OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

college of business

New Corvallis microtechnology firm takes aim at $2 billion market

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Microflow CVOTM, a company spun off from research in the Oregon State University Microproducts Breakthrough Institute (MBI), has launched its first product line of stainless steel micromixers. Inside the precision-engineered devices, which are about the size of a dime, is a multilayer network of channels designed to meet manufacturer needs in the pharmaceutical, petrochemical, personal-care product and other industries.

The problem that Microflow CVOTM has addressed seems simple: how to mix two liquids with consistently high-quality results. Manufacturers commonly perform this step in large vats where batches of liquids are stirred and then processed.

In contrast, so-called “microfluidic technologies” push liquids through channels slightly larger than a human hair where mixing occurs under precisely controlled conditions. Microflow CVO’s stainless steel microreactors perform better and cost less than devices currently on the market. They can be customized easily for existing processing operations, said Todd Miller, prototyping manager at the MBI and president of the new firm.

Located in the MBI building on the Corvallis HP campus, the company currently offers two products for sale and will expand its offerings to more than 15 by the end of the calendar year, providing options in flow rates, fluid inputs and operational scale.

Miller has developed and tested micromixers to produce copper nanoparticles, a collaborative effort with the company’s chief technology officer Scott Gilbert, OSU chemistry professor Vincent Remcho and the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With proof-of-concept in hand, Miller applied for and received “gap funding” assistance through the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI), which supports efforts to commercialize technology originating from the Oregon University System. “ONAMI has been critical to this whole process,” said Miller. “Without ONAMI, we wouldn’t be here.”

A market analysis by the OSU College of Business estimates the global micromixer (also called “microreactors”) market in the life sciences at $2 billion. “It’s a rapidly changing and growing market,” said John Turner, OSU instructor and CEO of Microflow CVO. He and OSU MBA student Ken True identified more than 1,000 researchers at 270 institutions in 30 countries using microreactors in pharmaceutical research. “We expect the market to exceed $3 billion by 2014. And that’s only in the life sciences. Other chemical manufacturing markets raise the potential for these products,” added Turner.

Miller said the company has licensed rights to patent applications he has made over the past five years while at OSU.

More information is available at http://www.microflowcvo.com.

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John Turner, 541-760-0225

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Microflow CVO
Scott Gilbert, left, and Todd Miller of Microflow CVO collaborated in the creation of a stainless steel micromixer for use in the chemical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical industries. (Photo: Karl Maasdam)

 

Microflow CVO micromixer
The Microflow CVO micromixer achieves a high-quality mixture of liquids for research and industrial process control. (Photo: Karl Maasdam)

New index identifies periods when global stock markets might decline

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Researchers have found a way to measure the likelihood of global stock market losses by identifying periods in which shocks may be more likely to spread across many national markets.

This “fragility index” identifies periods in which international equity markets are more susceptible to widespread pull-backs by identifying common risk exposures. The index identifies when systemic risk exposure is high in markets across multiple countries, and shows an increasing probability of a global stock market draw-down.

For example, the likelihood of a global decline was one in three on days in which the index was high, but less than one in 20 following days in which the index was low.

Dave Berger, an assistant professor of finance at Oregon State University, is lead author on the study, which was published online today in the Journal of Financial Economics.

"The index may have important uses for policy makers, money managers and ultimately private investors," Berger said.

On one level, he said, the fragility index is a measure of when stock movements are most apt to be exaggerated, either positively or negatively. When it is high, movements are more extreme. When fragility is low, stock movements are less apt to experience a significant change, either up or down.

For instance, global daily returns above 1 percent, as well as losses greater than 1 percent, are both more common when the fragility index is high. But when the fragility index is high instead of low, the down days are by far more common. During such periods the probability of one of the bad days occurring is 33 percent – more than seven times higher than when fragility index is low, when these significant downturns occur only 4.5 percent of the time.

Looking at data from 1994 to 2010 that covers indexes from 82 countries, Berger and Kuntara Pukthuanthong of San Diego State University were able to identify periods in which national stock markets had a high degree of correlation, and then were able to identify periods when an initial shock would be more likely to spread.

Berger said the 2008 stock market crash illustrates the importance of studying systemic risk in international equity markets.

“The factors that lead to global declines can change, so we tried to create a general measure of systemic risk,” Berger said. “The probability of a worldwide financial pull-back is highest during periods in which many countries share a high exposure to our factor. When exposures are high across multiple countries, then if a shock occurs it will manifest globally, and multiple markets will simultaneously decline.”

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Dave Berger, 541-737-2636

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Oregon CEO Summit to be held May 3

PORTLAND, Ore. – The third annual Oregon CEO Summit, which will include business leaders discussing the role real estate plays in the economy, will take place on Thursday, May 3, from 7:30 to 9:15 a.m. at the Governor Hotel in Portland.

