OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of liberal arts

Businesses need to plan for, address impacts on biodiversity, new report indicates

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Businesses large and small need to begin the difficult work of assessing and addressing their impact on biodiversity and ecosystem services in order to reduce risk to natural resources in the future, according to a new report from Oregon State University researchers.

Biodiversity and ecosystem services refer to the variety and diversity of plants and animals in the ecosystem and the benefits that nature provides, respectively. They should be part of companies’ strategic planning, said Sally Duncan, director of the OSU Policy Analysis Lab in the School of Public Policy.

“This is an issue of risk management – it has to be part of a strategic plan,” Duncan said. “As one pioneer company leader put it, the greatest risk of all is not doing anything.”

The report, “The New Nature of Business: How Business Pioneers Support Biodiversity and Ecosystems Services,” provides a framework for companies to begin identifying and addressing their potential impacts on the ecosystem.

The report was published this month and is available at www.newnatureofbusiness.org. Partners in the multidisciplinary, international project include Oregon State University and the University of Sydney Business School. Funding comes from the National Science Foundation’s National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, with additional support from the University of Sydney Business School.

Biodiversity of plants, animals and microorganisms is essential to a properly functioning ecosystem. Ecosystem services are the benefits of such a system, and include goods such as food and fiber or services such as flood control or pest management.

But biodiversity is threatened by environmental degradation due to things such as habitat destruction and climate change. That, in turn, poses challenges for business leaders, who will have to deal with the ramifications, including pressure from consumers to improve business practices.

“There are many, many companies that have started doing important work on water conservation and energy conservation,” Duncan said. “Biodiversity and ecosystem services are much more complicated. They’re very hard to measure and most companies haven’t even thought about it yet.”

Corporate giants Dow Chemical Co., Pfizer Inc. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc., and smaller organizations such as the Eugene Water and Electric Board, are among the pioneers who are taking steps to address their impacts on biodiversity. Their efforts are highlighted in the report.

Pfizer created a Wildlife Management Team and employees are working to restore and enhance the wildlife on the company’s 2,200-acre manufacturing site in Michigan. Eugene Water and Electric is working with landowners and local government to change land management practices, rather than build a new water treatment plant and charge higher rates.

Researchers developed a decision-making framework to help other companies get started addressing their own impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems services. The hope is that business leaders will use and test the framework and share their experiences on the project website, Duncan said.

“Any change to a big organization is extremely difficult,” Duncan said. “If business leaders see a story on the website that they can relate to, it might seem less scary.”

Developing a tool to measure companies’ impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems services and making that tool available to companies around the world are some of the next steps for the project, she said.

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Sally Duncan, 541-737-9931 or Sally.duncan@oregonstate.edu

Linda Bacon to speak about obesity myths and body acceptance at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Linda Bacon, author of “Health at Every Size: The Surprising Truth About your Weight,” will speak about weight prejudice and body acceptance at Oregon State University in Corvallis on Thursday, May 22.

Bacon’s presentation, “The Next Public Health Challenge: Losing the Anti-Obesity Paradigm,” will examine myths about obesity and problems with a health agenda that is focused on the concept of thinness. She’ll also offer an alternative that does not use weight as a barometer for health or promote weight loss as a means to achieving better health.

Bacon will speak from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Withycombe Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way. The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by Healthy Campus Initiatives and the School of Psychological Science in the College of Liberal Arts at OSU.

Bacon is a professor, researcher and author who combines academic expertise and clinical experience to bring together scientific research and practical application. She focuses on well-being rather than weight to help people of all sizes achieve fitness, health and happiness without dieting.

She is an assistant researcher in the nutrition department and teaches nutrition at City College of San Francisco. She holds a doctorate in physiology from the University of California, Davis.

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Patti Watkins, 541-737-9234, pwatkins@oregonstate.edu

Writer Tobias Wolff to receive Stone Award from OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Award-winning American writer Tobias Wolff will receive Oregon State University’s Stone Award for Lifetime Literary Achievement  at a special event in Portland May 21.

