OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

athletics

Special Olympics Oregon moving to OSU, Corvallis in 2017

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Special Olympics Oregon will move its Summer State Games to Oregon State University and venues around Corvallis beginning in 2017. The games are scheduled for July 8-9 next year.

With more than 2,000 athletes, 600 coaches and 1,400 volunteers, the event is one of Oregon’s largest and most significant sports and humanitarian efforts. The games have been held in Newberg, Oregon, for the past six years.

“SOOR is thrilled to partner with Corvallis and Oregon State on this statewide event,” said Margie Hunt, CEO of Special Olympics Oregon. “OSU has clearly adopted the games and is just as committed as we are to creating an unbelievable experience for our participants and their families.”

Summer State Games participants will be housed at Oregon State and the event is being supported by the OSU Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and University Housing and Dining Services, as well as other campus groups.

“We are very proud and honored to partner with Special Olympics Oregon,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “Special Olympics Oregon is a wonderful organization and to have Oregon State University host this event in 2017 and into the future is extraordinarily gratifying.”

Although planning for next year’s Summer State Games is in the early stages, SOOR officials say they are looking to hold the Games Ceremony at Reser Stadium, bocce at other OSU facilities, track and field at Corvallis High School, golf at Trysting Tree Golf Course, and softball at both OSU and Philomath High School.

An “Olympic Town” will be set up in Parker Plaza outside of Reser Stadium.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Special Olympics
2016 participants

OSU names Todd Stansbury athletic director, vice president

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Todd Stansbury, a former executive associate athletic director at Oregon State University, has been named vice president and director of intercollegiate athletics at OSU. He will begin his new duties on Aug. 1.

Stansbury, who has 25 years of athletics administration experience, has spent the last three-plus years as vice president and athletic director at the University of Central Florida. He previously was at Oregon State from 2003-12 before taking the UCF position.

He succeeds Bob De Carolis, who resigned as OSU athletic director in May after nearly 17 years at Oregon State, including nearly 13 as athletic director. Effective July 1, Marianne Vydra, senior associate athletic director/senior woman administrator, will serve as interim director of OSU intercollegiate athletics.

“I am very pleased that Todd Stansbury is rejoining Oregon State University,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “He is prepared to hit the ground running and will help propel OSU’s men’s and women’s athletics. He is very skilled at growing fan excitement and engagement, and will guide the success of our student-athletes in sports, academics and community.”

“He is committed to high-level athletics achievement by competing and winning championships the right way – the Oregon State way.”

Stansbury was selected following a national search that attracted extensive interest and several high-level finalists for the position, Ray said. Stansbury will be welcomed to OSU on Wednesday, June 24, at a news conference.

A native of Ontario, Canada, Stansbury graduated with a degree in industrial management from Georgia Tech in 1984, where he played linebacker for the Yellow Jackets’ football team.  He went on to earn a master’s degree in sports administration from Georgia State University in 1993.

Before coming to Oregon State, Stansbury worked in athletics administration at Georgia Tech (1990-95), where he was assistant athletic director; the University of Houston (1997-2000), as associate athletic director; and East Tennessee State (2000-03), where he was director of athletics.

During his three-and-a-half years at Central Florida, Stansbury transformed a department that increased its donor base by 47 percent; won 12 CUSA and American Athletic Conference championships in eight different sports; and has had the highest graduation success rate of any public Division I higher education institution in the United States.

Those attributes will enable Stansbury to seamlessly fit into the Oregon State culture, President Ray said.

“Todd will be an excellent and effective contributor to the remarkable transformation that is occurring throughout Oregon State as the university continues to strive for excellence in the classroom, on the field of competition and in our service impact to Oregon, the nation and the world. Good is not good enough at Oregon State University.” Ray said.

Stansbury will provide leadership for an Oregon State intercollegiate athletics program that has 17 NCAA sports, more than 500 student-athletes and a $73 million budget.

The University of Central Florida has 16 NCAA sports, more than 450 student athletes, and a $47 million budget.

Stansbury will be joined in Corvallis by his wife, Karen.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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Stansbury
Todd Stansbury

OSU President Ed Ray names search committee for new athletic director

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Ed Ray on Monday named a committee to assist him in a national search to select a new director of intercollegiate athletics. The search process includes noted OSU alumni, national leaders in college sports, a head coach, faculty, students and university leaders.

