OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

OSU selects public health leader, ecologist for Distinguished Professor Awards

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The leader behind what will become Oregon’s first accredited school of public health and a terrestrial ecologist who identified a new paradigm in wildlife research have been named 2014 recipients of the Distinguished Professor Award by Oregon State University.

Marie Harvey, a professor in OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences, and William Ripple, a professor in the College of Forestry, will receive their awards this spring and give public lectures on campus.

The Distinguished Professor title is the highest designation Oregon State gives to its faculty.

Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president, said the two faculty members chosen for the honor share similar traits of innovative leadership, internationally recognized scholarship and service to the university and their respective fields.

“Marie Harvey and Bill Ripple exemplify what we hope all of our faculty will strive to become as they develop their careers,” Randhawa said. “They both have revolutionized their fields, drawing respect and admiration not only from their colleagues on campus, but from around the world.”

Harvey is widely known for her pioneering work in reproductive and sexual health, shifting the research from an exclusive focus on women to one that examines the relationship dynamics of couples as it applies to both pregnancy and disease prevention. That shift, along with Harvey’s work in diversity and equity, prompted the American Public Health Association to present her with its Lifetime Achievement Award.

“I am very pleased that Marie Harvey is being honored with the Distinguished Professor title,” said Tammy Bray, dean of OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences. “In addition to her scholarly contributions to the field of public health, I most appreciate her leadership and partnership with me in the effort to transform our college to become the first accredited school of public health in Oregon.”

Harvey has been a faculty member at OSU since 2003 and associate dean of the college since 2011. Her title is Distinguished Professor of Public Health.

Ripple began his career studying old-growth forests and spotted owls and evolved his research to look at the impact of predators. His work led to a new field called “trophic cascades” – or how large predators exert powerful influences on ecosystem structure and function. Examples include the influence of wolves in Yellowstone Park on everything from the composition of hardwood forests to streamside erosion.

His prominence as an ecologist has led to consulting efforts with the National Academy of Sciences, The White House, President Clinton’s Forest Summit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others. Ripple will be Distinguished Professor of Ecology.

“Bill Ripple has been a fantastic teacher and researcher in the College of Forestry and well deserves being named a Distinguished Professor,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college. “He is an internationally known leader in the ecology of top predators and his studies on the impact of gray wolves in Yellowstone, along with co-author (OSU professor emeritus) Robert Beschta, have been featured in numerous scientific journals and in popular media. They have directly impacted conservation research and policies.”

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 Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111; Sabah.Randhawa@oregonstate.edu

OSU Board of Trustees elects initial leadership

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees, in its first meeting since being confirmed by the Oregon Senate in November, on Thursday unanimously elected Patricia “Pat” Reser of Beaverton, Ore., as initial chairwoman.

The board also voted Darald “Darry” Callahan of San Rafael, Calif., as initial vice-chairman. The positions are being listed as “initial” until the board becomes official under state law on July 1.

Reser is board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, Inc., a family-owned fresh refrigerated food company. A retired employee of the Beaverton School District, she is one of three co-chairs of OSU’s Capital Campaign Steering Committee and is serving her third term as an OSU Foundation Trustee.

Callahan is former president of Chevron Chemical Company, and served as executive vice president of Power, Chemicals and Technology for ChevronTexaco Corp. from 2001 until his retirement in 2003. He is a former chair of the OSU Foundation Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees also created three initial committees:

  • The Academic Strategies Committee will be chaired by Paul Kelly of Portland; Orcilia Zúñiga Forbes of Portland is vice chair;
  • The Finance and Administration Committee will be chaired by Kirk Schueler of Bend; Elson Floyd of Pullman, Wash., is vice chair;
  • The Executive and Audit Committee will be chaired by Reser; Callahan is vice chair.

The board approved Meg Reeves, OSU’s general counsel, as board secretary. It also approved a series of bylaws guiding its actions.

Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at OSU, said the primary purpose of this first meeting of the board has been to orient the board with the university, introduce the members to their roles and responsibilities, and allow them to get acquainted with one another.

The board meeting will continue on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center.

