OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

campus life

Architect Maya Lin to speak at OSU

American architect and sculptor Maya Lin, perhaps best known for designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., as a Yale University student in 1981, will deliver the next Provost’s Lecture at Oregon State University on Tuesday, April 18.

Lin’s works have made an impact around the world, from a tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr., in Montgomery, Alabama, to a piece along the Columbia River honoring the Lewis & Clark expedition and the Shantou University Bell Tower in China.

Lin will speak at 7:30 p.m. in The LaSells Stewart Center’s Austin Auditorium. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and a book signing will follow the program. The event is free, but tickets are required for admission and are just now being made available to the public. They can be downloaded at communications.oregonstate.edu/events/maya-lin.

The daughter of Chinese immigrants, Lin has also designed a number of buildings, including the Museum of Chinese in America in New York City. In 2009, she received the National Medal of Arts and a documentary about her life and work won the 1994 Oscar for best documentary. In 2016 she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Lin describes her work as a dialogue between the landscape and the built environment, and her more recent work has focused on the crucial role of nature in the modern world. Her latest memorial, entitled "What is Missing?" is still in progress. It is described as a cross-platform, global memorial to the planet, located in select scientific institutions, online as a website, and available as a book, calling attention to the crisis surrounding biodiversity and habitat loss.

As artist and architect for the Confluence Project, Lin has also designed public art pieces to commemorate the original location of Celilo Falls and other points of significance along the Columbia River system.

For more information or accommodation for disabilities contact University Events at 541-737-4717 or events@oregonstate.edu

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the OSU Foundation, the Provost’s Lecture Series brings renowned speakers to the Oregon State University community to engage in thought-provoking discussions on topics of cultural and global significance. Lin’s visit is also supported by the College of Liberal Arts.

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Mealoha McFadden, mealoha.mcfadden@oregonstate.edu; 541-737-6522

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Maya Lin

Vietnam Memorial Wall

Vietnam Memorial

OSU names Lisa L. Templeton associate provost for Division of Extended Campus

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Lisa L. Templeton, who has helped propel the Extended Campus program at Oregon State University into a national online learning leader, has been named associate provost for the Division of Extended Campus at OSU.

She succeeds Dave King, who retired from that position last July and since has been serving as a special assistant to the provost for innovation.

Templeton has spent the last eight months as interim associate provost of Extended Campus, which is among the top 10 online education programs in the country, according to many different rankings. She had been executive director of Ecampus at OSU since 2008. She is actively national in the field of online and continuing education and serves on the board of directors for the University Professional and Continuing Education Association.

In 2016, a record 692 students earned an Oregon State diploma after completing degree requirements online with OSU Ecampus – a 17 percent increase over the previous year. For the third straight year, Ecampus was ranked in the top 10 nationally by U.S. News & World Report. OSU was eighth out of more than 300 higher education institutions in the category of Best Online Bachelor’s Programs, and first among all land grant universities.

Last year, more than 19,000 OSU students – roughly 60 percent of the student body – took at least one online course. Ecampus serves students in all 50 states and more than 40 countries. It now delivers 50 degree programs and more than a thousand classes online.

Templeton has a bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture from The Ohio State University and an Ed.M. in adult education from Oregon State.

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Ron Adams, 541-737-2111, ron.adams@oregonstate.edu

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Lisa Templeton
Lisa L. Templeton

OSU’s College of Liberal Arts to offer four-year graduation guarantee to incoming students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University’s College of Liberal Arts will guarantee that students can earn a bachelor’s degree in four years beginning with the freshman class entering college in fall 2017.

The College of Liberal Arts is the first college at OSU to offer a four-year degree completion guarantee. Under the program, if a student meets their obligations but still cannot get through all of their needed courses in four years, the college will pick up the cost of OSU tuition for the remaining required classes. 

The goal is to encourage more students to complete their undergraduate degrees and to do so in a timely fashion, which also helps reduce overall college costs for students.

“The guarantee we are offering CLA students exemplifies our dedication to their success,” said Larry Rodgers, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. “We are offering students who sign up for the degree all the support they need to graduate in four years. We are happy to be the model for the rest of the university and our hope is that eventually a program like this will be available at other colleges at OSU.”