The search committee will be led by Joey Spatafora, an OSU professor and the university’s faculty athletic representative to the PAC-12 conference.

The committee includes Oregon State alumni Marty Reser, vice president of retail sales for Reser’s Fine Foods, and John Stirek, regional president of Trammell Crow; OSU women’s basketball coach Scott Rueck; Erika Aufiero, an OSU student-athlete competing in gymnastics; Colleen Bee, associate professor in OSU’s College of Business, who serves as co-chair of OSU’s student athletics advisory committee; Glenn Ford, OSU vice president of finance and administration; Jim Patterson, OSU senior associate athletic director; Taylor Sarman, OSU student body president; and Marianne Vydra, senior associate athletic director/senior woman administrator.

OSU will engage national sports management consultants Jeff Schemmel, president of College Sports Solutions; and Kevin Weiberg, former commissioner of the Big 12 Conference, to assist with the search.

The search for a new athletic director began last week after Bob De Carolis announced on May 11 that he would leave Oregon State after serving as director of OSU intercollegiate athletics for nearly 13 years and working in athletics administration at the university for 17 years. The search committee will begin meeting this week, and Ray said he hopes to have a new athletic director named by June 30 when De Carolis departs Oregon State.

“I am very impressed by the number of high-level candidates that are expressing strong interest in working at OSU,” Ray said. “Our new athletic director will add to the success of Oregon State’s men’s and women’s athletics and grow fan excitement and engagement. He or she will be committed to our student-athletes and to all OSU students.

“The new director will contribute to the remarkable transformation that is occurring at Oregon State where everything we do is about excellence and leadership.”

Ray said the new athletic director will help build on his own personal commitment to high level athletic success at the university. “Oregon State will compete and will win championships. We will win the right way – the Oregon State way,” Ray said. “Count on it. You have my word on it.”

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

Thursday night football game will impact OSU parking

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University students, staff and faculty should plan ahead as parking on campus will be a challenge on Thursday, Oct. 16, due to a 7 p.m. home football game against Utah.

Employees and students are encouraged to find alternative transportation to campus Oct. 16 or to park strategically, as some lots will be restricted to those with game day passes only after 1 p.m. On game day, OSU parking permit holders will be allowed to park in any A, B, or C zone, regardless of their permitted zone, but some parking lots will be closing midday to employees and students to accommodate parking by football game ticketholders.

OSU department heads and business unit directors are encouraged to be more flexible with employees to accommodate the influx of cars and visitors to campus.

A free shuttle to and from campus will be offered to anyone who parks at the Benton County Fairgrounds beginning at 6 a.m. Thursday morning through 2 a.m. Friday morning after the game. The fairgrounds are located west of campus along Southwest 53rd Street just south of Harrison Boulevard. During peak hours, the fairgrounds shuttle will run at least every 30 minutes. The OSU Beaver Bus service will run on its normal schedule on game day.

Beginning at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 16, some parking lots will be open only to those with athletics-issued game-day parking passes and must be vacated by OSU permit holders. These include:

  • All Reser Stadium parking lots;
  • The Gill Coliseum lot;
  • The parking garage at 26th Street and Washington;
  • South Farm parking lot off Brooklane Road.

Other parking areas (listed below) will be available until 3 p.m. for regular faculty/staff business day parking. After 3 p.m., however, entrance to these areas will be limited only to people with athletics-issued game-day parking permits. Employee and student vehicles already parked in these lots may remain until 5 p.m., at which time all vehicles without athletics-issued passes must vacate. Signs will be posted at the entrance of these lots. These include:

  • Lots between 15th Street and 11th Street, off Washington Way;
  • The Benton Place parking lots east of Goss Stadium;
  • Lots off Washington Way adjacent to the Student Legacy Park (intramural fields);
  • The 30th Street parking lots around Peavy Hall, between Jefferson Street and Washington Way;
  • The 30th Street parking lot by Magruder Hall;
  • The 35th Street parking lot at the OSU Foundation building;
  • The lot off 15th Street and Western Boulevard at the University Plaza building

All other Faculty/Staff parking lots that are designated as “Athletics Event” parking on game days are available for regular business-day parking. However, they will have attendants starting at 4 p.m. Employees are encouraged to vacate these lots by 5 p.m. and will be required to vacate those lots by 6 p.m.

