crossed lovers, which is set at the height of the 19th-century Romantic era and will feature elegant costumes and exciting swordplay.

The cast features OSU students Kolby Baethke as Paris; Daniel Barber as Mercutio; Cheyenne Dickey as a vendor;  Robert Best as Lord Montague; Dakota Carter as a Montague; Ruth Drake as a vendor; Erick Harris as Samson; Nick Diaz-Hui as Tybalt; Lindsey Esch as Lady Montague; Sedona Garcia as Benvolia; Anahelena Goodman-Flood as a friend; Brian Greer as Romeo; Alex Herrington as Rosaline; Emerson Hovekamp as a Capulet;  Jade Kasbohm as a local; Sidney King as the apothecary; Hunter Leishman as Abraham; Annie Parham as Juliet; Nate Pereira as a Capulet servant; Chase Pixley as a Capulet; Emily Upton as the nurse; Steve Walter as a Montague; and Cory Warren as the Prince.

Also featured are community actors Rick Wallace as Lord Capulet; Diana Jepsen as Lady Capulet; and Craig Currier as Friar Lawrence.

‘Romeo and Juliet’ is the first production of the 2015-16 OSU Theatre season, “All the World’s a Stage: Celebrating Shakespeare,” and will feature a collection of plays inspired by Shakespeare. The season is being dedicated to the memory of C.V. “Ben” Bennett, a long-time OSU faculty member who died this summer. During his career, Bennett worked in technical theater, as a director, as coordinator of the University Theatre and as chair of the Department of Speech Communication at OSU.

Other productions planned for the season include Cole Porter’s jazzy musical, “Kiss Me Kate,” Paula Vogel’s “Desdemona: A Play About A Handkerchief,” and Tom Stoppard’s “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.” 

Tickets for ‘Romeo and Juliet’ are $12; $10 for seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ or by calling the box office at 541-737-2784. Accommodations for disabilities and group ticket sales may also be arranged through the box office.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Elizabeth Helman, Elizabeth.Helman@oregonstate.edu

 

Panelists to discuss Iran nuclear deal Nov. 5 at Oregon State

Oregon State University faculty and other experts will discuss the latest news and information about the nuclear deal with Iran beginning at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 5, in the Valley Library on campus.

The event is an opportunity to explore the historical roots of the accord, consider its impact on war and peace, and discuss central issues related to non-proliferation and related international relations issues.

It is sponsored by OSU’s Citizenship and Crisis initiative, directed by history professor Christopher McKnight Nichols. The discussion will be moderated by event co-organizer Jacob Hamblin, professor of the history of science and director of environmental arts and humanities at OSU. Panelists include:

  • Nichols, who also is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations;
  • Jonathan Katz, a history professor whose research has focused on Iranian history and Islamic political theory;
  • Linda Richards, instructor in the history of science, whose research has focused on issues related to human rights and the history of nuclear technologies;
  • Mark Schanfein, senior proliferation adviser at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former employee of the International Atomic Energy Agency;
  • Susan Voss, nuclear engineer, president of Global Nuclear Network Analysis, a consulting firm, and former employee of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

The discussion will be held in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center in the library, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. It is free and open to the public.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

‘Contemporary Japanese Prints’ exhibit opens Nov. 9 at Fairbanks Gallery

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “Contemporary Japanese Prints,” an exhibit exploring the Japanese aesthetic, will be on display Nov. 9 through Dec. 1 in the Fairbanks Gallery at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

A reception will be held from 4:30 to 6 p.m. on Nov. 19, with a gallery talk by OSU art professor Yuji Hiratsuka at 5 p.m.

“Contemporary Japanese Prints” explores the distinctive and influential Japanese aesthetic. A driving force behind this aesthetic is Japan’s appreciation of technical skill and craftsmanship. From fashion to fine art, the physical artifacts of Japanese culture reflect this dedication to creating precious and precise art and design, exhibit organizers say.

