college of business

Is there a right way to quit your job? Research finds some ways are better than others

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Most everybody has been there: you’ve decided to quit your job and now you have to inform your employer that you’re leaving. So what is the best way to resign?

Turns out, there are generally seven ways in which people quit their jobs, and there are two key factors that determine whether a person resigns in a positive way or in a way that could have damaging consequences for the business, new research from Oregon State University shows.

Those predictors are whether an employee feels they are being treated fairly at work, and whether they feel they are respected by their boss, said Anthony Klotz, an assistant professor in the College of Business at OSU and lead author of the paper. Those who feel they are respected and treated fairly are more likely to resign in a positive manner.

“As an employee, you are pretty powerless for much of your work life, until you decide to quit,” he said. “That is the one time you feel empowered and have a chance to even the score if you feel like you’ve been treated badly.”

Employee resignations are part of doing business; in the U.S. and western Europe, resignation rates run about 10 percent per year, while in parts of Asia, they can be much higher. But there is little known about how employees go about quitting their jobs, and what the implications of their resignations may have for the company, good or bad.

“There is a lot of research about why people quit their jobs. But very little is known about how people quit,” Klotz said. “Employers as well as employees want to know what the right way is.”

Klotz and his co-author, Mark Bolino of the University of Oklahoma, set out to learn more about how employees quit their jobs and the consequences of their choices when doing so. Their findings were published recently in the Journal of Applied Psychology. The study was supported by the Society for Human Resource Management Foundation.

Through a series of studies, including interviews with employees and employers, the researchers found that generally, employees quit in one of seven ways:

  • By the book: These resignations involve a face-to-face meeting with one’s manager to announce the resignation, a standard notice period, and an explanation of the reason for quitting.
  • Perfunctory: These resignations are similar to “by the book” resignations, except the meeting tends to be shorter and the reason for quitting is not provided.
  • Grateful goodbye: Employees express gratitude toward their employer and often offer to help with the transition period.
  • In the loop: In these resignations, employees typically confide in their manager that they are contemplating quitting, or are looking for another job, before formally resigning.
  • Avoidant: This occurs when employees let other employees such as peers, mentors, or human resources representatives know that they plan to leave rather than giving notice to their immediate boss.
  • Bridge burning: In this resignation style, employees seek to harm the organization or its members on their way out the door, often through verbal assaults.
  • Impulsive quitting: Some employees simply walk off the job, never to return or communicate with their employer again. This can leave the organization in quite a lurch, given it is the only style in which no notice is provided.

The by the book and perfunctory resignations are the most common, but roughly one in 10 employees quits in bridge-burning style. Avoidant, bridge burning and impulsive quitting are seen as potentially harmful resignation styles for employers. 

In addition, the researchers found that managers were particularly frustrated by employees who resigned using bridge burning, avoidant or perfunctory styles, so employees who want to leave on good terms should avoid those styles, Klotz said.

The study findings also indicated that managers responded the least negatively to resignations when employees kept them “in the loop” and when employees followed organizational policies regarding resignation. Quitting in these more positive styles is a good idea for employees who want a positive recommendation from a former supervisor or may consider returning to that company one day.

The managers’ attitudes toward the perfunctory resignation was a bit surprising, he said, and seemed to be rooted in the fact that employees using that style did not provide reasons for their decisions to resign.

Each resignation situation is unique to that employee and their relationship to the company, Klotz noted, so the best way to resign at one company may not be the best way to resign at another. But companies would be well-served to review their employee handbooks and update their formal resignation policies to reflect best practices for current company needs, he said.

Understanding why employees quit in the ways they do is particularly important for companies that could suffer if an employee uses his or her departure as an opportunity to damage the company’s reputation or create other problems, Klotz said.

“Turnover is common, it’s expensive, it’s disruptive and it can be contagious,” he said. “But this damage is mitigated when employees resign in a positive manner. So to the extent you can, as an employer, you want to have employees resign in a positive manner.”

Companies also should consider monitoring how employees quit for potential signs of management issues. If a number of employees quit in a negative way, that could be a sign of a poor supervisor or other problems with company treatment of employees, he said.

