campus life

Annual Klatowa Eena Powwow set at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s 38th annual Klatowa Eena Powwow will take place on Saturday, May 17, in Gill Coliseum on campus.

Grand Entry takes place at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Host Drum is the Blacklodge Singers; Honor Drum is Little River Singers. Emcee is Nick Sixkiller.

In addition to the powwow, the annual salmon bake takes place in the Memorial Union quad from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, May 16.  A meet and greet at the Eena Haws Native American Longhouse will follow at 5 p.m. The longhouse is located at 311 S.W. 26th St.

The meet and greet will feature the 1491s, a Native American sketch comedy group. The 1491s will also perform May 17 during the powwow, beginning at 5 p.m.

All events are free and open to the public.

For additional information: http://oregonstate.edu/nal/

Media Contact: 

Eena Haws Native American Longhouse: 541-737-2783 

Multimedia Downloads


Former director of Hatfield Center Lavern Weber dies Monday

NEWPORT, Ore. – Lavern Weber, director of Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center for a quarter-century and a leader in the development of Newport as a marine science education and research center, died Monday. He was 80.

Weber led the Newport-based OSU center from 1977 until his retirement in 2002. In addition to directing the Hatfield Center, he also served as director of the Cooperative Institute for Marine Resource Studies (CIMRS) and as superintendent of the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station (COMES), which was the nation’s first experiment station dedicated to coastal issues.

“Lavern Weber was heavily involved in nearly everything that went on at the Hatfield Marine Science Center and in Newport, contributing significantly to these and to the OSU community,” said Robert Cowen, who now directs the Hatfield Marine Science Center. “He will be missed.”

Weber graduated from Pacific Lutheran University in 1958 and earned masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Washington, where he served on the faculty from 1964-69. He joined the OSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in 1969 and later had a faculty appointment in pharmacy and worked as assistant dean of the graduate school before moving into his role at the Newport center in 1977.

Under his leadership, the center grew as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Marine Fisheries Service and Vents Programs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife became established at the OSU facility. Weber also oversaw the expansion of student and faculty housing, the remodeling of the Visitor’s Center, expanded ship operations, and construction of several buildings, including the Guin Library.

Weber received the OSU Alumni Association’s Distinguished Professor Award in 1992. He was president of the Yaquina Bay Economic Foundation, served for a dozen years on the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve Management Commission, and in 2000-01 was president of the National Association of Marine Laboratories.

“He was a wonderful citizen of Newport, participating in a variety of organizations, including chairing the board of the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts,” said Janet Webster, head librarian for the Hatfield Marine Science Center. He mentored numerous graduate students and faculty in his years as a professor, director and associate dean (in the College of Agricultural Sciences). OSU and Newport will miss him.”

Plans for a memorial service will be announced later.

Media Contact: 

Maryann Bozza, 541-867-0234; Robert Cowen, 541-867-0211

Multimedia Downloads

lavern1 Lavern Webber

New Centro Cultural Cesar Chavez building opens on campus

CORVALLIS – Latino students at Oregon State University now have a brand new home away from home, and the campus will celebrate the new Centro Cultural Cesar Chavez during a grand opening ceremony Monday, April 7, beginning at 5 p.m.

The new building is one of four new cultural centers being built on campus to replace aging structures. The centers provide space for students to socialize, celebrate and study, learn more about their own culture and explore the world of other students of different backgrounds.

“Oregon State does a great job in supporting students from diverse backgrounds, and the Centro provides a space for dialogue and an opportunity to share perspectives,” said Miguel Arellano, a graduate assistant who helps coordinate Centro activities. “That combined with the support services offered at OSU provides a place where students from different backgrounds are able to thrive. This is a welcoming space for all students to learn about or retain Latino culture.”

In 1971, a group of nine students met in the basement of Milam Hall in an effort to establish a Latino student organization. Originally called the Chicano Cultural Center, the basement location was less than ideal, and students eventually asked for a more permanent and independent location on campus. After temporarily moving into a house on Orchard Street, in 1977 they moved into an older, former family home on A Street.