This dedication is well-suited to printmaking, a medium where the tools, workshop, esoteric details and variety of techniques make it an art form which is process-driven. The work in this exhibition embodies both superb technical ability and the alluring Japanese aesthetic.

The artists represented in the exhibit are from all stages in their careers. Yukio Fukazawa is a 91-year-old graphic master, while Fumiko Suzuki is a 27-year-old recent graduate of art school. She is producing hand-drawn stone lithographs; her images are that of her contemporary female artists in Tokyo portrayed in intimate self-reflection.

Keisuke Yamamoto, Tomuyuki Sakuta, Sohee Kim, Azumi Takeda and Ryohei Tanaka are among the other artists featured in the exhibit.

This exhibit was curated by Miranda K. Metcalf, director of contemporary works of paper at Davidson Galleries in Seattle. Metcalf traveled to Tokyo in September 2014 to research and prepare the exhibition.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Douglas Russell, 541-737-5009, or drussell@oregonstate.edu

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“Perhaps” by Fumiko Suzuki

Perhaps

“Golden Seven” by Hikari Hirose

Golden Seven

“A Frozen Passage” by Yukio Fukazama

 

A Frozen Passage

Novelist T. Geronimo Johnson to read at Oregon State Nov. 5

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Author T. Geronimo Johnson will give a free public reading beginning at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 5, in the Valley Library rotunda on the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow.

Johnson is the author of “Hold it ‘Til it Hurts,” a PEN/Faulkner finalist. His most recent book, “Welcome to Braggsville,” was longlisted for the National Book Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction.

“Welcome to Braggsville” is a provocative comedy about four liberal University of California, Berkeley students who stage a mock lynching during a Civil War reenactment. It was named one of the 10 books all Georgians should read by the Georgia Center for the Book, and was recommended by UC Berkeley as summer reading for incoming undergraduates.

The Washington Post hailed the book, describing it as: “The most dazzling, most unsettling, most oh-my-God-listen-up novel you’ll read this year.”

Johnson is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. He is a founding and core faculty member in the OSU-Cascades low-residency creative writing program, teaching fiction. He also has taught writing at UC Berkeley, Stanford, Iowa Writers’ Workshop, The Prague Summer Program, San Quentin and elsewhere. 

The reading is part of the 2015-16 Visiting Writers Series at Oregon State, which is sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing with support from the OSU Libraries and Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

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T. Geronimo Johnson

T. Geronimo Johnson

Young Latinos experience discrimination when obtaining health care, research shows

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Young Latinos living in rural areas say they face discrimination when they obtain health care services – a factor that could contribute to disparities in their rates for obtaining medical care and in their health outcomes, a new study from Oregon State University has found.

Perceived discrimination is considered a barrier to obtaining health care services for underrepresented populations, including Latinos, according to lead researcher Daniel López-Cevallos, associate director of research for the Center for Latino/a Studies and Engagement at OSU.

The findings were published recently in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. The research was co-authored by S. Marie Harvey, associate dean and professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. Harvey received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to support the study.

Researchers conducted interviews with 349 young adult Latinos, ages 18 to 25, living in rural Oregon. Nearly 40 percent of those interviewed said they had experienced health care discrimination, such as being prevented from accessing services; being hassled; or being made to feel inferior in some way.

“What matters is the perception,” Harvey said. “If a person is less likely to seek out services because of that perception, it needs to be addressed.”

Latinos are considered an underserved group because they are less likely to obtain regular health care services and have higher rates of chronic disease such as diabetes than the general population, leading to disparities in their overall health and well-being. 

The researchers’ goal was to better understand the role perceived discrimination plays in Latinos’ access to and use of health care services. Much of the past research on discrimination in health care has focused on African-Americans and people living in urban settings. This study emphasizes the experience of Latinos living in rural areas, a trend emerging as Latino populations move to rural areas across the nation, Lopez-Cevallos said.

“We have a different population here, so we want to be able to address concerns in Oregon and other states with growing rural Latino communities,” he said.