Klotz said he would also like to further study the “lame duck period,” between the time an employee gives notice to their last day on the job, to better understand what happens during that period.

“Is it better to just say ‘see ya’ and pay the employee’s salary for two weeks, or is it better to have the person stay for a transition period such as training their replacement?” Klotz said. “It’s often a very weird time for the employer and the employee.”

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Anthony Klotz, 541-737-6044


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New OSU College of Business program will aid aspiring entrepreneurs

PORTLAND, Ore. – A new program designed to increase entrepreneurial activity and stimulate job creation in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest is now being offered in Portland by Oregon State University’s College of Business. 

The goal of Launch Corps is to provide additional startup support services for select students who are enrolled in the college’s Innovation Management MBA program and are also developing a business idea. Innovation Management is a new track in the college’s MBA program that prepares students to start new companies and advance ideas within existing ones.

“Research shows rates of entrepreneurship are in a state of decline in the U.S.,” said Mitzi Montoya, dean of OSU’s College of Business. “That’s concerning news, especially given reports that indicate entrepreneurs are responsible for nearly all net new job creation. Oregon has unprecedented potential to address our regional and national need for entrepreneurial activity if we can effectively recruit entrepreneurs from the full pool of available talent and accelerate their success.”

As they progress through the Innovation Management MBA, students in Launch Corps will be connected to resources that can help move their startup ideas forward. Those resources include mentors in areas such as marketing, accounting and finance; office space at the college’s new Portland headquarters at WeWork, a co-working community for multiple ventures and startups; services, equipment and related amenities; and access to workshops and entrepreneurial training programs.

Launch Corps is open to all founders, co-founders or teams at the startup stage who have a passion for addressing a problem and an idea that offers market potential. Women, people of color, and others who have historically been underrepresented among entrepreneurs are particularly encouraged to apply for Launch Corps.

“Research shows that women lead about one-third of entrepreneurial activity, even though they make up slightly more than half of the population,” said Audrey Iffert-Saleem, executive director of strategic initiatives for the College of Business. “Our vision is that the population of entrepreneurs will grow to reflect the changing demographics of the United States.”

Supporting these entrepreneurs in their startup journey is about more than getting them in the pipeline, said Iffert-Saleem, who has led the development of several entrepreneurship programs for women and people of color.

“A recent report shows that only a tiny fraction of one percent of venture funding went to black women founders in 2014,” she said. “We need a culture shift, and we need support from the community.”

The fee for the two-year program is $5,000, and fellowships are available for selected students. The J.D. Power Launch Corps fellowships cover the costs of the program as well as a $2,000 business start-up grant and an $8,000 tuition scholarship.

All Launch Corps applicants will be considered for the fellowship, and priority will be given to women applicants. The program will begin in the fall term, and the deadline to apply for the fall MBA program is Aug. 22.

The college also is seeking mentors and startup coaches to support Launch Corps members, especially women and people of color who are entrepreneurs, investors and business professionals.

For more information about Launch Corps or to apply to the program, visit business.oregonstate.edu/launchcorps.

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Jessi Hibsman, 541-737-1059


OSU names ASU vice president as dean of the College of Business

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Mitzi Montoya, vice president and university dean of Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Arizona State University, has been named the Sara Hart Kimball Dean of the College of Business at Oregon State University.

Montoya begins her new duties on Aug. 31. She succeeds Ilene Kleinsorge, who announced her retirement earlier this year after 12 years as dean.

As dean at OSU, Montoya will oversee a growing College of Business that has 3,900 students seeking business majors, 850 students with business and entrepreneurship minors, and more than 800 design students. The college just moved into its new headquarters - the 100,000-square-foot, $55 million Austin Hall, which opened last year.

In her position at Arizona State, Montoya has been responsible for advancing entrepreneurship and innovative collaborative initiatives across the ASU campuses. She also has been dean of the College of Technology & Innovation there, and vice provost of the ASU Polytechnic campus.

“We are very excited about Mitzi joining OSU – her candidacy generated a tremendous amount of enthusiasm and excitement across the campus community, and I am thrilled that she will join our leadership team,” said Sabah Randhawa, Oregon State’s provost and executive vice president.

