OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

Hazing remains a concern in college marching bands, new study shows

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Nearly a third of college marching band members surveyed in a national study observed hazing in their programs but few of the students reported the activities, often because of fears of retribution or loss of social standing, according to researchers.

Public verbal humiliation and public degradation were the most common forms of hazing reported by the band members, said Jason Silveira, an assistant professor of music education in the College of Liberal Arts at Oregon State University and lead author of the study, published recently in the Journal of Research in Music Education. Co-author of the study is Michael Hudson of the University of Kentucky.

The findings indicate there may still be confusion about what constitutes hazing and band members may need more education to understand what hazing is and why it shouldn’t be tolerated, Silveira said.

“Despite all of our efforts, the message about hazing is still not getting out there,” he said. “Band participants might say it’s no big deal, it’s what we do. It may not be a big deal to that person, but to someone else it may be.”

Silveira and Hudson began investigating marching band hazing after several high-profile hazing incidents at colleges across the country, including the death of Robert Champion, a member of the Florida A&M University marching band who died during a hazing incident in 2011. Silveira had recently finished graduate school at another Florida institution at the time of Champion’s death.

They found that few researchers had examined hazing in the performing arts; the little research that did exist tended to be part of larger hazing studies involving athletics or Greek organizations as well, Silveira said. So Silveira and Hudson set out to learn more about students’ attitudes toward, understanding of and exposure to hazing in their marching bands.

“We wanted to pull back the veil of secrecy and see if there was anything we could do to help prevent hazing incidents in the future,” Silveira said.

With permission from band directors, the researchers queried more than 1,200 undergraduate and graduate students who participate in NCAA Division I marching band programs in 30 states across the U.S. Student participation in the online survey was voluntary.

Overall, band members reported that they had never been forced to participate in most of the 18 types of hazing incidents listed in the survey. Only four types of hazing had been experienced by at least 10 percent of the respondents.

Nearly 20 percent of band members indicated they had been required to sing or chant by themselves or with selected others while in public and nearly 20 percent reported being yelled at, cursed at or sworn at. Nearly 15 percent of the band members reported that they had been asked not to associate with certain specific people but not others. And nearly 12 percent of the students reported depriving themselves of sleep.

The numbers were even lower when students were asked if they had participated in hazing others. About 3 percent of the survey respondents reported forcing others to participate in a drinking game, for example. Nearly 8 percent reported forcing others to sing or chant in public and 5 percent reported yelling, cursing or swearing at other members.

The vast majority of the students indicated they were aware of their university’s hazing policies and expressed negative views toward hazing activities, Silveira said.

“That’s a promising finding, that hazing is not being supported,” he said.

However, nearly a third of the band members also reported observing some type of hazing. That indicates a possible disconnect in band members’ understanding of what hazing is, Silveira said.

Silveira suggested band directors or other band leaders may need to step up education and reporting efforts to root out hazing in their programs. That might include establishing a system for anonymous reporting of hazing; comprehensive reviews of hazing policies with members; or using role-playing to help members better understand what hazing is.

“There was a sense that band members didn’t see some behaviors as hazing,” Silveira said. “Giving students concrete examples that help delineate what hazing is might help.”

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Jason Silveira, 541-737-2514. Jason.silveira@oregonstate.edu

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Jason Silveira

Jason Silveira

Author Claire Vaye Watkins to read at Oregon State May 22

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Author Claire Vaye Watkins will read at Oregon State University on Friday, May 22, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library rotunda (201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis).

The event is free and open to the public. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow the reading.

Watkins is a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow and an assistant professor at Bucknell University. She also is the co-director of the Mojave School, a free creative writing workshop for teenagers in rural Nevada.

Watkins’ stories and essays have appeared in Granta, One Story, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Glimmer Train, Best of the West 2011, New Stories from the Southwest 2013, the New York Times and elsewhere. In 2012, she was selected as one of the National Book Foundation’s “5 Under 35.”