The biennial Stone Award recognizes a major American author who has created a body of critically-acclaimed work and has mentored young writers. Wolff is the second recipient of the honor, which was established in 2011.

The award ceremony, which begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Portland Art Museum, will include an on-stage interview with Wolff about his work and the presentation of the award. A reception and book-signing will follow. Tickets are required and are available at the museum’s ticket office or online: http://bit.ly/1hJXdVh.

On May 22, Wolff will appear at a free public reading, question-and-answer session and book signing at OSU’s main campus in Corvallis. The event begins at 7:30 p.m. in the CH2M HILL Alumni Center, 725 S.W. 26th St.

Wolff, who teaches creative writing at Stanford University, is best known for his work in two genres: the short story and the memoir. His first short story collection, “In the Garden of the North American Martyrs,” was published in 1981. Wolff chronicled his early life in two memoirs, “In Pharaoh’s Army” (1994) and “This Boy’s Life” (1989), which was turned into a 1993 movie starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert De Niro.

“Tobias Wolff is a master storyteller – generous, compassionate, keenly observant,” said Keith Scribner, a professor of English and creative writing at OSU. Scribner became friends with Wolff while he was teaching at Stanford. 

“When we read his novels, memoirs, and short stories, we come away richer for the experience in part because we know ourselves better,” Scribner said. “He is one of our nation’s preeminent writers and has mentored countless students who’ve had the good fortune to work with him.”

The Stone Award was established by Patrick and Vicki Stone to spotlight OSU’s Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing, which is in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The honorarium for the award is $20,000, making it one of the most substantial awards for lifetime literary achievement offered by any university in the country. The first honoree was Joyce Carol Oates in 2012.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Keith Scribner, 541-737-1645, keith.scribner@oregonstate.edu

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Tobias Wolff

Tobias_Wolff

Artist DJ Spooky to perform free concert at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Composer, multimedia artist and author Paul D. Miller, also known as DJ Spooky, will perform a free concert on Friday, May 9, beginning at 7:30 p.m.at Oregon State University.  

Miller will be joined by OSU musicians Dana Reason and Michael Gamble. The show will be held in the Construction & Engineering Hall at the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

Miller is known for his genre-bending art, vast catalogue of music and work in environmental awareness and social justice. In addition to collaborating with musicians such as Chuck D, Thurston Moore and Yoko Ono, Miller has travelled the world to perform.

Miller was the first artist-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and his work has appeared in The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, The Venice Biennial for Architecture and other museums.

He is the executive editor of “Origin Magazine,” which focuses on the intersection of art, yoga and new ideas. He is the composer of the multimedia performance piece “Terra Nova: Sinfonia Antarctica.” Miller also is the author of “Book of Ice,” a multimedia, multidisciplinary study of Antarctica that contemplates climate change and humanity’s relationship with the natural world.

The concert is sponsored by the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word and the College of Liberal Arts Music Department’s “Between the Cracks” series. In advance of his Corvallis appearance, Miller will be writer-in-residence for the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, which is co-sponsored by Spring Creek and the U.S. Forest Service.  

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Contact: Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198

Marijuana policy expert to give McCall Lecture

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Mason Tvert, communications director for the Marijuana Policy Project – and a leader of the campaign to legalize marijuana in Colorado – will deliver the annual Gov. Tom McCall Memorial Lecture at Oregon State University on Tuesday, May 13.

In his lecture, “The Road to Legal Marijuana in America,” Tvert will share insights on the past, present and future of marijuana policy in the United States.

The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Construction and Engineering Hall in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. The lecture is free and open to the public. It is presented by the OSU College of Liberal Arts and the School of Public Policy.

As director of communications, Tvert oversees the Marijuana Policy Project’s media strategy and online outreach efforts out of the organization's Denver office. Before joining the lobbying organization, he co-directed the successful campaign in support of Amendment 64, the 2012 ballot initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol in Colorado.

