OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

OSU lecture to explore the 'Lost City' and ocean research

03/24/2016

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A veteran of more than 50 dives to the ocean floor in the submersible Alvin will describe in a lecture at Oregon State University a remarkable new underwater warm spring system she discovered.

Deborah Kelley’s find, dubbed “Lost City,” is the focus of the annual Hydrothermal Vent Discovery Lecture, hosted by OSU’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences. This free public talk will begin at 4 p.m. on Friday, April 1, in OSU’s Gilfillan Auditorium.

In 2000, Kelley discovered a new kind of seafloor hot spring vent in the Atlantic Ocean, with huge limestone spires hosting a novel assemblage of organisms.

“This astounding vent system, ‘Lost City,’ possesses a unique chemistry which supports a novel ecosystem,” said OSU oceanographer Robert Collier, one of the organizers of the lectures.

“This discovery vastly expands the regions of the seafloor still to be explored for hydrothermal vents," added OSU oceanographer Martin Fisk, another organizer of the events. 

Kelley is a marine geologist whose dives in the Alvin probe the ocean to a depth of 4,000 meters, or more than 13,000 feet. The hot springs at these vent sites can reach temperatures of more than 680 degrees Fahrenheit. 

She also will give a seminar on Thursday, March 31, at noon in Burt Hall Room 193 on research opportunities using the Cabled Observatory off the Oregon coast – part of the National Science Foundation-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative. OSU is one of the leaders on the project.

The lecture series celebrates the discovery of hydrothermal vents and their ecosystems on mid-ocean ridges in 1977 by a research team that included OSU scientists. Since that initial discovery, more than 300 vent fields have been explored.

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

About the OSU College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences: CEOAS is internationally recognized for its faculty, research and facilities, including state-of-the-art computing infrastructure to support real-time ocean/atmosphere observation and prediction. The college is a leader in the study of the Earth as an integrated system, providing scientific understanding to address complex environmental challenges