OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

Block Party celebrates new home of the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A “block party” celebration of the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center, which is currently under construction, will take place Oct. 17 at the center, located at 2320 S.W. Monroe Ave.

The event will be from 5:15-7 p.m., as a street party featuring a DJ, bouncy inflatables that can accommodate adults, and free food including pulled pork sandwiches. Those planning to attend are encouraged to RSVP by emailing events@oregonstate.edu or by calling 541-737-4717.

“This is one of many great events we’re putting on this year at the BCC,” said Dominique Austin, assistant director for the center. Austin said the block party ties in with the center’s theme for this year, which is creating a culture of excellence within the black community at OSU and a welcoming atmosphere for all students.

“The BCC is not only for black students, but is open to the whole OSU community,” Austin said. “All students are welcome. You don’t have to identify as black. We have a very diverse staff at the BCC, and we’re committed to recruiting and retaining students from all backgrounds.”

The BCC, as it is known, is one of four OSU cultural centers getting a new home to replace its former aging building. The Native American Longhouse moved into a new building in 2013, and the Cesar Chavez Centro Cultural opened the doors of their new building in 2014. The new Asian and Pacific Cultural Center is currently under construction. The four cultural centers are being funded with a combination of private gifts and university funds. 

Groundbreaking for the BCC took place in June, 2013, but construction was delayed after workers found that groundwater and soil about eight feet below grade had been contaminated by fuel from an unknown source, possibly many years ago.

Due to health concerns from the contaminated soil and groundwater, OSU had to hire a geotechnical firm from Portland to establish the extent of the contamination and then do a risk analysis. The result was evidence that the contamination was spread over a significant area of the construction site, but that the levels were medium low, meaning it was safe to proceed with construction as long as a vapor barrier was placed under the foundation, protecting all occupants from any contamination or risk.

The extra steps involved in addressing the contamination issue slowed the construction, but project manager Larrie Easterly says the new building will be ready to move into by spring break, 2015, within the same approximate completion time as the Native American Longhouse, which took two years from groundbreaking to completion. The Centro Cultural Cesar Chavez broke ground in November, 2012, and was completed in April, 2014.

The original Black Student Union Cultural Center was formed on campus in 1975, and later renamed the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center after the first director of the Educational Opportunities Program, who helped increase recruitment and retention of black students at OSU.

The new building will provide entrances both to Memorial Place, to the east of the current building, and Monroe Avenue to the north. The building, designed by Seattle architectural firm Jones & Jones, will have a unique circular lounge, and exterior brick patterns based on Yoruba textiles known as Aso Oke, from Nigeria.

The BCC is temporarily being housed in Snell Hall, Room 427. Programming is continuing there and BCC students benefit from a recent grant that is helping students at all OSU cultural centers.

The Meyer Memorial Trust grant has given Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) the opportunity to provide academic mentors, tutors, and study tables in all cultural centers including the BCC.  Academic mentors are peer educators who help students with academics, to connect to resources, and partner with the Academic Success Center’s Learning Campaign.   

The current BCC space is dedicated for study tables Mondays through Thursdays from 2-5 p.m.  Math and chemistry tutoring is provided on Mondays from 3-6 p.m.  The center also is collaborating with the Writing Center to providing writing assistants in the BCC on Thursdays from 2-5 p.m. That work will continue once the BCC staff and students move into their new home during spring break, 2015.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Dominique Austin, 541-737-0706; dominique.austin@oregonstate.edu

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Be Well Run, Walk N’ Roll celebrates fifth year

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Runners, race walkers and anyone looking for a brisk fall stroll are invited to participate in a 5-kilometer run/1-mile walk on Oct. 17 at Oregon State University. It is free and open to the public. 

The event, which is sponsored by Be Well, OSU Healthy Campus Initiatives and Recreational Sports, celebrates Beaver Nation’s commitment to health and well-being. The run/walk kicks off at 3:30 p.m.

This is the fifth year of the “Run, Walk, N’ Roll” event, which draws hundreds to the Memorial Union quad. While many participate in the 5K run, others take a more relaxed approach and walk, roll or stroll through a mile-long route.

This year, the event fair includes a ‘body shop’ starting at 3 p.m., giving participants a chance to test their flexibility, balance, heart rate, blood pressure and to try out biofeedback.

“Every year it’s fun to see so many OSU and Corvallis community folks coming out to enjoy this event,” said Lisa Hoogesteger, director of Healthy Campus Initiatives. “A lot of people bring their whole family and teams dress up in fun costumes. It’s a party atmosphere, and it really emphasizes that physical activity can be fun and social as well.” 

The long course takes runners out Campus Way past the covered bridge and almost to the fairgrounds and back, while the short course ends by the east greenhouses on Campus Way and circles back around.

Registration is free and those who pre-register are guaranteed to receive a T-shirt. Pre-registration is encouraged to avoid lines the day of the event.

To register, go to http://oregonstate.edu/recsports/bewell5k. Check in for the event and day-of registration will be available on site in the Memorial Union Quad starting at 3 p.m. on the day of the event.

For photos of last year’s event: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonstateuniversity/sets/72157636549485256/

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Lisa Hoogesteger, 541-737-3343; lisa.hoogesteger@oregonstate.edu

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Last year's event

Fireworks display part of Beaver Nation celebration

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University is inviting students, faculty, staff and community members to Goss Stadium this Friday to celebrate being a part of “Beaver Nation” with free food, prizes and a fireworks show. 

The activities, which are free and open to the public, begin at 7 p.m., Oct. 10 at Goss Stadium (the baseball park) on campus.

“The term ‘Beaver Nation’ is best-known in athletics, but it actually represents something much bigger,” said Melody Oldfield, assistant vice president for University Relations and Marketing. “Beaver Nation is the community of Oregon State students, faculty, staff and alumni who are solving problems, making discoveries and leading innovations that make positive impacts across Oregon – and around the world.

 “This event is a way to welcome students – the newest members of Beaver Nation – and celebrate what we can accomplish together,” she added.

 The first 500 people at the event will receive Papa John’s pizza. Among the prizes will be a $500 gift card to the OSU Beaver Store.

 Orange glow sticks will be handed out and participants will form a glowing orange outline of the state of Oregon, which will be captured on video.

 OSU officials say the fireworks should go off around 7:45 to 8 p.m.

 “We want to let the university’s neighbors know so they aren’t alarmed,” Oldfield said.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Melody Oldfield, 541-737-8956; melody.oldfield @oregonstate.edu

Brittney Yeskie, 541-737-3788; Brittney.yeskie@oregonstate.edu

Thursday night football game will impact OSU parking

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students, staff and faculty should plan ahead as parking on campus will be a challenge on Thursday, Oct. 16, due to a 7 p.m. home football game against Utah.

Employees and students are encouraged to find alternative transportation to campus Oct. 16 or to park strategically, as some lots will be restricted to those with game day passes only after 1 p.m. On game day, OSU parking permit holders will be allowed to park in any A, B, or C zone, regardless of their permitted zone, but some parking lots will be closing midday to employees and students to accommodate parking by football game ticketholders.

OSU department heads and business unit directors are encouraged to be more flexible with employees to accommodate the influx of cars and visitors to campus.

A free shuttle to and from campus will be offered to anyone who parks at the Benton County Fairgrounds beginning at 6 a.m. Thursday morning through 2 a.m. Friday morning after the game. The fairgrounds are located west of campus along Southwest 53rd Street just south of Harrison Boulevard. During peak hours, the fairgrounds shuttle will run at least every 30 minutes. The OSU Beaver Bus service will run on its normal schedule on game day.