After four decades, the house has finally been replaced. A crowded living room and sun-faded deck have been swapped for a spacious building that includes a large gathering hall, multiple office and study spaces and a large kitchen for hosting social events. The Centro is affiliated with 17 different student organizations on campus and is a popular spot for many different events, from cultural celebrations to social justice activities.

“It’s a space where students can gain a broader world view,” Arellano said, and the new building will offer many more opportunities to bring people from around campus into the Centro to celebrate Latino heritage.

“I grew up in Woodburn, and coming from a place that is 60 percent Latino to a place where the Latino population is around 6 percent, there’s a big difference,” Arellano said, which is why having a place like the Centro is so important to student retention. “When you’re participating in events here, you see people who look like you, and who share similar passions and experiences.”

Latino identity is broad and complex, and represents people from many different parts of the world, which can be difficult to encompass in one building. But the Centro staff tries to make the space welcoming not just for Latino students, but anyone on campus who wants to stop in.

For Joyce Contreras, a human development and family sciences major who grew up in Beaverton, the Centro has provided her the chance to explore aspects of her Mexican background that she had previously not been in touch with.

"I wanted to be involved with the Centro because I wanted to further my knowledge about my own heritage and be a welcoming individual to others. What we say about our center is 'This is a home away from home.' I wanted to be in that environment and learn more about my culture," she said. For Contreras, it was important to find her roots. Before she became involved with Centro, she didn't know whether to identify as Mexican or Hispanic, and often switched between the two. Now she proudly identifies as Latina, and understands the cultural and political context of the term.

The 3,565 square-foot building cost $2,521,051. It was designed by Seattle-based architects Jones & Jones, who also designed the Native American Longhouse, which opened the doors on its new building last spring. They are also designing new buildings for the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center and the Asian Pacific Cultural Center.

The four cultural centers are being funded with a combination of private gifts and university funds. The project got off the ground with a $500,000 gift from the late Portland philanthropist Joyce Collin Furman to create the OSU President’s Fund for Cultural Centers. The 1965 OSU alumna was a strong supporter of her alma mater and served on the steering committee for The Campaign for OSU.

The Centro is located at 691 S.W. 26th Street. For more information on the grand opening, go to https://www.facebook.com/events/754118061279312/



Media Contact: 

Miguel Arellano, 541-737-3790

Multimedia Downloads


OSU Board of Trustees to consider tuition and fees for 2014-15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet Thursday, March 13, on the OSU campus to approve tuition and fee levels for the 2014-15 academic year.

The meeting, which is open to the public, will run from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Willamette Room of the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center, located at 725 S.W. 26th St. in Corvallis.

The board also will review the university’s funding request to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission for the 2015-17 biennium, and receive updates on OSU’s strategic plan revision and The Campaign for OSU, which recently topped the $1 billion landmark in fund-raising.

Additional reports to the board will be made by OSU President Edward J. Ray, the chairs of the board’s Executive and Audit Committee and the Finance and Administration Committee, and the chair and executive director of the Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

On Wednesday, March 12, a meeting of the board’s Finance and Administration Committee will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. in the President’s Conference Room on the sixth floor of Kerr Administration Building. The committee will discuss tuition and fee levels, and OSU’s funding request to the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and then consider a resolution forwarding those recommendations to the full board on Thursday. This meeting is also open to the public.

People who wish to attend either meeting and need special accommodations should contact Mark Huey in the board’s office at 541-737-8260 at least 72 hours in advance.

Meeting materials for these and other meetings will be posted at:


Media Contact: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU selects public health leader, ecologist for Distinguished Professor Awards

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The leader behind what will become Oregon’s first accredited school of public health and a terrestrial ecologist who identified a new paradigm in wildlife research have been named 2014 recipients of the Distinguished Professor Award by Oregon State University.