Previously, Tvert co-founded and directed Safer Alternative For Enjoyable Recreation, a Colorado-based nonprofit organization dedicated to educating the public about the relative safety of marijuana compared to alcohol. He is a member of the SAFER board of directors and a member of the advisory board for Marijuana Majority.

The OSU lectureship is named after Tom McCall, who was Oregon’s governor from 1967-75. Past lecturers have included several Oregon governors; Washington Post columnists David Broder and William Raspberry; political analyst Floyd McKay; Dennis Dimick of National Geographic magazine; and Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

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David Bernell, 541-737-6281, david.bernell@oregonstate.edu

Fairbanks Gallery at OSU to exhibit work of artist Royal Nebeker

“Dreams & Memories,” an exhibit of prints and monoprints by artist Royal Nebeker, opens May 5 in the Fairbanks Gallery at Oregon State University.

The gallery is located in Fairbanks Hall, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and the gallery is free and open to the public. The exhibit runs through May 28.

As an artist, Nebeker creates personalized narratives based on dreams and memories, often embellished with words and notations that help tell the story. Some of his works are based on personal events, others on literature. Through powerful and enigmatic imagery, Nebeker paints what arts historian Stephen C. McGough has called a reflective journey of the artist's life, exploring such universal themes as hope, fear, joy, anguish, sexuality, spirituality, power, vulnerability and the dynamics of personal relationships.

Throughout his career, Nebeker has focused on the human figure. His work is strongly influenced by  Norwegian painter Edvard Munch, the German Expressionists, Vienna Secessionist artists Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and others.

A prolific painter and printmaker, he has been featured in countless solo and group exhibitions over the past four decades and his work is included in public and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.

Nebeker studied in California at the Claremont College and Otis Art Institute, earned a master of fine arts degree from Brigham Young University in 1970 and completed a post graduate degree from the National School of Fine Arts in Oslo in 1972.

Source: 

Douglas Russell, 541-737-5009, drussell@oregonstate.edu

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"Dreamland" by Royal Nebeker

Dreamland - Royal Nebeker

"Lone Ranger and Tonto" by Royal Nebeker
Lone Ranger and Tonto - Royal Nebeker

OSU Theatre to perform ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ in May

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, “A Streetcar Named Desire,” at several performances in May.

The tragic and poetic tale of fading Southern belle Blanche DuBois will be performed at 7:30 p.m. on May 8-10 and May 16-17; and at 2 p.m. on May 18 on the main stage in Withycombe Hall, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

 “The masterpiece has been performed throughout the world in virtually every language because it speaks to the strength and frailty of human interactions when combat and violence too easily replace our thirst for love and caring,” said George Caldwell, director and scenic designer.

“A Streetcar Named Desire,” originally premiered in 1947 and has remained one of the most popular and memorable works in the American dramatic canon. After having lost the family estate to a series of misfortunes, the elegant and refined DuBois comes to the New Orleans French Quarter to stay with her sister, Stella.

Soon after her arrival, a vicious struggle for power erupts between the mannered Blanche and Stella’s bullying, boorish husband, Stanley Kowalski. Tensions run high as Stanley becomes obsessed with exposing Blanche’s long-buried secrets and dismantling her carefully structured persona.

The cast features OSU students Mike Beaton as Doctor; Nick Diaz-Hui as Pablo; Brian Greer as the Collector; Davey Kashuba as Mitch; J. Garrett Luna as the Piano Player; Anna Mahaffey as Blanche; Chris Peterman as Steve; Brittany Potter as Stella; Bryanna Rainwater as Eunice; Alex Reis as Stanley; Erin Wallerstein as the Nurse; and Emily Zellner-Gisler as the Flower Vendor.

Tickets are $12 for general admission; $10 seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased at the OSU Theatre Box Office by calling 541-737-2784 or online at http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/school-arts-and-communication/theatre.