More information about the OSU Board of Trustees is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Pat Reser, OSU Board

Pat Reser

 

Darry Callahan and Ed Ray
Darry Callahan and
OSU President Ed Ray

OSU to close on Monday as icy conditions persist

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will close its main campus on Monday, Dec. 9, as packed snow from a storm that dumped nearly a foot of snow – and temperatures dipping into single digits – have combined to create hazardous driving and even walking conditions.

Monday is the first day of finals week for fall term.

OSU Provost and Executive Vice President Sabah Randhawa said the closure may result in some inconvenience for students, but “the safety of all is our first priority.”

“We ask for everyone’s continued patience and understanding regarding this weather-related closure,” Randhawa said.  “We also ask for everyone’s continued use of good judgment when it comes to traveling even short distances in these frigid conditions.”

The OSU Registrar’s Office is working to establish a new schedule for finals that originally were set for Monday. The new schedule will be posted after 8 p.m. Sunday at: http://oregonstate.edu/registrar/

Monday’s shutdown includes the Valley Library at OSU, which will be closed all day.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

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Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

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Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

OSU Theatre to present ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University Theatre will present “The Diary of Anne Frank,” Feb. 12-14 and Feb. 20-22 in the Withycombe Hall Main Stage theater, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The theatrical adaptation of Anne Frank’s diary, by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett and newly adapted by Wendy Kesselman, chronicles the true story of Anne’s time in hiding during the Nazi occupation of Holland.

Anne was a clever, creative, and spirited 13-year-old girl when she, her family, and four other Jews were forced to go into hiding in a secret annex behind her father’s office building in the heart of Amsterdam in 1942. She turned to her diary as a source of comfort and inspiration.

The diary was first published in 1947 as “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl.” It inspired a Pulitzer Prize-winning stage adaptation and an Academy-Award winning film.

The OSU production is directed by Theatre Arts faculty member Elizabeth Helman and features an original score composed by Oregon State University students.

“This is such an important story; it reminds us of the complexity and fragility of human life,” Helman said. “Each character in this play really lived, suffered, and died because of intolerance and racism. Genocide still happens all over the world. We can’t forget that.”

The cast features OSU students Daniel Barber as Otto; Elise Barberis as Margot; Burke DaBoer as the officer; Emily Gassaway as Miep; Brian Greer as Peter; Diana Jepsen as Edith; Annie Parham as Anne; Alex Small as Mr. VanDaan; Sarah Sutton as Mrs. VanDaan; Cory Warren as a man; and Joseph Workman as Mr. Dussel. Corvallis community member Ricky Zipp joins the cast as Mr. Kraler.

Shows begin at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 12-14 and Feb. 20-21, with a matinee beginning at 2 p.m. Feb. 22. Tickets are $12; $10 for seniors; $8 youth/student; and $5 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ  or by calling the box office at 541-737-2784. Contact the box office for disability accommodations, faculty/staff discounts or group ticket sales.

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TEDxOregonStateU conference to be held Feb. 12 in Corvallis

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will host TEDxOregonStateU, a conference featuring a series of short talks on the theme of disruption, on Thursday, Feb. 12, on the Corvallis campus.

Speakers include a producer of the television show “Xploration Outerspace;” a winner of the fashion design competition “Project Runway;” a former war correspondent; an information technology executive; and an Oregon State student involved in cancer research.

TEDx events feature talks, demonstrations or performances that foster learning, inspiration and wonder. They are independently organized events in the style of the TED conference. This is the second TEDx event to be held at OSU. This year’s event is being organized by OSU students Aaron LaVigne and Dustin Fernandes and recent alumnus Vinay Bikkina.

