OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

OSU selects public health leader, ecologist for Distinguished Professor Awards

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The leader behind what will become Oregon’s first accredited school of public health and a terrestrial ecologist who identified a new paradigm in wildlife research have been named 2014 recipients of the Distinguished Professor Award by Oregon State University.

Marie Harvey, a professor in OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences, and William Ripple, a professor in the College of Forestry, will receive their awards this spring and give public lectures on campus.

The Distinguished Professor title is the highest designation Oregon State gives to its faculty.

Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president, said the two faculty members chosen for the honor share similar traits of innovative leadership, internationally recognized scholarship and service to the university and their respective fields.

“Marie Harvey and Bill Ripple exemplify what we hope all of our faculty will strive to become as they develop their careers,” Randhawa said. “They both have revolutionized their fields, drawing respect and admiration not only from their colleagues on campus, but from around the world.”

Harvey is widely known for her pioneering work in reproductive and sexual health, shifting the research from an exclusive focus on women to one that examines the relationship dynamics of couples as it applies to both pregnancy and disease prevention. That shift, along with Harvey’s work in diversity and equity, prompted the American Public Health Association to present her with its Lifetime Achievement Award.

“I am very pleased that Marie Harvey is being honored with the Distinguished Professor title,” said Tammy Bray, dean of OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences. “In addition to her scholarly contributions to the field of public health, I most appreciate her leadership and partnership with me in the effort to transform our college to become the first accredited school of public health in Oregon.”

Harvey has been a faculty member at OSU since 2003 and associate dean of the college since 2011. Her title is Distinguished Professor of Public Health.

Ripple began his career studying old-growth forests and spotted owls and evolved his research to look at the impact of predators. His work led to a new field called “trophic cascades” – or how large predators exert powerful influences on ecosystem structure and function. Examples include the influence of wolves in Yellowstone Park on everything from the composition of hardwood forests to streamside erosion.

His prominence as an ecologist has led to consulting efforts with the National Academy of Sciences, The White House, President Clinton’s Forest Summit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others. Ripple will be Distinguished Professor of Ecology.

“Bill Ripple has been a fantastic teacher and researcher in the College of Forestry and well deserves being named a Distinguished Professor,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college. “He is an internationally known leader in the ecology of top predators and his studies on the impact of gray wolves in Yellowstone, along with co-author (OSU professor emeritus) Robert Beschta, have been featured in numerous scientific journals and in popular media. They have directly impacted conservation research and policies.”

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 Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111; Sabah.Randhawa@oregonstate.edu

OSU Board of Trustees elects initial leadership

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees, in its first meeting since being confirmed by the Oregon Senate in November, on Thursday unanimously elected Patricia “Pat” Reser of Beaverton, Ore., as initial chairwoman.

The board also voted Darald “Darry” Callahan of San Rafael, Calif., as initial vice-chairman. The positions are being listed as “initial” until the board becomes official under state law on July 1.

Reser is board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, Inc., a family-owned fresh refrigerated food company. A retired employee of the Beaverton School District, she is one of three co-chairs of OSU’s Capital Campaign Steering Committee and is serving her third term as an OSU Foundation Trustee.

Callahan is former president of Chevron Chemical Company, and served as executive vice president of Power, Chemicals and Technology for ChevronTexaco Corp. from 2001 until his retirement in 2003. He is a former chair of the OSU Foundation Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees also created three initial committees:

  • The Academic Strategies Committee will be chaired by Paul Kelly of Portland; Orcilia Zúñiga Forbes of Portland is vice chair;
  • The Finance and Administration Committee will be chaired by Kirk Schueler of Bend; Elson Floyd of Pullman, Wash., is vice chair;
  • The Executive and Audit Committee will be chaired by Reser; Callahan is vice chair.

The board approved Meg Reeves, OSU’s general counsel, as board secretary. It also approved a series of bylaws guiding its actions.

Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at OSU, said the primary purpose of this first meeting of the board has been to orient the board with the university, introduce the members to their roles and responsibilities, and allow them to get acquainted with one another.

The board meeting will continue on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the CH2M-Hill Alumni Center.