The College of Liberal Arts is the second largest college at OSU, with 17 undergraduate degree options, 3,917 undergraduates enrolled in fall 2016 and 972 undergraduate degrees awarded in 2016. However, of those students who entered college in 2011, only about 43 percent graduated in four years.

College leaders hope the new degree guarantee will boost that rate significantly. The changes also should lead to higher six-year graduation rates and help the university reach the goals of the Student Success Initiative, which includes a goal of 70 percent of students graduating within six years by the year 2020. 

To participate in the four-year graduation guarantee program, new students must:

  • Declare a major in the College of Liberal Arts by the end of the first quarter of freshman year
  • Meet with a designated adviser at least twice a year and follow their progress recommendations
  • Each year, earn at least 45 credits that fulfill degree and college requirements
  • Stay on track with financial obligations such as tuition

Embedded in the degree guarantee program is a shift in philosophy toward first-year students. 

In the past, academic advisors were encouraging first-year students to start with 12 to 14 credits in their first term of college. But now advisors will encourage students to take 15 credits per term starting with the first term, said Louie Bottaro, director of student services for the College of Liberal Arts.

“We have research that tells us that students who take 15 hours from day one are more likely to succeed than those who take fewer classes and plan to ramp up to 15 later,” Bottaro said. 

Advisors will meet more often with students – currently they meet at least six times with students but that will jump to eight to 10 times or more during the student’s college career. The goal of those meetings will be to ensure that students have the information they need to stay on track, are getting the appropriate classes and receive regular updates about their progress toward their degree, Bottaro said.

Regular monitoring also will help better predict which courses students might need access to in order to graduate on time, so that enough seats are available or sections can be added to address student needs, Bottaro said. 

Students who fail a class, accidentally take the wrong course or decide to change majors may need to take additional steps, such as taking a summer class. For some majors, such as music and graphic design, students must begin their major course work in their first term on campus in order to complete a degree on time.

If students do fall off course, they may not be eligible for the four-year degree guarantee, but advisors will continue to work with them to help them achieve their goals as expediently as possible, Bottaro said. 

“Ultimately, our goal is to help students reach their academic goals and complete their degrees,” he said. “This new degree guarantee is one way to assist with that process, but we are committed to meeting students wherever they are in their academic plan.”

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Louie Bottaro, 541-737-0561, Louie.bottaro@oregonstate.edu

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Edward Feser named provost and executive vice president at Oregon State

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray has named Edward Feser the provost and executive vice president for the university.

Feser, who currently serves as interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and provost at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will begin at Oregon State on Feb. 28.

He succeeds Ron Adams, who has served as OSU’s interim provost and executive vice president since July 1.

“Ed Feser will be a great addition to Oregon State University,” said Ray. “His academic and leadership success at the University of Illinois, the University of North Carolina and the University of Manchester in England will serve him very well.

“Ed fully understands Oregon State’s land grant mission as Oregon’s statewide university and OSU’s role as an internationally recognized public research university,” Ray said. “As the provost of the University of Illinois, a nationally top-ranked land grant university, he has successfully helped provide transformative learning experiences for students in and out of the classroom, and steward a global research portfolio.”

As provost and executive vice president, Feser will provide leadership to continue implementation of the university’s strategic plan and student success initiative; support growth of OSU’s grant/contract-funded research and impact; foster faculty and graduate student success; and support OSU’s diversity, enrollment management, and outreach and engagement strategies.

Feser said he is excited to join Oregon State and inspired by the university’s successes and many future opportunities.

“Oregon State has gone through a remarkable transformation over the last decade or more,” Feser said. “This has been achieved as part of a deliberate and strategic process to guide Oregon State to become one of the leading land grant universities in the U.S.”

Feser said he was drawn to Oregon State for several reasons, including its West Coast location and natural orientation toward the Pacific Rim.

“I am very impressed by Oregon State’s quickly increasing research profile; the new OSU-Cascades campus in Bend; its focused instructional priorities; its outreach and engagement impact throughout Oregon; its current global reach and focus to expand internationally; and the institution’s next phase of visioning and strategic planning.