“She has a background that dovetails nicely with the strengths of OSU’s College of Business – including entrepreneurship and innovation – and she also has the vision and experience to help the college grow in other areas,” Randhawa added. “The college is seeking to expand its graduate programs and work more collaboratively with other units on campus, and with private, public and non-profit organizations.”

“She also has done a lot of work in the aerospace industry and with clean energy – two initiatives that Oregon State University has become deeply involved with in recent years.”

Montoya established the Aerospace & Defense Research Collaboratory in Arizona, a statewide platform for collaboration across the aerospace and defense supply chain and research institutions.  She also has been leading ASU’s global training program for clean energy, sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Montoya is a professor in the Management Department of ASU’s W.P. Carey School of Business. Before coming to ASU, she worked for 15 years at North Carolina State University, where she held the Zeinak Chair in Marketing and Innovation in the Poole College of Management. She also founded and led the Innovation Lab, a collaborative effort between different NC State colleges and private industry.

An international scholar, Montoya has taught courses on innovation and marketing strategy – at the undergraduate, graduate, and executive levels – in Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, England, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Panama, Russia, Switzerland and the United States.

Her research has focused on innovation processes and strategies, and the role of technology in team decision-making. She has received research funding from numerous institutions, including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Education, USAID, the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation and others.

Montoya has a bachelor’s of science degree in applied engineering science, and a Ph.D. in marketing and statistics – both from Michigan State University.

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 Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.randhawa@oregonstate.edu

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Mitzi Montoya, dean of the OSU College of Business

College of Business Dean Ilene Kleinsorge announces retirement

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Ilene Kleinsorge, dean and Sara Hart Kimball chair of the College of Business and executive dean of the Division of Business and Engineering at Oregon State University announced today that she will retire from OSU effective June 30.

“The significant impact of Dean Kleinsorge’s contributions to the College of Business, the university and the local and regional business communities will continue long after she retires,” said Provost Sabah Randhawa. “Her commitment to alumni, students, faculty and staff is reflected in the enduring relationships she has cultivated, the college’s collaborative community, the business partnerships she has created and students who are graduating and entering the work force prepared and ready to make an immediate impact.”

Under her leadership, the college raised more than $78 million in private philanthropy during The Campaign for OSU. More than $30 million of those gifts were for the construction of Austin Hall, the new 100,000-square foot home for the College of Business that opened in fall 2014. It was under Kleinsorge’s guidance that the funding was secured; the building was planned for, designed, built and opened.

Austin Hall accommodates more than 5,800 students each year, which includes 3,900 business majors and pre-majors, nearly 850 business and entrepreneurship minors and more than 800 design students. The college also teaches service courses for more than 1,500 students from outside of the College of Business. 

Kleinsorge, who started at OSU as an assistant accounting professor in 1987, was appointed dean in March 2003. Other accomplishments achieved under her tenure as dean include: 

  • Revising curriculum to create discipline specific majors and establishing a competitive professional school model, which requires students to apply for and be accepted into the college;
  • Growth of graduate programs including the launch of the first business doctoral program and the diversification of the MBA program to meet market demand;
  • Integrating the design majors into the College of Business;
  • Establishing a college specific Career Success Center;
  • Launching the Austin Entrepreneurship Program;
  • Collaborating with the university and the Office of Commercialization and Corporate Development to launch the Advantage Accelerator.

“It has been a privilege to lead, serve and be a part of such an accomplished community of alumni, students, faculty and staff,” said Kleinsorge. “Together we have evolved our curriculum, experiential learning opportunities and programs to provide a business education that prepares our graduates to be ready to work in the local, regional, national and global economies.”

Kleinsorge served as department chair of Accounting, Finance and Information Management from 1995-2001 and again from 2001-02. She serves as a technical adviser for the Governor’s Oregon Innovation Council; is the treasurer for Benton Hospice Board of Directors; and she is a member of the Advantage Accelerator Advisory Board; the University Budget Committee; and the Campus Planning Committee. She is also the university representative for the local Economic Vitality Partnership in Corvallis.

