OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

OSU Press publishes new book on strategies for ‘wicked problems’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new book about past ”wicked problems” that have confounded society, the economy, the environment and politics may help guide the nation through its current era of political polarization and complex issues.

Scholars say so-called wicked problems usually involve social, economic, environmental and political issues. In a new book, just published by the Oregon State University Press, a group of scholars has written a series of essays to address these challenges and propose an assortment of problem-solving methodologies to tackle wicked problems.

The essays were solicited and edited by Edward Weber, Denise Lach and Brent Steel of the School of Public Policy at Oregon State, and compiled into “New Strategies for Wicked Problems: Science and Solutions in the 21st Century.” It is available in bookstores, by calling 1-800-621-2736, or by ordering online at osupress.oregonstate.edu

“The book will appeal to scholars, students and decision-makers wrestling with wicked problems and ‘post-normal’ science settings beyond simply environment and natural resource-based issues,” said Marty Brown, marketing manager for the OSU Press. “At the same time, it will provide much-needed guidance to policymakers, citizens, public managers and other stakeholders.”

One such issue addresses the pros and cons of hydraulic fracturing, commonly referred to as “fracking.” Written by Christopher Weible and Tanya Heikkila of the University of Colorado-Denver, the essay explores how professional expertise, personal values, and affiliation with different groups affects how people approach the issue – and how the process might be regulated.

Robert Lackey, a fisheries biologist who has worked for the Environmental Protection Agency and OSU, tackles the issue of wild salmon recovery in the Pacific Northwest. He argues that the science and technology to restore wild salmon runs is available, but the solutions ultimately would be too restrictive and divisive to succeed. The billions of dollars spent on salmon recovery to make minute inroads into the solution might be considered “guilt money,” he says.

“It is money spent on activities not likely to achieve recovery of wild salmon, but it helps people feel better as they continue the behaviors and choices that preclude the recovery of wild salmon,” Lackey wrote.

In their concluding essay, editors Weber, Lach and Steel explore whether there is need for a new social contract for scientists and policy implementation. They argue that plans to address issues are often rushed and lack sufficient time for implementation – and the timetable for addressing such issues rarely matches funding cycles. Additionally, leadership needs training – not only on issues, but on how to engage stakeholders and collaborate on processes.

They wrote: “… We also hope to energize the scholarly and practitioner-based conversations and real-world practices around these topics in ways that help leaders and stakeholders imagine new possibilities, conduct new experiments in implementation, and, ultimately, make even more progress in the ongoing, difficult battle against wicked problems and their less-than-desirable effects for society as a whole.” 

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Mark Floyd, 541-737-0778

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12th Annual Community Art Show

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Annual Community Art Show is back again to celebrate its 12th year at the Giustina Gallery in The LaSells Stewart Center. The exhibit runs from July 5 – 27 and participation is open to the general public.

The public is invited to a free reception on Tuesday, July 13, from 6 to 8:30 p.m., to celebrate the show’s opening and meet the artists. There will be complimentary appetizers and a no-host bar.

This non-juried exhibit is a great opportunity for anyone in the community—regardless of age or skill level—to submit any art piece they’ve created to showcase in the gallery. There is no cost to submit artwork. For new artists that want to take that first step into the art world, this is their chance to show the community their artistic style and have it displayed in an exhibit.

All artists are limited to one piece per person of any medium. The deadline to submit and drop-off artwork is Friday, June 30.  You may enter the show online at http://lasells.oregonstate.edu/current-future-exhibits or bring your piece in to The LaSells Stewart Center in person and fill out a submission form.

The Giustina Gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and is located on the Oregon State University campus at 875 SW 26th Street, Corvallis, Ore. Parking is available across the street in the Reser Stadium parking lot for $1 per hour from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. (free after 5).

For more information about this show and other upcoming exhibits go to http://oregonstate.edu/lasells/gallery

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Mary McKillop, 541-737-2402, mary.mckillop@oregonstate.edu

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Tina Green-Price, 541-737-3116, tina.green-price@oregonstate.edu

OSU 148th commencement ceremony set for June 17

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will graduate a record 6,807 students during its 148th commencement ceremony at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 17, at Reser Stadium in Corvallis.

Gates will open at 9 a.m. for the event, which is free, open to the public and held rain or shine. Tickets are not required.

The 6,807 graduating students will receive 7,097 degrees, according to OSU Registrar Rebecca Mathern. (There will be 276 students receiving two degrees and seven who will receive three degrees.) They will add to the ranks of Oregon State alumni, which have earned 243,081 degrees over the university’s history.

