OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Scientists discover new eruption at undersea volcano, after successfully forecasting the event

By Mark Floyd, 541-737-0788;

Sources: Bill Chadwick, 541-867-0179; Scott Nooner, 845-365-8944; Dave Butterfield, 206-526-6722

 

NEWPORT, Ore. – A team of scientists just discovered a new eruption of Axial Seamount, an undersea volcano located about 250 miles off the Oregon coast – and one of the most active and intensely studied seamounts in the world.

 

What makes the event so intriguing is that the scientists had forecast the eruption starting five years ago – the first successful forecast of an undersea volcano.

 

Full text of the release is available online at: http://bit.ly/mWr5TT

 

Photos and videos are available from Axial Seamount expedition.

 

Photos from Axial Seamount following the recent expedition are available at the links below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video is available at the links below. The four video clips are 25 to 60 seconds and each is provided in two formats – HD and a smaller compressed “low-resolution” format. The HD video clips are in Apple Pro Res 422 format (1920 x 1080 pixels) and are 385-760 MB in size. The low-res clips are in Apple Quicktime H.264 format (853 x 480 pixels) and are in 10-24 MB in size.

 

Videos obtained at; http://www.oregonwin.org/2011-08-09_ocean/

 

  • The Boca Snowblower Vent on Axial Seamount – Description: Shimmering hot water exits from this new “snowblower” vent named Boca in the new lava flow. Such vents are only seen right after eruptions and are named for the white particles that spew out of the seafloor, evidence of a vast microbial bloom. (video credit: Dave Butterfield, University of Washington; copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

 

  • New lava below the arch – Description: New lava erupted in April 2011 flows under an archway formed in an older lava flow at Axial Seamount. (video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University; copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

 

  • An ocean-bottom hydrophone chain - Description: The chain from an ocean-bottom hydrophone instrument mooring is seen coming out of the seafloor where the new lava buried it in April 2011. The front of the ROV Jason is visible at the right. (video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University; copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

 

  • New lava sample: – Description: The manipulator arm on the ROV Jason takes a sample of the new lava flow (upper left) that emerged from an April 2011 eruption and was discovered during dives at the site in July. The lava will be analyzed to determine its chemical composition. (video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University; copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)