OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

cascades campus

Landfill acquisition and planned innovation district increase future regional and state impact

BEND, Ore. – Oregon State University President Ed Ray signed documents Wednesday that finalized the purchase of a 72-acre former Deschutes County landfill that will expand the footprint of the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend to 128 acres. 

Key among the features planned for the expanded campus is an innovation district that will foster partnerships between university researchers, students and startup companies in high-tech, bio-tech and other industries. The future innovation district is estimated to contribute $282 million annually to the Deschutes County economy and $318.8 million annually in total state economic impact by 2025, according to ECONorthwest, an economics consulting firm.

“The acquisition of the landfill is a benefit for both OSU-Cascades and the community,” said Becky Johnson, vice president of OSU-Cascades. “This is a visionary opportunity to bring unused land back into public use for higher education, reduce the impact of campus construction on the surrounding community, grow the economy, and develop amenities for our community like walking and biking paths, natural areas and athletic fields.

“This is an environmental, community, higher education and economic win,” Johnson said.  “And not just for Central Oregon, but for all of the state.”

Plans for the expanded campus include buildings and features to support academic and experiential learning, health and recreation, and student and workforce housing. 

The purchase follows a nearly two-year study of the landfill during which OSU-Cascades collaborated with OSU’s College of Engineering, state and federal agencies, and reclamation experts to evaluate remediation strategies.  The resulting remediation approach may reduce an estimated 29,600 truck trips on local roads to partially fill an adjoining former pumice mine that makes up the OSU-Cascades campus. Instead, remediated soil from the landfill will be used to terrace the former mine. Planning for the future campus, which is anticipated to enroll 3,000 to 5,000 undergraduate and graduate students, has been underway since 2013. 

Over a nearly two-year community engagement process to gather input for a long range development plan for the future campus, community member attendance at meetings totaled 1,500.   With the certainty of the campus footprint, the university can finalize its master plan for submission to the city of Bend.

Ray was authorized to complete negotiations and finalize the purchase by the OSU Board of Trustees at a meeting on Oct. 20.

Source: 

 Christine Coffin, 541-322-3152

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

View of campus and expansion

cascades acquisition

$5 million gift is largest in OSU-Cascades’ history, supports capital expansion

BEND, Ore. – A $5 million gift to Oregon State University – Cascades will propel the university toward its next phase of capital development, which will include a second academic building for the growing campus. The gift from an anonymous donor represents the largest donation ever received by the Bend campus.

“A visionary gift like this, at the onset of our efforts to seek capital funds from the Oregon State Legislature, makes a powerful and motivating statement,” said OSU-Cascades Vice President Becky Johnson. “Our appreciation is tremendous, as the gift signals to our elected officials and supporters how important higher education is for all of Oregon.” 

The investment is a profound step toward a $10 million philanthropic match required for the state capital funding currently sought by OSU-Cascades, according to Johnson.

In total, OSU-Cascades is seeking $69.5 million in state bonding from the 2017 Oregon Legislature for the next phase of campus expansion. The project includes preparing adjacent land for expansion and constructing an academic building and Student Success Center. With the commitment of state funding, the anonymous donation will be applied to construction costs for the new academic building.

In his recent State of the University address, OSU President Ed Ray called the expansion of OSU-Cascades the fulfillment of a 30-year community dream to bring a four-year university to Central Oregon. He emphasized its potential impact on the state’s economy. According to ECONorthwest, if work on the Bend campus occurs as planned, in 2025 OSU-Cascades will contribute $197.8 million in total annual economic output throughout Oregon.

“OSU-Cascades is providing valued education, cultural opportunities, research and innovation to Oregon’s fastest-growing region,” Ray said. “I know that Central Oregon residents would say they have waited long enough for a four-year university. I hope that all Oregonians will agree that this university campus and its statewide benefits are long overdue.”

The Tykeson Family Foundation has also pledged $1 million toward the philanthropic match for the capital expansion. The Tykeson Family contributed toward the OSU-Cascades campus’s first academic building, named Tykeson Hall.