RVs are only allowed after 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 15, in the gravel lot off 35th and Campus Way, next to the Motor Pool. Employees and students who normally park in this location, should give themselves extra time Thursday morning to locate a parking space as many may be filled with recreational vehicles. RV’s are not permitted on campus in any other lot on Wednesday.

A game-day parking map is available to help visitors, students and employees better understand designated lots. It is available online at:  http://www.osubeavers.com/pdf9/2778891.pdf

For additional information regarding game-day parking on campus, visit the OSU athletics website at www.osubeavers.com or for offering thoughts and concerns, e-mail eventmanagement@oregonstate.edu; wecare@oregonstate.edu or contact Steve Clark, vice president for University Relations and Marketing at steve.clark@oregonstate.edu. For suggestions on alternative transportation: 

http://transportation.oregonstate.edu/ 

The Corvallis Transit System map is accessible at: http://www.corvallisoregon.gov/index.aspx?page=884

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU President Ray calls for university-wide effort to halt sexual assaults

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray on Tuesday challenged all students, faculty, staff and community members to work together to end sexual violence.

Ray’s challenge follows the announcement last Friday by President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden of the “It’s On Us” campaign to raise awareness of – and ultimately prevent - sexual assaults on university campuses.

In a letter to the Oregon State community, Ray pointed to several programs at OSU that focus on education and prevention of sexual assaults and then said “that is not enough.” He challenged all members of the Oregon State community to get involved in their own way.

“I expect each and every one of us – regardless of where you work or attend classes – to become informed about sexual violence and to take the responsibility to help prevent and report all forms of sexual violence or harassment,” Ray said. “I have no doubt that we can all do something.

“Teaching faculty can learn how best to use classroom and advising opportunities to promote awareness, safety and support,” Ray pointed out. “Likewise, advisers, fraternities and sororities, supervisors, coaches, friends, etc. can all become informed about how they can respond and help this important effort.

“We are a community and should work together to ensure each of us are safe.”

The OSU president noted that an estimated one in five women nationally is sexually assaulted during her college years. Sexual violence can impact anyone, he said, regardless of age, race, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation. In the great majority of cases, individuals are assaulted by someone they know and even trust, whether as an acquaintance, classmate, friend, or current or former partner.

Of those assaults, it is estimated that only 12 percent nationally are reported, and only a fraction of the offenders are held accountable.

“Sexual assault is a severely violating experience that can cause a victim substantial immediate and long-term physical and mental health consequences,” Ray said. “These assaults must end, and to do so will require our collective focus locally and nationally.”

Oregon State will develop an “It’s On Us” website that will have  information about the university’s response, prevention and education programs as well as information on how each of us can be part of the solution. The website will link to the national campaign and additional resources.

Ray asked all students and employees to learn about OSU’s programs and services regarding sexual violence reporting, emergency response, education and community services.

“During the course of the 2014-15 academic year Oregon State will take additional steps to address sexual violence within our community,” Ray said. “We will keep everyone informed of these important developments.” The university will publicize these efforts through the sexual assault website, the OSU Today newsletter, the online LIFE@OSU magazine, social media and other communications.

“It’s on us to end sexual assaults in the Oregon State University community,” Ray said. “Each of us has a role in creating a caring community – based on civility and respect – that is free of sexual assaults and other forms of harassment and violence.”

 

                                                                     OSU Sexual Assault Prevention Services and Programs

Confidential support, counseling and advocacy services: 

Sexual assault reporting and response services:

Awareness and prevention education programs and services:

  • “Haven” -- Online prevention education program required for all incoming OSU students and student athletes.
  • “AlcoholEdu” Substance abuse prevention program required for all incoming first-year students attending OSU in Corvallis.
  • Sexual violence prevention educator on staff in OSU Student Health Services. (541-737-9355)

Academic programs, such as those offered in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Other OSU efforts:

  • On-going training for all for all residential staff in University Housing and Dining Services in conjunction with the Office of Equity and Inclusion; Sexual Assault Support Services; and Student Health Services to understand, identify and appropriately respond to disclosures of sexual violence.
  • Residence hall educational programming – including resource information and support – provided by professional staff and members of student.
  • Required educational programs for students living in OSU’s Affiliated Housing Program, made up of fraternities and sororities.
  • Sexual harassment and sexual violence prevention training for OSU employees by the Office of Equity and Inclusion. Oregon State employee policy on responding to disclosures of sexual violence or sexual harassment:

