OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

OSU Board of Trustees elects initial leadership

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees, in its first meeting since being confirmed by the Oregon Senate in November, on Thursday unanimously elected Patricia “Pat” Reser of Beaverton, Ore., as initial chairwoman.

The board also voted Darald “Darry” Callahan of San Rafael, Calif., as initial vice-chairman. The positions are being listed as “initial” until the board becomes official under state law on July 1.

Reser is board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, Inc., a family-owned fresh refrigerated food company. A retired employee of the Beaverton School District, she is one of three co-chairs of OSU’s Capital Campaign Steering Committee and is serving her third term as an OSU Foundation Trustee.

Callahan is former president of Chevron Chemical Company, and served as executive vice president of Power, Chemicals and Technology for ChevronTexaco Corp. from 2001 until his retirement in 2003. He is a former chair of the OSU Foundation Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees also created three initial committees:

  • The Academic Strategies Committee will be chaired by Paul Kelly of Portland; Orcilia Zúñiga Forbes of Portland is vice chair;
  • The Finance and Administration Committee will be chaired by Kirk Schueler of Bend; Elson Floyd of Pullman, Wash., is vice chair;
  • The Executive and Audit Committee will be chaired by Reser; Callahan is vice chair.

The board approved Meg Reeves, OSU’s general counsel, as board secretary. It also approved a series of bylaws guiding its actions.

Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at OSU, said the primary purpose of this first meeting of the board has been to orient the board with the university, introduce the members to their roles and responsibilities, and allow them to get acquainted with one another.

The board meeting will continue on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center.

More information about the OSU Board of Trustees is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Pat Reser, OSU Board

Pat Reser

 

Darry Callahan and Ed Ray
Darry Callahan and
OSU President Ed Ray

OSU to close on Monday as icy conditions persist

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will close its main campus on Monday, Dec. 9, as packed snow from a storm that dumped nearly a foot of snow – and temperatures dipping into single digits – have combined to create hazardous driving and even walking conditions.

Monday is the first day of finals week for fall term.

OSU Provost and Executive Vice President Sabah Randhawa said the closure may result in some inconvenience for students, but “the safety of all is our first priority.”

“We ask for everyone’s continued patience and understanding regarding this weather-related closure,” Randhawa said.  “We also ask for everyone’s continued use of good judgment when it comes to traveling even short distances in these frigid conditions.”

The OSU Registrar’s Office is working to establish a new schedule for finals that originally were set for Monday. The new schedule will be posted after 8 p.m. Sunday at: http://oregonstate.edu/registrar/

Monday’s shutdown includes the Valley Library at OSU, which will be closed all day.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

Thomas Kinkade exhibit at OSU explores artistic process, humanitarian work

CORVALLIS, Ore. – While the late artist Thomas Kinkade is mainly associated with paintings of English country scenes, he had a strong connection with Corvallis through longtime friend, fellow artist Charles Kelley.

Now, with Kelley’s help, one of the first major showings of Kinkade’s work since his death will take place at The La Sells Stewart Center on the Oregon State University campus, Feb. 23 through March 15.

Kelley is the founder and leader of the charity Bridge Builders International, a Christian gospel-focused evangelical organization based in Philomath that primarily does work in Latvia. Kelley and Kinkade met in 2003 and began a friendship that extended throughout Kinkade’s life. In 2004, Kinkade and his family traveled to Latvia through Bridge Builders International to offer a children’s art camp, and at that time Kinkade began painting Latvian scenes.

“His love for art went hand in hand with his passion for life and commitment to help those in need,” Kelley said. “He and Nanette have always been extremely generous with their resources, helping countless people, organizations and humanitarian causes.  When they have seen needs they have wanted to respond.”

Kinkade’s family says that through his work, he was able to raise more than $10 million for a variety of charitable causes.

Now on the board of the Kinkade Family Foundation, Kelley and Kinkade’s wife and daughters are helping further Kinkade’s dual interests in art and humanitarianism. The exhibit at OSU, titled “What Will Last,” aims to capture both those aspects of Kinkade’s life.

“OSU’s exhibit is unique because every piece in the show is hand selected by the Kinkade family,” said Thomas’ daughter Chandler Kinkade. “By doing this we are able to shed light on how our dad worked as an artist and where his inspiration came from.

“Providing the exhibit with personal photos of our dad creating plein airs (outdoor paintings) on site, original sketches demonstrating the progression from idea to published oil prints, and stories illustrating how our dad’s humanitarian passion influenced his art allows the audiences to better understand our dad’s immensely detailed and comprehensive creative process, which in turn allows them to better understand who he was.”

Kinkade’s art, which continues to be commercially successful, allowed him to pursue his family’s interest in philanthropy.