“As part of this strategic planning process and as Oregon State’s provost, I am committed to provide every student with the tools and community support needed to succeed.”

Feser was named Illinois’ interim provost in September of 2015. Beginning in 2012, he served as dean of the University of Illinois College of Fine and Applied Arts. As dean, he oversaw academic and engagement programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, design and the visual and performing arts.

Prior to becoming dean at Illinois, Feser held the Davies Chair of Entrepreneurship and served as head of the Division of Innovation, Management and Policy at the Manchester Business School, University of Manchester in England. He also was an associate professor and associate department head at the University of North Carolina, and in 2003, served as assistant secretary for the North Carolina state Department of Commerce. Since 2009, Feser has served as a senior research fellow with the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness in Arlington, Virginia.

Feser earned both a master’s degree in regional planning and a doctorate in regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a bachelor’s degree in government from the University of San Francisco.

Feser’s wife of 26 years, Kathy, is a civil engineer-turned-primary school science teacher. Their son, Jack, 22, is pursuing a doctorate in computer science at MIT. Their daughter, Mary, 19, is a freshman at Colorado College, studying economics and languages.

Feser grew up in Montana, Washington and northern California as his father was a U.S. National Park ranger at Glacier, Olympic and Lassen parks.

“For me, joining Oregon State is something of a coming home,” Feser said.

“I’ve always considered the Pacific Northwest – broadly – to be home. As a National Park ‘brat,’ the environmental and land ethic is in my blood. So Oregon State’s strengths in forestry, the environment and marine sciences, and its land, sea, space and sun grant designations are very appealing. I look forward to working with President Ray, the deans and other senior administrators, and the faculty, staff and students to advance the goals of this great university.”

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Edward Feser
Edward Feser

OSU honored for policies embracing free speech

Oregon State University has received a “green light” rating from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, indicating that university policies do not restrict speech.

OSU is one of only 27 green light universities in the nation, and the only one in Oregon.

Among other efforts, the university has recently drafted a Freedom of Expression document dedicated to the university’s position on free speech, available online at http://bit.ly/2hLH6xr

Nationally, the situation is improving. Foundation spokespeople say there has been a nearly 10 percent drop in the number of universities maintaining written policies that severely restrict students’ free speech rights. This is the ninth year in a row that the percentage has dropped.

Spotlight on Speech Codes 2017: The State of Free Speech on Our Nation’s Campuses reports on written policies at 449 of America’s largest and most prestigious colleges and universities, all of which are accessible online in a searchable Spotlight speech code database. It rates schools as “red light,” “yellow light,” or “green light” institutions based on how much, if any, protected speech their policies restrict.

Major findings from that report include:

  • 39.6 percent of surveyed institutions maintain severely restrictive, red light speech codes, a nearly 10 percent drop from last year’s 49.3 percent.
  • Of the 449 schools surveyed, 27 received the highest, green light rating for free speech. This number is up from 22 schools as of last year’s report.
  • 20 schools or faculty bodies adopted statements in support of free speech modeled after the one adopted by the University of Chicago in January, 2015.

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to defending liberty, freedom of speech, due process, academic freedom, legal equality, and freedom of conscience on America’s college campuses.

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Susie Brubaker-Cole, 541-737-3626


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OSU overall enrollment up 2.9 percent, Corvallis campus increases less than 1 percent

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Fall term 2016 enrollment at Oregon State University grew 2.9 percent from last year, as stable enrollment continued at OSU’s Corvallis campus and double-digit growth continued at the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend and within OSU’s nationally ranked Ecampus online degree program.

Oregon State’s overall fall enrollment is 31,303 – up 852 students from 2015 – making OSU the largest university in the state of Oregon for the third consecutive year.

Oregon State’s fall enrollment includes:

  • 24,672 students at the university’s main campus in Corvallis, an increase from fall 2015 of 205 students or 0.8 percent;
  • 5,682 students in Ecampus, an increase of 573 students or 11.2 percent over last year; and
  • 1,122 students at OSU-Cascades, an increase of 106 students or 10.4 percent more than a year ago.

“As Oregon’s statewide university, we are committed to serve all qualified Oregonians,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “This year, 74.2 percent of our degree-seeking undergraduates on our Corvallis campus are Oregon residents.

“We serve as the ‘people’s university’ of the state of Oregon by offering diverse, high-quality academic programs at our campuses in Corvallis, Bend and Newport, and through top-ranked online degree programs. We are seeing students literally choose where, how and when it is best for them to learn. Each year, more students choose Oregon State as their destination of choice.”

Oregon State continues to attract high-achieving students. Among first-time college students from Oregon high schools, 47 percent of OSU’s freshmen class are considered high-achievers – having graduated from high school with a cumulative grade point of 3.75 or higher.

As well, of OSU’s new students:

  • 21 had perfect SAT mathematics scores and 11 had perfect SAT verbal scores, compared with 17 and 8 students, respectively, in 2015.
  • Five are National Merit award winners, compared with four a year ago.
  • 225 – or 3.8 percent of Oregon State’s new undergraduates – were ranked number 1 in their high school graduating class, compared with 156 students in 2015.
  • 78 are Presidential Scholars – 20 more than a year ago.
  • 358 entered the university’s Honors College, compared with 265 in 2015;

“Oregon State is achieving excellence through inclusivity,” Ray said. “Twenty-five percent of this year’s entering Honors College students come from diverse backgrounds. I also am pleased with the continued growth of U.S. minority and first-generation students in Oregon State’s overall enrollment. And that 3.2 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment – 956 students – are veterans of U.S. military service.

This fall, OSU has enrolled 7,204 students representing U.S. minorities – an increase of 450 students or 6.7 percent over a year ago. In total, 23.7 percent of the students attending Oregon State in Corvallis or within Ecampus identify themselves as a U.S. minority, compared with 2,806 students and 14.5 percent a decade ago in fall of 2006.

Twenty-three percent – or 5,858 OSU undergraduates in Corvallis or within Ecampus – are first-generation students, an increase of nearly 1 percent over a year ago. At OSU-Cascades, first-generation students make up 35.4 percent of the enrollment.

“As a first-generation college student myself, these students are near-and-dear to my heart,” Ray said. “Increasing the enrollment of people of diversity, students from low-income families, and first-generation students by providing access to an excellent higher education and a college degree is essential for all Oregonians.”

OSU also continues to expand its global reach as an internationally recognized public research university. This fall, international student enrollment increased by 201 students to a total of 3,529 students or 11.6 percent of Oregon State’s overall enrollment. International students from 110 countries attend Oregon State this fall. A decade ago, OSU enrolled 897 international students – or 4.6 percent of its overall enrollment.

“We live and work in a global society,” Ray said. “It is essential that universities such as Oregon State bring people worldwide together to learn, pursue research and engage as a community.”

Oregon State’s commitment to graduate studies and graduate student engagement in research is evident in this year’s enrollment. Overall, the number of graduate students, including professional students in OSU’s colleges of pharmacy and veterinary medicine, increased by 1.3 percent this fall to total 5,027 students, compared with 4,964 students in 2015. 

Steve Clark, OSU’s vice president for University Relations and Marketing, said Oregon State intentionally manages its enrollment to achieve the university’s land grant mission; support the state of Oregon’s educational attainment goals; operate in a financially sustainable manner; and be a good neighbor in Corvallis, Bend and Newport.

“We manage enrollment very mindfully,” Clark said. “For example, we have promised to slow the growth of our Corvallis campus and not grow above 28,000 students by 2025 by limiting enrollment growth to 1-2 percent each year. We are doing so intentionally and with good results. The past three years, our enrollment growth has been well below 1 percent and with such a trend, OSU’s Corvallis campus may not reach 28,000 students until sometime in the early 2030s.”

“In Bend, we have committed to limit our new OSU-Cascades campus to between 3,000 to 5,000 students by 2025, and in Newport, to between 400 to 500 students. At the same time, we will provide higher education where students live and work by enrolling more distance online students through Ecampus,” Clark said.