OSU’s Community Partners:

  • Corvallis Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence (CARDV) provides confidential, 24-hour hotline services in the Corvallis area. (541-754-0110) http://cardv.org/
  • Guide to sexual assault service responders in communities through Oregon and the U.S. https://www.notalone.gov/resources
  • Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis (541-768-5111)
  • Hospitals and medical centers in your community

 Future sexual assault education programs services

  • OSU Student Health Services is creating a center on violence prevention; and alcohol and drug abuse to work with Corvallis campus and community partners to expand and enhance education, outreach and prevention efforts.
  • Office of Equity and Inclusion is taking additional steps to expand awareness of sexual violence and enhance prevention education among OSU employees.
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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

New York Yankee Jacoby Ellsbury commits $1 million to alma mater

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Jacoby Ellsbury, center fielder for the New York Yankees and former student-athlete at Oregon State University, has committed $1 million to help the OSU baseball program expand its locker room facilities.

Goss Stadium, which has stood on the Oregon State campus since 1907, is the oldest continuous ballpark in the nation, and has been home to the Beavers since the program’s first pitch more than 100 years ago.

“We are tremendously thankful,” said Pat Casey, who is in his 20th year as OSU’s head coach. “Great facilities are at the core of great programs, and with Jacoby’s generous gift we will be able to continue to offer our student-athletes a world-class experience.”

The stadium has undergone several enhancements in recent years with support from donors. Prior to the 2009 season, nearly 1,000 seats were added down the left and right field lines and the Omaha Room created seating for approximately 70.

Despite the recent improvements, the baseball program has outgrown its locker room space, Casey said. The proposed $2.8 million project will expand and enhance the locker room, update the equipment room, add team meeting space, and include both a new recruiting area and a centralized main entrance. In recognition of the gift, the OSU locker room facilities will be named in honor of Ellsbury.

“OSU Baseball has given me so much,” said Jacoby Ellsbury, who holds among his accolades the Beavers’ run record at 168. “I am thrilled I am able to help my alma mater carry on its proud tradition; and perhaps, this expansion will convince a few more Pacific Northwest recruits to wear OSU orange and black.”

The Madras, Ore., native played for Oregon State from 2003-2005 before being drafted 23rd overall by the Boston Red Sox in 2005. In 2007, he helped the club win the World Series. In 2011, he won the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, the Silver Slugger Award, and was the American League MVP runner-up. He earned his second World Series ring in 2013, before signing with the New York Yankees.

“Oregon State is where I got my start,” explained Ellsbury. “It’s where I learned—from Coach Casey, teammates, and assistant coaches—how to be a successful athlete, a successful person. For that, I am forever grateful.”

With this gift, donors to The Campaign for OSU have committed more than $172 million for OSU Athletics. University leaders announced in January that the campaign had passed its overall $1 billion goal with 11 months to spare, making OSU one of only 35 public universities to achieve the billion-dollar milestone in a campaign.

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Pat Casey, 541-737-7472

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Goss Stadium

Goss Stadium

OSU responds to NCAA sanction on pitcher Ben Wetzler

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University officials say the penalty imposed Friday by the NCAA staff on pitcher Ben Wetzler, which will cost him 20 percent of his senior season, is too harsh given all of the mitigating factors.

The NCAA began an investigation of Wetzler late last year concerning advice he received from a representative of a sports management group just after the 2013 Major League Baseball amateur draft.

Wetzler will be eligible to resume playing for the Beavers on Sunday, March 2, in the fourth game of a four-game series against Wright State University.

As a college junior last year, Wetzler was chosen in the fifth round of the Major League Baseball draft by the Philadelphia Phillies, but chose to return to Oregon State for his senior season to pursue an NCAA championship with his teammates.

The NCAA notified OSU in late November 2013 of its intent to conduct an investigation involving Wetzler.  Both OSU and Wetzler fully cooperated with that investigation. During the course of the NCAA’s investigation, OSU learned that the charges were related to communications and actions by an adviser that Wetzler had engaged to advise him about his draft options.  Wetzler received no compensation from the adviser.  

“While NCAA rules allow a student-athlete to obtain advising services about the draft and contract offers, the adviser may have no contact with a professional organization,” said Steve Clark, OSU’s vice president for University Relations and Marketing.

