OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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OSU to hold 146th commencement on Saturday in Reser Stadium

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Class of 2015 will top 6,000 graduates for the first time in the university’s history – and many of the newest members of Beaver Nation will be on hand this Saturday, June 13, when OSU holds its 146th commencement.

The ceremony will begin at 10:30 a.m. in Reser Stadium on campus. No tickets are required for the event, which also will be shown on Oregon Public Broadcasting.

A total of 6,038 graduates will receive 6,317 degrees this year, according to OSU Registrar Rebecca Mathern. They will add to the ranks of Oregon State alumni, which have earned a total of 230,136 degrees over the university’s history.

Howard K. Koh, director of the Leading Change Studio at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, will deliver the commencement address. Koh also will receive an honorary doctorate from Oregon State. He is a former member of the Obama Administration, serving as the nation’s 14th Assistant Secretary for Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Some facts and figures about OSU’s Class of 2015:

  • Of the 6,317 degrees that will be awarded, 4,981 will go to students receiving baccalaureate degrees; 960, master’s degrees; 232, doctor of philosophy degrees; 83, doctor of pharmacy degrees; and 61, doctor of veterinary medicine degrees.
  • A total of 590 graduates earned degrees in distance education in 33 different degree programs.
  • OSU’s 2015 graduates come from all 36 Oregon counties, 49 of the 50 states, four U.S. territories or commonwealths, and 63 nations around the world.
  • The oldest graduate is 70 years of age; the youngest is 20.
  • The graduating class includes 121 veterans of U.S. military service.

Each of the 6,038 OSU graduates has a compelling story. Take, for instance, Claire Ostertag-Hill, who moved to Corvallis from Germany so she could be part of the University Honors College at OSU. She pursued three majors simultaneously – biology, psychology and international studies – with support from an OSU Presidential Scholarship. As part of her honors senior thesis, she conducted research on cattle disease and discovered mutations in several genes that may be the cause of Bovine HPV-1 disease.

Now Ostertag-Hill is taking her studies to the prestigious Wake Forest Medical School in North Carolina, where she will pursue her dream of becoming a pediatric surgeon.

Michael Davis, who hails from the tiny farm town of Ramsey, Indiana, joined the U.S. Army in 2001 and served in Iraq, where he sustained injuries. At the age of 28, he retired from the military and began driving trucks for a living. Interested in bettering his career, he discovered OSU’s Ecampus distance learning program and enrolled as an agricultural sciences student.

The flexibility and challenging coursework appealed to the veteran, who sandwiched his studies around 50-hour weeks of driving trucks and vocational rehabilitation sessions at the Veterans Affairs office. Davis and his family are traveling the 2,000 miles to Corvallis to attend commencement.

Mathern said OSU expects about 3,800 students – and more than 23,000 friends and family members – to attend commencement. Oregon State is one of the only universities of its size to hand out actual diplomas to students as they graduate.

Media Contact: 
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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808, steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU President Ed Ray names search committee for new athletic director

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Ed Ray on Monday named a committee to assist him in a national search to select a new director of intercollegiate athletics. The search process includes noted OSU alumni, national leaders in college sports, a head coach, faculty, students and university leaders.

The search committee will be led by Joey Spatafora, an OSU professor and the university’s faculty athletic representative to the PAC-12 conference.

The committee includes Oregon State alumni Marty Reser, vice president of retail sales for Reser’s Fine Foods, and John Stirek, regional president of Trammell Crow; OSU women’s basketball coach Scott Rueck; Erika Aufiero, an OSU student-athlete competing in gymnastics; Colleen Bee, associate professor in OSU’s College of Business, who serves as co-chair of OSU’s student athletics advisory committee; Glenn Ford, OSU vice president of finance and administration; Jim Patterson, OSU senior associate athletic director; Taylor Sarman, OSU student body president; and Marianne Vydra, senior associate athletic director/senior woman administrator.

OSU will engage national sports management consultants Jeff Schemmel, president of College Sports Solutions; and Kevin Weiberg, former commissioner of the Big 12 Conference, to assist with the search.

The search for a new athletic director began last week after Bob De Carolis announced on May 11 that he would leave Oregon State after serving as director of OSU intercollegiate athletics for nearly 13 years and working in athletics administration at the university for 17 years. The search committee will begin meeting this week, and Ray said he hopes to have a new athletic director named by June 30 when De Carolis departs Oregon State.