OSU-Cascades’ proposed additional capital facilities will provide needed instructional classroom, laboratories and student support space for the growing student enrollment at OSU-Cascades. Over the past five years, OSU-Cascades has been the fastest growing public university in Oregon. More than 1,100 students are pursuing degrees at the Bend campus, which can currently accommodate up to 1,890 students. Plans are to grow enrollment to 3,000 to 5,000 students.

Source: 

Christine Coffin, 541-322-3152, Christine.Coffin@osucascades.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Conceptual image of future buildings on Oregon State University – Cascades campus

OSU-Cascades rendering

Framing discourse around conservative values shifts climate change attitudes

BEND, Ore. – Conservatives’ attitudes toward climate change and other environmental concerns shift when the issues are reframed in terms more closely aligned with their values, a new study from Oregon State University indicates.

Researchers found that people who identified as conservative were more likely to support “pro-environmental” ideals when the issues were framed as matters of obeying authority, defending the purity of nature and demonstrating patriotism. 

The study underscores the ways in which discussions of important topics are informed by a person’s moral and ideological perspective, said the study’s lead author, Christopher Wolsko, an assistant professor of psychology at OSU-Cascades.

“We think we’re just discussing issues, but we’re discussing those issues through particular cultural values that we normally take for granted,” Wolsko said. “If you re-frame issues to be more inclusive of those diverse values, people’s attitudes change.” 

The findings were published in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Co-authors are Hector Ariceaga and Jesse Seiden, who are alumni of OSU-Cascades.

Wolsko studies ecopsychology, a field that examines the relationship between humans and the natural world from both a psychological and ecological perspective. The goal of his latest research is to better understand the widespread political polarization occurring around environmental issues such as climate change. 

“This political polarization has been a big issue, even in the current presidential campaign,” Wolsko said. “Why is that? What, exactly, is going on psychologically?”

Moral foundations theory suggests that liberals and conservatives respond differently to broad moral categories. Liberals respond more favorably to moral issues involving harm and care, or fairness and justice, and conservatives respond more favorably to issues framed by loyalty, authority and respect, and the purity and sanctity of human endeavors, Wolsko said.

In a series of experiments, the researchers tested how shifts in moral framing affected attitudes toward environmental issues such as climate change. They reframed questions about conservation and climate change around ideals of patriotism, loyalty, authority and purity and paired them with imagery such as flags and bald eagles. 

They found that reframing the issues around these moral foundations led to shifts in attitudes for conservatives, who were more likely to favor environmental concerns in that context. There was no noticeable shift in attitudes among liberals, which isn’t a big surprise, Wolsko said.

Environmental issues are typically framed in ideological and moral terms that hold greater appeal for people with liberal views. Conservatives may not so much be rejecting environmental concerns, but rather the tone and tenor of the prevailing moral discourse around environmental issues, he said. 

That does not mean people should reframe critical discourse to manipulate attitudes about environmental concerns, Wolsko said. Rather, the goal should be to find more balanced ways to talk about the issues in an effort to reduce the polarization that can occur.

“The classic move is to segment people along these ideological lines,” he said. “But if we’re more inclusive in our discourse, can we reduce the animosity and find more common ground?” 

Future research should look at messaging that is considered more neutral and appeals to people with both liberal and conservative ideologies, Wolsko said.

“I’m really interested in the extent to which we can bring everyone together, to be more inclusive and affirm common values,” he said. “Can we apply these lessons to the political and policy arenas, and ultimately reduce the vast political polarization we’re experiencing right now?”

Story By: 
Source: 

Christopher Wolsko, 541-322-3182, chris.wolsko@osucascades.edu

Oregon State research reaches record, exceeds $308 million

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Oregon State University research funding reached $308.9 million, its highest level ever, in the fiscal year that ended on June 30. A near doubling of revenues from licensing patented technologies and an 8.5 percent increase in competitive federal funding fueled OSU research on a range of projects including advanced ocean-going research vessels, the health impacts of pollution and sustainable materials for high-speed computing.