“Although the evidence was unclear, the NCAA found that Wetzler’s adviser did have prohibited contact and that a violation of the ‘spirit’ of the NCAA bylaw occurred,” Clark said. “It was clear from the beginning, however, that there was no intent on the part of Ben Wetzler to circumvent the rules. He was trying to do the right thing.”

“Oregon State University continues to support Ben in this matter,” said Bob De Carolis, OSU’s Athletic Director. “He is a great example of a student-athlete who turned down a significant sum of money from a professional baseball team to return to OSU to complete his academic degree and collegiate eligibility.”

Oregon State proposed a self-imposed penalty on Wetzler of 10 percent of his team’s games, which apparently was not enough for the NCAA, according to Clark.

“This is really a shame. To be clear, Ben received no money, nor did he enter into an agreement with the intent of hiring an agent to negotiate on his behalf,” Clark said. “The violation was a technicality, and we strongly believe that it is overly harsh for him to lose 20 percent of his senior season because of that.

“Oregon State believes that this penalty does not fairly represent Ben’s culpability in the matter or the seriousness of the violation,” Clark said. “This student was looking for a way to deal with the pressures associated with the situation so he could return to school.”

Clark said the complexity of a student-athlete being able to individually evaluate an offer to become a professional athlete, or instead choose to remain in school, is “incredibly daunting and not something we should expect young people to be able to do on their own.

“This is simply what Ben Wetzler did – he sought to understand his options for a professional baseball career versus completing his education and playing out his senior year,” Clark said. “He trusted his adviser to follow the NCAA rules and not negotiate on his behalf. Once he understood his options, he decided to remain a student-athlete for one more year at Oregon State University.

“Let’s review the facts here,” Clark said. “A student-athlete sought advice on whether to go pro or return to school. He received that advice, and now he is being punished by the NCAA for making a decision to complete his education – a decision that we should all applaud. This is inexplicable.”

Clark said the decision by the NCAA suggests that the organization needs to re-evaluate its stance on how best to help student-athletes determine their futures.

“The NCAA should have the best interests of student-athletes in mind, and it should certainly question rules that produce this outcome,” Clark said. “Having seen these amateurism rules in action, OSU believes the NCAA should take a serious look with an eye toward revising the rules on amateur status and find new ways to help student-athletes navigate the high-pressure negotiations of professional sports to make the best life choices.”

De Carolis said that OSU takes its NCAA obligations seriously and works hard to support the success of its student-athletes on and off the playing field. 

One of the best pitchers in OSU history, Wetzler has a 24-6 all-time record pitching under Coach Pat Casey – just seven wins shy of breaking Oregon State’s school record for victories. Last year, the southpaw hurler from Clackamas, Ore., went 10-1 with a 2.25 earned run average, winning his last 10 decisions en route to being named to the All-Pac-12 First Team.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217

Oregon State University band, the oldest program in the Pac-12, celebrates 125th anniversary

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University band program will celebrate its 125th anniversary with a concert at 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9, in the Austin Auditorium at The LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St., Corvallis.

Established in 1891, the OSU Band is the oldest in the Pac-12 conference. With over 500 students participating annually, it is one of the largest collegiate band programs in the Pacific Northwest. 

Five guest conductors will join OSU Director of Bands Chris Chapman and the OSU Wind Ensemble on the first half of the concert. After conducting a traditional season-opening performance of the “Star Spangled Banner,” Chapman will relinquish the stage to retired OSU band director James Douglass.

Douglass will lead a performance of Fucik’s spirited “Florentiner March.” Marc Dickey will guide the ensemble through Morton Lauridsen’s “O Magnum Mysterium;” Rod Winther will conduct Yu-Chou Chen’s “Dance Festival;” Steve Matthes will lead the rarely-heard “Oregon Trail March,” composed by former OSU Director of Bands Ted Mesang; and David Becker will lead the popular “Variations on a Theme by Robert Schumann” by Robert Jager. Chapman again takes the podium to close out the first half with a medley of traditional OSU school songs. 

Following intermission, The Spirit and Sound of OSU - Oregon State’s 265-member marching band - will treat the audience to favorites drawn from its extensive catalogue of show music. Newly appointed Director of Athletic Bands Olin Hannum will be joined by guest conductors Gerry Fujii, Mary Bengel, Robyn Chapman, Brad Townsend and Megan Hansen.

The concert is free and open to the public; no tickets are required to attend.