At OSU-Cascades, 92.2 percent of the enrollment is composed of Oregonians, including 205 students who are U.S. minorities – a 17 percent increase from 2015 – and 323 are first-generation students – a 7.7 percent increase from a year ago. Overall, OSU-Cascades’ enrollment includes 912 undergraduate and 210 graduate students. Freshmen enrollment at the new campus, which opened in September, increased 17.7 percent from 2015.

More students are studying engineering than any other discipline. The College of Engineering has a total of 8,724 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled this fall. The next largest programs are the College of Liberal Arts, 4,178 students; the College of Business, 3,726; the College of Science, 3,503; the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, 3,009; and the College of Agricultural Sciences, 2,580.

Enrollment in other colleges and programs includes: College of Forestry, 1,093, University Exploratory Studies, 1,081; Graduate School, 830; College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, 739; College of Pharmacy, 370; College of Education, 300; and College of Veterinary Medicine, 221.

Oregon State’s Honors College enrolls 4.2 percent of all undergraduates with a total of 1,057 students – a 3.6 percent increase over 2015.

The most popular undergraduate majors at OSU are computer science, followed by business administration, mechanical engineering, kinesiology and biology.

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-4875

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Robotics program expanding
Robotics program expanding

OSU Dads and Moms weekends become Family Weekends

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Program Council has changed the name of Dads and Moms Weekend to Fall and Spring Family Weekend, respectively.

With the change in name for the weekend, the Program Council hopes to expand the reach and scope of the weekends to be more inclusive family and friend events.

“The new name really gives us the opportunity to reexamine what the weekend means for the Oregon State community, and to welcome far more than students’ parents to experience Beaver Nation,” said Curtis Orona, the Program Council’s director. “We really want to emphasize that this weekend is for everyone in the family, including younger siblings, grandparents, friends, and is even welcome to members of the community.”

The original Moms’ weekend took place in spring 1924, and was aimed at highlighting women’s opportunities on campus. The first Dads Weekend was simply called “Dad’s Day” and took place on April 14, 1934, in conjunction with homecoming. Since then the events have greatly expanded their scope and mission, and now, have shifted to a broader family focus.

This year’s Fall and Spring Family Weekends will happen Nov.18-20, and May 5-7. A welcome reception is planned for Friday of both days, beginning at 5 p.m. For more on the November event: http://sli.oregonstate.edu/osupc/family

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Curtis Orona, Curtis.orona@oregonstate.edu  

Beaver Store supporting open textbook initiative to aid affordability

CORVALLIS, Ore. - As part of ongoing efforts to increase textbook affordability for Oregon State University students, the OSU Beaver Store is supporting OSU’s open textbook initiative by distributing free open source textbooks on its digital e-commerce platform.

The university's open textbook initiative is a collaboration between OSU Libraries, OSU Press and Open Oregon State. It provides financial, technical and editorial support for faculty members to create texts that will be freely accessible online to any student in the world.

The OSU Beaver Store’s website displays the textbooks used in each course at OSU, along with price comparisons to the online marketplace. When the required course content happens to be open source, the store now distributes or links to those free digital materials.

“We’ve created a one-stop portal for OSU students to connect to all of their course materials, be they paid or free,” said Steve Eckrich, OSU Beaver Store president and chief executive officer. “We’re providing students with every possible format to choose from, including digital, rental, and now free open source content.”

The OSU Beaver Store has been providing price-transparency to students for many years using its online price comparison tool. Its website displays the store’s prices for new, used, digital, and rental course materials, alongside the prices of online retailers and others.

“Because the OSU Beaver Store provides the largest student discount of any college store in the country, we are very price-competitive with the online marketplace,” said James Howard, OSU Beaver Store academic materials manager. “We also provide certainty that the student is getting the correct book and edition, with the option to get it more quickly in-store and have in-store returns that don’t require shipping.”

The OSU Beaver Store works closely with faculty to procure the materials they want to use for their courses. It sources a wide variety of formats and pricing options, to ensure that students have everything needed to be informed consumers.

“Adding free open source content to our digital platform is a natural extension of our commitment to textbook affordability as a student-based organization,” said Eckrich.

