OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

business and the economy

Oregon State University celebrates record year for fundraising

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Foundation closed the books June 30 on its best fundraising year in history, with gifts totaling $130.8 million to advance university priorities.

The fiscal-year total eclipsed the previous record set in 2007-08 by $4 million, when the university publicly launched its first comprehensive campaign. The Campaign for OSU concluded on Dec. 31, 2014, with gifts totaling $1.14 billion from more than 106,000 donors.

“While this level of philanthropic support for Oregon State is historic, the lasting impact it represents is truly amazing,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “OSU has become an internationally recognized public research university, and the incredible momentum driving our work today has been powered by unprecedented support from Beaver Nation.

“Thanks to our supporters, the best is yet to come for this university and all those we serve.”

Donors are supporting high-achieving and diverse OSU students at record levels, creating more than 600 new scholarship funds over the last 10 years – an increase of 45 percent. Donor-funded scholarships coupled with other awards like Pell Grants allow OSU to provide more scholarships and grants to undergraduates than any other institution in the state, university officials say. More than 13,500 undergraduates at Oregon State receive support from these sources annually.

Donors are also boosting the university’s research enterprise through investments in facilities, programs and faculty. Since 2004 Oregon State’s number of endowed faculty funds has grown from 47 to 128. These prestigious positions support global leaders in teaching and research, with earnings from the endowments also creating opportunities for students they mentor.

“Our donors see the university’s potential for leadership on issues critical for Oregon’s future as well as key challenges facing our world,” said OSU Foundation CEO and President J. Michael Goodwin. “Their investments in Oregon State build the critical mass and excellence that make real progress possible.”

Building on this momentum, the OSU Foundation has launched the first in a planned series of strategic fundraising initiatives designed to support the university’s areas of distinction and its goals for student success. These include plans to advance the university’s marine studies program; accelerate forestry education and research on advanced wood products; and renovate the Valley Football Center.

Source: 

Molly Brown, 541-737-3602

OSU researchers discover the unicorn – seaweed that tastes like bacon!

NEWPORT, Ore. – Oregon State University researchers have patented a new strain of a succulent red marine algae called dulse that grows extraordinarily quickly, is packed full of protein and has an unusual trait when it is cooked.

This seaweed tastes like bacon.

Dulse (Palmaria sp.) grows in the wild along the Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. It is harvested and usually sold for up to $90 a pound in dried form as a cooking ingredient or nutritional supplement. But researcher Chris Langdon and colleagues at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center have created and patented a new strain of dulse – one he has been growing for the past 15 years.

This strain, which looks like translucent red lettuce, is an excellent source of minerals, vitamins and antioxidants – and it contains up to 16 percent protein in dry weight, Langdon said.

“The original goal was to create a super-food for abalone, because high-quality abalone is treasured, especially in Asia,” Langdon pointed out. “We were able to grow dulse-fed abalone at rates that exceeded those previously reported in the literature. There always has been an interest in growing dulse for human consumption, but we originally focused on using dulse as a food for abalone.”

The technology of growing abalone and dulse has been successfully implemented on a commercial scale by the Big Island Abalone Corporation in Hawaii.

Langdon’s change in perspective about dulse was triggered by a visit by Chuck Toombs, a faculty member in OSU’s College of Business, who stopped by Langdon’s office because he was looking for potential projects for his business students. He saw the dulse growing in bubbling containers outside of Langdon’s office and the proverbial light went on.

“Dulse is a super-food, with twice the nutritional value of kale,” Toombs said. “And OSU had developed this variety that can be farmed, with the potential for a new industry for Oregon.”

Toombs began working with OSU’s Food Innovation Center in Portland, where a product development team created a smorgasbord of new foods with dulse as the main ingredient. Among the most promising were a dulse-based rice cracker and salad dressing.

The research team received a grant from the Oregon Department of Agriculture to explore dulse as a “specialty crop” – the first time a seaweed had made the list, according to Food Innovation Center director Michael Morrissey.

That allowed the team to bring Jason Ball onto the project. The research chef previously had worked with the University of Copenhagen’s Nordic Food Lab, helping chefs there better use local ingredients.