“I am very impressed by the number of high-level candidates that are expressing strong interest in working at OSU,” Ray said. “Our new athletic director will add to the success of Oregon State’s men’s and women’s athletics and grow fan excitement and engagement. He or she will be committed to our student-athletes and to all OSU students.

“The new director will contribute to the remarkable transformation that is occurring at Oregon State where everything we do is about excellence and leadership.”

Ray said the new athletic director will help build on his own personal commitment to high level athletic success at the university. “Oregon State will compete and will win championships. We will win the right way – the Oregon State way,” Ray said. “Count on it. You have my word on it.”

Source: 

Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

New analysis puts OSU’s economic impact at more than $2.37 billion

CORVALLIS, Ore. – An analysis of Oregon State University’s economic impact released today estimates that Oregon’s largest university contributed $2.371 billion to the global economy last year – an economic footprint that has grown by $311 million, or 15 percent, since 2011.

The greatest impact is in Oregon, where OSU was responsible for adding an estimated $2.232 billion to the state’s economy in 2014 – a figure that accounts for 31,660 jobs.

The analysis was conducted by the economic consulting firm ECONorthwest, based on OSU expenditure data, visitor data, student enrollment and a 2013 Oregon Travel Impacts study.

The ECONorthwest analysis looked for the first time at OSU’s contribution in Portland, where OSU contributed $401.9 million to the economy in 2014, along with 2,350 jobs.

The economic impact of OSU in Benton and Linn counties was $1.334 billion, along with 25,110 jobs.

Oregon State’s impacts come in three ways, direct impacts ($973 million), indirect impacts ($424.2 million) and induced impacts ($834.8 million). Direct impacts include spending on operations, goods and services, and capital construction; indirect impacts result from companies purchasing additional supplies or hiring additional employees to support spending by OSU; and induced impacts result from the purchasing power of the university’s employees.

The total does not include other significant OSU influences to the state, regional and national economies, including the contributions by university graduates or the benefits of OSU research, such as improved varieties of wheat and other crops used by Oregon farmers; spinoff companies that have major economic impacts; and scholarship that has improved public health and environmental stewardship.

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Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU campaign celebration to feature N.Y. Times columnist

CORVALLIS, Ore.: Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times will be the keynote speaker at an event on Friday, Oct. 31, celebrating the success of Oregon State University’s billion-dollar campaign.

The public is invited to this free celebration, which will be held at the LaSells Stewart Center on the OSU campus beginning at 4 p.m.

A seasoned journalist and native of Yamhill, Oregon, Kristof has traveled the major roads and minor byways of China, India, South Asia and Africa, offering a compassionate glimpse into global health, poverty and gender in the developing world.

He and his wife Sheryl Wudunn co-authored the best-selling “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide,” which inspired a four-hour PBS series of the same name. In their new book, “A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity,” they look around the world at people who are working to make it a better place, and show readers the numerous ways this work can be supported.

Kristof’s remarks will conclude an hour-long multimedia showcase of the impact of The Campaign for OSU on students, Oregon and the world. Publicly launched in October 2007, the campaign has raised more than $1.096 billion to support university priorities. To date, more than 105,000 donors to the campaign have:

  • Created more than 600 new scholarships and fellowship funds – a 30 percent increase – with gifts for student support exceeding $180 million;
  • Contributed more than $100 million to help attract and retain leading professors and researchers, including funding for 77 of Oregon State’s 124 endowed faculty positions;
  • Supported the construction or renovation of more than two dozen campus facilities, including Austin Hall in the College of Business, the Linus Pauling Science Center, new cultural centers, and the OSU Basketball Center. Bonding support from the state was critical to many of these projects.

"In his world travels, Nicholas Kristof has seen incredible examples of people who are transforming lives and creating opportunity,” said OSU President Edward J. Ray. “Though on a different level, that’s what’s happening at Oregon State University, with the help of our growing philanthropic community. We couldn’t be more pleased to welcome one of Oregon’s native sons to our campus to celebrate our progress over the last decade and look together to the future.

“The contribution this university makes to our state and to our world is extraordinary and this campaign has expanded future opportunities tremendously.”

Several additional activities are planned on campus for Oct. 31, which is part of Homecoming week. The grand opening celebration for Austin Hall, the new home of the College of Business, will take place at 1:30 p.m. A full schedule of Homecoming events, including lectures, open houses and a Thursday evening Lights Parade and Block Party, is available at osualum.com/homecoming.