Addressing health care barriers facing Latinos and other underrepresented groups is important because when health care issues go undiagnosed or untreated, health care costs tend to rise. Prevention, early diagnosis and disease management are critical components of health care reform under the federal Affordable Care Act.

Nearly 45 percent of foreign-born Latinos, reported discrimination, compared to about 32 percent of Latinos born in the U.S. Researchers did not ask participants in the study about their immigration status.

Some Latinos may feel discriminated against simply because they are not eligible for health care programs and cannot get the access to services that they need, Lopez-Cevallos said.

Immigration reform policies, such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy enacted by President Obama in 2012, could also open access for Latinos who are not eligible for care under the Affordable Care Act. People who qualify for the program have access to employment, and employment often leads to access to health care, Lopez-Cevallos said.

The findings also suggest a need to improve “cultural competency” among health care providers, from the doctors to the receptionists to the lab technicians, so Latinos are treated with respect and dignity, the researchers said.

“It’s not all on the doctor, it’s up to the whole health care team,” Lopez-Cevallos said.

“For young adult Latinos, ‘confianza,’ a term that encompasses trust, respect, level of communication and confidentiality, is really important,” Harvey added. “If they don’t feel like they are treated with confianza, they may view that as discrimination.”

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Daniel López-Cevallos, 541-737-3850, Daniel.lopez-cevallos@oregonstate.edu; S. Marie Harvey, 541-737-3824, Marie.harvey@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University’s School of Arts and Communication launches new arts event series

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The School of Arts and Communication in Oregon State University’s College of Liberal Arts is starting a new performing and visual arts series to bring well-known headliners, rising stars and unique, lesser-known artists and ensembles to Corvallis throughout the year. 

The series, “SAC Presents,” will feature a wide range of musical genres, from country music to jazz, chamber music and rock. The series also will include exhibits and lectures by visual artists and guest speakers addressing topics associated with the arts.

“This new series allows us to bring a wide range of artists to the campus and the community, while also providing our students with opportunities to go to a variety of performances they might not otherwise have an opportunity to experience,” said Lee Ann Garrison, director of the School of Arts and Communication.

SAC Presents will kick off with several events during OSU’s homecoming weekend. They are: 

  • “How Country Music Became America’s Pop”: A talk by Bob Santelli, executive director of the Los Angeles-based GRAMMY Museum, Thursday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. Free and open to the public.
  • The Music Revolution Project: A select group of OSU students and alumni will spend the day in a songwriting workshop with Santelli, a music producer and music faculty, followed by a concert showcasing their work. The performance will be held at 4 p.m., Friday, Oct. 23, in the Fairbanks Gallery at OSU, 220 S.W. 26th St. Free and open to the public.
  • Jackson Michelson Concert: Rising country music star Michelson, a Corvallis native, will present a free concert on Friday, Oct. 23. The Grange Hall Drifters will open the show, which is co-sponsored by the OSU Alumni Association. 8 p.m., Student Experience Center Plaza, 2251 S.W. Jefferson Way.

The series will continue in November with a performance by concert violinist, recording artist and Milwaukee Symphony concertmaster Frank Almond on Nov. 17. Almond will perform a recital to commemorate the 300th birthday of his celebrated, historical instrument, a 1715 Lipinski Stradivari. The concert will be held in Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center. Tickets are $25; they are available at Gracewinds Music in Corvallis and online at TicketTomato.com.

Performances by the chamber music group Ivy Street Ensemble; Douglas Detrick’s AnyWhen Ensemble, a chamber music- jazz hybrid band; and other events also are being planned for the winter and spring terms, with dates to be announced later.

The new series, along with growth in OSU’s music, art, and theatre programs, is supported in part by generous gifts from donors, including donations made during the Cornerstone for the Arts challenge, in which donors gave over $6 million to support the arts at Oregon State.

More information about SAC Presents is available online at http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/sac-presents-series.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Erin O’Shea Sneller, 541-619-2420, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu