OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

OSU adds new parking lot, additional shuttle bus to campus

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new parking lot will open in June on the south side of Oregon State University’s Corvallis campus as OSU also makes plans to expand campus bus service.

The parking lot, located at the corner of 16th Street and A Avenue, will add 76 parking spaces to the B2 commuter zone, and will increase the number of campus parking permits available. The lot sits on the east route of the OSU Beaver Bus, which is OSU’s free campus shuttle.

“This new lot helps us meet parking demands while maintaining campus planning goals for a pedestrian-friendly campus core,” said Meredith Williams, director for Transportation Services at OSU. “We’re glad to have this new lot within easy walking distance of the heart of campus, and right on a Beaver Bus route.”

An additional Beaver Bus will be added to the campus fleet by fall 2017, providing a total of five buses in service. Route modifications to accommodate the fifth bus are currently under review. 

The university has implemented several other recent transportation service improvements. A protected pedestrian crosswalk on Western Boulevard has been added just west of 15th Street to enhance safety in the area. New secure bike lockers are now available for monthly rental at Reser Stadium near the C zone parking lot, and on the east side of Snell Hall near Valley Library. In addition, security cameras are being installed in the campus parking garage to address safety concerns.

“We are constantly working to improve the safety and quality of campus, and adopting beneficial new technology,” Williams said. “For instance, since launching the Passport Parking mobile phone app to pay for metered parking on campus, use of the app has exceeded that of using coins and has increased the overall use of metered parking spaces.”

 For more information on the parking app and other transportation services, see http://transportation.oregonstate.edu/parking

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Meredith Williams, 541-737-0673; Meredith.williams@oregonstate.edu

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Beaver Bus

Oregon State University to hold “Take Back the Night” event

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will hold a march, rally and survivor speak-out on Thursday, April 27, in recognition of “Take Back the Night,” an event held in many locations throughout the world to raise awareness about sexual violence.

The OSU event begins at 7:30 p.m., in the Student Experience Center Plaza on the Corvallis campus. Speakers featured at this event include Brenda Tracy, Jackie Sandmeyer, and Rachel Grisham. Additionally, there will be a talk by Tracy and Sandmeyer about sexual violence on college campuses April 27, 4 p.m., in the MU Horizon Room.

“Take Back the Night” is just one event of many being held in April at Oregon State to acknowledge Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Organizers say the events provide opportunities for students, staff and faculty to declare as a community that sexual violence will not be tolerated on the OSU campus.

Oregon State is not only committed to preventing all forms of sexual violence and providing a safe campus atmosphere but also fosters a compassionate response to those who have experienced this type of violence, according to Judy Neighbours, associate director of the Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center (SARC) at Oregon State.

 Sexual violence – in the form of sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking – negatively impacts the lives of survivors and those around them, Neighbours pointed out. People of all genders, races, cultural backgrounds, religions, socioeconomic levels, marital status, abilities or levels of education can experience sexual violence.

Nationally, one in five women and one in 16 men experience sexual violence while attending college. There are additional students who have experienced other forms of violence, including stalking and dating violence. 

“We know that many will not report their assault, and OSU wants students and the community to know that the university provides numerous services to students exposed to this tragic experience, regardless of their choice about reporting,” Neighbours said.

SARC offers students a safe and confidential place to discuss their experience with an advocate. The advocate can help them understand their rights for reporting and for safety, assist with any housing or academic needs that arise as a result of their experience, and refer them to Student Health Services and/or Counseling and Psychological Services.

When students do want to report their experience to the university, the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access assists with investigating complaints of sexual misconduct.

For additional information, call Neighbours at 541-737-2030 or visit http://tbtn.oregonstate.edu

Media Contact: 

Gina Flak: 541-737-2715; gina.flak@oregonstate.edu

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Judy Neighbours, 541-737-2030; judy.neighbours@oregonstate.edu

Inspired by land grant mission, state flag, OSU’s new logo emphasizes far-reaching service

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University unveiled a new institutional logo and branding Monday that pays homage to OSU’s nearly 150 years of service as Oregon’s statewide university and its mission as a 21st-century land grant university.

Along with the logo and branding, Oregon State rolled out a creative marketing campaign entitled “Out There,” which emphasizes the expansive reach and relevance of the university’s statewide, national and global impacts.