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Melanie Williams, 541-737-0050

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James Howard, 541-737-0036

james@osubookstore.com

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OSU names Susan Capalbo as senior vice provost for Academic Affairs

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Susan Capalbo, who heads the Department of Applied Economics at Oregon State University, has been named senior vice provost for Academic Affairs at OSU. She will begin her new duties on Oct. 1.

Capalbo replaces Brenda McComb, who will retire from this position on July 31, and who has served in a variety of leadership positions at the university.

As senior vice provost, Capalbo will support the university’s provost and executive vice president in matters related to faculty development, curricular operations, assessment and accreditation, strategic plan implementation, academic capacity planning, academic initiatives and special projects.

She also will serve on the OSU President’s Cabinet and Provost’s Council.

Among the primary responsibilities for the senior vice provost are leadership and coordination of faculty matters, including shaping faculty hiring, support and development of OSU faculty; oversight of curriculum matters, including curriculum development and review; acting as a liaison with the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and the Higher Education Coordinating Commission; and oversight of institutional planning and research.

“Susan Capalbo has been active in leading the development of the university’s updated strategic plan and other university-level initiatives,” said Ron Adams, interim provost and executive vice president. “Susan has an excellent track record as an educator, researcher and mentor. Her work as head of a large and complex department, and leading the strategic plan steering committee, will jump-start her into the role of senior vice provost.”

Capalbo, who has been at Oregon State since 2008, previously was on the faculty of Montana State University and the University of Maryland. Her research focuses on applied economics and policy related to sustainable agriculture and resource management.

She has a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of California-Davis, and a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in economics from the University of Rhode Island.

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Ron Adams, 541-737-2111, ronald.lynn.adams@oregonstate.edu

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Personalized learning systems to boost education of college students

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University is beginning a new three-year, $515,000 initiative that will use interactive computer software to help improve the learning and knowledge retention of college students, especially to overcome the hurdles of highly complex mathematics and science.

The project is part of a major national program announced today by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. It will offer some alternatives to the traditional classroom concept of lecture, textbook, and “everyone moves along at the same speed” – an approach that in some courses is largely failing across the United States.

New technologies, interactive learning systems and short quizzes can help ensure a student understands the material being studied, as they move ahead. If they are confused or still struggling to learn the subject, the software system will help identify the problem, allow them to back up, go through things again, and provide additional support and knowledge until they do understand.

If a student just needs more basic information, they can get it. If they need a contextual explanation, that will be available as well.

“We’re facing a societal problem in a range of educational approaches, especially where class sizes are large and there’s less individual assistance,” said Julie Greenwood, associate dean for undergraduate studies at OSU and project manager of this new grant.

“For instance, almost all students have to take college algebra, and in some cases the failure rate can approach 50 percent. We believe that modern computer software can help address this problem, especially in math and the sciences, but also in liberal arts, social sciences and almost any field of study. We’re really optimistic this is going to be a success.”

Other collaborators in this program include Arizona State University, Colorado State University, Georgia State University, Northern Arizona University, Portland State University and the University of Mississippi.

OSU educators, Greenwood said, will help students work with existing software systems, find out which seems to work best or fit with the university’s culture and approach to learning, and which approaches are most appropriate for different disciplines.

University officials say this project, called “All Hands on Deck,” is an embrace of a new trend toward “adaptive,” or personalized learning approaches. They believe it can improve both the rate of first-year student retention and the university’s six-year graduation rate. It will initially be used in eight high-enrollment, general education courses, in such fields as mathematics, biology and psychology.

“This national grant will kick-start our efforts to move more aggressively toward personalized learning,” said David King, special assistant to the provost for learning innovation at OSU. “The initiative will also provide our faculty with insight and information on a learner-by-learner basis, and give them the opportunity to develop more individual and unique student-teacher relationships.”

OSU has been a national leader in new educational approaches and innovations, especially through its widely-recognized program of extended online education, or E-campus, and more recently through construction of a $65 million Learning Innovation Center to conduct research on new approaches to collaborative learning and education.

The most promising findings and practices emerging from this initiative will be shared among 200 public university members across the country, officials said, to better meet the general educational needs of today’s undergraduate college students.

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Julie Greenwood, 541-737-1190

Julie.greenwood@oregonstate.edu

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Learning Innovation Center