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OSU to host Spanish Film Festival with screenings across Oregon

Oregon State University will host its first Spanish Language Film Festival, featuring films of the Spanish Film Club, May 3 through May 10. Screenings will be held in Corvallis, Madras, Bend and Tillamook.

Spanish film director Felix Viscarret will run a number of workshops in conjunction with screenings of the five films featured in the festival. All events are free and open to the public and will be accessible to both English and Spanish speakers.

“We wanted to reach out to Spanish-speaking communities and engage them by providing them opportunities to watch and discuss contemporary Spanish and Latin American cinema,” said Sebastian Heiduschke, coordinator of the World Languages and Cultures program in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts.

Heiduschke partnered with the Spanish Film Club to bring the films to Oregon. Spanish Film Club is an initiative of the film distribution company PRAGDA to bring contemporary Spanish and Latin American cinema to college campuses.

The schedule of screenings and workshops is:

  • Bend, Saturday, May 3: 1 p.m., “Que Culpa Tiene el Tomate,” 3:30 p.m. “Chico y Rita,” and 5:30 p.m., “El Regreso.” Screenings will be held in the Hitchcock Auditorium in Pioneer Hall at Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend.
  • Madras, Sunday, May 4: 8 a.m., Juntos program, with traditional Mexican breakfast and workshop. 11 a.m., “Chico y Rita,” Central Oregon Community College Madras campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road.
  • Corvallis, Monday, May 5: 6 p.m. workshop and 6:30 p.m. screening, “Chico y Rita,” followed by a question and answer session. Darkside Cinema, 215 S.W. Fourth St.
  • Corvallis, Tuesday, May 6: 6 p.m. workshop and 6:30 p.m. screening of “Wilaya,” followed by question and answer session, Darkside Cinema.
  • Corvallis, Wednesday, May 7:  6 p.m. workshop and 6:30 p.m. screening of “El Regreso,” followed by question and answer session, Darkside Cinema.
  • Corvallis, Thursday, May 8: 6 p.m. workshop and 6:30 p.m. screening of “Que Culpa Tiene el Tomate,” followed by question and answer session, Darkside Cinema.
  • Corvallis, Friday, May 9: 6 p.m. workshop, 6:30 p.m. screening of “Viajo Porque Preciso,” followed by a question and answer session, Darkside Cinema.
  • Tillamook, Saturday, May 10: Screening of “Chico y Rita,” time and location to be announced.

The screenings are sponsored by the School of Language, Culture and Society in the OSU College of Liberal Arts. The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of PRAGDA and the Embassy of Spain in Washington D.C., Spain-USA Foundation. Event organizers say they also appreciated the support of the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain.

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Contact: Sebastian Heiduschke, 541-737-3957, Sebastian.heiduschke@oregonstate.edu

OSU to celebrate 100th birthday of former faculty member Bernard Malamud

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will mark the 100th birthday this month of one of its most-recognized faculty members, acclaimed American novelist Bernard Malamud, with a celebration and the launch of a search for early copies of his book, “A New Life.”

The centenary celebration, featuring a display from the university’s Malamud archives, will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. Thursday, April 24, in the Valley Library at OSU. Neil Davison, an associate professor of English, will give a brief presentation; OSU English majors will read from “A New Life,” and archival materials from the library’s Malamud collection will be on display.

The event will be held in Special Collections on the fifth floor of the library, 201 S.W. Waldo Place.

It is free and open to the public. It is hosted by the School of Writing, Literature and Film in the OSU College of Liberal Arts and the English Student Association.

Malamud, who died in 1986, taught at OSU from 1949 to 1961. His books include “The Natural,” and “The Fixer,” for which he won a Pulitzer Prize. “A New Life,” published in 1961, is based on Malamud’s time in Corvallis.

Two members of the English faculty are searching for annotated, first-edition copies of “A New Life” that may have circulated in Corvallis in the 1960s. There are rumors that several copies of the book exist in Corvallis, with notations connecting real people and places in Corvallis to the characters and situations in the book, said assistant professor Ehren Pflugfelder.