More information about the OSU Board of Trustees is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/trustees

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Pat Reser, OSU Board

Pat Reser

 

Darry Callahan and Ed Ray
Darry Callahan and
OSU President Ed Ray

OSU to close on Monday as icy conditions persist

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will close its main campus on Monday, Dec. 9, as packed snow from a storm that dumped nearly a foot of snow – and temperatures dipping into single digits – have combined to create hazardous driving and even walking conditions.

Monday is the first day of finals week for fall term.

OSU Provost and Executive Vice President Sabah Randhawa said the closure may result in some inconvenience for students, but “the safety of all is our first priority.”

“We ask for everyone’s continued patience and understanding regarding this weather-related closure,” Randhawa said.  “We also ask for everyone’s continued use of good judgment when it comes to traveling even short distances in these frigid conditions.”

The OSU Registrar’s Office is working to establish a new schedule for finals that originally were set for Monday. The new schedule will be posted after 8 p.m. Sunday at: http://oregonstate.edu/registrar/

Monday’s shutdown includes the Valley Library at OSU, which will be closed all day.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Celebrate Veterans Day – then head back to class

CORVALLIS, Ore. – With improved educational benefits and after years of conflict in the Middle East, a flood of veterans are heading to college in numbers that surpass those of recent history.

Oregon State University has 1,025 students who are receiving veteran educational benefits, a new record and the most of any university in Oregon. They now account for about one out of every 25 students at OSU, and a range of programs are being created or expanded to help facilitate this stream of incoming veterans.

“I’ve talked to counterparts all over the country and this is clearly a national trend,” said Gus Bedwell, the OSU veteran resources coordinator. “OSU has always had quite a few veteran students, but right now we’re almost triple the number of five years ago. Other institutions are also seeing three to four times as many veterans as they used to.”

Part of the increase, officials say, is due to an expansion of educational benefits that were put in place in the early 2000s, including some that veteran dependents and spouses can use. A weak economy also made it an opportune time for veterans to attend college, just like many other students.

OSU has responded with renewed efforts to pave the way for returning veterans, programs to cut through federal bureaucracy, and make sure the students get both the personal and professional help they need.

Two new initiatives at OSU are an example. A Student Health Services Veterans Work Group is helping to ensure treatment of the full range of health concerns that veterans face, including access to some local services. And a Veterans Work Group focuses much of its efforts on academic and programmatic support. This group and other officials have trained advisers, worked to expedite the transfer of military transcripts to academia, and helped keep students informed during the recent government shutdown.

A website at http://oregonstate.edu/veterans/home/ helps guide veterans, and a veterans lounge in the OSU Memorial Union allows veterans an opportunity to meet and build their community in a casual setting.

“OSU has really made an effort to understand the obstacles veterans face and help work around them,” Bedwell said.

For instance, he said, the federal government is often slow at making veteran educational benefit payments. Officials know the money will come, but in the meantime it can cost students penalties, interest, and create “holds” that interfere with course registration. So the university created a mechanism to avoid these holds, allow regular progress with an educational program, and refund any penalties once the government payments are made. This program is called the “Goodwill Interest Waiver.”

The university’s nationally recognized program of distance education, E-Campus, is also a favorite with many veterans. They can take courses while living literally anywhere in the world and earn degrees in a wide range of fields.

OSU, with its origin as a land grant college, had a mandate under the Morrill Act of 1862 to “include military tactics” as part of its educational program, and the university has always been tuned to the needs of veterans.

It’s one of a limited number of schools that hosts all four branches of the Reserve Officers Training Corp, and its student center, the Memorial Union, was named to help honor veterans, many of them returned from World War I. OSU has earned the title of “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs several years in a row.

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Gus Bedwell, 541-737-7662

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Veterans Day Parade

Students in parade

OSU celebrates National Nutrition Month with March 4 event

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s Nutrition and Dietetics Club is celebrating National Nutrition Month on Wednesday, March 4, with an event in the Memorial Union quad from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Its theme of “Bite Into a Healthy Lifestyle” encourages everyone to adopt eating plans focused on making informed food choices and promoting overall health. The event will feature games, prizes, free food, and tips on how to stay healthy from guests representing Bob’s Red Mill, Trader Joes, Pacific Fruit Company, Food@OSU and more.

Activities will focus around vitamins, mineral and fiber content in food, and helping students, faculty and staff learn more about what makes a healthy, balanced meal. There will be free cookbooks for the first 200 participants, a competition to win a bullet blender, and other prizes.

