OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

OSU Board of Trustees to consider tuition and fees for 2014-15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet Thursday, March 13, on the OSU campus to approve tuition and fee levels for the 2014-15 academic year.

The meeting, which is open to the public, will run from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Willamette Room of the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center, located at 725 S.W. 26th St. in Corvallis.

The board also will review the university’s funding request to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission for the 2015-17 biennium, and receive updates on OSU’s strategic plan revision and The Campaign for OSU, which recently topped the $1 billion landmark in fund-raising.

Additional reports to the board will be made by OSU President Edward J. Ray, the chairs of the board’s Executive and Audit Committee and the Finance and Administration Committee, and the chair and executive director of the Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

On Wednesday, March 12, a meeting of the board’s Finance and Administration Committee will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. in the President’s Conference Room on the sixth floor of Kerr Administration Building. The committee will discuss tuition and fee levels, and OSU’s funding request to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and then consider a resolution forwarding those recommendations to the full board on Thursday. This meeting is also open to the public.

People who wish to attend either meeting and need special accommodations should contact Mark Huey in the board’s office at 541-737-8260 at least 72 hours in advance.

Meeting materials for these and other meetings will be posted at:

http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees/meetings.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU selects public health leader, ecologist for Distinguished Professor Awards

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The leader behind what will become Oregon’s first accredited school of public health and a terrestrial ecologist who identified a new paradigm in wildlife research have been named 2014 recipients of the Distinguished Professor Award by Oregon State University.

Marie Harvey, a professor in OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences, and William Ripple, a professor in the College of Forestry, will receive their awards this spring and give public lectures on campus.

The Distinguished Professor title is the highest designation Oregon State gives to its faculty.

Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president, said the two faculty members chosen for the honor share similar traits of innovative leadership, internationally recognized scholarship and service to the university and their respective fields.

“Marie Harvey and Bill Ripple exemplify what we hope all of our faculty will strive to become as they develop their careers,” Randhawa said. “They both have revolutionized their fields, drawing respect and admiration not only from their colleagues on campus, but from around the world.”

Harvey is widely known for her pioneering work in reproductive and sexual health, shifting the research from an exclusive focus on women to one that examines the relationship dynamics of couples as it applies to both pregnancy and disease prevention. That shift, along with Harvey’s work in diversity and equity, prompted the American Public Health Association to present her with its Lifetime Achievement Award.

“I am very pleased that Marie Harvey is being honored with the Distinguished Professor title,” said Tammy Bray, dean of OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences. “In addition to her scholarly contributions to the field of public health, I most appreciate her leadership and partnership with me in the effort to transform our college to become the first accredited school of public health in Oregon.”

Harvey has been a faculty member at OSU since 2003 and associate dean of the college since 2011. Her title is Distinguished Professor of Public Health.

Ripple began his career studying old-growth forests and spotted owls and evolved his research to look at the impact of predators. His work led to a new field called “trophic cascades” – or how large predators exert powerful influences on ecosystem structure and function. Examples include the influence of wolves in Yellowstone Park on everything from the composition of hardwood forests to streamside erosion.

His prominence as an ecologist has led to consulting efforts with the National Academy of Sciences, The White House, President Clinton’s Forest Summit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others. Ripple will be Distinguished Professor of Ecology.

“Bill Ripple has been a fantastic teacher and researcher in the College of Forestry and well deserves being named a Distinguished Professor,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college. “He is an internationally known leader in the ecology of top predators and his studies on the impact of gray wolves in Yellowstone, along with co-author (OSU professor emeritus) Robert Beschta, have been featured in numerous scientific journals and in popular media. They have directly impacted conservation research and policies.”

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 Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111; Sabah.Randhawa@oregonstate.edu

OSU Board of Trustees elects initial leadership

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees, in its first meeting since being confirmed by the Oregon Senate in November, on Thursday unanimously elected Patricia “Pat” Reser of Beaverton, Ore., as initial chairwoman.

The board also voted Darald “Darry” Callahan of San Rafael, Calif., as initial vice-chairman. The positions are being listed as “initial” until the board becomes official under state law on July 1.

Reser is board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, Inc., a family-owned fresh refrigerated food company. A retired employee of the Beaverton School District, she is one of three co-chairs of OSU’s Capital Campaign Steering Committee and is serving her third term as an OSU Foundation Trustee.

Callahan is former president of Chevron Chemical Company, and served as executive vice president of Power, Chemicals and Technology for ChevronTexaco Corp. from 2001 until his retirement in 2003. He is a former chair of the OSU Foundation Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees also created three initial committees:

  • The Academic Strategies Committee will be chaired by Paul Kelly of Portland; Orcilia Zúñiga Forbes of Portland is vice chair;
  • The Finance and Administration Committee will be chaired by Kirk Schueler of Bend; Elson Floyd of Pullman, Wash., is vice chair;
  • The Executive and Audit Committee will be chaired by Reser; Callahan is vice chair.