Beginning at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 16, some parking lots will be open only to those with athletics-issued game-day parking passes and must be vacated by OSU permit holders. These include:

  • All Reser Stadium parking lots;
  • The Gill Coliseum lot;
  • The parking garage at 26th Street and Washington;
  • South Farm parking lot off Brooklane Road.

Other parking areas (listed below) will be available until 3 p.m. for regular faculty/staff business day parking. After 3 p.m., however, entrance to these areas will be limited only to people with athletics-issued game-day parking permits. Employee and student vehicles already parked in these lots may remain until 5 p.m., at which time all vehicles without athletics-issued passes must vacate. Signs will be posted at the entrance of these lots. These include:

  • Lots between 15th Street and 11th Street, off Washington Way;
  • The Benton Place parking lots east of Goss Stadium;
  • Lots off Washington Way adjacent to the Student Legacy Park (intramural fields);
  • The 30th Street parking lots around Peavy Hall, between Jefferson Street and Washington Way;
  • The 30th Street parking lot by Magruder Hall;
  • The 35th Street parking lot at the OSU Foundation building;
  • The lot off 15th Street and Western Boulevard at the University Plaza building

All other Faculty/Staff parking lots that are designated as “Athletics Event” parking on game days are available for regular business-day parking. However, they will have attendants starting at 4 p.m. Employees are encouraged to vacate these lots by 5 p.m. and will be required to vacate those lots by 6 p.m.

RVs are only allowed after 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 15, in the gravel lot off 35th and Campus Way, next to the Motor Pool. Employees and students who normally park in this location, should give themselves extra time Thursday morning to locate a parking space as many may be filled with recreational vehicles. RV’s are not permitted on campus in any other lot on Wednesday.

A game-day parking map is available to help visitors, students and employees better understand designated lots. It is available online at:  http://www.osubeavers.com/pdf9/2778891.pdf

For additional information regarding game-day parking on campus, visit the OSU athletics website at www.osubeavers.com or for offering thoughts and concerns, e-mail eventmanagement@oregonstate.edu; wecare@oregonstate.edu or contact Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at steve.clark@oregonstate.edu. For suggestions on alternative transportation: 

http://transportation.oregonstate.edu/ 

The Corvallis Transit System map is accessible at: http://www.corvallisoregon.gov/index.aspx?page=884

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU joins new education technology consortium

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has joined several leading research universities to create an education technology consortium called Unizin that will provide new ways to create and share digital educational content.

Unizin is a university-owned and operated national collaboration to provide a common infrastructure for educational content and empower faculty with a new suite of tools to create and share digital learning materials.

“As a founding member of the new Unizin consortium, Oregon State steps up to a leadership role nationwide to help guide the next generation digital learning,” said Lois Brooks, vice provost for Information  Services and chief information officer at OSU.

Oregon State has been involved in the development of the new Unizin consortium for the past year. Colorado State University, University of Florida, Indiana University and the University of Michigan signed on earlier this year. Now Oregon State, University of Wisconsin and University of Minnesota join them as founding members of Unizin, to provide leadership in higher education for the new wave of digital learning technologies and strategies sweeping college campuses.

By the end of this year, Unizin founding membership is likely to grow with several additional leading research universities working toward full membership.

“That three more world-class institutions joined Unizin further validates our strategy and gives us the momentum to have greater impact on teaching and learning,” said Amin Qazi, chief executive officer of Unizin. “The participation of these institutions will greatly extend our reach and strengthen the services Unizin provides to its members.”

Under Unizin, OSU faculty will be able to create and share digital content with faculty at other Unizin institutions as well as universities around the world who subscribe to standards for open educational resources, giving students access to more and better digital course materials.

“Over the past few decades, higher education has been evolving from a traditional lecture format to more digital-based interactive learning,” said Dave King, OSU’s associate provost for Extended Campus. “The next step in that evolution is to provide richer digital material across a full spectrum of learning opportunities – credit courses, professional programs, open educational resources and especially important to OSU, Extension programs.