Sponsored by Oregon State University’s College of Business, the event, “Real Estate Now: Rethinking, Renewing, Reinventing,” begins with a keynote address by Tom Toomey, president and CEO of United Dominion Realty, Inc. Toomey will speak about how the real estate industry is evolving and doing more with less in today’s economy.

Following the keynote, a panel discussion will discuss the role of real estate in the current economy, which continues to challenge the industry and local communities. Panelists include:

The panel will be moderated by Diane Detering-Paddison, chief strategy officer, Cassidy Turley.

With expertise in different segments of the real estate industry including capital markets, construction, institutional investment, design and sustainability, the diverse group of panelists will discuss new trends, opportunities and innovative solutions that drive the economy.

Registration for the summit is $50, which includes breakfast. The Governor Hotel is located at 614 S.W. 11th Ave., Portland. Registration closes on Thursday, April 26.

For more information and to register, go to: http://business.oregonstate.edu/CEOSummit

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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695

Alumni and Business Partner Awards held May 3 in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. – Five prominent business leaders and one Fortune 100 company will be recognized during the Oregon State University College of Business’ Alumni and Business Partner Awards on Thursday, May 3, at the Governor Hotel in Portland.


The annual event, established in 2002, recognizes outstanding professional achievements and services to the college by alumni and business partners.


The evening begins at 5:30 p.m. with a reception, followed by dinner and the awards presentation beginning at 6:30 p.m. Registration opens Friday, March 30, and will be open until Thursday, April 26. For ticket information visit http://business.oregonstate.edu/awards or contact Gwen Wolfram at 541-737-4330 or gwen.wolfram@oregonstate.edu


The 2012 award winners include:



  • Hall of Fame: Wayne Ericksen ’58, vice president and principal, Columbia Management Company (retired)

  • Innovative Business Leader: Tom Toomey ‘82, president and CEO, UDR, Inc.

  • Distinguished Business Professional: Diane Detering-Paddison ’81, chief strategy officer, Cassidy Turley; founder of 4word and author.

  • Distinguished Early Career Business Professional: Eric Winston ‘98, chief financial officer, Keen, Inc.

  • Distinguished Young Professional: Angelina Lusetti ‘07, store team leader, Target Stores.

  • Distinguished Business Partner: Boeing, Inc.
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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695

OSU accounting students take first place in tax competition

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A team of accounting students from Oregon State University’s College of Business won first prize in the 2012 Foster School of Business Master of Professional Accounting Tax Case Competition held in Seattle.

John Baglien, Kathryn Cook, Victoria Uong, and Brittany Weede solved complex tax-planning problems and took home a $2,400 grand prize after competing against nine teams from the Northwest.

In four tries at this event, OSU students have won twice (2008 and 2012) and came in second in 2009.

The competition was a two-day event sponsored by the University of Washington and KPMG, an audit, tax and advisory firm. On the first day, the students analyzed the tax-relevant activities of a fictional couple and solved various compliance- and planning-related problems. On the second day, the students created a tax plan for the fictional couple and then presented their solutions to actors playing the clients as well as a panel of judges. 

The presentation was structured as a client interview, with the couple frequently interrupting to ask questions or argue with each other about various things, including long-term objectives, when and where they wanted to retire, and whether to keep or sell specific investments.

OSU accounting faculty members Jared Moore and Larry Brown advised the student team.

“My sense is that the quality and depth of their tax planning suggestions along with their professional and positive handling of the difficult clients are what won over the judges,” said Moore, the Mary Ellen Phillips Assistant Professor of Accounting.

OSU accounting students have surpassed the national average on the Certified Public Accounting Exam for the last seven years. Recently, a Master of Business Administration and Accountancy program (MBAA) that will begin in fall 2012 was approved by Oregon State Board of Higher Education.

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Jared Moore, 541-737-2517

Sporting event ads viewed favorably – especially if the game is close

CORVALLIS, Ore. –The average price for a 30-second advertising spot in the 2012 Super Bowl on Feb. 5 is a staggering $3.5 million and a new study suggests that, for advertisers, it may not really matter if the New England Patriots or the New York Giants win.

But for the sake of companies forking out big bucks on the ads, it had better be a close and exciting game.

The study by an Oregon State University researcher, which is being published in the spring issue of the Journal of Advertising, found that viewers consider advertising in a more favorable light after watching a close, exciting sporting event.

“Games with high excitement levels result in a transfer of that emotion to the ads – particularly to ads shown at the end of the game that also have a lot of energy and excitement built in,” said Colleen Bee, an Oregon State marketing expert and author of the study. “We expected the outcome of a game to affect a viewer’s attitude toward the brand and the ad itself, but we found that whether the favored team won or lost had no real impact.

“It was all about the excitement and intensity of the game,” she added.