“Because Thom recognized the power of leveraged help he began creating paintings for causes that he believed in and he then donated high-quality giclee' lithographic prints of these special paintings to these organizations to be used to fund emergencies, scholarships, projects or even operating expenses,” Kelley said. “In this way, he could do what he loved…paint…and combine it with his entrepreneurial bent…multiply his paintings…and literally see millions upon millions of dollars help causes that he loved. More than $10 million was raised for charity in this way, more than any other known artist.”

The exhibit captures some of the process that Kinkade went through when creating a painting. His daughter Merritt Kinkade said inspiration could strike at any time.

“Whether we were on a walk in the neighborhoods or sitting at a local diner, my dad would take out his tiny notepad that fit in his front pocket and start sketching,” she recalled. “He would write words alongside the images so that later he could embellish the concept for a full studio piece.

“From there he would rip the sketch out of his notepad and tape it next to his easel. Then he’d hunt through hundreds of books in his studio library to find ‘scrap’ images of flowers, trees or dogs to include in his masterpiece.”

Her father worked from early morning until dinner time, and would sometimes return later to continue working on a piece. His wife Nanette said she cherished the times when her husband would work plein air. Then she would often sit with him and chat, or paint herself, while he worked. There will be some plein air pieces in the OSU exhibit.

Kelley said the exhibit will help viewers gain a broader view of an already well-known artist.

“He was an artistic genius and avid reader and idea-generating machine,” Kelley said. “He was extremely interested in art history, business, marketing, international affairs, the Christian faith, old cars and even inventing. Even though he succumbed to significant life struggles, what he pursued, the values he embraced and stood for make up things that truly last.”

A reception will be held from 6-9 p.m. Wednesday, March 9, in the Giustina Gallery. Members of Kinkade’s family are scheduled to attend.

 

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Tina Green-Price, curator, 541-737-2402; tina.green-price@oregonstate.edu

TEDxOregonStateU event to be held Feb. 11 in Corvallis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host TEDxOregonStateU, a conference featuring a series of short talks on the theme “Ignite,” on Feb. 11 on the Corvallis campus.

TEDx events feature talks, demonstrations or performances that foster learning, inspiration and wonder. They are independently organized events in the style of the TED conference. This is the third TEDx event to be held at OSU.

This year’s speakers include a teacher, performer and storyteller who is a native of Ghana; a robotics expert who studies legged locomotion; a motivational author and Oregon State alum; a journalist and social justice issues activist; and an associate professor of management whose work focuses on human sustainability issues.

The speakers, who will all touch on aspects of the theme Ignite, are:

●       Habiba Addo: A native of Ghana and a guest teacher and performer for Portland Public Schools, Addo has performed and taught dance, rhythm and stories from Ghana, Guinea, Gambia and Senegal in the United States and internationally for more than 15 years.

●       Chris Barnes: An associate professor of management in the Foster School of Business at the University of Washington, Barnes researches human sustainability issues, especially the relationship between sleep and work.

●       Kyle Hart: A 2013 graduate of OSU, Hart is a children's book author and illustrator living in Portland. His books, “The Mustache that Cured World Hunger” and “The Beard that Boosted Self Confidence,” creatively facilitate conversations around societal problems.

●       Jonathan Hurst: An OSU professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Dynamic Robotics Laboratory in the College of Engineering, Hurst researches the fundamental science and engineering best practices for legged locomotion.

●       Chinyere Tutashinda: Tutashinda is a social justice issues activist who has documented injustices in the 2006 Presidential elections in Mexico; participated as a co-facilitator on the Oakland Mayors' Youth Violence Task Force; traveled to Ferguson, Missouri, to lead trainings; and taught middle school students about media activism. 

The event will run from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 11, in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. Registration is $25 or $15 for students. To register or for additional information, visit www.oregonstate.edu/TEDxOregonStateU.

TEDxOregonStateU is a student-organized event. The 2016 committee includes students Faisal Albassam, Shelby Stevens, Jeremiah Hauth, Christine Kang, McKenzie Ross, Lauren Wallace and Max Redman and recent alumnus and event co-founder Aaron LaVigne. 

Follow the event on Twitter: @TEDxOregonState; Instagram: TEDxOregonStateU; or on Facebook: www.Facebook.com/TEDxOregonStateU.

 


 

About TEDx, x = independently organized event: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

About TED: TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or fewer) delivered by today's leading thinkers and doers. Many of these talks are given at TED's annual conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, and made available, free, on TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Nandan Nilekani, Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Sal Khan and Daniel Kahneman.

TED's open and free initiatives for spreading ideas include TED.com, where new TED Talk videos are posted daily; the Open Translation Project, which provides subtitles and interactive transcripts as well as translations from thousands of volunteers worldwide; the educational initiative TED-Ed; the annual million-dollar TED Prize, which funds exceptional individuals with a "wish," or idea, to create change in the world; TEDx, which provides licenses to thousands of individuals and groups who host local, self-organized TED-style events around the world; and the TED Fellows program, which selects innovators from around the globe to amplify the impact of their remarkable projects and activities.