Source: 

Molly Brown, 541-737-3602, molly.brown@oregonstate.edu

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Nicholas Kristof

OSU president outlines a decade of accomplishments, new challenges for future

CORVALLIS, Ore. – In an annual address to the Faculty Senate at Oregon State University, OSU President Edward J. Ray reviewed what he called the “extraordinary” successes of the past 10 years, explored a range of financial and student issues, and cited major challenges and opportunities facing both OSU and the future of higher education.

While the United States was recovering from what’s been called the “Great Recession,” OSU boosted enrollment by 37 percent, raised nearly $1.1 billion in the most successful university fund raising campaign in state history, added and modernized an unprecedented number of campus structures and facilities, hit record levels of research funding and significantly expanded both the diversity and high-achieving status of its student body.

“The changes at Oregon State University affected over the last 10 years are nothing short of extraordinary,” Ray said in his address. “Our faculty, staff and students remain the lifeblood of this community, and without their talents and work, we simply would not have realized the positive change we see around us.”

Ray pointed to the expansion of Oregon State’s Ecampus distance education program, the creation of a Marine Studies Campus in Newport, and the planned growth of the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend as the primary future opportunities for student enrollment growth. He retained his commitment to a target of 28,000 students on the Corvallis campus and pledged steady additions of tenure-track faculty to boost both educational and research opportunities.

But he also warned that just celebrating the past will not address the challenges of the future.

“The natural inclination to stick with what has worked in the past, to not mess with success, is very powerful,” Ray said. “History is replete with examples of nations, governments, institutions and businesses that lost dominant positions because they failed to recognize the forces of change around them, that made business as usual a recipe for failure.”

To help deal with those changes, Ray noted that OSU will be managed by its own Board of Trustees for the first time in 80 years.

He suggested that over the next 10 years, OSU should launch its second comprehensive fundraising campaign, with goals of raising twice the total raised in this campaign and double the level of annual giving. And he said that possible slowdowns in federal research funding might be addressed with more funds from private industry partners, as may be possible through the university’s OSU Advantage program which targets university collaboration with industry..

Among other changes, accomplishments and challenges that Ray highlighted:

  • High achieving students from Oregon with a grade point averages of 3.75 or higher this year will make up 44 percent of Oregon State’s entering freshman class. Meanwhile, U.S. minority students will make up 20.6 percent of OSU’s enrollment and international students, 13.1 percent.
  • Key factors, made possible by faculty and staff collaboration, that allowed OSU’s stability and strategic focus during a time of national economic stress included elimination of 26 low-enrollment majors and consolidation of 62 colleges, schools, departments and programs into 42.
  • The Campaign for OSU helped create an additional 77 endowed faculty positions, more than 600 new scholarships and fellowships, and facilitated 30 major construction projects valued at more than $727 million.
  • OSU funding for research reached $285 million in fiscal year 2014, industry investments have grown by 50 percent over the past five years and licensing revenue from OSU inventions grew by 120 percent.
  • With currently anticipated levels of state support, the university will provide 3 percent faculty merit raises and hire 30-40 new faculty members in each of the next several years.
  • New initiatives have been implemented to improve first-year retention and six-year graduation rates for all students, such as a live-on campus policy, better academic advising, small-group peer mentoring, enhanced cultural centers and other activities.

OSU should both recognize its successes and acknowledge that the challenges of the near future will be different from those of the past decade, Ray said.

“Even as we celebrate the success of the Campaign for OSU, we should remember our role as stewards of this great university,” he said. “The extraordinary accomplishments we celebrate are the foundation for future greatness only if we sustain our momentum.”

Media Contact: 
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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808

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Ed Ray



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OSU President Ray calls for university-wide effort to halt sexual assaults

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray on Tuesday challenged all students, faculty, staff and community members to work together to end sexual violence.

Ray’s challenge follows the announcement last Friday by President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden of the “It’s On Us” campaign to raise awareness of – and ultimately prevent - sexual assaults on university campuses.

In a letter to the Oregon State community, Ray pointed to several programs at OSU that focus on education and prevention of sexual assaults and then said “that is not enough.” He challenged all members of the Oregon State community to get involved in their own way.

“I expect each and every one of us – regardless of where you work or attend classes – to become informed about sexual violence and to take the responsibility to help prevent and report all forms of sexual violence or harassment,” Ray said. “I have no doubt that we can all do something.

“Teaching faculty can learn how best to use classroom and advising opportunities to promote awareness, safety and support,” Ray pointed out. “Likewise, advisers, fraternities and sororities, supervisors, coaches, friends, etc. can all become informed about how they can respond and help this important effort.

“We are a community and should work together to ensure each of us are safe.”

