OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of education

Two OSU buildings selected for 2013 DeMuro Award

CORVALLIS, Ore.— The Hallie Ford Center and Joyce Collin Furman Hall at Oregon State University have been selected to receive the 2013 DeMuro Award for Excellence in Preservation, Reuse and Community Revitalization by Restore Oregon.

The Hallie Ford Center is being recognized as an outstanding example of compatible infill development within a historic district. Furman Hall is being recognized for the extraordinary complexity, creativity, design and craftsmanship of its historic rehabilitation.

They are among seven Oregon buildings to be honored with the award this year. The awards were presented at a banquet Wednesday in Portland, which included a guest presentation by Portland Mayor Charlie Hales.

The DeMuro Award honors extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects and compatible infill development across Oregon – residential and commercial, urban and rural, private and public. The award is named in honor of Art DeMuro whose redevelopment of historic properties such as the White Stag Block set the standard for quality, creativity, persistence, and business acumen.

“Hallie Ford wanted to inspire people to use the resources they have to make the world a better place,” said Richard Settersten, Hallie E. Ford endowed director. “This principle not only drives the work we do, but is also reflected in the intentional design and beauty of the building we now call home."

According to Restore Oregon, the Hallie Ford Center is an outstanding example of compatible infill development that harmonizes beautifully with its neighbors. “It makes a distinct statement that’s of its time, yet is complementary in scale, massing, proportion, and materials, enhancing the story of the historic district,” Restore Oregon staff noted.

The Hallie Ford building houses the Hallie E. Ford Center for Children and Families. Made possible by a gift from late Oregon philanthropist Hallie Ford, the center opened Sept. 8, 2011, and is home to interdisciplinary, collaborative research from the College of Public Health and Human Sciences.

Furman Hall, which was originally built in 1902 and recently restored, was honored by Restore Oregon for being rescued from a deteriorating and dangerous state. Seismically unsound and wrapped in netting to protect pedestrians from crumbling sandstone, Furman Hall was structurally rebuilt, its interior redesigned, and sandstone façade replaced in kind.

"Furman Hall is destined to become one of the icons of the OSU campus,” said Larry Flick, dean of the College of Education. “Descriptions of the mapping of the original stone shapes to the newly quarried stone, delights visitors, parents, and students.  It is not unusual to look out my window and see a passerby photographing the building. The DeMuro Award is an honor for FFA and OSU in a highly successful collaboration to restore a proud part of OSU heritage."

Education Hall, originally built in 1902, re-opened as Joyce Collin Furman Hall in January 2012, following a complete renovation. An iconic structure at the campus’ east entrance, the renovated building blends historic charm with high-tech touches. The exterior seismic upgrades were funded by the state, and the interior renovations were made possible by private donors, including a $2 million gift from William A. Furman through the Joyce N. Furman Memorial Trust.

 

For more information: http://restoreoregon.org/demuro-award/

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Larry Flick
541-737-3664;

Richard Settersten
541-737-8902

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OSU’s first free, massive course attracts thousands worldwide

CORVALLIS, Ore. – More than 3,187 students from around the world have enrolled in Oregon State University’s first massive open online course, or MOOC.

The free, eight-week course, Supporting English Language Learners under New Standards, is offered in partnership with Stanford University and is funded by the Oregon Department of Education. The enrollment exceeds the expectations of the course developers and instructors.

“We can tell from the feedback that the course is addressing a real need educators have, providing opportunities to learn more about supporting English language learners,” said Karen Thompson, one of the course’s three instructors and an assistant professor in Oregon State’s College of Education.

Although it is particularly relevant to K-12 educators in the 11-state ELPA21 consortium, the class has attracted learners from most states in America and participants from Vietnam, Syria, Ecuador, Spain, Brazil, Ukraine, Libya and other countries. Participants work in teams to gather and analyze language samples from their students.

Oregon State Ecampus is also a partner in the MOOC and has provided multimedia and support services for the course. Educators can still register online.

Media Contact: 

Tyler Hansen, 520-312-1276

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Karen Thompson, 541-737-2988

Grant to enhance minority participation in STEM disciplines

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A collaboration of five universities in the Pacific Northwest has received a five-year, $3.44 million grant renewal from the National Science Foundation to increase the number of minority students who pursue careers in science, technology, engineering or mathematics.

Participants in the program include Oregon State University, Portland State University, Boise State University, the University of Washington and Washington State University. Karen Thompson, an assistant professor in the OSU College of Education, helped develop this collaboration. Called the Pacific Northwest Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation in STEM, the initiative has been quite successful in recruiting more minority students and assisting them in completing their degrees, officials say.

In the first five-year grant at OSU, the goal was to double the number of under-represented minority students who graduated in a STEM discipline – which would have been 154 graduates in June, 2014. They significantly exceeded that, with 196 degrees awarded. This program provides financial, academic, social and professional support to help students achieve their academic and professional goals.

“Changing demographics in Oregon make it critical to graduate a greater number of minority students in STEM disciplines to fill positions in industry and academia,” said Ellen Momsen, co-principal investigator of this program at OSU, and director of its Women and Minorities in Engineering program.