The board approved Meg Reeves, OSU’s general counsel, as board secretary. It also approved a series of bylaws guiding its actions.

Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at OSU, said the primary purpose of this first meeting of the board has been to orient the board with the university, introduce the members to their roles and responsibilities, and allow them to get acquainted with one another.

The board meeting will continue on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center.

More information about the OSU Board of Trustees is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Pat Reser, OSU Board

Pat Reser

 

Darry Callahan and Ed Ray
Darry Callahan and
OSU President Ed Ray

OSU to close on Monday as icy conditions persist

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will close its main campus on Monday, Dec. 9, as packed snow from a storm that dumped nearly a foot of snow – and temperatures dipping into single digits – have combined to create hazardous driving and even walking conditions.

Monday is the first day of finals week for fall term.

OSU Provost and Executive Vice President Sabah Randhawa said the closure may result in some inconvenience for students, but “the safety of all is our first priority.”

“We ask for everyone’s continued patience and understanding regarding this weather-related closure,” Randhawa said.  “We also ask for everyone’s continued use of good judgment when it comes to traveling even short distances in these frigid conditions.”

The OSU Registrar’s Office is working to establish a new schedule for finals that originally were set for Monday. The new schedule will be posted after 8 p.m. Sunday at: http://oregonstate.edu/registrar/

Monday’s shutdown includes the Valley Library at OSU, which will be closed all day.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

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Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

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Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

OSU Opera Workshop to present production of Aubert’s ‘The Blue Forest’ May 13-14

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Opera workshop will perform Louis Aubert’s opera “The Blue Forest” at 7:30 p.m. May 13 and 14 on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Composed at the turn of the 20th Century during a golden age of artistic symbolism, “The Blue Forest” is a whimsical fairytale opera set to a libretto by Jacques Cheneviere, who drew inspiration from the fairy tales of Charles Perrault. The three-act opera includes material from the popular tales “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Hop-o’-my-Thumb,” and “Sleeping Beauty.”

Marc Callahan, a visiting assistant professor at OSU and a world-traveling opera performer/director is directing the production. “The Blue Forest” also features video and sound production by OSU music instructor Mike Gamble and extensive artwork from OSU art instructor Andrew Myers.

Marrying art and science, the cross-disciplinary production also draws from the body of scientific and technological knowledge and abilities at OSU. From the use of the brilliant blue pigment created by OSU chemist Mas Subramian and his research team, to “forest creations” by Sara Robinson, assistant professor in the OSU College of Forestry, a scientific approach is present throughout this multimedia-rich production.

“The Blue Forest” is the first major performing arts production to use the OSU’s new Learning Innovation Center, a $65 million 130,000-square foot multi-disciplinary building designed for students from all academic areas at OSU.

The performance will be held in a classroom in the round, Room 100, in the LInC building, 165 S.W. Sackett Place, Corvallis.

General admission tickets are $10 advance or $12 at the door. Advance tickets are available online at http://www.tickettomato.com. OSU students free with valid ID. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply. For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

Foreign policy conference to feature Corvallis lecture, Portland panel discussion

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Harvard University historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Fredrik Logevall will speak at 7 p.m. Friday, May 13, at Oregon State University.

Logevall, the author of “Embers of War,” is the keynote speaker for “Rethinking Grand Strategy,” an international conference on American foreign policy strategy hosted by OSU. More than 20 renowned scholars of the U.S. role in the world will present papers, discuss and debate the historical development of the United States’ foreign policy and how this history might inform contemporary policies and also present challenges.

Logevall’s lecture, “American Grand Strategy: How Grand Has it Been? Does it Matter?” will be held in the Horizon Room of the Memorial Union on the OSU campus. It is free and open to the public and a book-signing will follow.

Additional panel discussions and presentations will be held from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. May 13 and May 14 in the Memorial Union Journey Room on the OSU campus in Corvallis. All panels are free and open to the public; on-site registration is required. A full schedule of events is available online: http://bit.ly/1TteLnC.

The conference concludes Monday, May 16, with a panel discussion, “Immigration and American Politics,” at the Oregon Historical Society, 1200 S.W. Park Ave., in Portland. The discussion, co-sponsored by the World Affairs Council, will begin at 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Panelists are: Elizabeth Borgwardt, an associate professor of history at Washington University, St. Louis; Christopher McKnight Nichols, an assistant professor of history and director of Citizenship and Crisis Initiative at OSU; and Daniel J. Tichenor, the Philip H. Knight Chair of Political Science and senior scholar at the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics at the University of Oregon.

C-SPAN’s American History TV also is expected to record several panels for later broadcast. Organizers also hope to compile a book from the work presented at the event.

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Christopher McKnight Nichols, 541-737-8910, Christopher.nichols@oregonstate.edu

Auditions for OSU’s summer Bard in the Quad production to be held May 15-16

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Open auditions for Oregon State University Theatre’s popular summer event, Bard in the Quad, will take place at 6 p.m. May 15 and 16 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis. Call-backs may be held May 17 if needed.