The logo and branding were unveiled today during the Celebrate Oregon State event in Corvallis, with similar events planned for Wednesday in Portland and for May 3 in Bend.

“Oregon State University’s new institutional logo celebrates OSU’s near 150-year legacy of excellence in teaching, research, and outreach and engagement,” said Steve Clark, OSU’s vice president for University Relations and Marketing.

The new logo and its academic crest tell a unique story about the university’s mission as a land, sea, space and sun grant institution. On the new logo, a beaver (the state animal, as well as OSU’s mascot) sits atop an academic crest. Inside the crest, a tree and an open book represent knowledge. The three stars represent OSU’s three campuses in Corvallis, Bend and Newport, while also referencing Oregon as the 33rd state in the union. Finally, the year 1868 denotes OSU’s founding. The new look also offers a nod to the state of Oregon shield that is portrayed on the state flag. The crest also represents the geography of the state of Oregon.

Oregon State’s new institutional logo replaces the current orange “OSU” logo that was created in 2003. The OSU athletic logo remains as it has been since 2013.

“Establishing a refreshed visual identity with a powerful and cohesive look and feel was needed to represent the brand of the entire university,” Clark said. “This branded logo portrays the promise and product of Oregon State: high-quality teaching, research and community engagement. It also portrays a personality of a university that indelibly serves Oregon and Oregonians with a statewide mission.

“The personality traits of Oregon State and members of Beaver Nation are gritty, determined, confident, collaborative, visionary, conscientious and welcoming,” Clark said.

“OSU people are out there working throughout Oregon and around the world, determined to innovate, solve tough problems and create a future that is better, healthier, more sustainable and more just for all. The new branding reaffirms our mission to serve all Oregonians while expanding the impacts of our teaching, research, and outreach and engagement.”

Clark said universities worldwide increasingly utilize logos and branding to portray their unique identities, promise and personality.

“It is essential in the 21st century that Oregon State’s logo and brand convey the quality, relevance, leadership and access to higher education that OSU provides all Oregonians and increasingly the nation and the world,” Clark said.

For its new logo, Oregon State teamed with Pentagram, the world’s largest independent design consultancy. Pentagram’s experience in higher education includes working with the University of Southern California, Columbia University and Loyola Marymount University.

Meanwhile, OSU developed its refreshed brand positioning in collaboration with Ologie, a leading branding agency with extensive experience in higher education. Their clients include the University of Arizona, Purdue University and the University of Notre Dame.

University Relations and Marketing staff and its consultants spoke with hundreds of faculty, students, prospective students, alumni, donors and other stakeholders about how they see Oregon State and how they believe the university should be represented. Those thoughts became the basis of the new logo and the refreshed branding that will change how the university looks on the web, in print and on signage.

No tuition or state funds were used to create the logo and the accompanying branding. Proceeds from the sale of licensed university merchandise and contributions from the OSU Foundation paid for this work, Clark said.

Media Contact: 

Steve Lundeberg, 541-737-4039

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808
steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University announces plans for arts and education complex

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Building on a decade of investment in the arts, Oregon State University leaders announced plans today for a new arts and education complex on the Corvallis campus. The initiative will expand and enhance the existing LaSells Stewart Center, bringing together music, theater, digital communications programs and the visual arts to form a center of creativity infused with science and technology.

The lead gift of $25 million comes from an anonymous donor and launches an effort to raise an additional $5 million in gifts for the project. With $30 million in private support, the university will seek future approvals for $30 million in state bonds, providing a total of $60 million for the arts and education complex. 

“This is a watershed investment in our university,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “The arts drive the culture of creativity, innovation and diversity that is essential to a thriving research environment. I believe with all my heart that a relationship with the arts is integral to the human experience. In addition to enhancing our strengths in the sciences, this initiative will enrich the education and life preparation of all our students. We owe a boundless debt of gratitude to this generous donor.”

Expected to open in 2022, the OSU arts and education complex will feature performance spaces including a new concert hall and a revitalized auditorium as well as a smaller black box theater that can be configured in multiple ways for performing and teaching. The facility also will contain classrooms designed for a media-rich environment; practice rooms and spaces for choir, symphony and band rehearsal; shop space equipped for work with sound, lights, animation and video; faculty offices and seminar rooms. 