Her collection of short stories, “Battleborn,” won numerous awards, including the Story Prize, the Dylan Thomas Prize, and the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

The Rumpus called Watkins, “Exceptional… A writer of great precision and greater restraint, [she] is a natural storyteller whose material enriches that gift rather than engulfing it… One doesn’t have to be from the Battleborn state to recognize and appreciate literature that resonates like this.”

This event is part of the 2014-15 Visiting Writers Series sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film.

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Oregon State University to host ‘The Co.’ – an interactive event focused on maker culture

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University on May 28 will host “The Co.,” an interactive event showcasing the wide array of “maker” activities happening in and around Corvallis.

The event, which is free and open to people of all ages, will run from noon to 6 p.m. in the Memorial Union ballroom, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

Maker culture is a popular movement that honors craftsmanship and technology. It brings together do-it-yourself enthusiasts, designers and engineers to share knowledge, skills and resources – and to collaborate, innovate and create.

The Co. was designed to honor the simple act of creating and to allow campus and community groups to network. It will feature an array of activities including a maker fair, speakers, interactive demonstrations, kinetic sculptures from the da Vinci Days festival and more.

“Our title stems from the prefix of applicable words such as collaborate, co-design, co-create,” said Charles Robinson, the event’s director. “Our goal is to promote an inclusive culture that knocks down barriers and offers instead a collaborative model for making, creating, and hands-on learning.”

Exhibitors at the maker fair include several OSU departments and programs such as wood science and art students from the College of Forestry, the College of Liberal Arts, the Craft Center, robotics, Precollege Programs, the College of Business, and the OSU Solar Vehicle Team.

Community exhibitors include Bricks 4 Kidz, da Vinci Days, NuScale Power, Corvallis Arts Center, the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library and the Pacific Slope Archaeological Laboratory. A “2-D room” presented by the OSU libraries will focus on print technologies.

Scheduled presenters include Frankie Flood, associate professor at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, who teaches jewelry and metal-smith and oversees a digital craft research lab; Barry Kudrowitz, a toy designer, musician and engineer from MIT and the University of Minnesota; and OSU robotics professor Yigit Mengüc. A full list of speakers, times and locations will be posted online: http://gototheco.tumblr.com.

A maker film festival will be held in advance of the event. Maker-themed films such as “Handmade Nation” and “Maker: A Documentary on the Maker Movement” will be screened.  On May 19 and May 26, films will be shown in Owen Hall Room 103; on May 20 and May 27, screenings will be held in Milam Auditorium. All screenings begin at 6 p.m.

Satellite events will be held May 28 in Hood River and in Tillamook through a partnership with OSU’s OPEN Campus network. The Hood River event will be held at Hood River Valley High School, 1220 Indian Creek Road.  The public is welcome from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. The Tillamook event will be held at Tillamook Bay Community College; details are still being finalized.

For a complete schedule and more information, or to sign up to exhibit at The Co., visit: http://gototheco.tumblr.com.

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Charles Robinson, 541-737-6535, charles.robinson@oregonstate.edu

Auditions for ‘Romeo and Juliet’ to be held May 17-19 at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auditions will be held May 17 through May 19 for Oregon State University Theatre’s upcoming production of William Shakespeare’s quintessential tragedy of star-crossed lovers, “Romeo and Juliet.”

The play calls for a cast of about 25 actors but the spring auditions are to cast 12 principal roles for the production, which will be performed in November. Another round of auditions to fill out the cast will be held in September. Those cast for principal roles will rehearse individually until the end of the spring term, with rehearsals resuming in the fall.

Auditions will be held from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. each day in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. Auditions are open to all OSU students, faculty and staff and to the community and those interested may attend one or all of the audition sessions.

Those auditioning are asked to read “Rome and Juliet” in advance. Scripts are available online and in libraries and bookstores. Tryouts will consist of group readings from the script. Participants also will be asked to prepare a short, one-minute monologue from any Shakespeare play. The monologue does not need to be memorized.

The performances will be held Nov. 12-14 and Nov. 19-22.

For additional information contact George Caldwell, george.caldwell@oregonstate.edu, 503-931-4222, or Arin Dooley, arin.dooley@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-2853.