“Unizin helps us open the door to many people who otherwise would not have access to higher education.”

One faculty proponent for the move is Kevin Ahern, a professor of biochemistry and biophysics who already offers free online courses and books.

“What I like about Unizin is that it is a way for many more people across OSU to participate in sharing as I have done,” Ahern said. “Open Educational Resources is going to rapidly become the biggest movement in higher education and I am delighted to see OSU participate in this process. Unizin is a credible, meaningful effort that will benefit students across the country – and OSU is showing important leadership by joining the conversation.”

The lexicon of 21st-century education can be intimidating – MOOCs, badges, flipped classrooms, digital platforms, and professional short-courses. What they have in common is expanding the reach of higher education to meet the needs of students, industry, and other professionals.

This fall, for example, Oregon State is offering its first MOOC – massive open online course. Karen Thompson, an OSU education faculty member, is teaming with the Oregon Department of Education and Stanford University on a course to help K-12 teachers work better with English language learners in their classrooms to meet new standards. It is potentially open to thousands of educators throughout the country.

“The potential for these types of courses is enormous,” King said. “You could offer a course on climate change, or earthquake hazards, or watershed enhancement. It could be offered free, or it could be underwritten by an agency or organization, with universities maintaining both intellectual property and quality control.”

Through Unizin, faculty will also be able to analyze ways in which students best learn and tailor their courses accordingly. Access to these kinds of analytics is becoming a required management tool for universities which are focusing on improved learner and student success like Oregon State is under its newly revised strategic plan.

The technology revolution goes well beyond traditional distance learning, OSU officials say. Many OSU resident students take online courses as well, and creative faculty members are incorporating new technologies into their classroom lectures.

“Twenty years ago many of us were involved in the development of Internet2 to provide universities the network Internet access that has changed the trajectory toward success of higher education,” said Brooks. “Our collaborative approach to Unizin offers the same path toward success for digital and online learning. The potential to use technology to enhance the learning environment for all learners is enormous.”

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Dave King, 541-737-3810, dave.king@oregonstate.edu;

Lois Brooks, 541-737-8247, lois.brooks@oregonstate.edu

OSU President Ray calls for university-wide effort to halt sexual assaults

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray on Tuesday challenged all students, faculty, staff and community members to work together to end sexual violence.

Ray’s challenge follows the announcement last Friday by President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden of the “It’s On Us” campaign to raise awareness of – and ultimately prevent - sexual assaults on university campuses.

In a letter to the Oregon State community, Ray pointed to several programs at OSU that focus on education and prevention of sexual assaults and then said “that is not enough.” He challenged all members of the Oregon State community to get involved in their own way.

“I expect each and every one of us – regardless of where you work or attend classes – to become informed about sexual violence and to take the responsibility to help prevent and report all forms of sexual violence or harassment,” Ray said. “I have no doubt that we can all do something.

“Teaching faculty can learn how best to use classroom and advising opportunities to promote awareness, safety and support,” Ray pointed out. “Likewise, advisers, fraternities and sororities, supervisors, coaches, friends, etc. can all become informed about how they can respond and help this important effort.

“We are a community and should work together to ensure each of us are safe.”

The OSU president noted that an estimated one in five women nationally is sexually assaulted during her college years. Sexual violence can impact anyone, he said, regardless of age, race, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation. In the great majority of cases, individuals are assaulted by someone they know and even trust, whether as an acquaintance, classmate, friend, or current or former partner.

Of those assaults, it is estimated that only 12 percent nationally are reported, and only a fraction of the offenders are held accountable.

“Sexual assault is a severely violating experience that can cause a victim substantial immediate and long-term physical and mental health consequences,” Ray said. “These assaults must end, and to do so will require our collective focus locally and nationally.”

Oregon State will develop an “It’s On Us” website that will have  information about the university’s response, prevention and education programs as well as information on how each of us can be part of the solution. The website will link to the national campaign and additional resources.