“The arts and education complex is the next major step for OSU’s development as one of America’s great land grant universities,” said Larry Rodgers, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. “At OSU we are especially interested in how art intersects with science, humanities and technology. This facility will build on these connections, transforming the way our students and our community learn, perform, innovate and communicate.”

“I am certain this new complex will join other iconic facilities that stand as testaments to the lasting impact of philanthropy on our campus – Valley Library, Austin Hall, Reser Stadium,” said Mike Goodwin, president and CEO of the OSU Foundation. 

Goodwin noted that a turning point took place in early 2013 when a donor made a $5 million challenge gift to advance OSU’s performing arts programs. By the end of the year, 26 individuals, families and organizations had made gifts of at least $25,000 each. These philanthropic commitments and others resulted in more than $8 million to support scholarships, faculty, facilities, equipment and other programs in OSU’s School of Arts & Communication. This momentum in support of OSU arts programs continues to grow. In fact, over the last two years, donors have nearly doubled the amount of scholarships available for vocal music students.

Opened in 1981, the current LaSells Stewart Center has over 1,660 event bookings annually, attracting more than 150,000 attendees for academic and research conferences and cultural offerings. The Stewart Center’s 1,200-seat Austin Auditorium is often sold out for campus and community musical performances and presentations.

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Larry Rodgers, 541-737-4581, Larry.Rodgers@oregonstate.edu; Molly Brown, 541-737-3602, molly.brown@osufoundation.org

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Student Maria Rivera

Play

Soloists Logan Stewart, Megan Sand, Nicholas Larson and Kevin Helppie

Perform

Art Professor Yuji Hiratsuka and students

Art

Staying informed in a post-truth, fake news era

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Fake news has become a catch-phrase in the modern political arena, but what does it really mean? Is it a label for unethical, biased journalism or a turn-of-phrase for news that doesn’t meet one’s personal agenda? How do you spot fake news, and what do you do about it?

Scholars will explore these ideas and more in a speaker series at Oregon State University this spring.

“As a librarian, I’ve been thinking a lot about the idea of fake news and how to be an educated consumer of media,” said Laurie Bridges, associate professor and instruction and outreach librarian at Oregon State. “The aim of this speaker’s series is to make sense of the idea of fake news and see how media has been used to both educate and manipulate the public throughout modern history.”

Speakers will make presentations at OSU during April and May, and all lectures are all free and open to the public. The series is sponsored by OSU Libraries; OSU Press; OSU Ethnic Studies; the OSU Center for Civic Engagement; and the OSU School of History, Philosophy, and Religion.

The topics include:

“Alternative Facts”

Peter Laufer, 3-4 p.m. April 27, Willamette Rooms, The Valley Library

  • In an age of instant news and “alternative facts,” information consumers need easy-to-follow rules for sorting truth from lies. Award-winning journalist and University of Oregon Professor Peter Laufer will present Slow News: A Manifesto for the Critical News Consumer. Inspired by the Slow Food movement, a timely antidote is offered to “fake news,” with 29 simple rules for avoiding echo chambers and recognizing misinformation.

“Fake News is the New V.D.: Verbal Deception as a Means of Manipulation”

Trischa Goodnow, 3-4 p.m., May 3, Willamette Rooms, The Valley Library

  • The phrase verbal deception has been coined to better describe what has popularly become known as fake news.  OSU Professor Trischa Goodnow will discuss how fake news or verbal deception are being used in the current political climate to manipulate audiences, and the lecture will suggest a simple solution to the problem – logic and reason.

Der Stürmer, Fake News, and the Making of the "Jewish Criminal" in Nazi Germany”

Katherine Hubler, 3-4 p.m., May 11, Willamette Rooms, The Valley Library

  • National Socialist propaganda frequently spread “fake news” about European Jews, but few Nazi publications were as belligerent and unrestrained in their antisemitic attacks as Der Stürmer (The Stormtrooper), published between 1923 and 1945. Der Stürmer perpetuated the myth of Jewish criminality by soliciting public slander about German Jews—in the form of readers’ letters—and passing it off as fact.  The methods it used will be discussed by Katherine Hubler, an instructor and Ecampus coordinator with the OSU school of History, Philosophy, and Religion.