Pflugfelder and assistant professor Raymond Malewitz are hoping one or more such copies still exist. They would like to borrow the books for use in a new digital humanities course being planned for 2015.

Digital humanities courses are a way for researchers to help students use new, technology-based research methods. Using the annotated books and other materials from the Malamud archives, students could create projects such as digital maps of places in the book, or a field guide to Malamud’s work in Corvallis, Pflugfelder said.

“We plan to offer the digital humanities course and focus on Malamud, but if we found an annotated copy of ‘A New Life,’ we would build the course around it,” Pflugfelder said. “It would be great raw material for the students to work from.”

Anyone who might have an early annotated copy of “A New Life,” or who knows of one, can contact Pflugfelder at Ehren.pflugfelder@oregonstate.edu.

Media Contact: 
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Elizabeth Sheehan, Elizabeth.sheehan@oregonstate.edu, regarding the event

Ehren Pflugfelder, Ehren.pflugfelder@oregonstate.edu, regarding the book search

The GRAMMY Museum announces affiliate partnership with Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has been selected as an official university affiliate of the Los Angeles-based GRAMMY Museum, providing the university access to the rich musical history and archives of the museum.

Through interactive exhibits and educational programs, the GRAMMY Museum explores and celebrates the enduring legacies of all forms of music and the history of the GRAMMY Awards. The museum’s collection includes personal artifacts from legendary GRAMMY winners such as Elvis Presley, Miles Davis and Neil Diamond.

“The GRAMMY Museum’s university affiliate program is designed to allow educational institutions to engage in an exciting resource-sharing opportunity,” said Bob Santelli, executive director of The GRAMMY Museum.  "We are very excited to welcome Oregon State University into The GRAMMY Museum family and look forward to building a great partnership.”

As a university affiliate, OSU will have access to the GRAMMY Museum’s content for educational purposes, curriculum resources, research programs, internship opportunities, professional development seminars, collaborative marketing and promotions, project-based learning and more.

Oregon State, which has its main campus in Corvallis, Ore., is one of two inaugural universities to join the new affiliate program. A celebration to mark the partnership will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, April 25, in the Memorial Union Lounge on the OSU campus, 2501 S.W. Jefferson Way, Corvallis.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will include a performance by OSU alumnus Roosevelt Credit, who has appeared on Broadway in the Tony Award-winning productions of “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess,” and Harold Prince’s revival of “Show Boat.”  Credit also has performed in venues such as Carnegie Hall and the Lincoln Center.

“Our Oregon State students are the real winners, whether through internships, networking opportunities, or use of the museum's extensive archives on the music industry’s history,” said Larry Rodgers, dean of OSU’s College of Liberal Arts. “This is an exciting new step in elevating the arts at Oregon State."

The affiliate program for the GRAMMY Museum is designed to help further the GRAMMY Museum’s education initiatives and mission in a collaborative and unique approach to arts education and outreach. Additional GRAMMY Museum university affiliates are expected to be announced throughout 2014.

About The GRAMMY Museum: Paying tribute to music's rich cultural history, this one-of-a-kind, 21st-century Museum explores and celebrates the enduring legacies of all forms of music, the creative process, the art and technology of the recording process, and the history of the premier recognition of excellence in recorded music — the GRAMMY Award. The GRAMMY Museum features 30,000 square feet of interactive and multimedia exhibits located within L.A. LIVE, the downtown Los Angeles sports, entertainment and residential district. Through thought-provoking and dynamic public and educational programs and exhibits, guests will experience music from a never-before-seen insider perspective that only The GRAMMY Museum can deliver. To learn more, visit www.grammymuseum.org.

Media Contact: 
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Andie Cox, The GRAMMY Museum, 213-763-2133, acox@grammymuseum.org

Celene Carillo, Oregon State University, 541-737-2137, Celene.Carillo@oregonstate.edu