The speakers, who will all touch on aspects of the theme, disruption, are:

  • Emily Calandrelli: A co-producer and host of FOX’s new show, “Xploration Outer Space,” she works to promote scientific literacy and women in science, technology, engineering and math, and she is passionate about technology policy, entrepreneurship, open innovation, space exploration. A former NASA employee, Calandrelli holds a master’s degree in aerospace engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • David Edelstein: He is senior vice president of global programs at Grameen Foundation and director of the Grameen Foundation Technology Center. Edelstein previously worked at Microsoft, where he designed a flexible financing model to enable people in developing countries to afford their first computers and led efforts to implement this new business model in several countries.
  • Hanson Hosein: He is the director of the communication leadership graduate program at the University of Washington and president of HRH Media Group. A former NBC News war correspondent, backpack journalist and investigative producer, Hosein is the recipient of several prestigious awards in the media industry.
  • Michelle Lesniak: She is the season 11 winner of “Project Runway,” and is known for her strong design sense and quick wit. She is dedicated to local manufacturing and ethical business practices and is playing a key role in shaping and growing the Portland fashion industry.
  • Matthew Kaiser: Kaiser is an undergraduate student at OSU, working toward an honors degree in microbiology and minors in Spanish, chemistry and toxicology. He is a fellow in the Linus Pauling Institute’s Cancer Chemoprevention Program and is preparing a manuscript on vitamin C and cancer.

The event will run from 6 to 9 p.m. in the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. Tickets are $20, or $15 for students. Tickets and additional information are available online at www.oregonstate.edu/TEDxOregonStateU. Follow the event on Twitter: @TEDxOregonState; Instagram: TEDxOregonStateU; or on Facebook: www.Facebook.com/TEDxOregonStateU.

 


 

About TEDx, x=independently organized event: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

About TED: TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to ideas worth spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 30 years ago, TED has grown to support its mission with multiple initiatives. The two annual TED Conferences invite the world's leading thinkers and doers to speak for 18 minutes or less. Many of these talks are then made available, free, at TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Nandan Nilekani, Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Sal Khan and Daniel Kahneman. Follow TED on Twitter at http://twitter.com/TEDTalks or on Facebook, http://www.facebook.com/TED.

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Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695, jenn.casey@oregonstate.edu

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Michelle Lesniak

Michelle Lesniak
Hanson Hosein
Hanson Hosein
Matthew Kaiser
Matthew Kaiser

Writer Elizabeth Kolbert of The New Yorker to speak at OSU Feb. 2

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Elizabeth Kolbert, an award-winning staff writer for The New Yorker magazine, will discuss her latest book, “The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History,” on Monday, Feb. 2, at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

Kolbert’s talk begins at 7 p.m. in Austin Auditorium at LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. The event is sponsored by OSU’s Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word, and is free and open to the public.

In “The Sixth Extinction,” Kolbert describes how humans are causing the earth’s next great extinction by altering life on the planet in a way no species has previously.

In a review, The New York Times said: “… the real power of her book resides in the hard science and historical context she delivers here, documenting the mounting losses that human beings are leaving in their wake.”

Kolbert is also author of “Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature and Climate Change.” She is a two-time National Magazine Award winner and a recipient of a Heinz Award and Guggenheim Fellowship.

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Charles Goodrich, 541-737-6198, Charles.goodrich@oregonstate.edu

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Elizabeth Kolbert

Elizabeth Kolbert

Authors Tracy Daugherty and Wayne Harrison to read at OSU Jan. 30

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Authors Tracy Daugherty and Wayne Harrison will read from their works on Friday, Jan. 30, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

The reading will be held in the Valley Library rotunda, 201 S.W. Waldo Place, Corvallis. A question-and-answer session and book signing will follow. The event is free and open to the public.

Daugherty is the author of four novels, four short story collections, a book of personal essays and two literary biographies. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, McSweeney's, The Georgia Review and other magazines. “Hiding Man,” his biography of Donald Barthelme, was a New York Times and New Yorker notable Book of the Year. His newest book, “Just One Catch,” a biography of Joseph Heller was excerpted in Vanity Fair. Daugherty helped found the Master’s of Fine Arts program in creative writing at OSU.

Harrison received a master in fine arts degree from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is an instructor in the School of Writing Literature and Film at OSU. His debut novel, “The Spark and The Drive,” was published in 2014. Harrison’s fiction has appeared in “Best American Short Stories 2010,” The Atlantic, Narrative Magazine, McSweeney’s and other magazines. His work also has been featured on NPR’s “All Things Considered.” His short story collection, “Wrench,” was a finalist for the Serena McDonald Kennedy Award, the Spokane Prize and the Iowa Short Fiction Award. 