“This is a phenomenal achievement. I've seen how OSU research is solving global problems and providing innovations that mean economic growth for Oregon and the nation,” said Cynthia Sagers, OSU’s vice president for research who undertook her duties on August 31. “OSU’s research performance in the last year is amazing, given that federal funds are so restricted right now.”

The overall economic and societal impact of OSU’s research enterprise exceeds $670 million, based on an analysis of OSU’s research contributions to the state and global economy that followed a recent economic study of OSU’s fiscal impact conducted by ECONorthwest.

Technology licensing almost doubled in the last year alone, from just under $6 million in 2014 to more than $10 million this year. Leading investments from business and industry were patented Oregon State innovations in agriculture, advanced materials and nuclear technologies.

OSU researchers exceeded the previous record of $288 million, which the university achieved in 2010. Although federal agencies provided the bulk of funding, most of the growth in OSU research revenues over the past five years stems from nonprofit organizations and industry.

Since 2010, total private-sector funding from sponsored contracts, research cooperatives and other sources has risen 60 percent — from $25 million to more than $40 million in 2015. Oregon State conducts research with multinationals such as HP, Nike and Boeing as well as with local firms such as Benchmade Knife of Oregon City, Sheldon Manufacturing of Cornelius and NuScale Power of Corvallis.

By contrast, federal research grants in 2015 were only 0.2 percent higher than those received in 2010, a year in which American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds gave university research a one-time shot in the arm across the country. According to the National Science Foundation, federal agency obligations for research have dropped from a high of $36 billion in 2009 to $29 billion in 2013, the last year for which cumulative figures are available. The Department of Health and Human Services accounted for more than half of that spending.

“We’ve worked hard to diversify our research portfolio,” said Ron Adams, who retired as interim vice president for research at the end of August. “But it’s remarkable that our researchers have succeeded in competing for an increase in federal funding. This speaks to the success of our strategic initiatives and our focus on clusters of excellence.”

Economic impact stems in part from new businesses launched this year through the Oregon State University Advantage program. Among them are:

  •  OnBoard Dynamics, a Bend company designing a natural-gas powered vehicle engine that can be fueled from home
  •  Valliscor, a Corvallis company that manufactures ultra-pure chemicals
  • eChemion, a Corvallis company that develops and markets technology to extend battery life

Altogether, 15 new companies have received mentoring assistance from Oregon State’s Advantage Accelerator program, part of the state-funded Regional Accelerator and Innovation Network, or RAIN. Six new companies are working with the Advantage program this fall.

Additional economic impact stems from the employment of students, post-doctoral researchers and faculty. According to the OSU Research Office, about a quarter of OSU undergraduates participate in research projects, many with stipends paid by grant funds. In addition, grants support a total of 843 graduate research positions and 165 post-doctoral researchers.

The College of Agricultural Sciences received the largest share of research grants at Oregon State with $49.4 million last year, followed by the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at $39 million and the College of Engineering at $37 million. The College of Science saw a 170 percent increase in research funding to $26.7 million, its largest total ever and the biggest rise among OSU colleges. Among the largest grants received in FY15 were:

  •  $8 million from the NSF to the Center for Sustainable Materials Chemistry (College of Science) for new high-speed information technologies
  •  $4 million from the Department of Energy to reduce barriers to the deployment of ocean energy systems (College of Engineering)
  •  $4 million from US Agency for International Development to the AquaFish Innovation Lab (College of Agricultural Sciences) for global food security
  •  $3.5 million from the USDA for experiential learning to reduce obesity (College of Public Health and Human Sciences)
  •  $2.3 million from the NSF for the ocean observing initiative (College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences)
  •  $1.5 million from the U.S. Department of Education for school readiness in early childhood (OSU Cascades)

 

Editor’s Note: FY15 research totals for OSU colleges and OSU-Cascades are posted online.