The OSU president noted that an estimated one in five women nationally is sexually assaulted during her college years. Sexual violence can impact anyone, he said, regardless of age, race, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation. In the great majority of cases, individuals are assaulted by someone they know and even trust, whether as an acquaintance, classmate, friend, or current or former partner.

Of those assaults, it is estimated that only 12 percent nationally are reported, and only a fraction of the offenders are held accountable.

“Sexual assault is a severely violating experience that can cause a victim substantial immediate and long-term physical and mental health consequences,” Ray said. “These assaults must end, and to do so will require our collective focus locally and nationally.”

Oregon State will develop an “It’s On Us” website that will have  information about the university’s response, prevention and education programs as well as information on how each of us can be part of the solution. The website will link to the national campaign and additional resources.

Ray asked all students and employees to learn about OSU’s programs and services regarding sexual violence reporting, emergency response, education and community services.

“During the course of the 2014-15 academic year Oregon State will take additional steps to address sexual violence within our community,” Ray said. “We will keep everyone informed of these important developments.” The university will publicize these efforts through the sexual assault website, the OSU Today newsletter, the online LIFE@OSU magazine, social media and other communications.

“It’s on us to end sexual assaults in the Oregon State University community,” Ray said. “Each of us has a role in creating a caring community – based on civility and respect – that is free of sexual assaults and other forms of harassment and violence.”

 

                                                                     OSU Sexual Assault Prevention Services and Programs

Confidential support, counseling and advocacy services: 

Sexual assault reporting and response services:

Awareness and prevention education programs and services:

  • “Haven” -- Online prevention education program required for all incoming OSU students and student athletes.
  • “AlcoholEdu” Substance abuse prevention program required for all incoming first-year students attending OSU in Corvallis.
  • Sexual violence prevention educator on staff in OSU Student Health Services. (541-737-9355)

Academic programs, such as those offered in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Other OSU efforts:

  • On-going training for all for all residential staff in University Housing and Dining Services in conjunction with the Office of Equity and Inclusion; Sexual Assault Support Services; and Student Health Services to understand, identify and appropriately respond to disclosures of sexual violence.
  • Residence hall educational programming – including resource information and support – provided by professional staff and members of student.
  • Required educational programs for students living in OSU’s Affiliated Housing Program, made up of fraternities and sororities.
  • Sexual harassment and sexual violence prevention training for OSU employees by the Office of Equity and Inclusion. Oregon State employee policy on responding to disclosures of sexual violence or sexual harassment:

OSU’s Community Partners:

  • Corvallis Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence (CARDV) provides confidential, 24-hour hotline services in the Corvallis area. (541-754-0110) http://cardv.org/
  • Guide to sexual assault service responders in communities through Oregon and the U.S. https://www.notalone.gov/resources
  • Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis (541-768-5111)
  • Hospitals and medical centers in your community

 Future sexual assault education programs services

  • OSU Student Health Services is creating a center on violence prevention; and alcohol and drug abuse to work with Corvallis campus and community partners to expand and enhance education, outreach and prevention efforts.
  • Office of Equity and Inclusion is taking additional steps to expand awareness of sexual violence and enhance prevention education among OSU employees.
Media Contact: 
Source: 

Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU Board of Trustees OKs budget, approves new degree programs

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon State University Board of Trustees on Friday approved the university’s operating budget for the 2014-15 fiscal year, and also approved new master and doctoral degree programs in robotics and bachelor degree programs in religious studies.

This was the first meeting of the board after it officially took over oversight responsibility for the university on July 1 from the State Board of Higher Education. This change occurred as part of legislation adopted by the 2013 Oregon Legislature and the university’s decision to have its own independent board of directors appointed by the governor.

The board unanimously voted to adopt a $1.023 billion operating budget for the 2015 fiscal year, which covers OSU revenues and expenditures from July 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015. The revenue stream includes:

  • Educational and program funding authorized by the state legislature;
  • Projected tuition and fees paid by students;
  • Auxiliary revenues from OSU service centers, including University Housing and Dining Services and OSU’s Department of Intercollegiate Athletics;
  • External funds for teaching, research and outreach from private giving through the OSU Foundation, and from grants funded by state, federal or non-profit agencies or private industry.

The university’s budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year was $986.3 million.

The interdisciplinary robotics degree programs, which will begin in 2014-15, will be located within the School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering in OSU’s College of Engineering. During its first five years, the program is expected to graduate as many as 10 Ph.D. students and 30 master degree students and provide students expertise in the fields of robot design, control, manufacturing and operation that are rapidly growing worldwide. As many as 70 OSU students already are engaged in robotics studies.