The commencement address will be given by Hüsnü M. Özyeğin, who arrived at Oregon State in 1963 with only $100 in his pocket. He graduated and went on to become a highly successful business leader and philanthropist in Turkey and Europe. He also will receive an honorary doctorate in civil engineering.

Özyeğin has made significant contributions to the global community with extensive work in social entrepreneurship, education, women’s rights, equity, child and youth development, and arts and cultural preservation.

 Some facts and figures about OSU’s Class of 2017:

  • Of the 7,097 degrees that will be awarded, 5,590 will go to students receiving baccalaureate degrees; 1,066, master’s degrees; 311, doctor of philosophy degrees; 76, doctor of pharmacy degrees; 51, doctor of veterinary medicine degrees; and three doctor of education. (The doctor of pharmacy and doctor of veterinary medicine degrees are awarded at separate ceremonies.)
  • OSU’s 2017 graduates represent all 36 Oregon counties, all 50 states and 68 countries.
  • The oldest graduate is 74 years old; the youngest is 19 years old.
  • The graduating class includes 159 veterans of U.S. military service.
  • Nearly 1,000 Oregon State distance students completed degree requirements online this year through OSU Ecampus, the university’s online education division. The graduates hail from nearly all 50 states and more than a half-dozen countries.

Each OSU graduate has a compelling story. For example:

  • Justyn Jacobs, a political science, pre-law major in the College of Liberal Arts is graduating magna cum laude. A rare and aggressive form of dyslexia left her illiterate until she was diagnosed in fifth grade. She was a member of the women’s rowing team, helped OSU's Hillel grow from five individuals to more than 60 active participants in two years and was a writer for Her Campus, a publication which educates readers about politics and combats extreme hate.
  • Madison Esposito majored in bioresource research, an interdisciplinary biosciences major centered around student research. From Georgia, she was attracted to OSU because of the opportunity to conduct research as an undergraduate in the university’s College of Agricultural Sciences. She is conducting research in epigenetics and plans to attend medical school to become a forensic pathologist. After graduation, she will begin a two-year research internship at the National Institutes of Health.

Mathern, the OSU registrar, said the university expects about 4,000 students to attend commencement. Oregon State is one of the only universities of its size to hand out actual diplomas to students as they graduate.

The ceremony will be broadcast in HD live on OPB PLUS and at http://commencement.oregonstate.edu/live-stream.

Media Contact: 

Sean Nealon, 541-737-0787, sean.nealon@oregonstate.edu

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Commencement 2016

6804

OSU Chamber Choir honors Ed and the late Beth Ray at annual President’s Concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Steven M. Zielke, will present the 13th annual President’s Concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 10, at First United Methodist Church, 1165 N.W. Monroe Ave. in Corvallis. 

The “Music of Spheres” concert revolves around Ola Gjeilo’s 2008 “Sunrise Mass,” for mixed choir and string orchestra. The film score-influenced work is a unique fusion of Latin Mass text and English titles in five sections: “The Spheres – Kyrie”; “Sunrise – Gloria”; “The City – Credo”; “Identity – Sanctus” and “The Ground – Pleni Sunt Coeli/Agnus Dei.”

The program also includes Michael Barrett and Ralf Schmitt’s arrangement of “Indonana,” a traditional South African folk song; “Sainte-Chappelle” by Eric Whitacre; a Craig Hella Johnson adaptation of Dolly Parton’s “Light of a Clear Blue Morning”; “Balleilakka,” by A.R. Rahman; and “Pseudo-Yoik” by Jaakko Mäntyjärvi. 

In 2004, OSU President Ed Ray and his late wife, Beth, established the Ed & Beth Ray Endowment for Choral Leadership Scholars. Each year since, four students – a soprano, alto, tenor and bass – who display excellent musicianship, leadership and vocal ability, have been honored with this award.

The following year after being selected, these students serve as section leaders in the OSU Chamber Choir. At the 2017 President’s Concert, four new students will be honored to continue this tradition. 