She has served as past chair of the Western Association of Collegiate Schools of Business; as a member of the Executive Commercialization Advisory Council; and has been active in community service including being on the Corvallis Chamber board of directors; co-chaired a capital campaign for an advocacy center for the Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence; and held various positions on the Majestic Theatre board.   

Kleinsorge earned her Ph.D. from the University of Kansas and her B.S. from Emporia State University in Emporia, Kansas. As an associate professor her teaching and research focused on cost and managerial accounting systems, with an emphasis on multi-national companies and health care.

Randhawa said a national search will be conducted for a new dean.

Media Contact: 

Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695, jenn.casey@oregonstate.edu


Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Ilene Kleinsorge

Advantage Accelerator “graduates” moving toward successful new businesses, jobs

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Four promising startup companies in fields ranging from social media to chemical manufacturing are among the first “graduating class” of the Oregon State University Advantage Accelerator, upon completion of a program designed to help lead them toward commercial success.

Organizers of the new program say it’s off to a promising start in efforts to bring more university research and community ideas to the commercial marketplace. This and other elements of the OSU Advantage form partnerships with industry and work to boost the Oregon economy, while providing invaluable experiences for OSU students involved in many aspects of the program.

“Our program has unfolded as well or better than we had hoped, and we now plan to increase the output,” said John Turner, co-director of the Advantage Accelerator. “Completion of this program means that companies have an increased chance to succeed and have a step-by-step plan to approach the future.”

“Based on our experience in the first year of this program, we’ve decided to conduct two cohort groups each year rather than one,” Turner said. “The coming year will result in about 15-20 new startup companies.”

Success in a tough and competitive commercial marketplace is not automatic, however, and not all companies have the will and strength to complete the rigorous program.

The first graduates have completed a “portfolio” of accomplishments, Turner said, that included training to attract investors, a validated business model, a schedule for future steps, and an initial product to show prospective customers, investors or manufacturers. A few clients are already attracting attention through the sale of products and generating profit.

The OSU Advantage Accelerator provides mentoring with industry and entrepreneurial experts, consulting sessions, access to seed grants and the OSU Venture Fund, meetings with active investors, workshops on various topics, networking events and many other activities.

One of the early participants in the program, Onboard Dynamics of Bend, Ore., plans to market technology that could ultimately revolutionize the way America drives. It has developed systems that compress natural gas right in the vehicle and take advantage of the enormous current supplies of low-cost natural gas. The innovation is able to cut automobile fuel costs to the gasoline-equivalent of less than $1 a gallon.

“An intern working with the Advantage Accelerator performed a lot of tasks relating to market analysis and startup activities that were incredibly helpful to the company,” said CEO Rita Hansen.

“We’re in an excellent position right now, having been formally selected by the Department of Energy for a $2.88 million award, and our initial target markets are the underserved, small, light-duty commercial fleets,” Hansen said. “We’re very bullish about widespread adoption by these fleets of our products.”

A few other companies that have completed the program include:

  • Pikli, a student-based company based on social media that allows individuals to involve their friends and family in their shopping experiences;
  • Waste2Watergy, which is commercializing a microbial fuel cell technology to reduce or eliminate significant wastewater costs and produce electricity from the resultant effluence; and
  • Valliscor, a chemical manufacturing company that licensed technology developed at OSU to produce high-value chemicals for the pharmaceutical, agricultural, polymer and electronics industries.

“The OSU Advantage Accelerator program was very helpful and their mentorship was really first-rate,” said Rich Carter, professor and chair of the OSU Department of Chemistry, and CEO of Valliscor. “They helped us develop the necessary tools to become a functioning company, and whenever you needed advice all you had to do was pick up the phone.”

Carter said he’s “very optimistic” about the company going forward, which is already producing and selling its first products.

The OSU Advantage Accelerator is one component of the Oregon Regional Accelerator and Innovation Network, or Oregon RAIN. With support from the Oregon legislature, collaborators on the initiative include OSU, the University of Oregon, the cities of Eugene, Springfield, Corvallis and Albany, and other economic development organizations. All the participants are focused on creating new business, expanding existing business, creating jobs and helping to build the Oregon and national economy.