“Manufacturing 'Military Necessity’: Japanese American Internment during World War II”

Patricia Sakurai, 3-4 p.m., May 18, Willamette Rooms The Valley Library

  • In 1942, a presidential order ultimately interned 120,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast, which a federal commission 40 years later said "was not justified by military necessity" but instead was the result of “race prejudice, war hysteria and a failure of political leadership.” OSU Associate Professor Patricia Sakurai will consider the particular convergence of misinformation, political and business interests, news media, and longstanding anti-Asian sentiment and legislation that sat just below assertions of “military necessity” during the period. 
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Laurie Bridges, 541-737-8821

Beaver Nation assembles in Salem for ‘OSU Day at the Capitol’

SALEM, Ore. – Salem will take on a decidedly orange hue Thursday, April 20, for OSU Day at the Capitol as Beaver Nation assembles to meet with legislators on matters important to OSU and higher education in Oregon.

Those who plan to participate in the day’s activities should register by April 12.

The event will allow OSU students, alumni, faculty and staff to highlight the impact that OSU has on the economy and people of the state. OSU has more than 164,000 alumni; serves the state through campuses in Corvallis, Bend and Newport; and maintains a presence in all 36 counties through the OSU Extension Service, Agricultural Experiment Station, and Forest Research Laboratory.

OSU supporters are invited to join students, alumni, faculty, staff and state government officials for a reception from 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the Galleria of the Oregon State Capitol building. As part of the reception, Benny Beaver will be on hand to pose for photos.

Earlier in the day, displays on OSU educational programs and research projects will be set up in the Galleria starting at 8 a.m.  The OSU Meistersingers and String Quartet will offer an invocation on the House and Senate Floors, respectively.

The OSU ROTC Color Guard will post the colors in both chambers. OSU’s College of Pharmacy will offer a Health Fair with blood pressure and blood glucose screenings with Pharm.D. students. The Café at the Capitol will offer a 10 percent discount for those wearing orange and black.

For more information about OSU Day at the Capitol, visit government.oregonstate.edu/osu-day-capitol.

Source: 

Karli Olsen, 541-737-4514

UPDATE: Event Cancelled - Architect Maya Lin to speak at OSU

4-17-17 Update

The scheduled April 18 Provost’s Lecture by American architect and sculptor Maya Lin at Oregon State University has been cancelled. Lin had to cancel her appearance due to illness. Organizers hope to reschedule her visit at a later date.

Those who obtained free tickets to the event will also receive an email regarding the cancellation from the ticket site, EventBrite. People with tickets for Tuesday’s event will be notified by email regarding rescheduling and will have first priority to receive tickets for the event if it can be rescheduled.


American architect and sculptor Maya Lin, perhaps best known for designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., as a Yale University student in 1981, will deliver the next Provost’s Lecture at Oregon State University on Tuesday, April 18.

Lin’s works have made an impact around the world, from a tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr., in Montgomery, Alabama, to a piece along the Columbia River honoring the Lewis & Clark expedition and the Shantou University Bell Tower in China.

Lin will speak at 7:30 p.m. in The LaSells Stewart Center’s Austin Auditorium. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and a book signing will follow the program. The event is free, but tickets are required for admission and are just now being made available to the public. They can be downloaded at communications.oregonstate.edu/events/maya-lin.

The daughter of Chinese immigrants, Lin has also designed a number of buildings, including the Museum of Chinese in America in New York City. In 2009, she received the National Medal of Arts and a documentary about her life and work won the 1994 Oscar for best documentary. In 2016 she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Lin describes her work as a dialogue between the landscape and the built environment, and her more recent work has focused on the crucial role of nature in the modern world. Her latest memorial, entitled "What is Missing?" is still in progress. It is described as a cross-platform, global memorial to the planet, located in select scientific institutions, online as a website, and available as a book, calling attention to the crisis surrounding biodiversity and habitat loss.

As artist and architect for the Confluence Project, Lin has also designed public art pieces to commemorate the original location of Celilo Falls and other points of significance along the Columbia River system.