Ray asked all students and employees to learn about OSU’s programs and services regarding sexual violence reporting, emergency response, education and community services.

“During the course of the 2014-15 academic year Oregon State will take additional steps to address sexual violence within our community,” Ray said. “We will keep everyone informed of these important developments.” The university will publicize these efforts through the sexual assault website, the OSU Today newsletter, the online LIFE@OSU magazine, social media and other communications.

“It’s on us to end sexual assaults in the Oregon State University community,” Ray said. “Each of us has a role in creating a caring community – based on civility and respect – that is free of sexual assaults and other forms of harassment and violence.”

 

                                                                     OSU Sexual Assault Prevention Services and Programs

Confidential support, counseling and advocacy services: 

Sexual assault reporting and response services:

Awareness and prevention education programs and services:

  • “Haven” -- Online prevention education program required for all incoming OSU students and student athletes.
  • “AlcoholEdu” Substance abuse prevention program required for all incoming first-year students attending OSU in Corvallis.
  • Sexual violence prevention educator on staff in OSU Student Health Services. (541-737-9355)

Academic programs, such as those offered in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Other OSU efforts:

  • On-going training for all for all residential staff in University Housing and Dining Services in conjunction with the Office of Equity and Inclusion; Sexual Assault Support Services; and Student Health Services to understand, identify and appropriately respond to disclosures of sexual violence.
  • Residence hall educational programming – including resource information and support – provided by professional staff and members of student.
  • Required educational programs for students living in OSU’s Affiliated Housing Program, made up of fraternities and sororities.
  • Sexual harassment and sexual violence prevention training for OSU employees by the Office of Equity and Inclusion. Oregon State employee policy on responding to disclosures of sexual violence or sexual harassment:

OSU’s Community Partners:

  • Corvallis Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence (CARDV) provides confidential, 24-hour hotline services in the Corvallis area. (541-754-0110) http://cardv.org/
  • Guide to sexual assault service responders in communities through Oregon and the U.S. https://www.notalone.gov/resources
  • Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis (541-768-5111)
  • Hospitals and medical centers in your community

 Future sexual assault education programs services

  • OSU Student Health Services is creating a center on violence prevention; and alcohol and drug abuse to work with Corvallis campus and community partners to expand and enhance education, outreach and prevention efforts.
  • Office of Equity and Inclusion is taking additional steps to expand awareness of sexual violence and enhance prevention education among OSU employees.
Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU part of national alliance to help students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University and 10 other prominent research universities have formed a nationwide alliance aimed at helping retain and ultimately graduate more first-generation students and students from low-income families.

The new consortium, known as the University Innovation Alliance, already has received $5.7 million in funding from charitable foundations, which will be matched by the member institutions.

The alliance is designed to develop and share best practices on ways to better engage first-generation and low-income students by creating a national “playbook” of successful initiatives. Access to higher education – and success upon matriculating – has long been a priority for OSU President Edward J. Ray, himself a first-generation college student.

“This alliance is near and dear to my heart because I know first-hand how important it is to provide mentoring and resources for these students,” Ray said. “Oregon State has some innovative and successful programs and we look forward to sharing our ideas and learning from other institutions ways we can do even more.”

Students from high-income families are seven times more likely to attain a college degree than those from low-income families. The United States will face a shortage of at least 16 million college graduates by 2025, studies show, and the alliance’s founding members are focused on addressing this gap at a time when public funding for higher education has been decreasing.

Joining Oregon State in forming the alliance are: Arizona State University, Georgia State University, Iowa State University, Michigan State University, Ohio State University, Purdue University, University of California, Riverside, University of Central Florida, University of Kansas, and University of Texas at Austin.

Supporting the initiative are the Ford Foundation, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, USA Funds and the Markle Foundation.

The $11.4 million in overall funding will be used in a variety of ways, focusing on encouraging leaders of innovative programs to engage with other member institutions, according to Rebecca Warner, OSU’s senior vice provost for academic affairs.