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John Turner, 541-368-5204

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Valliscor research

Social shopping via mobile app: do you like the mint green or coral?

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new business concept aided by the Oregon State University Advantage Accelerator will get its first test run on Tuesday, Jan. 21, when about 120 OSU sorority members get a chance to see what all their friends think about the new shoes they may buy – and which color looks best.

It’s the beginning of Tally, a mobile app developed by two recent OSU graduates to make shopping or just getting dressed a more fun, interactive and social experience.

With Tally, users can receive side-by-side images of their friend’s shopping options, vote on their favorite image and get results delivered in real time.

The developers of this company will also be interviewed on Jan. 30 at OSU by Alexis Ohanian, the co-founder of Reddit.com, one of the world’s leading web sites.  Ohanian will be speaking about his new book, Without Their Permission, as part of a 77-university tour about Internet entrepreneurship, at the LaSells Stewart Center beginning at 7 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

“Our release of the app to the OSU sororities is really exciting, and we’ll be very interested in their feedback as we try to fine tune the user experience,” said Ryan Connolly, a graduate last year in marketing and entrepreneurship in the OSU College of Business, who co-founded the company with Andy Miller, an OSU computer science graduate.

“We are very optimistic about the app and anxious to see what’s in store for the future,” Connolly said. “It’s free for people to download and use, and will help make shopping a more social experience, even if your friends live in another city or on the other side of the country. People can see what their friends think before they make a decision, and in our tests about 65 percent of our current users vote on each new poll within 20 minutes.”

The OSU Advantage Accelerator, which was recently formed to help this and other small business enterprises get the assistance they need to move out of academia and into the private sector, was a great help, Connolly said.

“The Accelerator gave us two mentors to work with, helped flush out our revenue model, introduced us to investors, and gave us exposure we wouldn’t have otherwise had,” he said.

The business concept of the company is to develop a large and active user base, Connolly said, and then approach clothing retailers and brands as a pinpoint marketing platform. Information will be acquired about merchandise, style, color and product preferences that would be of value to retailers, manufacturers and brand owners. The company web site is at tallyfashion.com

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Ryan Connolly, 503-961-5778

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Choices to make

Shopping choices

Die-hard fans view ads linked with rival teams negatively

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new study concludes that it doesn’t matter how compelling an advertisement may be, most die-hard Oregon State Beavers fans will simply not purchase a product associated with the Oregon Ducks.

Researchers at Oregon State University and California State University, San Marcos asked college students, who were a mix of average sports fans and “highly identified” fans, or super fans, to look at a generic ad that that featured an association with either the home or a rival team and included either strong or weak arguments about product quality.

The “less identified,” or average fans, responded positively to the strong advertising message regardless of team affiliation. However, even though the super fans were able to recognize which ads made a more compelling case, it did not sway their negative attitude and intentions toward the advertisement when there was an affiliation with the rival.

The study, co-authored by Colleen Bee, assistant professor of marketing in OSU’s College of Business, and Vassilis Dalakas, associate professor of marketing at Cal State San Marcos, was published online this month in the Journal of Marketing Communications.

“We found that less identified fans responded positively to strong, credible arguments,” said lead author Bee. “What we found interesting is that this effect went away for super fans when the ad featured a rival affiliation. Whether an argument was weak or strong did not make a difference – all that mattered was the association with the rival team.”

Study participants were either shown an ad with weak messaging, such as “Simply great!” or an ad with strong messaging, such as “Recommended by Consumer Reports.”  Fan identification was then assessed by asking respondents to rate themselves based on how they and others see them as team-specific sports fans.

Bee said this is the first study to consider the combined effects of fan identification, sponsorship affiliation, and message characteristics. Since sports sponsorship accounts for 77 percent, or $39.17 billion in revenue, of worldwide sponsorship spending, knowing potential pitfalls is important.

“Highly identified fans incorporate the team as part of their identity, which means it really influences and biases the way they process information much more than other consumers.”

Bee said sponsorship is still a highly effective and lucrative means of advertising and branding. She said that companies should just be aware that their message – and thus their product – may be viewed negatively when they align with certain teams. For this reason, she said savvy firms use brand loyalty to their advantage. One car rental company, for instance, with strong ties to the New York Yankees only ran ads promoting its alliance to the team in New York City. 