“The Food Innovation Center team was working on creating products from dulse, whereas Jason brings a ‘culinary research’ chef’s perspective,” said Gil Sylvia, director of the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. “The point that he and other chefs make is that fresh, high-quality seaweed is hard to get. ‘You bring us the seaweed,’ they say, ‘and we’ll do the creative stuff.’”

Several Portland-area chefs are now testing dulse as a fresh product and many believe it has significant potential in both its raw form and as a food ingredient.

Sylvia, who is a seafood economist, said that although dulse has great potential, no one has yet done a full analysis on whether a commercial operation would be economically feasible. “That fact that it grows rapidly, has high nutritional value, and can be used dried or fresh certainly makes it a strong candidate,” he said.

There are no commercial operations that grow dulse for human consumption in the United States, according to Langdon, who said it has been used as a food in northern Europe for centuries. The dulse sold in U.S. health food and nutrition stores is harvested, and is a different strain from the OSU-patented variety.

“In Europe, they add the powder to smoothies, or add flakes onto food,” Langdon said. “There hasn’t been a lot of interest in using it in a fresh form. But this stuff is pretty amazing. When you fry it, which I have done, it tastes like bacon, not seaweed. And it’s a pretty strong bacon flavor.”

The vegan market alone could comprise a niche.

Langdon, a professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at OSU and long-time leader of the Molluscan Broodstock Program, has two large tanks in which he can grow about 20-30 pounds of dulse a week. He has plans to up the production to 100 pounds a week. For now, they are using the dulse for research at the Food Innovation Center on dulse recipes and products.

However, Toombs’ MBA students are preparing a marketing plan for a new line of specialty foods and exploring the potential for a new aquaculture industry.

“The dulse grows using a water recirculation system,” Langdon said. “Theoretically, you could create an industry in eastern Oregon almost as easily as you could along the coast with a bit of supplementation. You just need a modest amount of seawater and some sunshine.”

The background of how Langdon and his colleagues developed dulse is outlined in the latest version of Oregon’s Agricultural Progress at : http://bit.ly/1fo9Doy

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Chris Langdon, 541-867-0231, chris.langdon@oregonstate.edu;  Chuck Toombs, 541-737-4087, Charles.Toombs@oregonstate.edu;

Michael Morrisey, 503-872-6656, Michael.Morrissey@oregonstate.edu;  Gil Sylvia, 541-867-0284, gil.sylvia@oregonstate.edu

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Dulse in its seaweed form

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Dulse prepared in a dish

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Chris Langdon near a vat of growing dulse

OSU names ASU vice president as dean of the College of Business

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Mitzi Montoya, vice president and university dean of Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Arizona State University, has been named the Sara Hart Kimball Dean of the College of Business at Oregon State University.

Montoya begins her new duties on Aug. 31. She succeeds Ilene Kleinsorge, who announced her retirement earlier this year after 12 years as dean.

As dean at OSU, Montoya will oversee a growing College of Business that has 3,900 students seeking business majors, 850 students with business and entrepreneurship minors, and more than 800 design students. The college just moved into its new headquarters - the 100,000-square-foot, $55 million Austin Hall, which opened last year.

In her position at Arizona State, Montoya has been responsible for advancing entrepreneurship and innovative collaborative initiatives across the ASU campuses. She also has been dean of the College of Technology & Innovation there, and vice provost of the ASU Polytechnic campus.

“We are very excited about Mitzi joining OSU – her candidacy generated a tremendous amount of enthusiasm and excitement across the campus community, and I am thrilled that she will join our leadership team,” said Sabah Randhawa, Oregon State’s provost and executive vice president.

“She has a background that dovetails nicely with the strengths of OSU’s College of Business – including entrepreneurship and innovation – and she also has the vision and experience to help the college grow in other areas,” Randhawa added. “The college is seeking to expand its graduate programs and work more collaboratively with other units on campus, and with private, public and non-profit organizations.”

“She also has done a lot of work in the aerospace industry and with clean energy – two initiatives that Oregon State University has become deeply involved with in recent years.”