The new bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degree programs in religious studies will be housed within OSU’s School of History, Philosophy and Religion in the College of Liberal Arts. The program will be initiated in fall 2015 and after five years would serve as many as 60 students. The decision restores religious study degree programs that were eliminated in the early 1990’s following budget cuts at Oregon State prompted by the adoption of state constitutional limits on property taxes.

The board also adopted a contract for the employment of OSU President Edward J. Ray through June 30, 2016, including terms of his compensation and his duties, responsibilities and annual performance evaluation.

The board also approved resolutions related to:

  • How the university manages safeguards of U.S. Department of Defense classified information related to research contracts that may be awarded Oregon State;
  • Reporting known or suspected fraud, waste and abuse within the university;
  • Establishing a university code of ethics;
  • Amending the charter of the OSU Board of Trustees’ executive and audit committee related to how external and internal university financial audits will be reviewed and approved by the board.

The board heard presentations from university finance and administration administrators related to public capital financing tools available for use by Oregon State; the university’s current and forecasted bonded indebtedness; and capital and facility improvement plans and procedures used by the university.

Media Contact: 
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 Steve Clark, 503-502-8217; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

OSU to hold 145th commencement ceremony on Saturday, June 14

CORVALLIS, Ore – Oregon State University will hold its 145th commencement on Saturday, June 14, beginning at 10:30 a.m. in Reser Stadium, graduating a record class of nearly 5,900 students.

The commencement speaker is Ann A. Kiessling, director of the independent Bedford Stem Cell Research Foundation and a leader in both stem cell research and reproductive biology. She also will receive an honorary doctorate from the university.

Commencement is free and open to the public; no tickets are necessary. More information about OSU’s graduation is available online at: http://oregonstate.edu/events/commencement/. The OSU ceremony is being broadcast on Oregon Public Broadcasting’s OPB Plus channel.

OSU’s class of 2014 has 5,878 graduates, who will receive 6,194 degrees, according to OSU Registrar Rebecca Mathern. The previous largest class was in 2013, when 5,221 grads earned 5,483 degrees. (About 3,800 grads are expected to participate in Saturday’s commencement, along with an estimated 21,000 guests).

This year’s graduates have many compelling stories about their success. Sadie Davis is a former high school dropout, who pursued an OSU degree after earning her GED. The mother of a teenage daughter, this first-generation college student overcame personal issues to graduate magna cum laude. She managed the Women Returning to Higher Education Program at OSU’s Women’s Center, and was a staunch advocate for students battling addiction as well as for students pursuing education later in life.

Brian Benavidez spent four years in the U.S. Air Force as an avionics systems specialist and served for a time in Iraq. He was accepted into the Airman Scholarship Commissioning Program and became a cadet in OSU’s Air Force ROTC program. He commanded a wing of nearly 80 cadets, and served as president of the Veterans & Family Student Association. He is graduating summa cum laude in electrical and computer engineering.

Kayla Thorsness was a high school valedictorian from Philomath who was active in sports, 4-H, school leaderships and volunteerism when she was diagnosed with melanoma. She didn’t let that deter her – and less than three years later she is graduating from OSU with two degrees, in accounting and business information systems. She worked at Dixon Recreation Center and eventually became supervisor and center manager. She also completed an internship with a major accounting firm, and was a volunteer for the American Cancer Society, Heartland Humane Society, the Philomath Booster Club and the Junior Achievement Program.

Some statistics about the class of 2014:

  • Of the 6,194 degrees: 4,908 are baccalaureate degrees; 917, master’s degrees, 93 Doctor of Pharmacy degrees, 224 Doctor of Philosophy degrees, and 52 Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degrees;
  • OSU’s graduates hail from 35 Oregon counties, 49 states, three U.S. territories or commonwealths and 55 countries;
  • The oldest member of the class of 2014 is 78 years of age and the youngest is 19;
  • A total of 107 members of the graduating class are veterans.

OSU’s commencement speaker Kiessling has a doctorate in biochemistry and biophysics from Oregon State. Born in Baker City, Ore., she graduated from Klamath Falls High School in 1960. She eventually joined the faculty of Harvard University in 1985, specializing in obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology, and working in the Department of Surgery. In the early 1990s, she pioneered reproductive options for couples living with the HIV disease and hepatitis C – techniques that led to the successful births of 121 children free of those diseases.