College of Agricultural Sciences: http://agsci.oregonstate.edu/story/osu%E2%80%99s-college-agricultural-sciences-receives-494-million-research-grants 

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences: http://ceoas.oregonstate.edu/features/funding/

College of Education: http://education.oregonstate.edu/research-and-outreach 

College of Engineering:  http://engineering.oregonstate.edu/fy15-research-funding-highlights

College of Forestry: http://www.forestry.oregonstate.edu/research/college-forestry-receives-near-record-grant-awards-fy-2015

College of Liberal Arts: http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/cla-research/2015-research-summary

College of Pharmacy: http://pharmacy.oregonstate.edu/grant_information

College of Public Health and Human Sciences: http://health.oregonstate.edu/research 

College of Science: http://impact.oregonstate.edu/2015/08/record-year-for-research-funding/

College of Veterinary Medicine: http://vetmed.oregonstate.edu/research-highlights

OSU-Cascades: http://osucascades.edu/research-and-scholarship 

Story By: 
Source: 

Cynthia Sagers, vice president for research, 541-737-0664; Rich Holdren on OSU research trends, 541-737-8390; Brian Wall on business spinoffs and commercialization, 541-737-9058

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Surface chemistry research

Masters students at OSU worked to improve the performance of thin-film transistors used in liquid crystal displays. (Photo courtesy of Oregon State University)

OOI mooring

The Oregon shelf surface mooring is lowered to the water using the R/V Oceanus ship's crane. (photo courtesy of Oregon State University). Wave Energy

The Ocean Sentinel, a wave energy testing device, rides gentle swells near Newport, Ore. (Photo courtesy of Oregon State University) Hernandez3-2

An undergraduate student at the Autonomous Juarez University of Tabasco, Mexico, is working with cage culture of cichlids in an educational partnership with the AquaFish collaborative Support Program. (Photo: Tiffany Woods)

Girls receive conflicting career messages from media, new research shows

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Teenage girls like and feel more similar to women in appearance-focused jobs such as models and actresses, though they find female CEOs and military pilots to be better role models, according to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University.

For the study, 100 girls and 76 boys ages 14 to 18 were shown photographs of model Heidi Klum, actress Jennifer Aniston, CEO Carly Fiorina and military pilot Sarah Deal Burrow. Klum and Aniston represented the appearance-focused careers and Fiorina and Deal Burrow represented the non-appearance focused careers.

Girls generally rated the women in the appearance-focused careers higher on likeability than the women in the non-appearance focused careers. Girls also rated the women in the appearance-focused photos as more competent than the other women. Boys, on the other hand, found the women in the non-appearance focused careers were more competent. The boys also ranked the appearance-focused photos lower on likeability.

The findings highlight the conflicting messages girls receive in the media about careers and success for women, said researcher Elizabeth Daniels, an assistant professor of psychology who studies the effects of media on body image and gender.

“Girls know they should look up to female doctors and scientists, but they also know that women in appearance-focused jobs get rewarded by society,” Daniels said. “It is, therefore, reasonable to think they would prefer women in those jobs.”

But the study also shows that teenage girls, as well as boys, value women in roles that are not appearance-focused and generally find those women to be better role models. That should encourage movie, television and advertising executives to showcase a much wider range of working women and move beyond the “moms and models” that are the most common examples of women in media, Daniels said.

“The dominant belief is that sex sells,” she said. “But our findings show teens have positive attitudes toward other images of working women, providing evidence that there is support for these other images.”

The research was just published in the Journal of Adolescent Research. The co-author is Aurora M. Sherman, an associate professor in the School of Psychological Science at OSU. The study was conducted while Daniels was on the faculty at OSU-Cascades; she’s now working at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.

The researchers wanted to study adolescents’ attitudes about working women in part because they are under-represented in the media and are often depicted in stereotyped roles. In film and prime-time television, for example, women are less likely to be shown working in professional roles such as executives at a major corporation. That could send a message to young people that such occupations are unattainable or inappropriate for women.

“We already have a lot of research about the negative effects of sexualized or idealized media images on young women,” Daniels said. “But there is very little research about the effects of other types of positive images of women, such as CEOs or military pilots. We wanted to understand how young people respond to those images.”