Marie Harvey, a professor in OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences, and William Ripple, a professor in the College of Forestry, will receive their awards this spring and give public lectures on campus.

The Distinguished Professor title is the highest designation Oregon State gives to its faculty.

Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president, said the two faculty members chosen for the honor share similar traits of innovative leadership, internationally recognized scholarship and service to the university and their respective fields.

“Marie Harvey and Bill Ripple exemplify what we hope all of our faculty will strive to become as they develop their careers,” Randhawa said. “They both have revolutionized their fields, drawing respect and admiration not only from their colleagues on campus, but from around the world.”

Harvey is widely known for her pioneering work in reproductive and sexual health, shifting the research from an exclusive focus on women to one that examines the relationship dynamics of couples as it applies to both pregnancy and disease prevention. That shift, along with Harvey’s work in diversity and equity, prompted the American Public Health Association to present her with its Lifetime Achievement Award.

“I am very pleased that Marie Harvey is being honored with the Distinguished Professor title,” said Tammy Bray, dean of OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences. “In addition to her scholarly contributions to the field of public health, I most appreciate her leadership and partnership with me in the effort to transform our college to become the first accredited school of public health in Oregon.”

Harvey has been a faculty member at OSU since 2003 and associate dean of the college since 2011. Her title is Distinguished Professor of Public Health.

Ripple began his career studying old-growth forests and spotted owls and evolved his research to look at the impact of predators. His work led to a new field called “trophic cascades” – or how large predators exert powerful influences on ecosystem structure and function. Examples include the influence of wolves in Yellowstone Park on everything from the composition of hardwood forests to streamside erosion.

His prominence as an ecologist has led to consulting efforts with the National Academy of Sciences, The White House, President Clinton’s Forest Summit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others. Ripple will be Distinguished Professor of Ecology.

“Bill Ripple has been a fantastic teacher and researcher in the College of Forestry and well deserves being named a Distinguished Professor,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college. “He is an internationally known leader in the ecology of top predators and his studies on the impact of gray wolves in Yellowstone, along with co-author (OSU professor emeritus) Robert Beschta, have been featured in numerous scientific journals and in popular media. They have directly impacted conservation research and policies.”

Media Contact: 

 Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111; Sabah.Randhawa@oregonstate.edu

OSU Board of Trustees elects initial leadership

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees, in its first meeting since being confirmed by the Oregon Senate in November, on Thursday unanimously elected Patricia “Pat” Reser of Beaverton, Ore., as initial chairwoman.

The board also voted Darald “Darry” Callahan of San Rafael, Calif., as initial vice-chairman. The positions are being listed as “initial” until the board becomes official under state law on July 1.

Reser is board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, Inc., a family-owned fresh refrigerated food company. A retired employee of the Beaverton School District, she is one of three co-chairs of OSU’s Capital Campaign Steering Committee and is serving her third term as an OSU Foundation Trustee.

Callahan is former president of Chevron Chemical Company, and served as executive vice president of Power, Chemicals and Technology for ChevronTexaco Corp. from 2001 until his retirement in 2003. He is a former chair of the OSU Foundation Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees also created three initial committees:

  • The Academic Strategies Committee will be chaired by Paul Kelly of Portland; Orcilia Zúñiga Forbes of Portland is vice chair;
  • The Finance and Administration Committee will be chaired by Kirk Schueler of Bend; Elson Floyd of Pullman, Wash., is vice chair;
  • The Executive and Audit Committee will be chaired by Reser; Callahan is vice chair.

The board approved Meg Reeves, OSU’s general counsel, as board secretary. It also approved a series of bylaws guiding its actions.

Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at OSU, said the primary purpose of this first meeting of the board has been to orient the board with the university, introduce the members to their roles and responsibilities, and allow them to get acquainted with one another.

The board meeting will continue on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center.