“Our industry partners are enthusiastic about the increase in the diversity of our College of Engineering graduates,” Momsen said. “This is essential to improve the lives of all the people in our state.”

About 47 percent of the 3,043 under-represented minority students at OSU are now majoring in STEM disciplines at OSU, Momsen said. Many of them are taking advantage of programs such as a two-week “bridge” program for freshmen and a two-day leadership academy. A significant number also later become involved as undergraduates in original scientific research.

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Ellen Momsen, 541-737-9699

OSU receives federal grant to study academic outcomes of Oregon’s English learners

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has won a grant of nearly $400,000 from the U.S. Department of Education to investigate what happens to Oregon students who begin school as English language learners.

Researchers will use the grant to examine the academic performance of current and former English language learners and determine how best to support their academic achievement, said Karen Thompson, an assistant professor in OSU’s College of Education, who will lead the study.

“Being able to see, over a long period of time, how a student is doing is very important,” Thompson said. “Some students might need ongoing assistance even after they are considered proficient in English, while others might achieve at very high levels.”

Students who do not speak English proficiently when they enter school are considered English language learners. When students master the language, they are no longer considered English language learners and are reclassified as English proficient students.

Some states continue to monitor former English language learners throughout their school careers, but until recently, Oregon has only monitored them for two years, as required by the federal government, Thompson said.

The grant, from the education department’s research arm, the Institute of Education Sciences, will give investigators the opportunity to assess the longer-term academic success of students who enter school as English language learners, including graduation rates, she said. Researchers will also collect and analyze data about how current and former English language learners are faring in different types of programs, including dual-language programs, which have greatly expanded in Oregon schools in recent years, Thompson said.

The grant runs from Aug. 1 through July 31, 2016. The Oregon Department of Education and WestEd, a nonprofit education research agency, are partnering with OSU on the project. David Bautista, an assistant superintendent at the Oregon Department of Education, will serve as co-principal investigator.

The three agencies have established the Oregon English Learner Alliance in an effort to improve educational outcomes for Oregon’s English language learners. The alliance is part of a larger effort by the Oregon Department of Education to improve educational outcomes for students learning English.

The number of English language learners in Oregon has grown dramatically over the last 20 years and now makes up about 10 percent of the state’s kindergarten- through 12th-grade population. The number of reclassified students also has grown, making it more important than ever to understand how those students do in school once they’re no longer receiving extra help to learn English, Thompson said.

If researchers identify areas where current and former English language learners do well, they want to examine practices in those classrooms or schools and share the best of them with other educators, Thompson said.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This work will be supported by U.S. Department of Education grant number R305H140072. The amount of federal funding is $399,928, the non-federal funding for the project is $29,009 and the project’s total funding is $428,937. Of the total funding, 93 percent is federal and 7 percent is non-federal.

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Karen Thompson, 541-737-2988, Karen.Thompson@oregonstate.edu

Storksdieck to head OSU STEM Learning Research Center

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Martin Storksdieck, an international leader in the study of how people of all ages learn “STEM” subjects of science, technology, engineering and mathematics both in and out of school, has been named head of the Center for Research on Lifelong STEM Learning at Oregon State University.

This unique research center, online at http://stem.science.oregonstate.edu, was established two years ago to study how individuals with diverse life circumstances and identities become lifelong STEM learners, practitioners and researchers.

Storksdieck does research on voluntary, or “free choice” learning, and how learning is connected to behaviors, identities and beliefs. He recently served as director of the board on science education at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C.

“I am delighted to join OSU and honored to be given the opportunity to shape the Center’s focus,” Storksdieck said. “In my new role I will help create a strong OSU community around STEM learning research that is of national and international significance.”

Source: 

Julie Risien, 541-737-8664

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Martin Storksdieck

Martin Storksdieck

President Ray to give 10th annual Carpenter Lecture at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray will give the 10th annual Charles Carpenter Memorial Lecture at OSU on May 9.

The lecture, presented by the College of Education, will begin at 4 p.m. in 112 Kearney Hall, 1491 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. The event is free and open to the public and a reception will follow. Ray will speak on “The Role of Governance, State Funding and Accountability in Reaching the 40-40-20 Goal.”

Oregon’s “40-40-20 Goal” is to have 40 percent of adult Oregonians hold a bachelor’s or advanced degree, 40 percent to have an associate’s degree or a meaningful postsecondary certificate, and all adult Oregonians to hold a high school diploma or equivalent by the year 2025. Ray has been a strong advocate for the plan.

The Carpenter lecture, held each spring, features a nationally known speaker on a topic of importance to community colleges. The event is an opportunity for students, graduates, and educational leaders to come together to learn about trends in community colleges and to network with other professionals.

The lecture was established in 2004 to honor Charles “Chuck” Carpenter, a former community college leader and a professor at Oregon State. Carpenter helped establish the Community College Leadership Program at OSU, which has a strong tradition of producing community college leaders at the state, regional and national levels.