Institutions affiliated with the alliance have a track record of success in helping students from all backgrounds. Georgia State, for example, successfully used predictive analytics and advising interventions to increase its semester-to-semester student retention rates by 5 percent and reduce time-to-degree for graduating students by almost half a semester.

That led to 1,200 more students staying in school every year, and the Georgia State Class of 2014 saved $10 million in tuition and fees compared to graduates a year earlier. If these same innovations were scaled across the 11 alliance member institutions over the next five years, it is estimated that an additional 61,000 students would graduate and save almost $1.5 billion in educational costs to students and taxpayers.

Sabah Randhawa, OSU’s provost and executive vice president, said Oregon State looks forward to sharing information about some of its successful programs, including the College Assistance Migrant Program for children for migrant families; the Educational Opportunities Program, a resources for students of color, students with disabilities, low-income students, veterans and others; and TRIO Support Services, a program aimed at boosting student retention.

“Oregon State also has some targeted precollege programs like Juntos, which is helping Latino students in central Oregon better prepare for going to college in the first place,” Randhawa said. “That kind of a head start can be critical in the success of students down the road.”

“We also will be sharing our successes with Ecampus, which annually is ranked among the best programs of its kind in the country,” Randhawa added. OSU Ecampus offers 35 degrees and certificate programs, and has grown at a rate of about 20 percent annually over the past five years.

More information on the University Innovation Alliance is available at www.theuia.org

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Becky Warner, 541-737-0732; becky.warner@oregonstate.edu;

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU receives Gold designation for sustainability

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has again received a “Gold” designation from the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System, or STARS, the second highest rating a university can receive.  Platinum is the highest rating, but no university received that designation this year.

STARS is administered by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, of which OSU is a member. Schools are rated in four large categories of academics; engagement; operations, planning and administration; and one additional innovation category.

“This repeated Gold designation is a great indicator of the comprehensive and consistent nature of OSU’s sustainability work,” said Brandon Trelstad, OSU’s sustainability coordinator.

“It’s a team effort that includes entities beyond the Sustainability Office, like Campus Recycling and the Student Sustainability Initiative,” Trelstad said. “We have established solid programs but are always looking for ways to expand positive impact and demonstrate leadership.”

OSU was the first Oregon university to be rated by STARS, and received a Gold designation in 2011, and again in 2013.

This year, OSU received high marks for its sustainability coordination and planning, its diversity and affordability, and a perfect score on campus engagement. It also earned high marks for academic research, including support and access.

President Edward Ray said that STARS provided a guidepost in helping the university develop programs and initiatives around sustainability.

"The assessment is a valuable tool in forging new conversations and inspiring actions around issues of global importance, like biodiversity, climate change, divestment and social justice," Ray wrote in his submittal letter to the STARS Steering Committee.

Of other participating Oregon institutions, only Portland State University received a Gold designation. Pacific University and Oregon Institute of Technology received “Bronze” designations, and University of Oregon’s designation was “Reporter.”

To see OSU’s full STARS assessment, visit http://bit.ly/1qOeGAW. For more information on OSU’s efforts in sustainability,  http://fa.oregonstate.edu/sustainability/

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Brandon Trelstad, 541-737-3307

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solar Solar panel array at Oregon State University

OSU Board of Trustees OKs budget, approves new degree programs

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees on Friday approved the university’s operating budget for the 2014-15 fiscal year, and also approved new master and doctoral degree programs in robotics and bachelor degree programs in religious studies.

This was the first meeting of the board after it officially took over oversight responsibility for the university on July 1 from the State Board of Higher Education. This change occurred as part of legislation adopted by the 2013 Oregon Legislature and the university’s decision to have its own independent board of directors appointed by the governor.