“When you associate your product or brand with a team logo, you need to keep in mind that you will alienate the super fans of the rival team, and potentially lose customers,” she said. “On the other hand, you can also leverage that social identification to win over those sports fans who will view this sponsorship favorably simply because it is their team.”

The study was funded by a grant from the OSU College of Business.

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Colleen Bee, 541-737-6059

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Colleen Bee

Top Oregon family businesses to be honored at Nov. 2 event

PORTLAND, Ore. – Several Oregon family businesses will be honored at the Oregon State University College of Business’ 2016 Excellence in Family Business Awards ceremony on Wednesday, Nov. 2, at the Portland Hilton and Executive Tower.

Bill Stoller, co-founder of Express Employment, will speak at the event, which is sponsored by the college’s Austin Family Business Program. Domonic Biggi, president of Beaverton Foods, will emcee. There are fees for attendance.

“Our Excellence in Family Business Awards recognize the achievements of family businesses in entrepreneurship, community involvement and multigenerational planning,” said Mitzi Montoya, dean of OSU’s College of Business. “With upwards of 80 percent of Oregon’s businesses being family-owned, it is really important that we honor the hard work and drive of these families and continue to foster a culture of support and shared-learning within the family business community.” 

Founded in 1985, the Austin Family Business Program provides inspiration, education, outreach and research to support family businesses.

“We want everyone to access these stories and learn why these businesses are so successful.” said Sherri Noxel, director of the Austin Family Business Program.

The awards feature categories that reflect sound family business practices. Honorees are:

  • Family Harmony: The Charlton Kennels & Farm, Portland. Finalists in the category included C & D Landscaping, Dayton, and Jag Forms, West Linn.
  • Generational Development: Benchmade Knife Company, Inc. C & R Remodeling, Salem, was a finalist in this category.
  • Business Renewal: GK Machine, Inc., Donald. Finalists included The Cronin Company, Portland, and Pride Disposal Company, Sherwood.
  • Student Award: Nicholas Strebin, Strebin Farms, Troutdale.

Stoller will receive the 2016 Dean’s Award for Family Business Leadership.

The event begins with a reception at 4 p.m. and the program at 5:50 p.m. Tickets are $45 for the reception alone, $75 for the reception with a buffet or $25 for children ages 3-10. The Portland Hilton and Executive Tower is at 921 S.W. 6th Ave., Portland.

Tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/2cNO3ga, by calling 1-800-859-7609 or by contacting Melissa Elmore at Melissa.elmore@bus.oregonstate.edu. The deadline to register is Oct. 26.

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Sherri Noxel, 541-737-6019, Sherri.noxel@bus.oregonstate.edu

Antitrust laws may hinder socially-responsible business collaboration

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new study suggests that U.S. antitrust laws could hamper the efforts of companies to collaborate on sustainable and socially-responsible business practices, even as consumers and businesses increasingly value them.

Both the public and many businesses are worried about natural resource limitations and the threat of climate change. Current anti-trust laws don’t fit with today’s global concerns, said Inara Scott, an attorney and assistant professor in the College of Business at Oregon State University.

“When it comes to the environment, we’re used to thinking of companies as part of the problem,” said Scott, who studies environmental law issues. “But today a lot of companies want to be part of the solution. They want to become more socially-responsible and drive sustainability for themselves and the consumer.

“The question for them becomes ‘How do I promote better environmental practices without losing market share?’ ”

Antitrust laws alone may not completely prevent businesses from collaborating, but the ways in which the laws have been interpreted and applied over time has had a chilling effect on businesses, said Scott, whose research on the issue was published in the spring issue of the American Business Law Journal.

Businesses do not want to risk even the appearance of impropriety, she said.

“The law is increasingly recognizing the role that sustainability has to play in the marketplace,” Scott said. “But out of an abundance of caution, companies avoid anything that looks like it might be considered a violation of antitrust laws.”