The teens in the study were given a brief description of each woman’s occupational accomplishments with each photo. The teenagers then answered a series of questions about the women in the photos, including: likability, competence and similarity to themselves.

The majority of both boys and girls rated the military pilot and the CEO as good role models, at 90 percent and 79 percent, respectively, while 58 percent said the actor was a good role model and 48 percent said the model was.

“The most striking finding is the disconnect between girls’ role model evaluations and their ratings of women’s competence,” Daniels said.

But the research also shows there is interest in and appetite for more diverse images of working women in media and advertising, she said. “Those images are reviewed positively by audiences, but it is really rare to see women featured in their careers.”

Additional research is needed to understand how media may affect the career aspirations of children and adolescents.

“Does it affect the teens’ aspirations of what they can be? Does exposure to a female CEO or military pilot encourage girls to join a computer coding club or take math or science classes? We don’t know yet,” Daniels said.

Future research also could look specifically at why boys downgraded the competence and likeability of women in appearance-focused jobs but teen girls did not, Sherman said.

“We speculate that teens may be receiving some deeply mixed messages about the importance of appearance for femininity that may be at odds with the messages they are learning about competence in occupations,” she said.

Story By: 
Source: 

Elizabeth Daniels, 831-345-8447, edaniels@uccs.edu; or Aurora Sherman, 541-737-1361, Aurora.sherman@oregonstate.edu

OSU-Cascades launches hospitality management degree

BEND, Ore. – Oregon State University - Cascades is adding a new bachelor’s degree in hospitality management, filling a need for highly-skilled employees in one of Oregon’s most important industries.

OSU-Cascades will begin offering hospitality management classes in fall 2015. The multi-disciplinary degree program will prepare graduates for a wide range of hospitality careers within a corporate setting, in a hospitality operations setting, or as an entrepreneur.  Among the possible career fields are hotel management, cruise operations, conference services, restaurant ownership, and food and beverage services. It is the only degree program of its kind in Oregon.

“We are thrilled to offer a program that will attract students and faculty, and provide talented interns and graduates for the lodging and restaurant industry in the state and region, ultimately increasing its significant contribution to Oregon's economy,” said Becky Johnson, vice president of OSU-Cascades.

The branch campus’s newest degree is the first four-year hospitality degree to be offered in Oregon in more than 20 years and will cater to the state’s hospitality and tourism industry, the second-largest industry in Oregon.

OSU-Cascades is an ideal location for a hospitality management program. Tourism and hospitality businesses are among the largest employers in Central Oregon and the industry is currently experiencing a surge in growth.

The hospitality management program will be led by Executive-in-Residence Todd Montgomery and will be offered through the OSU College of Business. The multi-disciplinary program will include classes in management, human resources, food and beverage operations, technology within the hospitality sector, and service delivery.

Students will also complete a business minor with courses in marketing and accounting, and be required to participate in internships and other work experience programs. The program is expected to draw interest from high school students, community college transfer students and culinary institute graduates.

“Our goal is to prepare our students for key positions in the hospitality industry in Central Oregon, throughout the state and beyond,” Montgomery said. “We want to give them the skills and tools they need to be leaders and innovators in the hospitality field.”

Budget cuts forced the closure of a similar hospitality degree program at OSU in the early 1990s; students then sought programs and careers outside of the state. Industry leaders in Oregon have been advocating for the program’s return and support from the state and local hospitality and tourism industry helped make the new degree possible. In 2012, the branch campus received gifts totaling $320,000 to develop the new program.

Media Contact: 

Christine Coffin, 541-322-3152

Source: 

Todd Montgomery, 541-322-2086

OSU-Cascades one of 15 universities nationwide to receive federal suicide prevention grant

BEND, Ore. – Oregon State University – Cascades will use a new $305,000 suicide prevention grant to develop programs at the branch campus to support student mental health and to identify and respond to students who are at risk for suicide.

The campus was one of 15 universities nationwide to receive a 2014 Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the second-leading cause of death among young people in the U.S. aged 18 to 25. Depression is a leading risk factor for suicide and a common problem that can interfere with a student’s ability to have a productive college experience.