Follow TED on Twitter at http://twitter.com/TEDTalks, or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/TED.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695, jenn.casey@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Chinyere Tutashinda

ChinyereTutashinda

Jonathan Hurst

Jonathan Hurst

Kyle Hart

Kyle Hart

Mammoth makes final touchdown in Reser Stadium end zone, construction reveals

CORVALLIS, Ore. – On Saturdays in the fall, cleats pound the turf at Reser Stadium at Oregon State University. But new evidence dug up during an expansion of the Valley Football Center has revealed that some much larger creatures once roamed this location more than 10,000 years ago.

Construction crews digging in the north end zone in Reser Stadium on Monday uncovered a large femur bone, likely from a mammoth. Further discovery revealed more bones from several extinct mammals.

“There are quite a few bones, and dozens of pieces,” said Loren Davis, an associate professor of anthropology at OSU who was called to the site after the initial discovery was made. "Some of the bones are not in very good shape, but some are actually quite well preserved."

There don’t appear to be any signs of human bones or artifacts at the site, Davis said. Further testing will be needed to determine the bones’ exact age.

The discovery of the ancient mammal bones is not unusual in the Willamette Valley, Davis said. The bones, including mammoth, bison and some kind of camel or horse, were discovered in a 10-foot deep plot in an area that could once have been a bog or marsh, Davis said.

 “Animals who were sick would often go to a body of water and die there, so it’s not unusual to find a group of bones like this,” Davis said. “We had all of these types of animals in the Willamette Valley back then.”

Crews are digging up a portion of the north end zone as part of the Valley Football Center expansion and renovation project. Work began after the fall football season ended and is slated for completion by the start of the 2016 home season.

A worker digging in the area made the initial discovery of the large femur bone and immediately stopped work in the area, said Tim Sissel, senior project manager for Hunt/Fortis, a joint venture, the general contractor on the project.

Company officials notified OSU officials, who brought in Davis and other experts to examine the bones and the site. Crews have moved to other areas of the construction project while Davis and others take a closer look at the find. The delay has been minimal so far, Sissel said.

The animals do not appear to have been killed, Davis said, and there is no other evidence of humans at the site. Since the find does not appear to involve humans or human artifacts, the bones are not considered part of an archaeological site, Davis said. Nonetheless, we can learn a great deal about what the ancient environment of the Willamette Valley was like from this discovery, he said.

The find does not appear to involve humans or human artifacts and there are no special rules or regulations in Oregon governing the preservation or protection of paleontology finds, Davis said.

In the short term, Davis plans to soak the discovered bones in water to prevent further deterioration, and hopes to send some out for carbon dating to determine more about their age. He and his students will also continue excavating a large pile of dirt pulled from the site, where more bones are believed to be buried.

“It’ll be a great learning experience for them, to learn how to identify extinct animal bones,” Davis said. “It’s really an amazing find.”

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

 

 

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

The following photos are available for media use. Click the images to download.

Femur bone

femur

Loren Davis

lorendavis1

Additional images are available to view or download for media use here: http://bit.ly/20ryg5D

 

Nigel Poor to speak, exhibit work at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Renowned artist and photographer Nigel Poor will speak and exhibit work at Oregon State University as part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series.

Poor will speak about her experience teaching history of photography classes for the Prison University Project at California’s San Quentin State Prison at 7 p.m. on Feb. 10 in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. A reception will be held prior to the lecture at 6 p.m. The events are free and open to the public.

Poor’s work from the San Quentin Prison Report Archive Project will be on display in OSU’s Fairbanks Gallery from Feb. 8 through March 1. The exhibit consists of inkjet prints with handwritten text reflecting prisoners’ reactions to a variety of historical prison photographs.

Poor is an associate professor of photography at California State University, Sacramento. Since 2011, she has taught photo history at San Quentin. Her work with the inmates focuses on the various ways people leave behind evidence of their existence and how the U.S. manages crime, punishment and rehabilitation. She also produces a radio storytelling project called the San Quentin Prison Report Radio Project.

Poor’s work has been exhibited at the San Jose Museum of Art; the Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art; the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and the Haines Gallery in San Francisco. Her work is also featured in the collections of several museums and galleries.

The Fairbanks Gallery, 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

The School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture series brings world-renowned artists and scholars to campus to interact with students so they can learn what is required of a professional artist or scholar.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Julia Bradshaw, julia.bradshaw@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-5014

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

An example of work Nigel Poor does with inmates at San Quentin State Prison. Credit: Nigel Poor

Nigel Poor

OSU Theatre to present the haunting tale 'Desdemona' Feb. 4-7

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present Paula Vogel’s haunting tale, “Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief,” on Feb. 4-7.