Source: 

Zachary C. Person, 541-737-4671, zachary.person@oregonstate.edu

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OSU Marching Band

Oregon State University marching band

OSU Wind Ensemble

Oregon State University wind ensemble

Photos by Zachary C. Person, OSU

OSU President Ed Ray names search committee for new athletics director

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Ed Ray Tuesday named a committee to assist him in a national search to select a new intercollegiate athletics director, as Todd Stansbury moves on to serve as Georgia Tech’s athletics director.

The committee includes noted OSU alumni, an NFL free agent, national leaders in college sports, two head coaches, faculty, students and university leaders. The search committee will be led by Joey Spatafora, OSU Alumni Association distinguished professor and the university’s faculty athletic representative to the PAC-12 conference.

The committee includes Oregon State alumni Marty Reser, vice president of sales for Reser’s Fine Foods; Steven Jackson, National Football League all-pro running back and former OSU player; John Stirek, president, Western Operations, Trammell Crow Company; Kim Casale, retired area director of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.; Pat Casey, head OSU baseball coach; Tanya Chaplin, head OSU women’s gymnastics coach; and Kate Halischak, OSU Faculty Senate president and director of student-athlete academic services.

Other members of the search committee are Stephen Thompson Jr., an OSU student-athlete competing in basketball; Colleen Bee, associate professor in OSU’s College of Business, who serves as co-chair of OSU’s athletics advisory committee; Michael Green, OSU interim vice president of finance and administration; Jim Patterson, OSU senior associate athletics director for development; student Darren Nguyen, executive director of community programs for the Associated Students of Oregon State University; and Marianne Vydra, interim OSU athletics director. Tricia Gerding, OSU human resources consultant, will serve as the committee’s search advocate.

Jeff Schemmel, president of College Sports Solutions, a strategic consulting company for collegiate athletics, and Kevin Weiberg, former commissioner of the Big 12 Conference, will serve as the search firm.

The search for a new athletics director began last week after Stansbury announced on Sept. 22 that he would leave Oregon State to return to his alma mater after serving as director of OSU intercollegiate athletics since August 2015. Stansbury played football at Georgia Tech and later worked in the school’s athletics department.

“The strong interest in this position demonstrates national awareness that Oregon State University is a place of excellence and leadership both on and off the field,” Ray said. “Our next athletics director will contribute to the university’s overall momentum and build upon the success of Oregon State’s men’s and women’s athletics. He or she will be committed to our student-athletes and to the success of all OSU students.”

Ray said he is committed to athletics success at the highest level. “I guarantee that Oregon State will continue to compete on the conference and national level and will win championships. We will win the right way – the Oregon State way,” Ray said. “Count on it.”

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU President Ed Ray names Marianne Vydra interim athletics director

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Ed Ray Wednesday named Marianne Vydra as interim OSU athletics director while the university completes a national search to select a new intercollegiate athletics director.

Todd Stansbury, Oregon State’s current athletics director and vice president, announced last week he will leave Oregon State to serve as Georgia Tech’s athletics director. Ray said Vydra and Stansbury will work together to provide for a “seamless leadership transition” to occur on Nov. 4.

Vydra served as interim director of Oregon State athletics in the summer of 2015, presently serves as deputy director of OSU athletics for administration and is the department’s senior woman administrator. In February 2015, CollegeAD.com named her one of the top 10 senior woman administrators in the NCAA.

“I thank President Ray for the opportunity to once again serve in this role,” Vydra said. “I also want to thank Todd Stansbury for assembling the best team in the nation. He brought some real stars in athletics administration to Oregon State and he allowed the stars already here to really shine. We will continue full steam ahead by executing our shared vision for the athletics department, the university and Beaver Nation.”

Vydra serves on numerous OSU, Pac-12 Conference and national governance committees. She is the chairperson for the NCAA Women’s Soccer and Softball committees; a member of the NCAA Women’s Gymnastics Committee; and a member of Oregon State’s President’s Commission on the Status of Women.

Vydra previously served as vice president of the executive board of the Pac-12 and has been a member of several other conference committees. These include the long-range planning committee; student-athlete advisory committee; diversity initiative committee; women’s basketball tournament committee; and the league’s television committee. 

She came to OSU in 1992 after working as an academic counselor at the University of Maine.

 

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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mariannevydra
Marianne Vydra