Montoya established the Aerospace & Defense Research Collaboratory in Arizona, a statewide platform for collaboration across the aerospace and defense supply chain and research institutions.  She also has been leading ASU’s global training program for clean energy, sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Montoya is a professor in the Management Department of ASU’s W.P. Carey School of Business. Before coming to ASU, she worked for 15 years at North Carolina State University, where she held the Zeinak Chair in Marketing and Innovation in the Poole College of Management. She also founded and led the Innovation Lab, a collaborative effort between different NC State colleges and private industry.

An international scholar, Montoya has taught courses on innovation and marketing strategy – at the undergraduate, graduate, and executive levels – in Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, England, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Panama, Russia, Switzerland and the United States.

Her research has focused on innovation processes and strategies, and the role of technology in team decision-making. She has received research funding from numerous institutions, including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Education, USAID, the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation and others.

Montoya has a bachelor’s of science degree in applied engineering science, and a Ph.D. in marketing and statistics – both from Michigan State University.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

 Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111, Sabah.randhawa@oregonstate.edu

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Mitzi Montoya, dean of the OSU College of Business

OSU to join National Science Foundation “Innovation Corps”

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University has received a three year, $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to become one of just 36 academic institutions in the United States designated as an “Innovation Corps Site,” to help bring ideas and discoveries to the commercial marketplace.

This recognition will enhance OSU’s collaboration with the National Science Foundation, and allow it to join other prestigious universities that have received the same designation, such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Illinois, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Southern California. 

The program is designed to accelerate commercialization of new technologies, products and processes that emerge from American universities, according to NSF representatives. It will nurture students and faculty involved in projects with commercial potential; develop a larger system of mentors, researchers, and entrepreneurs; and encourage collaboration between academia and industry.

At OSU, involvement with this program will be another boost to activities in its Advantage Accelerator, an existing initiative to help identify research discoveries with commercial potential and assist startup companies in bringing those discoveries to commercial success.

“This support from the NSF will be particularly helpful in preparing early stage concepts, to keep our pipeline full of new companies,” said John Turner, co-director of the OSU Advantage Accelerator. “One example is a pre-accelerator program we plan to begin next month, which will be a set of workshops open to both student, faculty and community innovators.”

This series of four workshops will allow participants to explore the formation of a startup company, generate a flow of new business concepts and help prepare applicants for the full Advantage Accelerator program, officials said.

OSU officials said this support also helps position the university to apply for larger grants and support from the NSF in the future.

As part of this program, OSU will be expected to create teams that engage competitively with other NSF “I-corps” teams for small business grants and other competitions, and contribute to a “National Innovation Network.”

Media Contact: 
Source: 

John Turner, 541-737-9219

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Building new companies

New analysis puts OSU’s economic impact at more than $2.37 billion

CORVALLIS, Ore. – An analysis of Oregon State University’s economic impact released today estimates that Oregon’s largest university contributed $2.371 billion to the global economy last year – an economic footprint that has grown by $311 million, or 15 percent, since 2011.

The greatest impact is in Oregon, where OSU was responsible for adding an estimated $2.232 billion to the state’s economy in 2014 – a figure that accounts for 31,660 jobs.

The analysis was conducted by the economic consulting firm ECONorthwest, based on OSU expenditure data, visitor data, student enrollment and a 2013 Oregon Travel Impacts study.

The ECONorthwest analysis looked for the first time at OSU’s contribution in Portland, where OSU contributed $401.9 million to the economy in 2014, along with 2,350 jobs.

The economic impact of OSU in Benton and Linn counties was $1.334 billion, along with 25,110 jobs.

Oregon State’s impacts come in three ways, direct impacts ($973 million), indirect impacts ($424.2 million) and induced impacts ($834.8 million). Direct impacts include spending on operations, goods and services, and capital construction; indirect impacts result from companies purchasing additional supplies or hiring additional employees to support spending by OSU; and induced impacts result from the purchasing power of the university’s employees.