The Bedford Research Foundation she directs was founded in 1996 as a Massachusetts public charity to support research. By the year 2000, the foundation’s research laboratory expanded to include human stem cell research. To date, the foundation has collaborated with more than 60 clinics globally to find treatment for infectious diseases and spinal cord injuries.

Kiessling, the mother of four children, wrote one of the first books about the enormous potential of stem cells in treating supposedly “incurable” diseases, including spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, kidney failure and diabetes. She has been a pioneer in developing ways to create or identify “pluripotent” stem cells that do not involve the use of human embryos.

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Rebecca Mathern, 541-737-4048; Rebecca.Mathern@oregonstate.edu

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Ann Kiessling

OSU President Ray to chair national AAC&U board

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray has been elected chair of the Association of American Colleges and Universities board of directors. The organization is the leading national association dealing with the quality and public understanding of undergraduate liberal education.

Founded in 1915, the association has more than 1,300 member institutions, including accredited public and private colleges, research universities, community colleges and other institutions. Among its goals are to advance liberal education as a global necessity, increase the value of college degrees in the United States, improve student success and promote innovation, and develop social responsibility.

Ray has been president of OSU since July 31, 2003. Under his leadership, Oregon State developed its first comprehensive strategic plan, launched a campaign that successfully raised more than $1.1 billion, put a plan in place to transform the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend into a four-year branch campus, and experienced a remarkable growth in enrollment, research funding, and private support.

The university recently announced plans to launch a Marine Studies Initiative that would significantly broaden OSU’s research, education and outreach opportunities and impact for ocean-related issues and their impacts on ocean health and coastal communities. Plans call for providing education opportunities for some 500 students at Oregon State’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport by 2025.

Ray serves on the board of directors of the American Council on Education and the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities. Before coming to Oregon State, he was a faculty member and administrator at The Ohio State University for more than 30 years, serving as executive vice president and provost from 1998 to 2003.

The OSU president succeeds Ken Ruscio, president of Washington and Lee University, chaired the  AAC&U board in 2014.

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Steve Clark, 541-737-3808; steve.clark@oregonstate.edu

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OSU President Ed Ray

OSU to celebrate Johnson Hall construction on Sept. 15

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University will celebrate the construction launch of its newest engineering building on Monday, Sept. 15, and the public is invited.

A ceremony and reception will begin at 1:30 p.m. to honor the donors who made this facility project possible and celebrate the impact it will make on OSU’s education and research programs, especially in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering. The events will take place at the building site at S.W. Park Terrace Place and Monroe Avenue, just north of Kelley Engineering Center.

Speakers include Julia Brim-Edwards, an OSU alumna and senior director for Global Strategy & Operations for Nike Corporation’s Government and Public Affairs team. She serves on the Oregon Education Investment Board.

The state-of-the-art, 58,000-square-foot engineering building is designed to be a place of collaboration and innovation in education and research for faculty, students and industry professionals. It will include labs for interdisciplinary research and a center focused on improving recruitment and retention of engineering students.

The building bears the name, and will continue the innovative legacy, of Peter and Rosalie Johnson. A 1955 Oregon State chemical engineering graduate, Peter Johnson revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment with his trademarked invention for making battery separator envelopes.

The Johnsons committed $7 million to begin construction on the new facility, leveraging an earlier gift of $10 million from an anonymous donor and $3 million in additional private funds, matched by $20 million in state funds.

In addition to being the lead donors for the facility initiative, the Johnsons previously created the Pete and Rosalie Johnson Internship program, which provides opportunities to at least two dozen Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering students annually. They also established the Linus Pauling Chair in chemical engineering to support a faculty member with industry experience who mentors students. The position currently is held by Philip Harding.

“We are so pleased that this new facility will honor the Johnsons and be a place dedicated to supporting the same areas they have always emphasized: collaborative research and hands-on learning for students,” said Scott Ashford, dean of the College of Engineering and Kearney Professor.

“Their investment, and that of our other generous donors, will have a powerful impact on Oregon and our world,” added Ashford, a 1983 OSU alumnus.

Johnson Hall follows two other major facility projects for the College of Engineering during The Campaign for OSU: construction of the $45 million, 153,000-square-foot Kelley Engineering Center, completed in 2005; and the $12 million complete renovation of historic Kearney Hall, completed in 2009. The university will celebrate donors to The Campaign for OSU during Homecoming Week on Friday, Oct. 31, at a public showcase and reception.

Source: 

Molly Brown, 541-737-3602