For more information or accommodation for disabilities contact University Events at 541-737-4717 or events@oregonstate.edu

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the OSU Foundation, the Provost’s Lecture Series brings renowned speakers to the Oregon State University community to engage in thought-provoking discussions on topics of cultural and global significance. Lin’s visit is also supported by the College of Liberal Arts.

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Mealoha McFadden, mealoha.mcfadden@oregonstate.edu; 541-737-6522

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Maya Lin

Vietnam Memorial Wall

Vietnam Memorial

OSU names Lisa L. Templeton associate provost for Division of Extended Campus

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Lisa L. Templeton, who has helped propel the Extended Campus program at Oregon State University into a national online learning leader, has been named associate provost for the Division of Extended Campus at OSU.

She succeeds Dave King, who retired from that position last July and since has been serving as a special assistant to the provost for innovation.

Templeton has spent the last eight months as interim associate provost of Extended Campus, which is among the top 10 online education programs in the country, according to many different rankings. She had been executive director of Ecampus at OSU since 2008. She is actively national in the field of online and continuing education and serves on the board of directors for the University Professional and Continuing Education Association.

In 2016, a record 692 students earned an Oregon State diploma after completing degree requirements online with OSU Ecampus – a 17 percent increase over the previous year. For the third straight year, Ecampus was ranked in the top 10 nationally by U.S. News & World Report. OSU was eighth out of more than 300 higher education institutions in the category of Best Online Bachelor’s Programs, and first among all land grant universities.

Last year, more than 19,000 OSU students – roughly 60 percent of the student body – took at least one online course. Ecampus serves students in all 50 states and more than 40 countries. It now delivers 50 degree programs and more than a thousand classes online.

Templeton has a bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture from The Ohio State University and an Ed.M. in adult education from Oregon State.

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Ron Adams, 541-737-2111, ron.adams@oregonstate.edu

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Lisa Templeton
Lisa L. Templeton

OSU’s College of Liberal Arts to offer four-year graduation guarantee to incoming students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s College of Liberal Arts will guarantee that students can earn a bachelor’s degree in four years beginning with the freshman class entering college in fall 2017.

The College of Liberal Arts is the first college at OSU to offer a four-year degree completion guarantee. Under the program, if a student meets their obligations but still cannot get through all of their needed courses in four years, the college will pick up the cost of OSU tuition for the remaining required classes. 

The goal is to encourage more students to complete their undergraduate degrees and to do so in a timely fashion, which also helps reduce overall college costs for students.

“The guarantee we are offering CLA students exemplifies our dedication to their success,” said Larry Rodgers, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. “We are offering students who sign up for the degree all the support they need to graduate in four years. We are happy to be the model for the rest of the university and our hope is that eventually a program like this will be available at other colleges at OSU.”

The College of Liberal Arts is the second largest college at OSU, with 17 undergraduate degree options, 3,917 undergraduates enrolled in fall 2016 and 972 undergraduate degrees awarded in 2016. However, of those students who entered college in 2011, only about 43 percent graduated in four years.

College leaders hope the new degree guarantee will boost that rate significantly. The changes also should lead to higher six-year graduation rates and help the university reach the goals of the Student Success Initiative, which includes a goal of 70 percent of students graduating within six years by the year 2020. 

To participate in the four-year graduation guarantee program, new students must:

  • Declare a major in the College of Liberal Arts by the end of the first quarter of freshman year
  • Meet with a designated adviser at least twice a year and follow their progress recommendations
  • Each year, earn at least 45 credits that fulfill degree and college requirements
  • Stay on track with financial obligations such as tuition

Embedded in the degree guarantee program is a shift in philosophy toward first-year students. 

In the past, academic advisors were encouraging first-year students to start with 12 to 14 credits in their first term of college. But now advisors will encourage students to take 15 credits per term starting with the first term, said Louie Bottaro, director of student services for the College of Liberal Arts.

“We have research that tells us that students who take 15 hours from day one are more likely to succeed than those who take fewer classes and plan to ramp up to 15 later,” Bottaro said. 

Advisors will meet more often with students – currently they meet at least six times with students but that will jump to eight to 10 times or more during the student’s college career. The goal of those meetings will be to ensure that students have the information they need to stay on track, are getting the appropriate classes and receive regular updates about their progress toward their degree, Bottaro said.