The total does not include other significant OSU influences to the state, regional and national economies, including the contributions by university graduates or the benefits of OSU research, such as improved varieties of wheat and other crops used by Oregon farmers; spinoff companies that have major economic impacts; and scholarship that has improved public health and environmental stewardship.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

College of Business Dean Ilene Kleinsorge announces retirement

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Ilene Kleinsorge, dean and Sara Hart Kimball chair of the College of Business and executive dean of the Division of Business and Engineering at Oregon State University announced today that she will retire from OSU effective June 30.

“The significant impact of Dean Kleinsorge’s contributions to the College of Business, the university and the local and regional business communities will continue long after she retires,” said Provost Sabah Randhawa. “Her commitment to alumni, students, faculty and staff is reflected in the enduring relationships she has cultivated, the college’s collaborative community, the business partnerships she has created and students who are graduating and entering the work force prepared and ready to make an immediate impact.”

Under her leadership, the college raised more than $78 million in private philanthropy during The Campaign for OSU. More than $30 million of those gifts were for the construction of Austin Hall, the new 100,000-square foot home for the College of Business that opened in fall 2014. It was under Kleinsorge’s guidance that the funding was secured; the building was planned for, designed, built and opened.

Austin Hall accommodates more than 5,800 students each year, which includes 3,900 business majors and pre-majors, nearly 850 business and entrepreneurship minors and more than 800 design students. The college also teaches service courses for more than 1,500 students from outside of the College of Business. 

Kleinsorge, who started at OSU as an assistant accounting professor in 1987, was appointed dean in March 2003. Other accomplishments achieved under her tenure as dean include: 

  • Revising curriculum to create discipline specific majors and establishing a competitive professional school model, which requires students to apply for and be accepted into the college;
  • Growth of graduate programs including the launch of the first business doctoral program and the diversification of the MBA program to meet market demand;
  • Integrating the design majors into the College of Business;
  • Establishing a college specific Career Success Center;
  • Launching the Austin Entrepreneurship Program;
  • Collaborating with the university and the Office of Commercialization and Corporate Development to launch the Advantage Accelerator.

“It has been a privilege to lead, serve and be a part of such an accomplished community of alumni, students, faculty and staff,” said Kleinsorge. “Together we have evolved our curriculum, experiential learning opportunities and programs to provide a business education that prepares our graduates to be ready to work in the local, regional, national and global economies.”

Kleinsorge served as department chair of Accounting, Finance and Information Management from 1995-2001 and again from 2001-02. She serves as a technical adviser for the Governor’s Oregon Innovation Council; is the treasurer for Benton Hospice Board of Directors; and she is a member of the Advantage Accelerator Advisory Board; the University Budget Committee; and the Campus Planning Committee. She is also the university representative for the local Economic Vitality Partnership in Corvallis.

She has served as past chair of the Western Association of Collegiate Schools of Business; as a member of the Executive Commercialization Advisory Council; and has been active in community service including being on the Corvallis Chamber board of directors; co-chaired a capital campaign for an advocacy center for the Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence; and held various positions on the Majestic Theatre board.   

Kleinsorge earned her Ph.D. from the University of Kansas and her B.S. from Emporia State University in Emporia, Kansas. As an associate professor her teaching and research focused on cost and managerial accounting systems, with an emphasis on multi-national companies and health care.

Randhawa said a national search will be conducted for a new dean.

Media Contact: 

Jenn Casey, 541-737-0695, jenn.casey@oregonstate.edu

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Ilene Kleinsorge

OSU scientists part of national APLU report outlining research challenges

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The national Association of Public and Land-grant Universities released a report today outlining six “grand challenges” facing the United States over the next decade in the areas of sustainability water, climate change, agriculture, energy and education.

The APLU project was co-chaired by W. Daniel Edge, head of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. The report is available online at: http://bit.ly/1ksH2ud

The “Science, Education, and Outreach Roadmap for Natural Resources” is the first comprehensive, nationwide report on research, education and outreach needs for natural resources the country’s university community has ever attempted, Edge said.

“The report identifies critical natural resources issues that interdisciplinary research programs need to focus on over the next 5-10 years in order to address emerging challenges,” Edge noted. “We hope that policy-makers and federal agencies will adopt recommendations in the roadmap when developing near-term research priorities and strategies.”