The reading is part of the 2014-15 Literary Northwest Series, sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings Pacific Northwest writers to OSU and is made possible by support from the OSU Libraries and Press, the OSU School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele and Grass Roots Books and Music.

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OSU celebrates legacy of Martin Luther King with two-week celebration

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr., celebration will be held Jan. 12-23 with the theme “Ordinary People, Extraordinary Change.” 

OSU’s 33-year-old celebration is one of the oldest continuous events in the state celebrating the civil rights leader. The events are open to the public and most are free.

Kevin Rome, president of Lincoln University of Missouri, will begin with a presentation on Jan. 12 at 2 p.m. in the MU Horizon Room. Lincoln University was founded in 1866 by African-American Civil War veterans to educate newly freed slaves, and now has a student body that’s about 40 percent black. Following his talk, there will be a panel discussion from 3-4:30 p.m. on social justice titled “Creating Change Panel of Speakers.”

A number of lectures, workshops and other events will be held throughout the two-week celebration. A full schedule is available online at http://oregonstate.edu/oei/mlk-events  as well as https://guidebook.com/app/OSUGuide/

  • On Jan. 15, 7-9 p.m., internationally recognized poetry duo Sister Outsider will headline a spoken word event called “Speaking Justice” in the Memorial Union Lounge.
  • On Jan. 16, 6-7 p.m., students will be provided with a safe space at Snell International Forum to discuss experiences of racism, discrimination and prejudice in an open mic format.
  • On Jan. 17, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., the annual Martin Luther King Day of Service will give participants the chance to do community service as a way of honoring King’s vision about beloved communities. To register: http://sli.oregonstate.edu/cce/events/mlk-jr-day-service
  • On Jan. 19, 5:30 p.m. screening of “Selma” at Carmike Cinemas, followed by a discussion at 8:30 p.m. of the film’s relevance in the MU Horizon Room (attendees don't have to screen the film at that time to participate in the discussion).
  • On Jan. 21, 7:30-9 p.m., a musical and spoken-word event will be held at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, called "Rage, Rage Against the Dying."

The annual Peace Breakfast on Jan. 19 at 9 a.m. will feature presentation of the Phyllis S. Lee & Frances Dancy Hooks Coalition Builder Awards. Darleen Ortega, judge with the Oregon Court of Appeals, is keynote speaker.

Tickets will be available at the door, but organizers advise patrons to buy tickets in advance from the MU Information Desk, as the event regularly sells out. The cost is $10 for general admission and $6 for students; children ages 5-and-under will be admitted free.

These events are organized each year by a group of OSU community members convened by the Office of Equity and Inclusion.

Media Contact: 
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Kerstin Colon, 541-737-6368 or Kerstin.colon@oregonstate.edu

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Sale of OSU co-op furniture set Dec. 29-31

CORVALLIS, Ore. – After the closure of Oregon State University’s four cooperative housing units on campus this year, the university is liquidating the furniture and kitchenware remaining in the buildings. OSU Surplus is handling the public sale of these items next week, from Dec. 29-31.

The sale takes place inside two of the co-ops, Avery House at 1030 S.W. Madison Ave., and Azalea House, 1050 S.W. Madison Ave. Sale hours are 9 am. to noon on Dec. 29 and Dec. 30, and 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. (when items will be sold at a 50 percent discount) on Dec. 31.

Sale items include couches, wood desks, coffee and end tables, chairs, dressers, industrial cookware, and industrial refrigerators and freezers.

The sale is open to on- and off-campus customers. Cash, credit and OSU department indexes  will be accepted for purchase. All purchased items must be removed by 5 p.m. the day of purchase. As the co-ops are not ADA accessible, contact OSU Surplus for accommodation at surplus@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-7347.

For more information: http://fa.oregonstate.edu/surplus/furniture-and-kitchenware-sale-osu-co-op-housing-units

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Rae DeLay, 541-737-7341; rae.delay@oregonstate.edu

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furnituresale