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OSU students to travel to Nepal to assist with earthquake recovery efforts, film documentary

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Two Oregon State University students are scheduled to travel to Nepal Friday, May 1, to film a documentary and to aid in humanitarian efforts following the devastating 7.8-magnitude earthquake that occurred there on April 25.

Cole Miller and Christian Nishioka had been planning the trip to Nepal since January. They were set to accompany CardioStart International, a Florida-based aid group that provides heart surgery and teaches local medical personnel advanced cardiac care, on a two-week humanitarian mission as part of a school project.

When the earthquake occurred, the students’ digital arts instructor, Alina Padilla-Miller, was sure the trip would be cancelled. But CardioStart is continuing with the mission, and the students don’t want to stay home when they could be of service in Nepal. 

“I still want to film a documentary, but I’m a lot more concerned about how I can help the people,” said Nishioka, 22, of Sherwood, Ore. “I actually felt like this was an even better time to go and help.” 

“Even if I am scared, I know the people over there are even more scared,” said Miller, 22, of Portland. “I think I would regret it if I had a chance to make a difference in the world and didn’t do it.”

The students’ commitment to the project has impressed their teacher.

“When the students said they still wanted to go, I was just stunned,” Padilla-Miller said. “Their biggest concern was how much aid they could provide.”

Miller, a senior majoring in digital communication arts, has been collecting monetary donations that will be used to purchase supplies needed in Nepal. Nishioka, a senior double-majoring in new media communications and business, has spent the last few days rounding up donations of food, blankets and other supplies and also set up donation boxes at each of Oregon State’s cultural centers. Some of the donations also may be shipped to Nepal, he said.

Officials with CardioStart have assured Padilla-Miller that the team and the students’ safety is a priority on the trip. The emphasis on safety and health is one of the benefits of traveling with a medical-based aid group, she said. Their destination is the city of Dhulikhel, about 38 miles from Kathmandu, where the medical team will work with a local hospital.

“We’re just going to be lending a hand wherever we can,” Miller said. “If we can at least put a smile on someone’s face, it’ll be worth it.” 

The students still plan to gather video footage of their work. They’ll use it to create a documentary as part of a new digital media course that is in development at OSU. A goal of the new course is to give students a chance to develop a project from design through filming and production, Padilla-Miller said.

Miller and Nishioka are the first two students to take the course, which is being offered as a pilot this spring. Footage from the trip also will be used in promotional materials for CardioStart as part of a partnership with the company, Padilla-Miller said.

The students hope their documentary will help demonstrate the need for aid in Nepal and encourage people to volunteer or donate to humanitarian aid efforts through programs such as CardioStart.

“Everyone has their own point of view and perspective,” Nishioka said. “If I show people what I’m seeing, it’s going to be different than what is on the news. And it might encourage people to get involved.”

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Alina Padilla-Miller, 541-514-0349, padillal@onid.oregonstate.edu

Auditions for OSU’s summer Bard in the Quad production to be held May 10-11

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Open auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s popular summer event, Bard in the Quad, will take place on May 10 and May 11 at 6 p.m. in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. Call-backs may be held May 12, if needed.

Bard in the Quad is an annual production featuring Shakespeare plays in a casual, outdoor summer atmosphere. The 2015 production will be the romantic comedy, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

Auditions are open to all OSU students, staff, and faculty and community members. They will consist of cold readings and movement exercises. Director Elizabeth Helman will be casting for a company of 12-14 players.

Performance dates for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” are Aug. 6-9 and Aug. 13-16. Rehearsals will begin with a read-through on June 14. Generally, rehearsals will be scheduled 5 to 9 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays until early August. Technical rehearsals will begin at 9 a.m. Aug. 1.

All cast members must be available to attend all technical rehearsals and performances. Some conflicts can be worked around during the early rehearsal process. Performers should bring their schedules to the auditions.

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/1NbuaeH or contact Helman at Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu.