A chief concern that Scott found is that some types of behavior trigger accusations of “per se” antitrust violations, in which the facts are secondary to any appearance of impropriety. In such cases, she said, it is difficult for companies to defend themselves when faced with those types of accusations.

Price-fixing is one example. Companies go out of their way to avoid even the appearance of it, lest they face antitrust penalties. But fixing prices might not be a bad idea in some circumstances - it might be worth considering if it could help protect valuable rainforests or provide better income for independent coffee growers around the world, Scott said.

The per se standards were designed with the idea that markets are functional and operate properly, but that is not always the case, especially in today’s global marketplace, Scott said. Environmental factors, limited resources or even a dominant regime may unduly influence markets around the globe.

“Some kind of defense to antitrust law violations should be available if there is a market failure,” Scott said. “Behaviors that benefit consumers should be allowed. We can find ways to make exceptions for that.”

People who have a strong mistrust of big businesses may fear a change to the laws might lead to abuse, Scott said. But that fear and mistrust may be limiting our options for tackling the big issues of climate change and declining natural resources. Changes to the law could allow for better disclosure, transparency and monitoring to ensure businesses are working for societal good, she said.

“We are so deeply rooted in our assumptions about markets and competition,” Scott said. “It is very hard to challenge that. But these laws were written at a time when resources seemed inexhaustible, whereas today we live in an era of limited resources.”

Changing antitrust laws to allow for more flexibility will likely require legislative action, given companies’ limited ability to challenge them in court. But it is time for people to begin considering such changes, Scott said.

“Climate change and sustainability are such overwhelming problems,” she said. “We need businesses to take on those problems. Government and individuals are not going to be able to solve them on their own. How can we foster the positive power of businesses and not shut down opportunities?”

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Inara Scott, 541-737-4102, Inara.Scott@oregonstate.edu

OSU College of Business establishes Portland headquarters, launches innovation MBA

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Oregon State University College of Business is launching a new MBA in innovation and establishing a Portland headquarters in the Pearl District.

The new space, located at 220 N.W. Eighth Ave., will be celebrated with several events, including informational meetings for the new MBA track in innovation as well as an upcoming open house for alumni, students, prospective students and industry representatives. 

“It’s an exciting time for us to grow in the Portland market,” said Dean Mitzi Montoya, who joined OSU’s College of Business in September.

OSU’s hybrid MBA program, based in Portland, offers a mix of online and in-person work. The innovation MBA will focus on one of Portland’s core values, entrepreneurial business growth, as it pertains to starting new businesses and advancing existing Oregon companies.

The MBA program in Portland also includes tracks in executive leadership and business analytics. Tracks in supply chain and logistics management and a certificate in financial planning will be offered beginning in the fall.

The flexible hybrid program format makes it accessible for the working professional. It involves working online about 80 percent of the time and gathering twice per 10-week term for team and faculty meetings, professional development, alumni networking and applied project work.

“OSU is an engine of innovation, and Portland is an exciting and growing innovation economy,” Montoya said. “I am excited about the tremendous potential of our work to grow Portland’s capacity to innovate even further.”

The College of Business’ new Portland headquarters will be located in the WeWork building in the Pearl District. WeWork is a national chain of shared office buildings and offers “co-working communities” that house multiple ventures, often startups. The businesses share office space, equipment and related amenities.

“WeWork’s entrepreneurial environment and its mission, to support hard-working members who produce results, aligns with the culture of the College of Business, our alumni and our programs,” Montoya said. 

The open house will be held on Feb. 18 from 4-6 p.m. Alumni, industry representatives, current MBA students, prospective students and community members are invited to attend the free event, which will be hosted by Montoya and other college leaders.

Information sessions for the new MBA track in innovation will be held on Feb. 11 from noon to 1 p.m. and from 4-5 p.m. The track will be offered starting in fall 2016. Business professionals in the metro area are invited to attend. RSVPs are appreciated but not required and can be made at osumba@oregonstate.edu.

In addition to the new WeWork space, the College of Business will continue to offer courses at the Collaborative Life Sciences Building in Portland’s South Waterfront district and expand its collaboration with OSU’s Food Innovation Center in Northwest Portland.

Story By: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039, steve.lundeberg@oregonstate.edu