More information about the OSU Board of Trustees is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees

Media Contact: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Multimedia Downloads

Pat Reser, OSU Board

Pat Reser


Darry Callahan and Ed Ray
Darry Callahan and
OSU President Ed Ray

OSU to close on Monday as icy conditions persist

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will close its main campus on Monday, Dec. 9, as packed snow from a storm that dumped nearly a foot of snow – and temperatures dipping into single digits – have combined to create hazardous driving and even walking conditions.

Monday is the first day of finals week for fall term.

OSU Provost and Executive Vice President Sabah Randhawa said the closure may result in some inconvenience for students, but “the safety of all is our first priority.”

“We ask for everyone’s continued patience and understanding regarding this weather-related closure,” Randhawa said.  “We also ask for everyone’s continued use of good judgment when it comes to traveling even short distances in these frigid conditions.”

The OSU Registrar’s Office is working to establish a new schedule for finals that originally were set for Monday. The new schedule will be posted after 8 p.m. Sunday at: http://oregonstate.edu/registrar/

Monday’s shutdown includes the Valley Library at OSU, which will be closed all day.

Media Contact: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

Media Contact: 

Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

Multimedia Downloads

Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

OSU students to hold vigil for victims of violence around world

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Ettihad Cultural Center at Oregon State University is holding a candle light vigil to stand in solidarity with victims of mindless terror in Paris, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria, Yemen and Kenya. Students are inviting the community to stand beside them as they pay respects to the victims. The gathering will take place from 6-8 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19, in  the Student Experience Center plaza, east of the Memorial Union. 

The ECC is a cross-cultural resource for OSU students who have a cultural or ethnic background in central and southwestern Asia and northern Africa, and for those who are interested in learning more about those cultures and regions. 

Organizers say the atrocities committed against humanity this week have shaken everyone. But the Ettihad student community is feeling particularly vulnerable right now because of the negative spotlight that can fall on people of Muslim faith and those with cultural or ethnic ties to the Middle East and North Africa. This event is a means to join hands and raise a voice against division and hatred. 

Media Contact: 

Amarah Khan, 541-737-6342; amarah.khan@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University Opera Workshop presents scenes from ‘The Marriage of Figaro’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Opera Workshop will present “An Evening of Opera,” Tuesday, Nov. 24, in OSU’s new Learning Innovation Center.

The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. in LInC Room 128, 165 S.W. Sackett Place, Corvallis.

The program will be Acts I and II of Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro,” sung in English and set in a 1950s “Mad Men” era theme. The storyline involves Figaro, his fiancée, his boss, and a wedding day love triangle that makes his life complicated.

The performance is directed and designed by Marc Callahan, visiting professor of opera and voice. Oregon State student Anna Patch is the assistant director. Music is directed by David Servias. The costume and set crew is comprised of Callahan and Patch with assistance from DeMara Cabrera, Alec Zinsli, Ken Richardson, Kathi Halloran and Taylor Siling.

The role of Figaro will be sung by Mason Cooper. The role of Susanna will be shared by Emma Nissen, Logan Stewart, Carolyn Poutasse, Jenna Skarphol and Taylor Siling. Other roles are: Bartolo by Jeramie Gajan; Marcellina by Larissa Zens and Diana Alarcon; Cherubino by Blair Bowmer, Anna Patch and Sara Engle; Count by David Zielke; Countess by Clarissa Clark and Grace Weaver; Antonio by Taylor Fahlman; and Basilio by Michael Ripp and Alex Weingarten.

Tickets are $7 in advance or $10 at the door, with open seating. Advance tickets may be purchased online at TicketTomato.com. OSU students will be admitted free with a valid student ID card. Tickets will be sold at the Learning Innovation Center beginning at 6:30 p.m. on the evening of the performance.

OSU Opera Workshop is a participant in Corvallis Arts for All, a program which offers up to two tickets for $5 each to participants in the SNAP Program with a valid Oregon Trail Card. 


Erin Sneller, 541-737-5592, erin.sneller@oregonstate.edu