General admission seating is $10. OSU students with ID and K-12 youth are admitted free. Advance tickets are available online at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACevents. Corvallis Arts For All discounts apply. For accommodations relating to a disability, call 541-737-4671, preferably one week in advance.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

Exhibit featuring graduating students’ thesis artwork at Fairbanks Gallery in June

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students completing their Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees will present their thesis work in an exhibit June 5-17 at the Fairbanks Gallery on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Twenty students graduating from various art disciplines will be exhibiting in the show. They are: Milla Oliveira, Mike Chasco, Angelica Ingeman, Diana Robbins, Kelsey Carruth, Ariyon Kawai, Brooklyn Cochran, Kiana McCurry, Mai Xee Yang, Johnny Beaver, Reid Dehle, Lily Hudnell-Almas, Koa Tom, Kaylee Weyrauch, Kody Kirkpatrick, Cat Fitzsimmons, Tiffany Cha, Madelaine Corbin, Alexandra May, Caroline Moses.

A reception will be held in the gallery at 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 6. OSU Provost Edward Feser will present the President’s Award for Excellence in Art and the Provost’s Purchase Award. Larry Rodgers, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, will present the College of Liberal Arts Purchase Award. Seniors of Distinction Awards also will be presented to outstanding graduating seniors in studio art, photography and art history.

Also at the reception, scholarships will be awarded to returning students, freshmen and transfer students selected through a competitive portfolio review. The scholarships include the Stone/Sponenburgh Scholarship, Joyce Dickerson Printmaking Award, Norma Seibert Print Scholarship, Yaquina Art Association Scholarship, Freshman Foundation Award, Helen E. Plinkiewisch Scholarship and others.

The Fairbanks Gallery is located at 220 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. Exhibits are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. It will also be open for special hours 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 15 and noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 17.

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Andrew Nigon, 541-737-4880, andrew.nigon@oregonstate.edu

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Tongue and Hip by Milla Oliveira

Tongue and Hip

Transcontinental by Milla Oliveira

 

Transcontinental

Student-directed one-act play festival runs June 1-4 at Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Three original, student-directed, one-act plays will be featured in Oregon State University Theatre’s annual Spring One-Act Festival June 1-3 on the OSU campus in Corvallis.

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. June 1-3 and at 2 p.m. June 4 in the Withycombe Hall Lab Theatre, 2901 S.W. Campus Way.

The three featured plays are comedies showcasing the creativity of student directors, actors and designers. The line-up includes: 

  • “The Two Minds of Mr. Coffan,” by Hannah Fretz and directed by Sedona Garcial, is a surreal look into the imagination of a struggling young writer whose characters come to life to help improve his terrible novel.
  • “Love Games,” by Heaven Carreon and directed by PJ Harris, is a wacky melodrama about the nature of sex, infidelity, and love.
  • “Skinner,” by Mike Stephens and directed by Brian Greer, is a pun-filled parody of 1980s teen-slasher movies depicting a group of naïve high school students on a weekend camping trip that goes terribly wrong.

Tickets for the 2017 One-Act Festival are $8 for general admission, $6 for seniors, $5 for youth/students, and $4 for OSU students. Tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/1wgmTkJ.

For accommodations related to a disability, contact the OSU Theatre Box Office at 541-737-2784.

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Oregon State University Band concludes 125th season with May 30 concert

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Band will conclude its 125th season with a performance by the OSU Wind Ensemble and OSU Wind Symphony on Tuesday, May 30, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis. 

The OSU Wind Symphony, directed by Olin Hannum, will open the concert with five popular favorites from the symphonic band repertoire: Alfred Reed’s “A Festival Prelude,” conducted by graduate music education student Hannah Sneller; John Mackey’s “Hymn to a Blue Hour”; Carolyn “Early Light,” conducted by graduate music education student Tim Chase; an arrangement of Astor Piazzolla’s “Oblivion” featuring student tuba soloist Maria Rivera; and a wind-band adaptation of John Williams’ overture “The Cowboys,” from the John Wayne movie of the same name.

 Director of bands Chris Chapman and the OSU Wind Ensemble will open the second half of the concert with  Justin Raines’ concert overture “Dreams of Flight”; followed by Bruce Broughton’s “In the World of Spirits,” a cinematic 11-minute tone poem written in 2011; “Baron Cimetiere’s Mambo” by Donald Grantham; Gustav Holst’s Second Suite for Military Band, Op. 28, conducted by graduate music education student Tim Chase; and Lucien Cailliet’s arrangement of Richard Wagner’s “Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral.”