Bard in the Quad, an annual production featuring Shakespeare plays in a casual, outdoor summer atmosphere, will return for its 11th season with a production of the romantic comedy, “Love’s Labour’s Lost.”

In the play, the King of Navarre and his three friends attempt to swear off love and affection in exchange for lives of study and denial, but their resolve is quickly tested when a beautiful princess and her ladies-in-waiting come to court. The tale explores the conventions of courtship, oaths, and human desire.

A full-text version of the script is available online at http://shakespeare.mit.edu/lll/full.html. Those auditioning should read the script beforehand and be prepared to perform cold readings and movement exercises. Auditions are open to all students, staff, faculty and community members.

Rehearsals will begin with a read-through on May 28. Regular rehearsals will start June 19 and be held from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays. Technical/dress rehearsals are July 30-Aug. 3.

Performances run August 4-8 and August 11-14. All actors must be available for all of technical rehearsals and performances and to strike the set immediately following the closing performance.

For more information, contact Elizabeth Helman, Elizabeth.helman@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Wind Ensemble to perform world premiere of ‘Heart of a Forest’ by artist Paul D. Miller

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Wind Ensemble will perform the world premiere of Paul D. Miller’s “Heart of a Forest” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 18, in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th Street, Corvallis.

Miller, a composer, multimedia artist and author who also goes by the stage name D.J. Spooky, composed the work after four artist residencies in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. He said that the piece is inspired by Thoreau and “the collision of data, sound and new ways to think about the absence of origins.”

“No one owns the forest and the sounds that it inspires,” Miller said. “It’s all a mirror of what is possible in our hyper interconnected world. Like the roots of trees underneath the forest. It is all connected, and we all contribute to the elements that make it evolve.”

Loosely based on the concept of Antonio Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons,” the work, composed for wind ensemble and turntables, explores a post-minimalist soundscape in which Miller draws from his immersive experience of visiting the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest during each of the four seasons of the year. Neo-classical in nature, the audience will be treated to a work that features the familiar and the modern.

Miller’s work has appeared at the Venice Biennial for Architecture, the Andy Warhol Museum, the Whitney Biennial and others. Miller spent 2012-2013 as the first artist-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and has collaborated with a diverse array of popular musicians, including Yoko Ono, Chuck D and Thurston Moore. Rising to fame through his hip-hop turntablist persona “DJ Spooky,” Miller is a global artist who has engaged in creative projects on all seven continents.

The project is collaboration between the Oregon State University School of Arts and Communication, the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word and the Oregon State University Wind Ensemble. Funding was provided by the Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights program and the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station.

The OSU Wind Symphony, under the direction of Dana Biggs, will open the concert with Alfred Reed’s “Hound of Spring,” “Elegy for a Young American” by Ronald Lo Presti, Chorale and Alleluia by Howard Hanson, an excerpt from Frank Ticheli’s Second Symphony and Vientos y Tangos by Michael Gandolfi.

The OSU Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Christopher Chapman, will also perform Percy Grainger’s popular “Lincolnshire Posy,” “Daybreak Crossing” by David Biedenbender and a transcription of John Adams’ fiercely rhythmic “Short Ride in a Fast Machine.”

Tickets are $7 in advance, $10 at the door. OSU students with ID and youth in grades K-12 will be admitted free. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply, allowing purchase of up to two tickets for $5 each at the door with a SNAP card. Advance tickets are also available online at www.tickettomato.com.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Wind Ensemble

OSU Wind Ensemble

 

Paul D. Miller

Paul Miller

Spring town hall to be held May 4 at Oregon State University

A Spring Term town hall meeting will be held from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4, at Oregon State University in the Memorial Union Horizon Room.

Oregon State University is committed to hosting town halls each quarter as part of an ongoing discussion on equity, inclusion, and civil and social justice at OSU. Last term’s event was hosted by President Ray and Interim Chief Diversity Officer Angela Batista. More than 150 OSU community members attended the inaugural town hall and many more community members participated through the online live-stream.

During the spring town hall, a team of students, faculty and staff led by Jennifer Dennis, Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School, will provide an update on the development of an online social justice training module for all entering OSU students and gather feedback on training content.

Town hall attendees will have the opportunity to communicate concerns, feedback and suggestions about the online training plan within small discussion groups. This feedback will directly inform further development of the training, which is scheduled for implementation in the Fall 2016. For those unable to attend the town hall, an opportunity to provide feedback online will be provided following the event.

During the second half of the town hall, there will be time for open questions and comments by community members about other topics and issues.

The town hall will be streamed live at http://live.oregonstate.edu. No online chat services will be provided. For accommodations related to disability please contact diversity@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-1063.

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Angela Batista, 541-737-5936; angela.batista@oregonstate.edu