OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

OSU’s Shelter Medicine Club aims to help homeless pets for the holidays, and beyond

12/02/2010

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A group of veterinary medicine students at Oregon State University is working with support organizations for homeless and low-income persons in the Willamette Valley to provide support of a different kind – for their pets.

The OSU Shelter Medicine Club actively collects donations of money and supplies, ranging from flea treatment medicine to blankets and toys.

“There are a lot of worthy organizations working to support the homeless in communities throughout the valley,” said Kate Hooper, co-president of the club for the past year, “but homeless pets need support, too. Winter is a particularly difficult time for the homeless and their faithful companions, and we appreciate donations from the public.”

Persons interested in donating can leave a message for the Shelter Medicine Club at 541-737-8055, e-mail the club at sheltermedicine@oregonstate.edu, or drop off donations at the lobby in Magruder Hall, which is located on 30th Street just south of Washington Way.

Among the items needed are:

  • Money for medicine and veterinary care;
  • Blankets and sleeping bags;
  • Unopened pet food;
  • New or used “clothing,” including coats, vests and booties;
  • Used human clothing, including hoodies, fleeces and sweaters;
  • Cat litter;
  • Unused Frontline, Advantage and other flea/tick medicine;
  • Dog and cat crates and carriers;
  • Toys;
  • Collars and leashes.

Items collected will be distributed through Pro Bone-O in Eugene and the local homeless pet community in Corvallis, said Leslie Dunham, who is in charge of donations for the club.

“The monetary donations support local care efforts, including three feral cat clinics we hold each year, as well as treatment for needy pets in the community,” Dunham said. “Last year, for example, we raised $200 for a puppy named Zoey who needed multiple tooth extractions. There are a lot of other animals in the Willamette Valley that need similar care, but their owners can’t afford it.”