The grant project will be co-led by Susan Keys, Ph.D., an associate professor and senior researcher in public health and Linda Porzelius, Ph.D., head of personal counseling services, both at the branch campus. 

“This grant could not come at a more propitious time,” Keys said. “The funds will help ensure we have important systems in place for mental health support as we welcome new students beginning in 2015."

The grant will also support the creation of web-based suicide prevention information for students; faculty, staff and student training in suicide prevention; and student projects that encourage fellow students to live healthy lives, seek help when they are experiencing stress and to reduce the stigma associated with asking for or receiving help. An additional focus will strengthen connections between campus services and those available in the community.  Grant collaborators include public, private and non-profit health and mental health providers.

“For some college students, balancing school, work, relationships and family while planning for a career can be overwhelming.  Educating our campus community on how to identify these students and referring them to supportive services could be lifesaving,” said Keys.

Keys joined OSU-Cascades in 2013. She has been a professional advocate for youth mental health for more than 30 years. Her experience has included leading national programs in suicide prevention and youth violence prevention for DHHS and serving as chair of the counseling department at Johns Hopkins University.  She chairs the Deschutes County Suicide Prevention Advisory Council. Keys is also a consultant for the state of Oregon’s youth suicide prevention grant program.

Resources to assist students in need are currently available on campus and within the community.  National online resources include ReachOut.com, a mental health and information service for teens and young adults, and the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK(8255).

Media Contact: 

Christine Coffin, 541-322-3152, Christine.Coffin@osucascades.edu

Source: 

Susan Keys, 541-322-2046

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Susan Keys

Susan Keys

Study: Young women with sexy social media photos seen as less competent

BEND, Ore. – Girls and young women who post sexy or revealing photos on social media sites such as Facebook are viewed by their female peers as less physically and socially attractive and less competent to perform tasks, a new study from Oregon State University indicates.

“This is a clear indictment of sexy social media photos,” said researcher Elizabeth Daniels, an assistant professor of psychology who studies the effect of media on girls’ body image. Daniels’ findings are based on an experiment she conducted using a fictitious Facebook profile.

“There is so much pressure on teen girls and young women to portray themselves as sexy, but sharing those sexy photos online may have more negative consequences than positive,” Daniels said.

Girls and young women are in a “no-win” situation when it comes to their Facebook photos, Daniels said. Those who post sexy photos may risk negative reactions from their peers, but those who post more wholesome photos may lose out on social rewards, including attention from boys and men, she said.

“Social media is where the youth are,” she said. “We need to understand what they’re doing online and how that affects their self-concept and their self-esteem.”

Daniels’ research was published today in the journal “Psychology of Popular Media Culture.” The article, titled “The price of sexy: Viewers’ perceptions of a sexualized versus non-sexualized Facebook profile photo,” was co-authored by Eileen L. Zurbriggen of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Daniels conducted the research while on the faculty at OSU-Cascades and received two Circle of Excellence grants from OSU-Cascades to support the study. She is now an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs.

For the study, Daniels created two mock Facebook profiles for the fictitious 20-year-old Amanda Johnson. In both versions, Amanda liked musicians such as Lady Gaga, books such as “Twilight,” and movies like “The Notebook,” that would be appropriate for a person her age.

The only difference between the two was the profile photo. The photos were actual high school senior portrait and prom photos of a real young woman who allowed the photos to be used for the experiment.

In the sexy photo, “Amanda” is wearing a low-cut red dress with a slit up one leg to mid-thigh and a visible garter belt. In the non-sexy photo, she’s wearing jeans, a short-sleeved shirt and a scarf draped around her neck, covering her chest. 

Study participants were 58 teen girls, ages 13-18, and 60 young adult women no longer in high school, ages 17-25. They were randomly assigned one of the profiles and asked questions based on that profile.

The participants were asked to assess Amanda’s physical attractiveness (I think she is pretty), social attractiveness (I think she could be a friend of mine), and task competence (I have confidence in her ability to get a job done) on a scale from 1-7, with one being strongly disagree and 7 being strongly agree.