Regular monitoring also will help better predict which courses students might need access to in order to graduate on time, so that enough seats are available or sections can be added to address student needs, Bottaro said. 

Students who fail a class, accidentally take the wrong course or decide to change majors may need to take additional steps, such as taking a summer class. For some majors, such as music and graphic design, students must begin their major course work in their first term on campus in order to complete a degree on time.

If students do fall off course, they may not be eligible for the four-year degree guarantee, but advisors will continue to work with them to help them achieve their goals as expediently as possible, Bottaro said. 

“Ultimately, our goal is to help students reach their academic goals and complete their degrees,” he said. “This new degree guarantee is one way to assist with that process, but we are committed to meeting students wherever they are in their academic plan.”

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Louie Bottaro, 541-737-0561, Louie.bottaro@oregonstate.edu

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Students graduating

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Edward Feser named provost and executive vice president at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray has named Edward Feser the provost and executive vice president for the university.

Feser, who currently serves as interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and provost at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will begin at Oregon State on Feb. 28.

He succeeds Ron Adams, who has served as OSU’s interim provost and executive vice president since July 1.

“Ed Feser will be a great addition to Oregon State University,” said Ray. “His academic and leadership success at the University of Illinois, the University of North Carolina and the University of Manchester in England will serve him very well.

“Ed fully understands Oregon State’s land grant mission as Oregon’s statewide university and OSU’s role as an internationally recognized public research university,” Ray said. “As the provost of the University of Illinois, a nationally top-ranked land grant university, he has successfully helped provide transformative learning experiences for students in and out of the classroom, and steward a global research portfolio.”

As provost and executive vice president, Feser will provide leadership to continue implementation of the university’s strategic plan and student success initiative; support growth of OSU’s grant/contract-funded research and impact; foster faculty and graduate student success; and support OSU’s diversity, enrollment management, and outreach and engagement strategies.

Feser said he is excited to join Oregon State and inspired by the university’s successes and many future opportunities.

“Oregon State has gone through a remarkable transformation over the last decade or more,” Feser said. “This has been achieved as part of a deliberate and strategic process to guide Oregon State to become one of the leading land grant universities in the U.S.”

Feser said he was drawn to Oregon State for several reasons, including its West Coast location and natural orientation toward the Pacific Rim.

“I am very impressed by Oregon State’s quickly increasing research profile; the new OSU-Cascades campus in Bend; its focused instructional priorities; its outreach and engagement impact throughout Oregon; its current global reach and focus to expand internationally; and the institution’s next phase of visioning and strategic planning.

“As part of this strategic planning process and as Oregon State’s provost, I am committed to provide every student with the tools and community support needed to succeed.”

Feser was named Illinois’ interim provost in September of 2015. Beginning in 2012, he served as dean of the University of Illinois College of Fine and Applied Arts. As dean, he oversaw academic and engagement programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, design and the visual and performing arts.

Prior to becoming dean at Illinois, Feser held the Davies Chair of Entrepreneurship and served as head of the Division of Innovation, Management and Policy at the Manchester Business School, University of Manchester in England. He also was an associate professor and associate department head at the University of North Carolina, and in 2003, served as assistant secretary for the North Carolina state Department of Commerce. Since 2009, Feser has served as a senior research fellow with the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness in Arlington, Virginia.

Feser earned both a master’s degree in regional planning and a doctorate in regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a bachelor’s degree in government from the University of San Francisco.

Feser’s wife of 26 years, Kathy, is a civil engineer-turned-primary school science teacher. Their son, Jack, 22, is pursuing a doctorate in computer science at MIT. Their daughter, Mary, 19, is a freshman at Colorado College, studying economics and languages.

Feser grew up in Montana, Washington and northern California as his father was a U.S. National Park ranger at Glacier, Olympic and Lassen parks.

“For me, joining Oregon State is something of a coming home,” Feser said.

“I’ve always considered the Pacific Northwest – broadly – to be home. As a National Park ‘brat,’ the environmental and land ethic is in my blood. So Oregon State’s strengths in forestry, the environment and marine sciences, and its land, sea, space and sun grant designations are very appealing. I look forward to working with President Ray, the deans and other senior administrators, and the faculty, staff and students to advance the goals of this great university.”

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Edward Feser
Edward Feser