A perfect example of that came in game six of the 2011 World Series, which according to Bee’s study should have been an advertiser’s dream. The St. Louis Cardinals were one strike from elimination not once, but twice, and rallied to beat the Texas Rangers 10-9 in a heart-stopping come-from-behind win.

“The idea is that excitement from watching the game is then transferred to a greater feeling of excitement for the ads and brands at the end of the game,” Bee said. “We also found that the more stimulating the content of the ad itself, the greater impact the exciting game had on the viewer.”

The study was conducted in a computer laboratory with 112 people who watched a collegiate basketball game. They viewed ads in the context of either a high-suspense game or a low-suspense game, featuring either a win or a loss.

Bee, who is an expert on sports marketing – particularly in the areas of sports and emotions and consumer responses – said the findings have important implications for advertisers.

“The most important influence we found was the level of suspense, both for the game and the advertisement,” she said. “An ad with more zip and high energy paired with a close game resulted in increased favorable responses toward the ad and brand.”

Robert Madrigal, associate professor of business at the University of Oregon, is co-author of the study.

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Colleen Bee, 541-737-6059

OSU alumna and business professional to speak on work/life balance

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University alumna and business woman Diane Paddison will offer practical advice for young professionals in a talk on Wednesday, Jan. 18, at the LaSells Stewart Center on campus.

The free, public lecture, “Finding Balance: Practical Wisdom for Young Professionals,” will begin at 7 p.m.

Paddison, ’81, is chief strategy officer at the national commercial real estate firm Cassidy Turley and serves on two other corporate boards, Behringer Harvard REIT Opportunity Fund II and AirAdvice. She also is a trustee for the OSU Foundation Board and the Dean’s Circle of Excellence for the College of Business.

Paddison is the author of “Work, Love, Pray: Practical Wisdom for Young Professional Christian Women,” released in 2011 by Harper Collins. She is also the founder of “4word,” a national nonprofit designed to connect, lead, and support young professional Christian women to fulfill their potential. She and her husband have four children and live in Dallas, Texas, and Portland.

For more information, call 541-713-8044 or go to http://business.oregonstate.edu/

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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695

Weatherford Awards honor notable entrepreneurs in Portland on Feb. 16

PORTLAND, Ore. – A Hollywood screenwriter, a cookware innovator, a communications trailblazer and a wine entrepreneur are among the recipients of this year’s Weatherford Awards, Oregon State University’s annual celebration of lifelong and pioneering entrepreneurship and innovation.

The event will be held Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Hilton in downtown Portland.

Hosted by OSU’s Austin Entrepreneurship Program, the event starts at 5:30 p.m. with a reception, followed by a dinner and the award presentations. Tickets are $95, available until sold out and can be obtained on the web at http://business.oregonstate.edu/programs/aep or by contacting Mary McKillop, 541-713-8044, e-mail mary.mckillop@bus.oregonstate.edu.

The Weatherford Awards recognize pioneering and lifelong entrepreneurs and innovators. This year, three of the honorees are native Oregonians and two are OSU alums.

The awards are named for OSU's Weatherford Hall where entrepreneurship and business students can explore their innovations and new venture ideas in a unique, living learning residence hall.

The recipients of the 2012 Weatherford Awards are:

  • Jim Bernau, a native Oregonian and founder of Willamette Valley Vineyards, purchased the Estate site in 1983 and cleared away the old pioneer plum orchard hidden in scotch broom and blackberry vines. He planted pinot noir, chardonnay and pinot gris. Willamette Valley Vineyards has become one of the region's leading wineries, earning the title “One of America's Great Pinot Noir Producers” from Wine Enthusiast magazine.
  • Carolyn Chambers, founder of Chamber Communications Corp. and a pioneer in the cable television industry, died in August at the age of 79. Her family will accept the award in her honor. A native Oregonian, Chambers earned a degree in business in 1953 at the University of Oregon, where she was the sole woman in her class. At 25, just four years out of college, she borrowed $100,000 from her father and pooled that with funds from other investors to launch Liberty Communications. In 1983 she founded Chambers Communications Corp., which today operates ABC affiliates KEZI in Eugene-Springfield, KOHD in Bend and KDRV in Medford and Klamath Falls. The company also includes a production arm, Chambers Productions, and Chambers Cable.
  • Stanley Cheng, chairman and CEO of Meyer Corporation and founder/owner of Hestan Vineyards. One of seven children, Cheng was born in 1947 in Hong Kong. He attended OSU where he received his degree in mechanical engineering. In 1981, Cheng founded California-based Meyer Corporation, America’s largest cookware company and the second largest in the world. In the midst of building his cookware enterprise, Cheng, who also received the 2002 Humanitarian of the Year Award from the Housewares Charity Foundation, cultivated his growing passion for wine. In 1996, Cheng and his wife Helen purchased a 127-acre property that they named Hestan Vineyards in Napa Valley.
  • Mike Rich, a Portland screenwriter whose breakthrough came in 1998 when his script, “Finding Forrester,” was awarded a prestigious Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Within weeks, it was picked up by Columbia Pictures and was a holiday season release in 2000, starring Sean Connery and directed by Gus Van Sant. His second screenplay, “The Rookie,” starred Dennis Quaid and Rachel Griffiths and was both a commercial and critical success for Disney in 2002. He also wrote the screenplays for “Radio” (2003), “The Nativity Story” (2006) and the 2010 film, “Secretariat.”
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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695