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Karla Rockhold, 541-737-2226, karla.rockhold@oregonstate.edu

OSU to host screening, discussion of documentary ‘American Promise’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The award-winning documentary “American Promise,” about the struggles of two middle-class African American families as they educate and parent their sons, will be shown at Oregon State University on Tuesday, April 15.

The screening begins at 7 p.m. in the auditorium in Milam Hall, 2520 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session with filmmaker Michèle Stephenson will follow. The event is free and open to the public. Lead sponsors for the event are the College of Education and the Division of Student Affairs, with additional support from several other OSU programs.

A 30-minute version of the film will be shown at 4 p.m. Monday, April 14, in the theater at Corvallis High School, 1400 N.W. Buchanan Ave. A panel discussion about the African American male experience in predominately white schools will follow. That event is also free and open to the public.

“We hope the film will help us better understand some of the issues surrounding the black male achievement gap as it exists in our community,” said Felicia Reid-Metoyer, a faculty member in the College of Education and one of the organizers of the events.

“In particular, we would like for the two-day event to advance the discussion as it relates to teachers, administrators, and staff who work with underrepresented minorities in Corvallis and other local schools,” said Reid-Metoyer, who was inspired to bring the film to Corvallis after watching it in Los Angeles last year.

In “American Promise,” Stephenson and her partner, Joe Brewster, follow their son, Idris, and his best friend, Oluwaseun “Seun” Summers, as they move through school and confront issues of class, race and opportunity. The film begins with the boys’ entry into kindergarten at a prestigious private school and follows them through their school years to high school graduation.

“American Promise” premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won the Grand Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking. To learn more about the film or watch the trailer, visit www.americanpromise.org.

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Karla Rockhold, 541-737-2226, karla.rockhold@oregonstate.edu

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Idris and Seun-1

Idris Brewster and Oluwaseun “Seun” Summers are featured in the documentary 'American Promise.' Credit: Michèle Stephenson

OSU alum named White House “Champion of Change”

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon State University alumna Sandra Henderson was recently honored in a White House ceremony for being a champion of citizen science.

Henderson is the director for Citizen Science at the National Ecological Observatory Network in Boulder, Colo. She received a doctorate in science education, with a minor in geography, from OSU in 2001.

She was recognized this week by the White House Champions of Change program, which aims to identify and recognize Americans doing extraordinary things.  This year, the program is honoring people who have demonstrated exemplary leadership in engaging the broader, non-expert community in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics, or STEM, research

In 2007, Henderson co-founded Project BudBurst, a national online citizen science campaign where individuals from all walks of life report on the timing of leafing, flowering, and fruiting of plants in their communities. The data are freely available to researchers and educators who can use it to learn more about the responsiveness of individual plant species to local, regional, and national changes in climate.

“Being able to combine my interest in science education with my passion for nature through NEON’s Project BudBurst has been a career highlight,” Henderson said. “It is so inspiring to work with thousands of people across the country to make a difference in our understanding of how plants respond to environmental change. Plants have stories to tell us about changing climates if we only take the time to observe and learn.”

For more information: www.whitehouse.gov/champions

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Glenna Stewart, 720-330-1588

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Screening of documentary film held May 2-3

CORVALLIS, Ore. — An award-winning documentary on journalist Damian Trujillo will be shown at various locations in Corvallis on Thursday, May 2, and Friday, May 3, and followed by a question and answer session with the director. 

The screenings are sponsored by several departments, schools and colleges at Oregon State University.

The film, “From the Fields: An American Journey,” chronicles the life of NBC news anchor Trujillo, who came to the United States from Mexico with his family in 1972. Trujillo worked in the agricultural fields of the Salinas Valley before becoming the first in his family to graduate from college.

Following the 30-minute documentary, director Carolyn Brown, an assistant professor of journalism at American University, will answer questions about the film. Brown says one goal in making “From the Fields” was to debunk common stereotypes about Latinos and immigrants, and to explore what it means to work, support a family and contribute to American society. For more information on the screenings, go to: http://oregonstate.edu/urm/events/education

The screening schedule is as follows:

May 2

  • 10 a.m.: Darkside Cinema, 215 S.W. 4th St., Corvallis.
  • 6:30 p.m.: Corvallis Public Library, 645 N.W. Monroe Ave. (A Q&A session will be followed by a public reception)

May 3

  • 3 p.m.: Joyce Collin Furman Hall, OSU campus, 200 S.W. 15th St.

“From the Fields” won the 2013 Gracie Award for outstanding director, and was the 2012 Orson Welles Grand Winner at the California Film Awards.

Brown’s visit is sponsored by the OSU colleges of Education and Liberal Arts, the Center for Latin@ Studies, the School of Language, Culture and Society, the College Assistant Migrant Program, Student Affairs and the Office of Equity and Inclusion.  

Media Contact: 

Celene Carillo, 541-737-2137

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Kathryn Ciechanowski, 541-737-8585

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"From the Fields"

College of Education

About the OSU College of Education: The mission of the College of Education is to prepare, inspire and support teachers, counselors, educational leaders, researchers and volunteers to promote lifelong learning in schools, colleges, universities, communities and workplaces.