The six grand challenges addressed in the report are: 

  • Sustainability: The need to conserve and manage natural landscapes and maintain environmental quality while optimizing renewable resource productivity to meet increasing human demands for natural resources, particularly with respect to increasing water, food, and energy demands.
  • Water: The need to restore, protect and conserve watersheds for biodiversity, water resources, pollution reduction and water security.
  • Climate Change: The need to understand the impacts of climate change on our environment, including such aspects as disease transmission, air quality, water supply, ecosystems, fire, species survival, and pest risk. Further, a comprehensive strategy is needed for managing natural resources to adapt to climate change.
  • Agriculture: The need to develop a sustainable, profitable, and environmentally responsible agriculture industry.
  • Energy: The need to identify new and alternative renewable energy sources and improve the efficiency of existing renewable resource-based energy to meet increasing energy demands while reducing the ecological footprint of energy production and consumption.
  • Education: The need to maintain and strengthen natural resources education at our schools at all levels in order to have the informed citizenry, civic leaders, and practicing professionals needed to sustain the natural resources of the United States.

 

Three other OSU researchers were co-authors on the report, including Hal Salwasser, a professor and former dean of the College of Forestry; JunJie Wu, the Emery N. Castle Endowed Chair in Resource and Rural Economics; and George Boehlert, former director of OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center.

Wu played a key role in the climate change chapter in identifying the need to better understand the tradeoffs between investing now in climate change adaptation measures versus the long-term risk of not adopting new policies.

Edge and Boehlert contributed to the energy chapter, which focuses primarily on renewable energy.

“The natural resources issues with traditional sources of energy already are well-understood,” Boehlert said, “with the possible exception of fracking. As the country moves more into renewable energy areas, there are many more uncertainties with respect to natural resources that need to be understood and addressed. There are no energy sources that do not have some environmental issues.”

Salwasser was an author on the sustainability chapter that identifies many issues associated with natural resource use, including rangelands, forestry, fisheries and wildlife and biodiversity. The authors contend the challenge is to use these resources in a sustainable manner meeting both human and ecosystem needs.

The project was sponsored by a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to Oregon State University, which partnered with APLU and authors from numerous institutions.

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Media Contact: 
Source: 

Dan Edge, 541-737-2810; Daniel.edge@oregonstate.edu

OSU surpasses fundraising milestone of $1 billion

 

A copy of President Ray’s speech is available online: http://bit.ly/1dRiaHx

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray announced today that the university’s first comprehensive campaign has surpassed its $1 billion fund-raising goal – 11 months ahead of schedule.

Ray made the announcement at his annual “State of the University” address in Portland to an audience of more than 600 business, political, civic and education leaders, alumni and friends of the university. He encouraged contributions through the remainder of the year to further deepen the university’s impact on students, the state, nation and world. Gifts to The Campaign for OSU now total $1,012,601,000.

“While this is a remarkable milestone, this campaign has never been about the big number,” Ray said. “Our generous donors are committed, as is the university, to transforming Oregon State into a top-10 land grant research university to significantly advance the health of the Earth, its people and our economy.”

Donors have brought private support for Oregon State to an all-time high, with annual totals exceeding $100 million for the last three years. More than 102,000 donors to the campaign have:

  • Created more than 600 new scholarships and fellowship funds – a 30 percent increase – with gifts for student support exceeding $170 million;
  • Contributed more than $100 million to help attract and retain leading professors and researchers, including funding for 77 of Oregon State’s 124 endowed faculty positions;
  • Supported the construction or renovation of more than two dozen campus facilities, including Austin Hall in the College of Business, the Linus Pauling Science Center, new cultural centers, and the OSU Basketball Center. Bonding support from the state was critical to many of these projects.

 

Business leaders Pat Reser, a 1960 OSU alumna; Patrick Stone, a 1974 graduate; and Jim Rudd have co-chaired the campaign since its public launch in 2007. All three have been trustees of the OSU Foundation, and Reser, board chair of Reser’s Fine Foods, also serves as chair of Oregon State’s new Board of Trustees that was appointed by Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber.