2011 Excellence in Family Business Award recipients announced

PORTLAND, Ore. – Bike Newport of Newport, Colas Construction of Portland, IB Roof Systems of Eugene and Wilcox Farms Organic Eggs of Wilsonville and Roy, Wash., will be recognized as winners at the 2011 Excellence in Family Business Awards at a ceremony Nov. 17 at the Governor Hotel in Portland.

The awards are presented by Oregon State University’s Austin Family Business Program.

Six companies and two individuals will receive the 2011 Excellence in Family Business Awards. Eight additional companies will be recognized as finalists at the awards event. More than 170 companies have received this recognition since the awards were first presented in 1988.

Sherri Noxel, director of the Austin Family Business Program, said the event offers an opportunity for families to be recognized for their commitment to family business.

“Each of the awards winners this year exemplifies why the Austin Family Business Program is committed to fostering healthy family businesses,” she said. “Especially in this current economy, it is important for family businesses to remain healthy and the 2011 winners have demonstrated that they can remain viable.”

The awards recognize the achievements of family businesses in innovation, entrepreneurship, and commitment to community involvement.

Bike Newport of Newport won the award in the micro category, which is open to businesses with nine or fewer employees. The company is being recognized for changing business lines to adapt to new opportunities, generating new community revenue and demonstrating its passion for family happiness in family business.

Oregon Coffee & Tea of Corvallis and Hybrid Real Estate of Eugene were the finalists in the micro category.

Portland-based Colas Construction, Inc. is the winner of the small family business category, which honors businesses with 10-24 employees. The business is being recognized for establishing strategic partnerships for long-term success, setting a powerful vision for the family business and for giving the second generation the freedom to choose their future.

The finalists in the small business category were The Joel Palmer House of Dayton and Koeber’s of Beaverton.

Eugene-based IB Roof Systems is the winner in the medium category for businesses with 25-99 employees. IB Roof Systems was honored because of the company’s willingness and capacity to make successful management changes, effectively engage all family members in the business, and develop exemplary family governance policies.

Denton Plastics and Meyer Sign Company of Oregon, both operating in Portland, were the finalists in the medium category.

In the large category (100 or more employees), Wilcox Farms Organic Eggs from Roy, Wash., and Wilsonville was recognized for its commitment to vertical integration to support sustainability, a sophisticated outside board structure and the transition to a values-based company and new generation management.

GloryBee Foods of Eugene and Wilson’s NAPA Auto Parts of Wilsonville were the finalists in the large family business category.

Also honored at the event will be Brad Withrow-Robinson, a forester from the OSU Yamhill County Extension office, and Alyssa Duval, who is from the DuVal Farms family in Silverton and is studying crop and soil science at OSU.

In addition, Starker Forests of Corvallis will be given the Dean’s Award for Family Business Leadership and Sokol Blosser Winery of Dundee will be awarded the Director’s Award for Family Business.

Founded in 1985, the Austin Family Business Program is a university-based family business program providing inspiration, education, outreach, and research to support the success and survival of family businesses.

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Sherri Noxel, 541-737-6019

Sperling’s BestPlaces founder and OSU alumnus to speak on Nov. 1

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Oregon State University alumnus Bert Sperling of Sperling's BestPlaces will speak about the importance of creating your brand in a talk at noon on Tuesday, Nov. 1, on the OSU campus.

The free public talk will take place at the Construction & Engineering Hall of LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

In his talk, “Create Your Own Brand and Control Your Destiny,” Sperling will discuss how his accidental path was once unusual, but is now relevant for anyone seeking success in today’s web-connected culture and challenging economy. Sperling’s insights will help students, industry leaders and anyone interested in entrepreneurship to establish a brand identity and be in control.

Through his one-person company and “BestPlaces lists,” Portland resident Sperling has become an internationally recognized expert and thought leader, inking deals with Yahoo, AOL, MSN and MSNBC, and working with Intel, AARP, McDonalds, American Express and Unilever. He has been profiled in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Today Show and CNN. Sperling is a 1972 business graduate of OSU.

The talk is sponsored by the Austin Entrepreneurship Program of the OSU College of Business.

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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695