In all three areas, the non-sexy profile scored higher, indicating that those who viewed that photo thought Amanda was prettier, more likely to make a good friend and more likely to complete a task. The largest difference was in the area of task competence, suggesting a young woman’s capabilities are really dinged by the sexy photo, Daniels said.

The research underscores the importance of helping children and young people understand the long-term consequences of their online posts, Daniels said. Parents, educators and other influential adults should have regular conversations about the implications of online behavior with teens and young adults, Daniels suggested.

“We really need to help youth understand this is a very public forum,” she said.

The research also highlights the need for more discussion about gender roles and attitudes, particularly regarding girls and young women, she said.

“Why is it we focus so heavily on girls’ appearances?” she said. “What does this tell us about gender? Those conversations should be part of everyday life.”

Daniels’ advice for girls and young women is to select social media photos that showcase their identity rather than her appearance, such as one from a trip or one that highlights participation in a sport or hobby.

“Don’t focus so heavily on appearance,” Daniels said. “Focus on who you are as a person and what you do in the world.”

Story By: 
Source: 

Elizabeth Daniels, 831-345-8447 or daniels.psychology@gmail.com

Corvallis Science Pub features talk on natural gas vehicles

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The growth of natural gas supplies in the United States has led to increased use of this fuel in industry and transportation.

At the April 14 Corvallis Science Pub, Chris Hagen of OSU-Cascades in Bend will discuss his research on a system that would enable homeowners to power their vehicles on natural gas at home. The Science Pub presentation, which is free and open to the public, begins at 6 p.m. in the Old World Deli located at 341 S.W. Second St. in Corvallis.

Hagen is testing an engine that can compress natural gas and store it in a vehicle fuel tank.

“Technologies for compressing natural gas already exist,” said Hagen, an assistant professor in the Energy Systems Engineering program. “We can buy a natural gas reciprocating compressor that operates separately and can fuel your car in eight hours. The question is whether we can come up with a commercially viable solution.”

Hagen’s research is supported by ARPA-E (the Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Project Agency–Energy) through its new program titled Methane Opportunities for Vehicular Energy (MOVE).

Before coming to OSU-Cascades, Hagen was an assistant research professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Colorado State University. He had also worked at the Chevron Energy Technology Company where he investigated novel fuels for advanced internal combustion engines. His previous industry experience includes working as an application engineer for Woodward, Inc., a global energy system solution provider.

Sponsors of Science Pub include Terra magazine at OSU, the Downtown Corvallis Association and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry.

Story By: 
Source: 

Chris Hagen, 541-322-2061

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

hagen-final-web-homepage-story

OSU-Cascades to host Geraldine Brooks as Distinguished Visiting Writer

BEND, Ore. – Pulitzer Prize-winning author Geraldine Brooks will join the faculty of Oregon State University-Cascades in June as a Distinguished Visiting Writer in the Low Residency Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program. The residency session takes place from June 9-19.

The Australian-born Brooks is an author and journalist who spent 11 years as a correspondent at The Wall Street Journal, where her beats focused on some of the world’s most troubled areas, including Bosnia, Somalia, and the Middle East.

Students in the OSU-Cascades creative writing program embark on long-distance and individualized courses of study with faculty author mentors, and join fellow students for two 10-day residences each year at Caldera Arts Center outside of Sister, Ore.  Distinguished writers are invited to join the residencies and guide and nurture apprentice writers.

In addition to her journalism background, Brooks is an accomplished author whose fiction debut, “Year of Wonders: A Novel of the Plague,” was published in 10 countries and was a 2001 Notable Book of the Year for The New York Times, The Washington Post and the Chicago Tribune.

Her second novel, “March,” earned Brooks the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Her third book, “People of the Book,” became an instant New York Times bestseller. Her most recent novel is “Caleb’s Crossing.”

While in Central Oregon, Brooks will also participate in the Deschutes Public Library Foundation’s Author! Author! literary series, speaking at Bend High School on June 19. 

Source: 

Christine Coffin, 541-322-3152