Tickets are $5 for general admission. Admission is free for K-12 youth and OSU students with valid ID. Advance tickets available online at http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/SACevents. For accommodations relating to a disability call 541-737-4671, preferably at least one week in advance.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu, 541-737-4671

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OSU Wind Ensemble

OSU Wind Ensemble

Corvallis-OSU Symphony concludes 111th season with ‘Music Transcendent’

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Corvallis-OSU Symphony Orchestra will perform “Music Transcendent” on Tuesday, May 23, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium of The LaSells Stewart Center at Oregon State University (875 S.W. 26th St.) in Corvallis.

The performance, conducted by Marlan Carlson, will feature works by Richard Wagner, Richard Strauss and Claude Debussy in a display of musical imagery, virtuoso ensemble work and colorful orchestration.

A selection from “The Sea,” a 1905 Debussy piece, opens the program. The orchestra will perform “From Dawn to Noon on the Sea,” the first movement of the three-part symphonic poem in which Debussy depicts the sunrise and waking of the sea.

Strauss’ suite from his opera “The Woman Without a Shadow” closes the first half of the show. The fairytale-based opera premiered in 1919. Strauss extracted key elements from the score for the suite nearly 30 years after its premiere and it is that piece that is most frequently heard by modern audiences.  

The second half of the concert is dedicated to popular excerpts from Wagner’s “Ring Cycle.” In addition to the well-known “Ride of the Valkyries,” Carlson will lead the ensemble in three selections from “Twilight of the Gods” – “Siegfried’s Rhine Journey,” “Siegfried’s Funeral Music,” and the final “Immolation Scene.”

Reserved seat tickets are $22, $27 and $32. They are available online at www.cosusymphony.org. General admission seats are $20 and are available in advance at Grass Roots Books and Music in Corvallis. Students are admitted free with valid student ID. Corvallis Arts for All discounts apply. For accommodations relating to a disability call 541-286-5580, preferably one week in advance.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

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Corvallis-OSU Symphony

Corvallis-OSU Symphony

Fishing and seafood in Oregon are the focus of May 18 discussion at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – “Fish Tales: Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon,” a conversation about Oregonians’ relationship with ocean life and products of the sea, will be held on Thursday, May 18,  beginning at 7 p.m.at The Center for the Humanities at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

Food and travel writer Jennifer Burns Bright will lead the conversation on topics including the impact of the global seafood market, cultural traditions related to fishing, and challenges to the ocean and its bounty.

The event, which is free and open to the public, is part of Oregon Humanities’ statewide Conversation Project. It will be held in the lecture room at the Autzen House, 811 S.W. Jefferson Ave. in Corvallis.

Bright, of Port Orford, recently retired from teaching at the University of Oregon, where she researched desire in 20th-century literature, led a faculty research group in the emerging discipline of food studies and won a national pedagogy award for a team-taught, interdisciplinary class on bread.

She holds a doctorate from the University of California, Irvine and a Master Food Preserver certification. As a community organizer linking local producers and consumers, Bright often speaks and teaches at events. Her writing appears in Gastronomica, Oregon Quarterly, NPR’s The Salt, and AAA’s Via.

Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to daily life and the state of Oregon’s future.

 


 

About Oregon Humanities: Oregon Humanities connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information about Oregon Humanities’ programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Idea Lab, Public Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine, can be found at oregonhumanities.org. Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust.

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Joy Jensen, 541-737-2450, centerforthehumanities@oregonstate.edu

OSU to celebrate its 25th repair fair

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Volunteers will repair broken items for free at the Oregon State University Spring Repair Fair on Wednesday, May 10, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Located at the OSUsed Store at the edge of OSU’s campus, volunteers savvy in a variety of D.I.Y. (do it yourself) and fix-it skills will offer their time and knowledge to teach others how to repair their belongings during the fair.

This event marks the 25th time the event has been offered, with more than 670 repairs taking place during the fairs. Volunteers can help make repairs in the following categories: small appliances and electronics; bikes; clothing; computer diagnostics; housewares, including furniture and lamps; woodwind instruments; and jewelry.

In addition to free repairs, two D.I.Y. demonstrations will be available during each hour of the event. Demos from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. will include workshops on planting seed starts and creating reusable bags from T-shirts. From 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. demos will teach attendees about how to fix bike tire tubes and basics of tire repair, as well as fixing bras when the wire sticks through.

OSU’s waste-reduction volunteer club, the Waste Watchers, hosts the repair fairs. Campus Recycling and the Student Sustainability Initiative jointly operate the club.

Full details for the event, including demos and repair skills, may be found at: http://tiny.cc/repair-fair

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Andrea Norris, 541-737-5398, andrea.norris@oregonstate.edu