“Our donor community is growing because people are deepening their ties to Oregon State – and that helps make us a better university,” said J. Michael Goodwin, CEO and president of the OSU Foundation, the nonprofit organization charged with raising, administering and stewarding private gifts to the university.  “This broad base of support positions Oregon State well for future philanthropic support and engagement from our alumni, parents and friends.”

Donors from every state and more than 50 countries have invested in OSU as part of the campaign. Almost 40 percent of these campaign donors are first-time donors to the university. More than 1,000 donors have made campaign gifts of more than $100,000, including 177 donors who have made gifts of $1 million or more. Oregon State joins only 34 other public universities in the country to have crossed the billion-dollar mark in a fund-raising campaign.

“The campaign is about developing and energizing a community of dedicated advocates, people who share our vision of what Oregon State can accomplish,” Ray said. “These partners have changed Oregon State forever – and I believe the best is yet to come.”

In his State of the University address, Ray said Oregon needs to quit talking and start planning to meet its goal of a more educated citizenry to achieve economic and social prosperity. He cited the state’s lack of apparent focus on reaching Oregon’s “40-40-20” educational achievement goal, which calls for 40 percent of adult Oregonians to hold a bachelor’s or advanced degree, 40 percent to have an associate’s degree or a meaningful postsecondary certificate, and all adult Oregonians to hold a high school diploma or equivalent by the year 2025.

OSU has developed a plan to do its part and is committed to those goals, already demonstrating success, Ray said. But more is needed.

“Beyond Oregon State University’s own enrollment management and strategic plan, I have no idea how the state will get to 40-40-20, which could require as many as 35,000 more students annually enrolled in our four-year universities and colleges,” Ray said. “There is no statewide blueprint.”

Ray went on to describe how OSU’s enrollment grew by 1,532 students in Corvallis and online and by another 135 students at OSU-Cascades in Bend.

“Despite those gains, the net increase in enrollment among all Oregon public universities outside of Oregon State totaled 14 students,” Ray pointed out. That includes an enrollment increase at the Oregon Institute of Technology of 413 students.

OSU has been following a plan for the past two years to help the state achieve its goals. Ray said the university expects to educate 28,000 students in Corvallis, 3,000 to 5,000 students at OSU-Cascades by 2025; and grow its online enrollment to more than 7,000 students. The university also plans to educate another 500 students annually by 2025 at a new marine studies campus located in Newport.

Ray, who recently completed his 10th year as OSU president, pointed to several Oregon State University initiatives that will help boost the economy:

 

  • OSU will lead a new national effort through its College of Forestry to advance the science and technology necessary to utilize wood in the construction of taller buildings in a public-private partnership that will advance manufacturing in Oregon and boost rural economies;
  • The university launched the OSU Advantage last year – a one-stop shop for linking businesses with the students and researchers of Oregon State to accelerate new business development and spinoff companies;
  • OSU’s research enterprise continues to grow and reached $263 million in 2013 – a 70 percent increase over the last decade. Two major initiatives include the selection of Oregon State to lead the design and construction of the next generation of ocean-going research vessels for the United States, and the selection of OSU, along with partners in Alaska and Hawaii, to operate one of six national sites for unmanned aircraft systems.

Industry-sponsored research is up 60 percent in five years, Ray pointed out, and licensing agreements with industry have increased 83 percent. Since 2006, OSU has helped launched 20 startup companies, which have raised $190 million in venture capital and created hundreds of jobs.

“Economic development,” Ray said, “is part of our DNA.”

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217

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Kearney Hall

Kearney Hall

 

Video that could be downloaded for B-roll is available online: http://bit.ly/1frg9Xc

Die-hard fans view ads linked with rival teams negatively

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new study concludes that it doesn’t matter how compelling an advertisement may be, most die-hard Oregon State Beavers fans will simply not purchase a product associated with the Oregon Ducks.

Researchers at Oregon State University and California State University, San Marcos asked college students, who were a mix of average sports fans and “highly identified” fans, or super fans, to look at a generic ad that that featured an association with either the home or a rival team and included either strong or weak arguments about product quality.

The “less identified,” or average fans, responded positively to the strong advertising message regardless of team affiliation. However, even though the super fans were able to recognize which ads made a more compelling case, it did not sway their negative attitude and intentions toward the advertisement when there was an affiliation with the rival.