The play, a witty drama based on Shakespeare’s “Othello,” is directed by OSU Theatre Arts student Sam Zinsli. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. from Feb. 4-6, and at 2 p.m. on Feb. 7, in the OSU Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. 

The production continues the 2015-16 theater season, “All the World’s a Stage – Celebrating Shakespeare.”

“Desdemona” tells the story of three of Shakespeare’s most memorable female characters while exploring themes of sex, violence, love and trust. In the play, set on the island of Cyprus, Desdemona, Bianca, and Emilia share their hopes, frustrations, and fantasies as rivalries emerge and tender friendships are forged.

“Paula Vogel uses the familiar story of ‘Othello’ to address important topics like sexuality and gender roles for women in society,” said Zinsli.

The production features the work of OSU students Annie Parham as Desdemona, Bria Love Robertson as Bianca and Diana Jepsen as Emilia. 

Tickets are $8; $6 for seniors; $5 for students/youths; and $4 for OSU students. There is no reserved seating. Tickets can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ beginning Jan. 25, or by calling the Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784. For more information or for disability accommodations please contact the Theatre Box Office or visit http://bit.ly/1jdKUgy.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

OSU to host internationally-recognized printmaker Jan. 26-29

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Artemio Rodriguez, an award-winning artist, author and printmaker, is visiting Oregon State University as an artist in residence Jan. 26-29, as part of the School of Arts & Communication’s Visiting Artists and Scholars Lecture Series. 

Rodriquez’ visit will include an artist’s talk on Thursday, Jan. 28, at 6 p.m., to be held in the Memorial Union, Room 13, on the Corvallis campus. A reception will follow the talk, and the event is free and open to the public.

During his time at OSU, Rodriguez will work with printmaking students to create an edition of an original relief print. The print will be one of three offered for purchase at an event in mid-May to honor and raise money for the art department’s Norma Seibert Printmaking Scholarship.

Rodriguez has worked in a variety of mediums, but is best known for his linocut prints, some of which are now part of distinguished collections at the Hammer Museum, the San Diego Art Museum, the Seattle Art Museum, Phoenix Art Museum and others.

A native of Michoacán, Mexico, Rodriguez migrated to the U.S. in 1994. He received recognition from the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs as an emerging artist and subsequently as an established artist.

After several years of working in the Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay areas of California, he opened a print shop near downtown Los Angeles, which he still owns. He recently returned to Mexico to live in Pátzcuaro, in his native state of Michoacán, where he founded a printing press, teaches his printmaking methods to Mexican artists, and co-owns a gallery.

Rodriguez is the author of several books, including “Posada,” “One Hundred-Fifty Years,” “American Dream,” and “Loteria Kind of Things.” He was awarded a grant from Creative Capital, a U.S.-based organization that provides financial support to artists pursuing adventurous projects in various disciplines.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Yuji Hiratsuka, 541-737-5006, yhiratsuka@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Evil Forest

Evil Forest

Triumph

Triumph

Journalist and novelist Héctor Tobar to read Jan. 15 at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Novelist and journalist Héctor Tobar will read at Oregon State University on Friday, Jan. 15.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Valley Library Rotunda, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow. 

Tobar is the author of “Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine and the Miracle that Set Them Free.” The book chronicles an official account of the 2010 Copiapó mining accident. The 33 miners chose Tobar to write a single history of the event and the book was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in General Nonfiction.

The Boston Globe said of the book: “Héctor Tobar’s masterful re-creation of the 2010 San José Mine collapse shows 33 ordinary men challenged to pull together as dire circumstances and diverse personalities pull them apart.”

Tobar is a longtime journalist who has worked for The New Yorker, LA Weekly, and in multiple positions at the Los Angeles Times, where he wrote hundreds of articles and contributed to the newspaper's Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the 1992 Los Angeles riots.

His other novels include “The Tattooed Soldier” (1998) and “The Barbarian Nurseries” (2011), which was named a New York Times Notable Book for 2011 and won the 2012 California Book Award gold medal for fiction. His nonfiction work in 2005 includes “Translation Nation: Defining a New American Identity in the Spanish-Speaking United States.”

In 2006, Tobar was named one of the 100 Most Influential Hispanics in the United States by Hispanic Business magazine. He earned a master of fine arts in fiction at University of California, Irvine, and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Oregon.

The reading is part of the 2015-2016 Literary Northwest Series, sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU and is made possible with support from the OSU Libraries and Press; the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film; the College of Liberal Arts; Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele; and Grass Roots Books and Music.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Susan Rodgers, 541-737-1658, susan.rodgers@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads
Multimedia: 

Héctor Tobar

Hector Tobar