OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

alumni

OSU EMERITUS PROF WRITES BOOK ON QUANTUM STRENGTH, POWER LIFTING

CORVALLIS - An Oregon State University emeritus professor has written a new book aimed at athletes and coaches who wish to learn more about the principles of strength and power lifting.

The author, Patrick O'Shea, has spent some 40 years as an athlete, coach and professor in the field of exercise and sports science. At the age of 65, he still can bench press 330 pounds and deadlift a quarter of a ton.

His book, "Quantum Strength and Power Training," covers a number of topics, including:

  • The neuromuscular and neuropsychological basis of strength - or how the mind and body work together;

     

  • Machine training versus "free weights";

     

  • The importance of cross training, using different athletic pursuits to avoid burnout;

     

  • Weight training for women, seniors and teenagers;

     

  • The mechanics of lifting, different workouts, avoiding injury, and how the body responds.

O'Shea said the book is designed for high school and college coaches, and for athletes who are interested in improving strength and power performances. It's never too late to begin weight training, he said, pointing out that strength can help improve the quality of life for people of all ages.

"The whole key to longevity in sports is variety," said O'Shea, whose average week includes two swimming workouts, two weight-lifting workouts, and 3-4 workouts on stair climbing and stationary bike machines. "In the summer, I do a lot of backpacking. Workouts just sort of flow along with the seasons."

The 256-page book, "Quantum Strength and Power Training," is available through the OSU Book Store for $32 plus shipping and handling. To order, call the book store at 541-737-1505.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Pat O'Shea, 541-752-1914

OSU's College of Ag Sciences honors four alumni for professional achievements

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University's College of Agricultural Sciences has honored four alumni for their professional achievements.

The first was Ken Bailey, the chief financial officer and vice president of Orchard View Farms in The Dalles. The business manages about 1,700 acres of cherries, which it grows, packs and ships. Bailey grew up on the farm, which his grandparents founded in 1923. He is the governor-appointed chair of the Oregon State Board of Agriculture and was a member of the Oregon Task Force on Land Use Planning, also known as the Big Look. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in horticulture from OSU in 1966. Bailey received the college’s Leader Alumni Award.

Next was Joseph Chapman, the president of North Dakota State University since 1999. Last month he said he plans to leave the university. He has held teaching and administrative positions at the University of Maryland, Utah State University and Montana State University. Between 1965 and 1970, he received his bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees from OSU, all in wildlife science. Chapman received the Legacy Alumni Award.

Also receiving an award was Colby Marshall, who has worked for U.S. Rep. Greg Walden since 2002. He lives in Bend and manages two of Walden's offices. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in agriculture business management through the OSU agriculture program at Eastern Oregon University in 1999. Marshall received the Luminary Alumni Award.

The fourth recipient was Gary Perdew, the director of the Center for Molecular Toxicology and Carcinogenesis at Penn State University since 1999. His lab is interested in the health effects of exposure to industrial pollutants. The lab's research has focused in part on a specific nuclear receptor that plays a central role in the biological response to dioxin, which can cause cancer. Perdew graduated from OSU in 1984 with a doctorate in food toxicology. He received the Leader Alumni Award.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Betsy Hartley, 541-737-5822

OSU to team with Oregon Humane Society on adoption special Sept. 25-27

PORTLAND, Ore. – If you go into the Oregon Humane Society on the weekend of Sept.25-27 wearing Oregon State University logo attire – or even orange – you will get 25 percent off the adoption fee. The same goes if you are an OSU student or alumnus, and forget to wear orange.

Heck, if you adopt an orange cat or dog (is there such a thing?), the Oregon Humane Society will knock 25 percent of the fee off. And the first 80 dogs adopted will receive a free leash with OSU logo.

The special is part of a launch of OSU’s Powered by Orange initiative and an opportunity to showcase the unique partnership between the Oregon Humane Society and the university’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

This month marks the anniversary of the partnership launched in 2007 between the Oregon Humane Society and OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. As part of that partnership, every OSU veterinary student will serve in a rotation at the Portland shelter. The students learn valuable treatment protocols and surgical techniques, and their supervised work there has increased the shelter’s capacity for facilitating Portland-area adoptions by about 20 percent.

The Oregon Humane Society is located at 1067 N.E. Columbia Blvd. in Portland. Hours for the weekend promotion are 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Sunday.

OSU’s Powered by Orange celebration showcases the positive difference the university’s students, alumni, faculty and friends are making in Oregon and beyond – with a particular emphasis on creating healthy people, healthy economies, and a healthy planet. More information on the PBO campaign is available at: http://poweredbyorange.com/

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Carson Dunlap, 541-737-5052

OSU to team with Heartland Humane Society on adoption special

Corvallis, Ore. – If you go into the Heartland Humane Society during the week of Sept. 22-27 wearing Oregon State University logo attire – or even orange – you will get 25 percent off the adoption fee. The same goes if you are an OSU student or alumnus, and forget to wear orange.

Heck, if you adopt an orange or black cat or dog, Heartland will knock off 25 percent of the fee. And the first 20 dogs adopted will receive a free leash with OSU logo.

The special is part of a launch of OSU’s Powered by Orange initiative.

“Powered by Orange” showcases the positive difference the university’s students, alumni, faculty and friends are making in Oregon and beyond – with a particular emphasis on creating healthy people, healthy economies, and a healthy planet. More information on the PBO campaign is available at: http://poweredbyorange.com/

Heartland Humane Society is located at 398 S.W. Twin Oaks Circle in Corvallis. It will be open for the Powered by Orange promotion on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday the week of Sept. 22 (closed Thursday). Hours are noon to 6 p.m. on weekdays; noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

Media Contact: 
Source: 

Carson Dunlap, 541-737-5052