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Writing, publishing a first book the focus of April 24 Editorial Festival at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Visiting Writers Series will host its fifth Editorial Festival on Friday, April 24, in the Memorial Union, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

The annual event is designed to engage students and community members in discussions about contemporary writing, publishing and media studies. This year’s theme is writing and publishing a first book.

At 4 p.m., professional writers and editors Geffrey Davis, T Clutch Fleischmann and Nina McConigley will participate in a roundtable discussion about how their first books came to be, from manuscript to editorial meetings to book launch. Caroline Casey, managing director of Coffee House Press, will moderate the discussion.

At 7:30 p.m., the authors will give readings from their first books. Both events will take place the Memorial Union’s Journey Room and are free and open to the public.

Davis is an OSU alumnus who teaches in the MFA program at the University of Arkansas. His collection, “Revising the Storm,” won the Poulin Poetry Prize. His other honors include the Halley Poetry Prize, the Dogwood Prize in Poetry, the Wabash Prize for Poetry, the Steinberg Memorial/Academy of American Poets Prize, and a fellowship from the Cave Canem foundation.

Fleischmann, of Seattle, is the author of “Syzygy, Beauty” and a nonfiction editor at DIAGRAM. A contributing editor at EssayDaily, Fleischmann’s critical and creative work has appeared in places such as The Brooklyn Rail, the PEN Poetry Series, and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

McConigley is the author of the story collection “Cowboys and East Indians,” which won the 2014 PEN Open Book Award and the High Plains Book Award. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Orion, Salon, Virginia Quarterly Review, American Short Fiction and The Asian American Literary Review. She teaches at the University of Wyoming and at the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Houston.

Casey has a background in marketing, publicity, and acquisitions, including stints at Sarabande Books and Stanford University Press, and holds an MFA from the nonfiction writing program at the University of Iowa.

The Visiting Writers Series is supported by the Valley Library and the OSU Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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OSU Theatre to present ‘Dolly West’s Kitchen’ in May

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will stage a production of “Dolly West’s Kitchen,” May 7-9 and May 15-17 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The World War II-era play by Frank McGuinness explores how Ireland’s neutrality in the war created a difficult atmosphere. It continues the 2014-15 theater season theme of “War and Remembrance.”

In the play, the witty and educated Dolly West has returned to her hometown from Italy to care for her elderly mother and siblings. The town of Buncrana in Northern Ireland sits close to the British port of Derry, where American and British soldiers are gathered in case Hitler makes it that far. In Dolly’s kitchen, Irish men and women, an English soldier and two G.I.s struggle with love, the disastrous effect of the war and the difficult position of remaining neutral.

Guest director Jade Rosina McCutcheon said she is drawn to the blending of human relationships with real world issues in the production. “The cost of war is enormous but so is the cost of losing your country to another,” she said. “This play will give us all plenty to reflect on.”

The cast features Oregon State students Joe Cullen as Marco; Burke De Boer as Jamie; Diana Jepsen as Dolly; Pamela Mealy as Esther; Reed Morris as Justin; Annie Parham as Anna; Alex Small as Alec; and Cory Warren as Ned. OSU Theatre Arts faculty member Charlotte Headrick joins the cast as Rima West.

Show times are 7:30 p.m. May 7-9 and May 15-16, with a 2 p.m. matinee on May 17. Tickets are $12 for general admission; $10 for seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ  or by calling the box office at 541-737-2784. Contact the box office for disability accommodations, faculty/staff discounts or group ticket sales.

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‘Philosophy Talk’ to visit OSU for discussion on science, politics

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The nationally syndicated public radio show “Philosophy Talk” will visit Oregon State University on Wednesday, April 15, for a live taping.

The show will focus on the theme “Science and Politics – Friends or Foes” with featured guest Sharyn Clough, an associate professor of philosophy in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts.

The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Withycombe Theater, 2921 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. It is free and open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for audience participation.

Show hosts Ken Taylor and John Perry, both of Stanford University, will lead the discussion with questions such as: Could politics sometimes have a positive effect on objectivity in science? If so, which kinds of politics might have a positive effect and which might not? What criteria could we use to make the distinction? And does 'objectivity' still have meaning in this context?