“Eating a healthy, well-balanced meal is crucial to success in the rest of your life, including your academic success,” said Jessica Hummel, vice president of OSU’s Nutrition and Dietetics Club. “We want students and staff to stop in and learn some fun facts about food, and maybe look at the way they eat in a new way.”

As part of this public education campaign, the academy’s National Nutrition Month website includes a variety of helpful tips, games, promotional tools and nutrition education resources, all designed to spread the message of good nutrition.  

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myplate

OSU Theatre to present Vietnam-era play, ‘Strange Snow,’ March 5-8

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Theatre’s 2014-15 season, which focuses on War and Remembrance, continues with the Lab Theatre production of Stephen Metcalf’s Vietnam-era play, “Strange Snow,” in March.

The production, directed by OSU Theatre Arts student Bryanna Rainwater, will run March 5-7 at 7:30 p.m. and March 8 at 2 p.m. in the Withycombe Hall Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way, Corvallis.

The play tells the story of a troubled past shared by two Vietnam veterans during a fishing trip on opening day of the season. Relationships develop through humor and heartache as Dave and Megs attempt to move on from a horrific event. The exploration of friendship and the impacts of war upon individuals and families serve as a reminder of the personal sacrifices made in military service.

“This play explores much more than what’s at the surface and reveals a lot about the human condition and what it is like to be vulnerable,” Rainwater said.

The production features the work of Oregon State students Amanda Kelner as Martha, Evan Butler as Megs and Brad Stone as Dave.

Tickets are $8 adults; $6 for seniors; $5 youth/student; and $4 for OSU students. They can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ  or by calling the theatre box office at 541-737-2784. There is no reserved seating for this production. For more information or DAS accommodations, contact the box office.

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Author Jenny Boully to read at Oregon State March 6

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Author Jenny Boully will read from her works on Friday, March 6, at Oregon State University’s Valley Library rotunda on the Corvallis campus beginning at 7:30 p.m. A question and answer session and book signing will follow.

Boully is the author of four books, most recently “not merely because of the unknown that was stalking toward them,” from Tarpaulin Sky Press. Her other books include “The Books of Beginnings and Endings,” (Sarabande Books) “[one love affair]* (Tarpaulin Sky Press), and “The Body: An Essay,” (Essay Press, first published by Slope Editions).

Boully’s chapbook of prose, “Moveable Types,” was released by Noemi Press. Her work has been anthologized in “The Best American Poetry,” “The Next American Essay,” “Great American Prose Poems: From Poe to the Present,” and other places.

Boully was born in Thailand and raised in Texas. She attended Hollins University and went on to receive her M.A. in English Criticism and Writing. She also earned a master of fine arts from the University of Notre Dame and holds a Ph.D. in English from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She lives in Chicago, Illinois, with her husband and daughter and teaches at Columbia College Chicago.

The reading is part of the 2014-15 Visiting Writers Series sponsored by the MFA Program in Creative Writing in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film. The series brings nationally known writers to Oregon State University.

The event is free and open to the public. The program is supported by OSU Libraries and Press, the School of Writing, Literature, and Film, the College of Liberal Arts, Kathy Brisker and Tim Steele and Grass Roots Books and Music.

The Valley Library is located at 201 S.W. Waldo Place on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

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OSU to host housing expo, good neighbor workshops for students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s second annual off-campus housing expo will connect property managers, campus offices and community agencies with Oregon State students – an event that last year drew more than 1,000 students.

This year’s expo will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 25, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Memorial Union ballroom. An added feature in 2015 will be a series of “Live Smart” workshops designed to provide OSU students with tools to become informed tenants and responsible neighbors.

The event is open to all OSU students and is particularly aimed at students transitioning to off-campus housing and living, according to Jonathan Stoll, director of Corvallis Community Relations.

“It’s important that we provide students with the resources necessary to be good neighbors and to successfully transition to living off-campus,” Stoll said. “Living on one’s own for the first time is a big step – and for some of our students, this will be the first time without the conveniences and accommodations that University Housing and Dining Services provides its students, from residential advisers and tutors to meal plans, cable, internet and most utilities.” 

Workshops topics will include local laws and ordinances, tips on hosting responsible parties, safety and security, financial literacy, and tenant rights and responsibilities. The workshops aim to improve livability by fostering a commitment to community that upholds Corvallis’ ranking as one of the nation’s top college towns and best places to live, Stoll said.