The study, co-authored by Colleen Bee, assistant professor of marketing in OSU’s College of Business, and Vassilis Dalakas, associate professor of marketing at Cal State San Marcos, was published online this month in the Journal of Marketing Communications.

“We found that less identified fans responded positively to strong, credible arguments,” said lead author Bee. “What we found interesting is that this effect went away for super fans when the ad featured a rival affiliation. Whether an argument was weak or strong did not make a difference – all that mattered was the association with the rival team.”

Study participants were either shown an ad with weak messaging, such as “Simply great!” or an ad with strong messaging, such as “Recommended by Consumer Reports.”  Fan identification was then assessed by asking respondents to rate themselves based on how they and others see them as team-specific sports fans.

Bee said this is the first study to consider the combined effects of fan identification, sponsorship affiliation, and message characteristics. Since sports sponsorship accounts for 77 percent, or $39.17 billion in revenue, of worldwide sponsorship spending, knowing potential pitfalls is important.

“Highly identified fans incorporate the team as part of their identity, which means it really influences and biases the way they process information much more than other consumers.”

Bee said sponsorship is still a highly effective and lucrative means of advertising and branding. She said that companies should just be aware that their message – and thus their product – may be viewed negatively when they align with certain teams. For this reason, she said savvy firms use brand loyalty to their advantage. One car rental company, for instance, with strong ties to the New York Yankees only ran ads promoting its alliance to the team in New York City. 

“When you associate your product or brand with a team logo, you need to keep in mind that you will alienate the super fans of the rival team, and potentially lose customers,” she said. “On the other hand, you can also leverage that social identification to win over those sports fans who will view this sponsorship favorably simply because it is their team.”

The study was funded by a grant from the OSU College of Business.

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Colleen Bee, 541-737-6059

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Colleen Bee
Colleen Bee

OSU-Cascades launches hospitality management degree

BEND, Ore. – Oregon State University - Cascades is adding a new bachelor’s degree in hospitality management, filling a need for highly-skilled employees in one of Oregon’s most important industries.

OSU-Cascades will begin offering hospitality management classes in fall 2015. The multi-disciplinary degree program will prepare graduates for a wide range of hospitality careers within a corporate setting, in a hospitality operations setting, or as an entrepreneur.  Among the possible career fields are hotel management, cruise operations, conference services, restaurant ownership, and food and beverage services. It is the only degree program of its kind in Oregon.

“We are thrilled to offer a program that will attract students and faculty, and provide talented interns and graduates for the lodging and restaurant industry in the state and region, ultimately increasing its significant contribution to Oregon's economy,” said Becky Johnson, vice president of OSU-Cascades.

The branch campus’s newest degree is the first four-year hospitality degree to be offered in Oregon in more than 20 years and will cater to the state’s hospitality and tourism industry, the second-largest industry in Oregon.

OSU-Cascades is an ideal location for a hospitality management program. Tourism and hospitality businesses are among the largest employers in Central Oregon and the industry is currently experiencing a surge in growth.

The hospitality management program will be led by Executive-in-Residence Todd Montgomery and will be offered through the OSU College of Business. The multi-disciplinary program will include classes in management, human resources, food and beverage operations, technology within the hospitality sector, and service delivery.

Students will also complete a business minor with courses in marketing and accounting, and be required to participate in internships and other work experience programs. The program is expected to draw interest from high school students, community college transfer students and culinary institute graduates.

“Our goal is to prepare our students for key positions in the hospitality industry in Central Oregon, throughout the state and beyond,” Montgomery said. “We want to give them the skills and tools they need to be leaders and innovators in the hospitality field.”

Budget cuts forced the closure of a similar hospitality degree program at OSU in the early 1990s; students then sought programs and careers outside of the state. Industry leaders in Oregon have been advocating for the program’s return and support from the state and local hospitality and tourism industry helped make the new degree possible. In 2012, the branch campus received gifts totaling $320,000 to develop the new program.

Media Contact: 

Christine Coffin, 541-322-3152

Source: 

Todd Montgomery, 541-322-2086