Clough teaches courses in the study of knowledge with an emphasis on scientific knowledge. Her research focuses on objectivity and values in science. She has written and edited books on feminism and science, and has written a number of scholarly essays on science and values. She is writing a book for general audiences on science and politics.

“I plan to discuss some of the biggest mistaken assumptions in contemporary debates about politics and science – that politics in science is always a bad thing, and that political values are subjective, floating free of considerations of evidence,” Clough said.

“I argue that while science is never without political influences, some politics make science better and some make it worse, and we can tell the difference,” she said. “We might make mistakes and disagree about the evidence in either case, but that shouldn’t stop us from seeing that there is evidence in both cases to consider.”

The show is scheduled to air in June. “Philosophy Talk” airs on dozens of public radio stations internationally, including on the radio network of Oregon Public Broadcasting. On OPB, the show is broadcast at 9 p.m. Thursdays.

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Robert Peckyno, 541-737-8560 or Robert.Peckyno@oregonstate.edu

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Sharyn Clough

Sharyn Clough

Oregon State to host Holocaust Memorial Week events April 13-21

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Auschwitz survivor and 2015 Elie Wiesel Award-winner Thomas Buergenthal will speak at Oregon State University in Corvallis as part of the university’s annual observance of Holocaust Memorial Week, April 13-21.

Born in Slovakia in 1934, Buergenthal recounted his survival of Auschwitz in the memoir, “A Lucky Child.” After coming to the United States he became a prominent legal scholar, specializing in international law. He has served as a judge on several panels that have dealt with human rights issues, including 10 years of service on the International Court of Justice.

Buergenthal will speak at 7:30 p.m. April 21 in the Austin Auditorium at the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. His talk will focus on his experience during World War II and his perspective on international law’s role in combatting persecution and protecting human rights.

For the first time in the event’s 29-year history, Holocaust Memorial Week this year will be expanded to include an event in Portland. Buergenthal and OSU faculty members will participate in a panel discussion on religious and human rights at 7 p.m. Monday, April 20, at the Mittleman Jewish Community Center, 6651 S.W. Capitol Highway, in Portland. Other panelists are Rena Lauer, Amy Koehlinger, Stuart Sarbacker and Paul Kopperman of OSU.

Holocaust Memorial Week is presented by the School of History, Philosophy and Religion in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts in association with the City of Corvallis and School District 509-J. All events are free and open to the public. This year’s program includes a special focus on human rights and women’s rights.

Other Holocaust Memorial Week events are:

  • Human rights lawyer Gabriela Rivera of Guatemala will speak about sexual violence against indigenous women in Guatemala at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 13, in the C & E Auditorium in the LaSells Stewart Center.
  • A virtual “tour” of Auschwitz will be presented by OSU philosophy instructor Marta Kunecka at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 14, in the Horizon Room in the Memorial Union at OSU. Kunecka conducted tours of the concentration camp while in graduate school in Krakow, Poland, and will recreate the experience using visual aids.
  • “Watchers of the Sky,” a documentary film about Raphael Lemkin, who coined the term genocide, will be shown at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 15, in the C &E Auditorium in the LaSells Stewart Center.
  • Elizabeth Heineman, a feminist historian who has written extensively on the subject of women in Nazi Germany, will be giving a talk entitled “Human Rights Law and the Issue of Violence against Women,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 16, in the C & E Auditorium in the LaSells Stewart Center.
  • Two academic conferences, the Social Justice Conference and the International Health Symposium, will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, April 16, in the Journey Room in the Memorial Union, and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, April 17, in the Snell International Forum at OSU. Students will present papers on topics such as violence against women, gender rights and human rights, LGBTQ rights and acceptance, and the relationship between gendered violence and genocide. For more information on the conferences, visit http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/sjc.

For more information about the events, visit http://oregonstate.edu/dept/holocaust

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Robert Peckyno, 541-737-8560 or Robert.peckyno@oregonstate.edu

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Thomas Buergenthal

Thomas Buergenthal