The board unanimously voted to adopt a $1.023 billion operating budget for the 2015 fiscal year, which covers OSU revenues and expenditures from July 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015. The revenue stream includes:

  • Educational and program funding authorized by the state legislature;
  • Projected tuition and fees paid by students;
  • Auxiliary revenues from OSU service centers, including University Housing and Dining Services and OSU’s Department of Intercollegiate Athletics;
  • External funds for teaching, research and outreach from private giving through the OSU Foundation, and from grants funded by state, federal or non-profit agencies or private industry.

The university’s budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year was $986.3 million.

The interdisciplinary robotics degree programs, which will begin in 2014-15, will be located within the School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering in OSU’s College of Engineering. During its first five years, the program is expected to graduate as many as 10 Ph.D. students and 30 master degree students and provide students expertise in the fields of robot design, control, manufacturing and operation that are rapidly growing worldwide. As many as 70 OSU students already are engaged in robotics studies.

The new bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degree programs in religious studies will be housed within OSU’s School of History, Philosophy and Religion in the College of Liberal Arts. The program will be initiated in fall 2015 and after five years would serve as many as 60 students. The decision restores religious study degree programs that were eliminated in the early 1990’s following budget cuts at Oregon State prompted by the adoption of state constitutional limits on property taxes.

The board also adopted a contract for the employment of OSU President Edward J. Ray through June 30, 2016, including terms of his compensation and his duties, responsibilities and annual performance evaluation.

The board also approved resolutions related to:

  • How the university manages safeguards of U.S. Department of Defense classified information related to research contracts that may be awarded Oregon State;
  • Reporting known or suspected fraud, waste and abuse within the university;
  • Establishing a university code of ethics;
  • Amending the charter of the OSU Board of Trustees’ executive and audit committee related to how external and internal university financial audits will be reviewed and approved by the board.

The board heard presentations from university finance and administration administrators related to public capital financing tools available for use by Oregon State; the university’s current and forecasted bonded indebtedness; and capital and facility improvement plans and procedures used by the university.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

 Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Ron Adams named interim research VP at OSU

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has named Ron Adams as interim vice president for Research, effective July 1.

Adams, former dean of the College of Engineering at OSU, has spent the past three years as executive associate vice president for research at Oregon State – a new position designed to boost the university’s partnerships with industry and spin out more companies based on Oregon State’s research discoveries.

He succeeds Rick Spinrad, who accepted a position as chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Washington, D.C.

“This is an important leadership position for Oregon State at a time of exceptional research growth for the university,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “I look forward to working with Ron as we advance OSU’s research activities and begin a national search for a new vice president.”

Adams leads the OSU Advantage program, which helps commercialize innovations, launch new companies, connect existing business with faculty expertise and student talent, and provide Oregon with the work-ready graduates needed for economic progress.

“This Advantage effort remains important to OSU's mission and strategy and we will expand its impact in the coming year,” Adams said. “In a broader sense, the collaborative culture of OSU will continue to create opportunities to increase the university's impact through discoveries from major research programs like the National Science Foundation Center for Sustainable Materials Chemistry.”

“We will increase our efforts to help foster these opportunities by working with faculty across disciplines in order to address major challenges such as of health and wellness, food/water safety and security, impacts of climate change on forests and other natural resources, and the availability of clean energy.”

Prior to his appointment as executive associate vice president, Adams was the engineering dean for 13 years, leading the college through a period of remarkable growth. The College of Engineering doubled the size of its Ph.D. program, tripled its research funding and helped spin off more than a dozen companies.

Before returning to OSU as dean after a previous stint on the faculty, Adams worked at Tektronix for more than 14 years, including serving as vice president of technology and as a senior Tektronix fellow.

Adams earned his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from OSU and his M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served in the U.S. Air Force and worked at MIT Lincoln Labs before joining the OSU faculty as an assistant, and then associate professor of mechanical engineering. He took a leave from OSU to lead a team at Tektronix working on developing color printing technologies.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Ed Ray, 541-737-4133; ed.ray@oregonstate.edu

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Ron Adams