“Most students have embraced being members of Beaver Nation and the Associated Students of Oregon State University is excited to spearhead a program that helps students embrace being members of our Corvallis community,” said Cassie Hubers, executive director of community resources for ASOSU.

Stoll said students who complete the Live Smart workshops and pass a corresponding preferred renters exam will receive a $50 rental deposit credit – a program endorsed by the Corvallis Rental Property Management Group. The proposed credit would be limited to properties electing to participate in the preferred renters program.

More information on the expo, including a list of workshops and participating vendors, is available at: http://studentlife.oregonstate.edu/ccr/community-and-u/2015-housing-expo

For additional information, contact Cassie Hubers at 541-737-7111 or asosu.community@oregonstate.edu; or Jonathan Stoll at 541-737-8606, jonathan.stoll@oregonstate.edu

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Jonathan Stoll, 541-737-8606, jonathan.stoll@oregonstate.edu

International Resource Center gets new home

A cultural center for international students at Oregon State University is getting a new home, which will be celebrated this weekend at an event filled with music and food.

The International Resource Center opened its doors on the west side of the Memorial Union lounge in 2009, with support from student affairs and international program staff. Operated primarily by the International Students of Oregon State University (ISOSU), the center has become a focal point for a number of internationally-based cultural activities and events on campus.

Last week the center moved into its new home in the Student Experience Center, a relocation that creates more opportunities for networking, programming and exposure, student organizers say.

A grand opening for the new center will be held this Saturday, Feb. 21, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  The event will feature food from around the globe and the music of DeCajon, a Seattle based Afro-Peruvian music and dance ensemble.

ISOSU will also host the 2015 Winter Showcase, featuring a performance from Monica Rojas (past ISOSU president) and DeCajon, which will be followed by OSU students showcasing their talents. It takes place Feb. 21, 7 p.m., in the MU Ballroom. Tickets are $5 for non OSU students and available at the door.

In its infancy, the International Resource Center offered a coffee hour every two weeks, ISOSU co-director Rone Nop said, and then evolved to include poetry nights, game events and cultural heritage nights, as well as programming around religion and spirituality.

“Eventually, we decided to narrow our palate, so that we weren’t diluting the programming,” Nop said.

As they prepare to celebrate their new space, the center staff has focused programming on a smaller series of offerings. The coffee hours and cultural heritage nights will continue due to their popularity (co-director Estefania Arellana said they’re always sold-out events). Additionally, there is a series called “The Dangers of a Single Perspective” that examines a hot topic issue from a variety of multi-cultural perspectives.

A cultural exposition similar to a talent show helps students from around the world showcase pieces from their own culture, including song, dance and story-telling.

“We’re at capacity for all these events,” said Robin Ryan, associate director of Student Leadership & Involvement. “Now we’ll be able to serve more students in the new space, and move from more random events to programming with very intentional learning outcomes.”

The new space will provide opportunities for other student groups with similar multicultural perspectives to present programming, and will increase the opportunities for student engagement with open workshops and other events.

In addition to the larger space, the center will also have an added draw – a huge collection of international dolls donated by the McHenry Family. The collection includes 247 dolls gathered from around the world, which will be on display in a large case at the entrance to the new center.

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Robin Ryan, 541-737-2917; robin.ryan@oregonstate.edu

Historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz to give Pauling Peace Lecture March 4

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Activist, writer and historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz will give the annual Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Memorial Lecture for World Peace at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 4, at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

The 32nd annual lecture, “The Future of the United States,” will be held in the Austin Auditorium at LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. The event is free and open to the public. 

Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, the daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother. She has been active in the international indigenous movement for more than four decades and is known for her commitment to national and international social justice issues.

After earning a doctorate in history at University of California, Los Angeles, Dunbar-Ortiz taught in the newly established Native American Studies Program at California State University, Hayward, and helped found the departments of ethnic studies and women’s studies.

Dunbar-Ortiz is the author or editor of several books, including “Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico,” and most recently, “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States.”

The OSU lectureship honors Linus Pauling, an OSU graduate and two-time Nobel Prize laureate, and his wife, Ava Helen Pauling, a noted peace activist. It is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts.

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Richard Clinton, 541-737-6246, Richard.clinton@oregonstate.edu