OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

'Ideas Matter' lectures focus on biotech

01/18/2002

CORVALLIS - "The Fear of God and Frankenstein: Religious Perspectives in Biotechnology," will open an Oregon State University winter lecture series at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 22.

The Program for Ethics, Science and the Environment at Oregon State University is coordinating the series with lectures at 4 p.m. every Tuesday from Jan. 22 through March 13 in OSU's Withycomb Hall, Room 217. The lectures are free and open to the public.

Courtney Campbell, OSU director of the Program for Ethics, Science and the Environment, will present the first lecture.

Remaining lectures in the winter series, "Biotechnology: Philosophical Perplexities, Ethical Enigmas," include a number of speakers from throughout the Pacific Northwest, Campbell said. He added that OSU is in the middle of what many scholars are calling a biotechnology revolution, and it is vital that everyone has a greater understanding of biotechnology issues, Campbell said.

The talks comprise the Department of Philosophy's Ideas Matter lecture series. Sponsors include OSU's Program for the Analysis of Issues in Biotechnology, PESE, and The Whitaker Foundation.

The winter term schedule includes:

  • Jan. 29: "Educating the Public on Biotechnology," by Terri Lomax, OSU professor of botany and plant pathology.

     

  • Feb. 5: "Biotechnology and Trees: An Enigma of Sustainable Forestry," by Steven Strauss, OSU professor of forest science.

     

  • Feb. 12: "Environmental Risk Assessment for Genetically Modified Organisms," by Paul Jepson, OSU professor of entomology.

     

  • Feb. 19: "Crop-Weed Introgression," by Carol Mallory-Smith, OSU associate professor of crop and soil science.

     

  • Feb. 26: "Fear, facts and Food: Public Education Issues in Ag Biotechnology," by Kori Haddix, an OSU senior in Health Promotion and Education.

     

  • March 5: "Has Patenting Cloned Mammals Become Passe," by Joel Corcoran, a Portland attorney.

     

  • March 13: "Responsible Use of Biotechnology," by Phil Bereano, professor of technical communication at the University of Washington.